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Sample records for albicans double infection

  1. Breakthrough Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans double infection during caspofungin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Buzina, Walter

    2009-01-01

    and evaluate the capability of susceptibility methods to identify candin resistance. The susceptibility of C. albicans to caspofungin and anidulafungin was investigated by Etest, microdilution (European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing [EUCAST] and CLSI), disk diffusion, agar dilution, and FKS1...... the sensitive control isolate as well as did the Etest and agar methods....

  2. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. For writing this review, Google Scholar -a scholarly search engine- (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future.

  3. Infection-associated genes of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hube, Bernhard

    2006-08-01

    Advances in the medical treatment of life-threatening disorders have increased the population of patients that are more susceptible to opportunistic microbial infections, such as those caused by the Candida species, in particular Candida albicans. This fungus normally belongs to the microbial flora but may cause a range of diseases from superficial to disseminated. What exactly causes the transition from commensalism to pathogenesis is not clear and how this fungus switches from a commensal mode of growth to a parasitic lifestyle remains unknown. Identifying the genes and factors essential for the different stages of C. albicans infections will not only help understanding of the infection process but also provide information about those fungal factors that have to be inhibited, and those parts of the immune system that have to be stimulated, in order to control or prevent infections. Furthermore, knowledge of those genes whose expression is associated with infection but not commensalism may provide valuable information to improve our diagnostic tools. A number of methodologies and models have already been used to identify infection-associated genes. In addition to genes encoding classical virulence determinants, such as those involved in interactions with the immune system and immune evasion, scientists have monitored the expression of genes involved in nutrient acquisition, metabolism, stress response, physical interaction and hyphal formation in infection models and have begun to elucidate the roles of these genes.

  4. IFN-gamma in Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, Maria Luisa

    2009-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Candida albicans is the most frequent etiologic agent that causes opportunistic infections called candidiasis, a disease whose systemic manifestation could prove fatal and whose incidence is increasing as a result of an expanding immunocompromised population. Here we review the role of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the host protection against invasive candidiasis. This cytokine plays an essential role in both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response to candidiasis. We focus on recent progress on host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level, leading to the production of IFN-gamma by host cells. IFN-gamma is produced by CD4 Th1, CD8, gamma delta T, and natural killer (NK) cells, essentially in response to both IL-12 and/or IL-18, and plays an important role in the regulation of the immune system as well as in the control of the infectious process. IFN-gamma is required for optimal activation of phagocytes, collaborates in the generation of protective antibody response, and favours the development of a Th1 protective response.

  5. Candida albicans infection of Caenorhabditis elegans induces antifungal immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans yeast cells are found in the intestine of most humans, yet this opportunist can invade host tissues and cause life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals. To better understand the host factors that underlie susceptibility to candidiasis, we developed a new model to study antifungal innate immunity. We demonstrate that the yeast form of C. albicans establishes an intestinal infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas heat-killed yeast are avirulent. Genome-wide, transcription-profiling analysis of C. elegans infected with C. albicans yeast showed that exposure to C. albicans stimulated a rapid host response involving 313 genes (124 upregulated and 189 downregulated, ~1.6% of the genome many of which encode antimicrobial, secreted or detoxification proteins. Interestingly, the host genes affected by C. albicans exposure overlapped only to a small extent with the distinct transcriptional responses to the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that there is a high degree of immune specificity toward different bacterial species and C. albicans. Furthermore, genes induced by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were strongly over-represented among the genes downregulated during C. albicans infection, suggesting that in response to fungal pathogens, nematodes selectively repress the transcription of antibacterial immune effectors. A similar phenomenon is well known in the plant immune response, but has not been described previously in metazoans. Finally, 56% of the genes induced by live C. albicans were also upregulated by heat-killed yeast. These data suggest that a large part of the transcriptional response to C. albicans is mediated through "pattern recognition," an ancient immune surveillance mechanism able to detect conserved microbial molecules (so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPs. This study provides new information on the evolution and regulation of the innate

  6. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-01-01

    abstract Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  7. Comparison of the clinical risk factors between Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species for bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Hayama, Brian; Ohji, Goh; Iwata, Kentaro; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors and susceptibilities to antifungal agents of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species (spp.) in candidemia cases in Kobe University Hospital. We investigated all consecutive patients with candida bloodstream infection (BSI) from 2008-2013 for whose full data were available for analyses, examining clinical factors such as gender, general complications, postoperative status or susceptibilities to antifungal agents. These factors were also compared between Candida albicans spp. and Candida non-albicans by univariate and multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses showed a significantly higher rate of Candida non-albicans species BSI patients cancer (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI))=2.29 (1.04-5.06) and P=0.040), chemotherapy (OR=4.35 (1.11-17.1) and P=0.035), fluconazole (FLCZ) resistance (OR=77.3 (4.51-1324) and P=0.003), and itraconazole (ITCZ) resistance (OR=15.6 (5.39-45.1) and PCandida albicans. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy (OR=4.44 (1.04-19.0) and P=0.045), FLCZ resistance (OR=5.87 (2.01-17.1) and P=0.001), and ITCZ resistance (OR=18.7(5.77-60.4) and PCandida albicans. In conclusion, this study revealed several risk factors for BSI with Candida albicans (underlying cardiovascular diseases and postoperative status) and Candida non-albicans spp. (cancer and chemotherapy), and demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. were more resistant to FLCZ and ITCZ than Candida albicans.

  8. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  9. Invasive candidiasis in intensive care units in China: Risk factors and prognoses of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Luan, Ting; Wu, Xingmao; Li, Guofu; Qiu, Haibo; Kang, Yan; Qin, Bingyu; Fang, Qiang; Cui, Wei; Qin, Yingzhi; Li, Jianguo; Zang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the risk factors and prognoses of patients with invasive Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida (NAC) infection in intensive care units (ICUs) in China. Between November 2009 and April 2011, we performed a prospective study of critically ill patients with invasive Candida infection from 67 ICUs across China to compare the risk factors and mortality between patients with C albicans and NAC infection. There were 306 patients with proven invasive Candida; 244 cases (a total 389 Candida isolates) were sent to laboratory for strain identification (C albicans, 40.1%; NAC, 59.9%). More patients admitted for surgery or trauma had NAC infection than C albicans infection. C albicans infection was more common in patients with subclavian vein catheters or peritoneal drainage tubes. Compared with patients with C albicans infection, patients with NAC infection had longer antifungal therapy (P albicans remains the most common pathogen in candidiasis in critical care patients. However, the number of NAC infections exceeded C albicans infections. Compared with patients with C albicans infection, patients with NAC infection had heavier disease burdens. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic Transcript Profiling of Candida albicans Infection in Zebrafish: A Pathogen-Host Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Chen; Hsu, Po-Chen; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Shih-Chi; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lan, Chung-Yu; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Wong, David Shan Hill

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is responsible for a number of life-threatening infections and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Previous studies of C. albicans pathogenesis have suggested several steps must occur before virulent infection, including early adhesion, invasion, and late tissue damage. However, the mechanism that triggers C. albicans transformation from yeast to hyphae form during infection has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used a systems biology approach to investigate C. albicans infection in zebrafish. The surviving fish were sampled at different post-infection time points to obtain time-lapsed, genome-wide transcriptomic data from both organisms, which were accompanied with in sync histological analyses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the dynamic gene expression profiles of significant variations in both C. albicans and zebrafish. The results categorized C. albicans infection into three progressing phases: adhesion, invasion, and damage. Such findings were highly supported by the corresponding histological analysis. Furthermore, the dynamic interspecies transcript profiling revealed that C. albicans activated its filamentous formation during invasion and the iron scavenging functions during the damage phases, whereas zebrafish ceased its iron homeostasis function following massive hemorrhage during the later stages of infection. Most of the immune related genes were expressed as the infection progressed from invasion to the damage phase. Such global, inter-species evidence of virulence-immune and iron competition dynamics during C. albicans infection could be crucial in understanding control fungal pathogenesis. PMID:24019870

  11. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlecht, L.M.; Peters, B.M.; Krom, B.P.; Freiberg, J.A.; Hänsch, G.M.; Filler, S.G.; Jabra-Rizk, M.A.; Shirtliff, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through

  12. Candida albicans infection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čanković Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Systemic candidiasis in intensive care units remains an improtant problem due to antifungal resistance. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis and they more frequent have prior fungi colonization. Due to identification of specific risk factors predisposing to fungal infection in order to threat such patients the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Candida species in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and compare it to the control subjects (patients with benign oral mucosal lesions. Methods. A total number of 30 consecutive oral cancer examined patients were included in this prospective study (24 men and 6 women with a mean age of 61.47 years, range 41-81 years. The control group consisted of 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign oral mucosal lesions (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 54.53 years, range 16- 83 years. The samples for mycological examination were obtained by using sterile cotton swabs from the cancer lesion surface and in the patients of the control group from the benign mucosal lesion surface. Samples were inoculated in Sabouraud' dextrose agar. For identification purposes, Mackenzie germ tube test was performend on all isolates. Results. The prevalence of Candida was significantly higher in oral cancer patients than in control subjects (χ2 = 5.455, p = 0.020. Candida was found on nine of the 30 cancer surfaces; 5 (16.7% were identified as non-albicans Candida and 4 (13.3% as Candida albicans. In the control group, only Candida albicans was isolated from 2 (6.7% patients. In this study, no statistically significant differences in the presence of Candida species was found with respect to gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, wearing of dental protheses and the site of cancer lesion. Conclusion. The increased prevalence of yeasts on the surfaces of oral carcinoma indicates a need for their

  13. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan, E-mail: yingyuanfu@126.com; Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, increasing

  14. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan; Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca 2+ –Mg 2+ ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca 2+ concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of 3 H-UdR, 3 H-TdR and 3 H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca 2+ –Mg 2+ ATPase, cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited 3 H-UdR, 3 H-TdR and 3 H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca 2+ –Mg 2+ ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca 2+ concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca 2+ –Mg 2+ ATPase, increasing cytosolic Ca 2+ content and damaging the ultrastructure of C. albicans

  15. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  16. Rare presentation of Candida albicans: infective endocarditis and a pulmonary coin lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner, Taliha; Korun, Oktay; Çelebi, Ahmet

    2018-04-01

    We present a case of a rare association of infective endocarditis and a coin lesion in the lung caused by Candida albicans. The lesion disappeared after 6 weeks of treatment with 5 mg/kg/day amphotericin B.

  17. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection.

  18. Essential functional modules for pathogenic and defensive mechanisms in Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chao; Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Lan, Chung-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection.

  19. Comparative transcript profiling of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis identifies SFL2, a C. albicans gene required for virulence in a reconstituted epithelial infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spiering, Martin J

    2010-02-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are closely related species displaying differences in virulence and genome content, therefore providing potential opportunities to identify novel C. albicans virulence genes. C. albicans gene arrays were used for comparative analysis of global gene expression in the two species in reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHE). C. albicans (SC5314) showed upregulation of hypha-specific and virulence genes within 30 min postinoculation, coinciding with rapid induction of filamentation and increased RHE damage. C. dubliniensis (CD36) showed no detectable upregulation of hypha-specific genes, grew as yeast, and caused limited RHE damage. Several genes absent or highly divergent in C. dubliniensis were upregulated in C. albicans. One such gene, SFL2 (orf19.3969), encoding a putative heat shock factor, was deleted in C. albicans. DeltaDeltasfl2 cells failed to filament under a range of hypha-inducing conditions and exhibited greatly reduced RHE damage, reversed by reintroduction of SFL2 into the DeltaDeltasfl2 strain. Moreover, SFL2 overexpression in C. albicans triggered hyphal morphogenesis. Although SFL2 deletion had no apparent effect on host survival in the murine model of systemic infection, DeltaDeltasfl2 strain-infected kidney tissues contained only yeast cells. These results suggest a role for SFL2 in morphogenesis and an indirect role in C. albicans pathogenesis in epithelial tissues.

  20. Human vaginal epithelial cells augment autophagy marker genes in response to Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ankit; Sequeira, Roicy; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2017-04-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in clearance of intracellular pathogens. However, no information is available on its involvement in vaginal infections such as vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC is intimately associated with the immune status of the human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs). The objective of our study is to decipher if autophagy process is involved during Candida albicans infection of VECs. In this study, C. albicans infection system was established using human VEC line (VK2/E6E7). Infection-induced change in the expression of autophagy markers like LC3 and LAMP-1 were analyzed by RT-PCR, q-PCR, Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out to ascertain the localization of autophagosomes. Multiplex ELISA was carried out to determine the cytokine profiles. Analysis of LC3 and LAMP-1 expression at mRNA and protein levels at different time points revealed up-regulation of these markers 6 hours post C. albicans infection. LC3 and LAMP-1 puncti were observed in infected VECs after 12 hours. TEM studies showed C. albicans entrapped in autophagosomes. Cytokines-TNF-α and IL-1β were up-regulated in culture supernatants of VECs at 12 hours post-infection. The results suggest that C. albicans invasion led to the activation of autophagy as a host defense mechanism of VECs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

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    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  2. A Virtual Infection Model Quantifies Innate Effector Mechanisms and Candida albicans Immune Escape in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, Kristin; Martin, Ronny; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment–model–experiment cycles allowed

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Candida albicans isolates from bloodstream and mucosal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblat, Marina; Frenkel, Michael; Abbey, Darren; Ben Ami, Ronen; Berman, Judith; Segal, Esther

    2017-08-01

    The interaction of Candida albicans with the host is of a complex nature involving fungal factors and host's response. In this study, we concentrated on the phenotypic expression of virulence attributes and genotypic characteristics of C. albicans isolates from two distinct clinical entities of candidiasis-blood stream and vaginal infections, and the possible role of these factors. Hence, we conducted a comparative in vitro assessment of virulence characteristics, including adhesion to epithelial cells and HaCat cell line, biofilm formation, aspartic proteinases and phospholipase activity of 20 C. albicans isolates from patients with C. albicans bloodstream infection and 22 isolates from patients with C. albicans vaginitis. Further, we studied the epigenetic phenotypic switching of the strains and their ploidy, by flow cytometry and CHEF techniques. These studies indicated that although no overall differentiation between the isolates of the two groups (bloodstream infection and vaginitis) could be demonstrated, several characteristics were more specific to one of the groups than the other. While the strains from vaginal infection had higher capacity to adhere, the strains from patients with bloodstream infection had higher activity of phospholipase. Differences were also noted in phenotypic switching, with the strains from bloodstream infection revealing primarily the "white" type colonies, known to be more virulent, and had higher DNA content. This study is unique considering the concurrent comparison of isolates from different clinical entities, at the phenotypic and genotypic level. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Incidence Of Candida Albicans Infection Among Women Having ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This work was carried out to ascertain the incidence of candida albicans among women in Anambra State. Design: High vaginal swab (HVS) samples were collected from women that attend six hospitals in Anambra State between the months of June and September 2006. Settings: The samples were collected ...

  5. Bioactive interleukin-1alpha is cytolytically released from Candida albicans-infected oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A; Kashleva, H; Villar, C Cunha

    2004-12-01

    Oral epithelial cells are primary targets of Candida albicans in the oropharynx and may regulate the inflammatory host response to this pathogen. This investigation studied the mechanisms underlying interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) release by oral epithelial cells and the role of IL-1alpha in regulating the mucosal inflammatory response to C. albicans. Infected oral epithelial cells released processed IL-1alpha protein in culture supernatants. The IL-1alpha generated was stored intracellularly and was released upon cell lysis. This was further supported by the fact that different C. albicans strains induced variable IL-1alpha release, depending on their cytolytic activity. IL-1alpha from C. albicans-infected oral epithelial cells upregulated proinflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-8 and GM-CSF) in uninfected oral epithelial or stromal cells. Our studies suggest that production of IL-1alpha, IL-8 and GM-CSF may take place in the oral mucosa in response to lytic infection of epithelial cells with C. albicans. This process can act as an early innate immune surveillance system and may contribute to the clinicopathologic signs of infection in the oral mucosa.

  6. Cell wall proteinaceous components in isolates of Candida albicans and non-albicans species from HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ribot, J L; Kirkpatrick, W R; McAtee, R K; Revankar, S G; Patterson, T F

    1998-09-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) remains a common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients. Candida albicans is the most frequent causative agent of OPC. However, non-albicans spp. are being increasingly isolated. Candidal cell wall proteins and mannoproteins play important roles in the biology and patogenesis of candidiasis. In the present study, we have analyzed the proteinaceous components associated with cell wall extracts from C. albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida rugosa obtained from HIV-infected patients with recurrent OPC. Cell wall proteinaceous components were extracted with beta-mercaptoethanol and analyzed using electrophoresis, immunoblotting (with antisera generated against C. albicans cell wall components, and with serum samples and oral saline rinses from patients with OPC), and lectin-blotting (concanavalin A) techniques. Numerous molecular species were solubilized from the various isolates. Major qualitative and quantitative differences in the polypeptidic and antigenic profiles associated with the cell wall extracts from the different Candida spp. were discernible. Some of the antibody preparations generated against C. albicans cell wall components were able to recognize homologous materials present in the extracts from non-albicans spp. Information on cell wall antigens of Candida species may be important in the therapy and prevention of HIV-related OPC.

  7. Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon W Blumstein

    Full Text Available Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans infection. To determine the outcome of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or Δ9-THC (16 mg/kg in vehicle on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×10(5 C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic Δ9-THC (4-64 mg/kg treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×10(4 C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×10(5 C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic Δ9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, Δ9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, Δ9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-γ and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-γ that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge.

  8. Effect of a Lactobacillus Salivarius Probiotic on a Double-Species Streptococcus Mutans and Candida Albicans Caries Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirginia Krzyściak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-cariogenic effects of Lactobacillus salivarius by reducing pathogenic species and biofilm mass in a double-species biofilm model. Coexistence of S. mutans with C. albicans can cause dental caries progression or recurrence of the disease in the future. Fifty-nine children with diagnosed early childhood caries (ECC were recruited onto the study. The condition of the children’s dentition was defined according to the World Health Organization guidelines. The participants were divided into children with initial enamel demineralization and children showing dentin damage. The study was performed on the S. mutans and C. albicans clinical strains, isolated from dental plaque of patients with ECC. The effect of a probiotic containing Lactobacillus salivarius on the ability of S. mutans and C. albicans to produce a double-species biofilm was investigated in an in vitro model. The biomass of the formed/non-degraded biofilm was analyzed on the basis of its crystal violet staining. The number of colonies of S. mutans and C. albicans (CFU/mL, colony forming units/mL forming the biofilm was determined. Microorganism morphology in the biofilm was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the presence of S. mutans increased the number of C. albicans colonies (CFU/mL; the double-species biofilm mass and hyphal forms produced in it by the yeast. L. salivarius inhibited the cariogenic biofilm formation of C. albicans and S. mutans. Under the influence of the probiotic; the biofilm mass and the number of S. mutans; C. albicans and S. mutans with C. albicans colonies in the biofilm was decreased. Moreover; it can be noted that after the addition of the probiotic; fungi did not form hyphae or germ tubes of pathogenic potential. These results suggest that L. salivarius can secrete intermediates capable of inhibiting the formation of cariogenic S. mutans and C. albicans biofilm

  9. Pathogenesis of Candida albicans infections in the alternative chorio-allantoic membrane chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse D Jacobsen

    Full Text Available Alternative models of microbial infections are increasingly used to screen virulence determinants of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of Candida albicans and C. glabrata infections in chicken embryos infected via the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM and analyzed the virulence of deletion mutants. The developing immune system of the host significantly influenced susceptibility: With increasing age, embryos became more resistant and mounted a more balanced immune response, characterized by lower induction of proinflammatory cytokines and increased transcription of regulatory cytokines, suggesting that immunopathology contributes to pathogenesis. While many aspects of the chicken embryo response resembled murine infections, we also observed significant differences: In contrast to systemic infections in mice, IL-10 had a beneficial effect in chicken embryos. IL-22 and IL-17A were only upregulated after the peak mortality in the chicken embryo model occurred; thus, the role of the Th17 response in this model remains unclear. Abscess formation occurs frequently in murine models, whereas the avian response was dominated by granuloma formation. Pathogenicity of the majority of 15 tested C. albicans deletion strains was comparable to the virulence in mouse models and reduced virulence was associated with significantly lower transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. However, fungal burden did not correlate with virulence and for few mutants like bcr1Δ and tec1Δ different outcomes in survival compared to murine infections were observed. C. albicans strains locked in the yeast stage disseminated significantly more often from the CAM into the embryo, supporting the hypothesis that the yeast morphology is responsible for dissemination in systemic infections. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections in the chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections but also differs in some aspects. Despite

  10. Genetic Variability of Candida albicans Sap8 Propeptide in Isolates from Different Types of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Carvalho-Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The secreted aspartic proteases (Saps are among the most studied virulence determinants in Candida albicans. These proteins are translated as pre-pro-enzymes consisting of a signal sequence followed by a propeptide and the mature enzyme. The propeptides of secreted proteinases are important for the correct processing, folding/secretion of the mature enzyme. In this study, the DNA sequences of C. albicans Saps were screened and a microsatellite was identified in SAP8 propeptide region. The genetic variability of the repetitive region of Sap8 propeptide was determined in 108 C. albicans independent strains isolated from different types of infection: oral infection (OI, oral commensal (OC, vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, and bloodstream infections (BSI. Nine different propeptides for Sap8 processing were identified whose frequencies varied with the type of infection. OC strains presented the highest gene diversity while OI isolated the lowest. The contribution of the Saps to mucosal and systemic infections has been demonstrated and recently Sap8 has been implicated in the cleavage of a signalling glycoprotein that leads to Cek1-MAPK pathway activation. This work is the first to identify a variable microsatellite in the propeptide of a secreted aspartic protease and brings new insights into the variability of Sap8.

  11. Technetium-99m labelled fluconazole and antimicrobial peptides for imaging of Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetti, Antonella; Welling, Mick M.; Mazzi, Ulderico; Nibbering, Peter H.; Pauwels, Ernest K.J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether technetium-99m labelled fluconazole can distinguish fungal from bacterial infections. Fluconazole was labelled with 99m Tc and radiochemical analysis showed less than 5% impurities. The labelling solution was injected into animals with experimental infections. For comparison, we used two peptides for infection detection, i.e. UBI 29-41 and hLF 1-11, and human IgG, all labelled with 99m Tc. Mice were infected with Candida albicans or injected with heat-killed C. albicans or lipopolysaccharides to induce sterile inflammation. Also, mice were infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. Next, accumulation of 99m Tc-fluconazole and 99m Tc-labelled peptides/IgG at affected sites was determined scintigraphically. 99m Tc-fluconazole detected C. albicans infections (T/NT ratio=3.6±0.47) without visualising bacterial infections (T/NT ratio=1.3±0.04) or sterile inflammatory processes (heat-killed C. albicans: T/NT ratio=1.3±0.2; lipopolysaccharide: T/NT ratio=1.4±0.1). C. albicans infections were already seen within the first hour after injection of 99m Tc-fluconazole (T/NT ratio=3.1±0.2). A good correlation (R 2 =0.864; P 99m Tc-UBI 29-41 and 99m Tc-hLF 1-11 were able to distinguish C. albicans infections from sterile inflammatory processes in mice, these 99m Tc-labelled peptides did not distinguish these fungal infections from bacterial infections. It is concluded that 99m Tc-fluconazole distinguishes infections with C. albicans from bacterial infections and sterile inflammations. (orig.)

  12. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol Dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis.

  13. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis. PMID:28267809

  14. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  15. ISG15 in Host Defense Against Candida albicans Infection in a Mouse Model of Fungal Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Gao, Nan; Ross, Bing X; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2017-06-01

    ISG15, a di-ubiquitin-like protein, is critical for controlling certain viral and bacterial infections. We sought to determine if ISG15 plays a role in corneal innate immunity against Candida albicans (C. albicans) using a C57BL/6 (B6) mouse model of human fungal keratitis. Scarified corneas of adult B6 mice were pretreated with TLR5 ligand flagellin and then inoculated with C. albicans. The expression of ISG15 and other genes involved in ISG15 conjugation (ISGylation) was determined by real-time PCR. ISG15 expression and distribution in infected corneas were assessed by immunohistochemistry. ISGylation was examined by Western blotting. siRNA knockdown and recombinant ISG15 were used to elucidate the effects of ISG15 on controlling fungal keratitis by clinical scoring, fungal number plate counting, ELISA cytokine determination, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration measurement. Heat-killed C. albicans induced expression of ISG15, and hBD2 was markedly enhanced by flagellin-pretreatment in cultured human primary corneal epithelial cells (CECs). In vivo, C. albicans infection induced the expression of ISG15, ISGylation-associated genes (UBE1L, UBCH8, and HERC5), and ISGylation in mouse CECs, all of which were enhanced by flagellin-pretreatment. siRNA knockdown of ISG15 increased keratitis severity, dampened flagellin-induced protection, and greatly suppressed the expressions of ISGylation enzymes, IFN-γ, but not CXCL2 in B6 mouse CECs. Recombinant ISG15, on the other hand, enhanced corneal innate immunity against C. albicans and suppressed infection-induced IL-1β, but not IL-Ra expression. ISG15 alone induced the expression of IL-1Ra, CXCL10, and CRAMP in mouse CECs. ISG15 was upregulated and secreted in cultured human CECs in response to challenge in a type 1 IFN-dependent manner. Our data, for the first time, demonstrate that ISG15 acts as an immunomodulator in the cornea and plays a critical role in controlling fungal keratitis.

  16. Solitary Candida albicans Infection Causing Fournier Gangrene and Review of Fungal Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tiffany A; Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial bacterial infections are commonly found in cases of Fournier gangrene (FG), although fungal growth may occur occasionally. Solitary fungal organisms causing FG have rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of an elderly man with a history of diabetes who presented with a necrotizing scrotal and perineal soft tissue infection. He underwent emergent surgical debridement with findings of diffuse urethral stricture disease and urinary extravasation requiring suprapubic tube placement. Candida albicans was found to be the single causative organism on culture, and the patient recovered well following antifungal treatment. Fungal infections should be considered as rare causes of necrotizing fasciitis and antifungal treatment considered in at-risk immunodeficient individuals.

  17. Role of IFN-gamma in immune responses to Candida albicans infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gozalbo, Daniel; Maneu Flores, Victoria; Gil, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent etiologic agent that causes opportunistic fungal infections called candidiasis, a disease whose systemic manifestation could prove fatal and whose incidence is increasing as a result of an expanding immunocompromised population. Here we review the role of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in host protection against invasive candidiasis. This cytokine plays an essential role in both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response to candidiasis. We focus on rec...

  18. Modulation of macrophage cytokine profiles during solid tumor progression: susceptibility to Candida albicans infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturini James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to attain a better understanding of the interactions between opportunist fungi and their hosts, we investigated the cytokine profile associated with the inflammatory response to Candida albicans infection in mice with solid Ehrlich tumors of different degrees. Methods Groups of eight animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5 × 106 C. albicans 7, 14 or 21 days after tumor implantation. After 24 or 72 hours, the animals were euthanized and intraperitoneal lavage fluid was collected. Peritoneal macrophages were cultivated and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10 and IL-4 released into the supernatants were measured by ELISA. Kidney, liver and spleen samples were evaluated for fungal dissemination. Tumor-free animals and animals that had only been subjected to C. albicans infection were used as control groups. Results Our results demonstrated that the mice produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and less IL-10, and also exhibited fungal clearance, at the beginning of tumor evolution. With the tumor progression, this picture changed: IL-10 production increased and IFN-γ and TNF-α release decreased; furthermore, there was extensive fungal dissemination. Conclusion Our results indicate that solid tumors can affect the production of macrophage cytokines and, in consequence, affect host resistance to opportunistic infections.

  19. Dissecting Candida albicans Infection from the Perspective of C. albicans Virulence and Omics Approaches on Host-Pathogen Interaction: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Voon Kin; Lee, Tze Yan; Rusliza, Basir; Chong, Pei Pei

    2016-10-18

    Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida , the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients. Adoption of animal models, viz. minihosts, mice, and zebrafish, has brought us closer to unraveling the pathogenesis and complexity of Candida infection in human hosts, leading towards the discovery of biomarkers and identification of potential therapeutic agents. In addition, the advancement of omics technologies offers a holistic view of the Candida -host interaction in a non-targeted and non-biased manner. Hence, in this review, we seek to summarize past and present milestone findings on C. albicans virulence, adoption of animal models in the study of C. albicans infection, and the application of omics technologies in the study of Candida -host interaction. A profound understanding of the interaction between host defense and pathogenesis is imperative for better design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in future.

  20. Dissecting Candida albicans Infection from the Perspective of C. albicans Virulence and Omics Approaches on Host–Pathogen Interaction: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Voon Kin; Lee, Tze Yan; Rusliza, Basir; Chong, Pei Pei

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients. Adoption of animal models, viz. minihosts, mice, and zebrafish, has brought us closer to unraveling the pathogenesis and complexity of Candida infection in human hosts, leading towards the discovery of biomarkers and identification of potential therapeutic agents. In addition, the advancement of omics technologies offers a holistic view of the Candida-host interaction in a non-targeted and non-biased manner. Hence, in this review, we seek to summarize past and present milestone findings on C. albicans virulence, adoption of animal models in the study of C. albicans infection, and the application of omics technologies in the study of Candida–host interaction. A profound understanding of the interaction between host defense and pathogenesis is imperative for better design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in future. PMID:27763544

  1. Coordination of Candida albicans Invasion and Infection Functions by Phosphoglycerol Phosphatase Rhr2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar V. Desai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Candida albicans RHR2 gene, which specifies a glycerol biosynthetic enzyme, is required for biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. Prior studies indicate that RHR2 is ultimately required for expression of adhesin genes, such as ALS1. In fact, RHR2 is unnecessary for biofilm formation when ALS1 is overexpressed from an RHR2-independent promoter. Here, we describe two additional biological processes that depend upon RHR2: invasion into an abiotic substrate and pathogenicity in an abdominal infection model. We report here that abiotic substrate invasion occurs concomitantly with biofilm formation, and a screen of transcription factor mutants indicates that biofilm and hyphal formation ability correlates with invasion ability. However, analysis presented here of the rhr2Δ/Δ mutant separates biofilm formation and invasion. We found that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant forms a biofilm upon overexpression of the adhesin gene ALS1 or the transcription factor genes BRG1 or UME6. However, the biofilm-forming strains do not invade the substrate. These results indicate that RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in substrate invasion, and mathematical modeling argues that RHR2 is required to generate turgor. Previous studies have shown that abdominal infection by C. albicans has two aspects: infection of abdominal organs and persistence in abscesses. We report here that an rhr2Δ/Δ mutant is defective in both of these infection phenotypes. We find here that overexpression of ALS1 in the mutant restores infection of organs, but does not improve persistence in abscesses. Therefore, RHR2 has an adhesin-independent role in abdominal infection, just as it does in substrate invasion. This report suggests that RHR2, through glycerol synthesis, coordinates adherence with host- or substrate-interaction activities that enable proliferation of the C. albicans population.

  2. BAY 41-2272 activates host defence against local and disseminated Candida albicans infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vítor Soeiro-Pereira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we have found that 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272, a guanylate cyclase agonist, activates human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line to produce the superoxide anion, increasing in vitro microbicidal activity, suggesting that this drug can be used to modulate immune functioning in primary immunodeficiency patients. In the present work, we investigated the potential of the in vivo administration of BAY 41-2272 for the treatment of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus infections introduced via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous inoculation. We found that intraperitoneal treatment with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased macrophage-dependent cell influx to the peritoneum in addition to macrophage functions, such as spreading, zymosan particle phagocytosis and nitric oxide and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 was highly effective in reducing the death rate due to intraperitoneal inoculation of C. albicans, but not S. aureus. However, we found that in vitro stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased microbicidal activities against both pathogens. Our results show that the prevention of death by the treatment of C. albicans-infected mice with BAY 41-2272 might occur primarily by the modulation of the host immune response through macrophage activation.

  3. Immunomodulatory and protective effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei against Candida albicans infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Julio; Salva, Susana; Agüero, Graciela; Alvarez, Susana

    2011-06-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 (Lc), when administered as a supplement to a repletion diet, on the resistance of malnourished mice to Candida albicans infection was studied. Weaned mice were malnourished by being given a protein-free diet (PFD) for 21 days. The malnourished mice were then fed a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for 7 days or BCD for 7 days with supplemental Lc on days 6 and 7 (BCD+Lc). Malnourished (MNC) and well-nourished (WNC) mice were used as controls. At the end of the treatments the mice were infected intraperitoneally with C. albicans. Animals that had received probiotics had improved survival and resistance against this infection compared to those in the BCD and MNC groups. The number and fungicidal activity of phagocytes, and the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), increased in blood and infected tissues in all experimental groups, but MNC mice showed lower concentrations than those in the WNC group. BCD and BCD+Lc mice showed higher concentrations of these variables than those in the MNC group, but only the BCD+Lc group presented values similar to the WNC mice. Malnutrition also impaired the production of IL-17 and IL-10 in response to infection. Both repletion treatments normalized IL-17 concentrations, but IL-10 in the BCD+Lc group was significantly higher than in WNC mice. The addition of L. casei to the repletion diet normalized the immune response against C. albicans, allowing efficient recruitment and activation of phagocytes, as well as effective release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, probiotic treatment induced an increase in IL-10 concentrations, which would have helped to prevent damage caused by the inflammatory response. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Impaired activity of phagocytic cells in Candida albicans infection after exposure to chronic varied stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Galán, M C; Correa, S G; Cejas, H; Sotomayor, C E

    2001-01-01

    Candidiasis is a prototypic opportunistic fungal disease that may follow severe modulations of the immune system of the host. The purpose of this study was to evaluate which innate immune mechanisms involved in the protection against fungal invasion are impaired under stress conditions. Wistar rats were infected intraperitoneally with Candida albicans and immediately exposed to chronic varied stress (CVS) over 10 days (CVS; Ca-S); the fungal burden (CFU), histopathological lesion and ACTH levels were evaluated. Additionally, functional assessment of peritoneal cells (PC) included the phagocytic and anticandidacidal activities and the production of H(2)O(2) and NO. In the only infected animals (Ca), C. albicans colonization stimulated an efficient inflammatory response, while in Ca-S rats poor tissue reactions were associated with increased CFU in livers and kidneys (p process was not modified, the candidacidal activity of PC was significantly decreased after the application of CVS (p < 0.001, Ca vs. Ca-S). The H(2)O(2) production by macrophages and neutrophils was downregulated by the infection, and while at early intervals these cells possessed a residual oxidative capacity, by day 10, the production of this metabolite was blocked. Spontaneous NO production by macrophages was significantly increased in both Ca and Ca-S animals (p < 0.001), but in stressed rats, this reactive nitrogen intermediate was noticeably downregulated (p < 0.05, Ca vs. Ca-S). The hyperactivity of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis after exposure to stress was confirmed by an increase in baseline plasma ACTH levels. These results show that during infection with C. albicans, the exposure to CVS contributes to the spread of the fungus and downregulates critical functions of phagocytic cells involved in the control of this opportunistic pathogen. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Role of Toll-like receptors in systemic Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisa Gil, Maria; Murciano, Celia; Yáñez, Alberto; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute a family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize molecular signatures of microbial pathogens and function as sensors for infection. Recognition of Candida albicans by TLRs on mature immune cells, such as phagocytic cells, activates intracellular signalling pathways that trigger production of proinflammatory cytokines which are critical for innate host defence and orchestrate the adaptive response. TLR2, and TLR4 in a minor extent, recognize cell wall-associated ligands; endosomal TLR9 and TLR7 recognize DNA and RNA respectively. Interaction of C. albicans with TLRs is a complex process, as TLRs may collaborate with other PRRs and expression of surface-associated fungal ligands depends on the strain and the morphotype (yeasts or hyphae), thus defining the final induced adaptive response (Th1/Th2/Th17). TLRs are also expressed on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) where they may play a role in modulating hematopoiesis; engagement of TLR2 induces, upon recognition of C. albicans, the differentiation of HSPCs towards specific subsets of mature myeloid cells. This has opened a new perspective for anti-Candida immunointervention.

  6. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ≥48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of cyclophosphamide on the course of Candida albicans infection in normal and vaccinated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japoni, A.; Alborzi, A.; Farshad, S.; Hayati, M.; Dehyadegari, Mohammad A.; Mehrabani, D.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the immunomodulating effect of cyclophosphamide (Cy) on the course of Candida albicans (C. albicans). We performed this study in the Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz, Iran during April to November 2003. Five groups of 10 mice (vaccinated group) were immunized by 5 equal injections of 2x105, 2.5x105 and 3x105 of the organism intraperitoneally. Then, the group received Cy on day zero and was challenged with lethal doses of C. albicans (7.74x105 colony forming unit) on days zero, one, 3, 6 and 12 post-Cy injection. Another 5 equal groups of 10 mice (non-vaccinated group) received Cy on day zero and similar to vaccinated ones were challenged with lethal doses of the organism too. The control groups received just Cy on day zero and were sacrificed on days zero, one, 3, 6 and 12 days post-Cy injection. We performed the hemogram and the spleen and studied the renal tissues microscopically and macroscopically. In vaccinated group, we observed an increase in survival time and in spleen and renal weights were visible while in non-vaccinated ones, a significant decrease was also observed on days one and 3 and an increased on days 6 and 12 post-Cy injection. We observed atrophy and necrosis in the spleen while inflammation and necrosis were also observed in the kidneys on days one and 3. We noticed a significant hyperplasia in the white pulp on days 6 and 12 post-Cy injection. We conclude that hyperplasia in the white pulp of spleen and the increase in peripheral polymorphonuclears due to selective effects of Cy could effectively protect the animal against C. albicans infection. (author)

  8. Successful Treatment of Candida Albicans-Infected Total Hip Prosthesis With Staged Procedure Using an Antifungal-Loaded Cement Spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelstra, Jenneke J.; Neut, Danielle; Jutte, Paul C.

    We present a rare case of an immunocompetent host who developed a Candida albicans-infected total hip prosthesis. The infection could not be eradicated with debridement and extensive antifungal therapy. Our patient first underwent a resection of the proximal femur and local treatment with

  9. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Fran?ois L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasi...

  10. Serum Antibody Profile during Colonization of the Mouse Gut by Candida albicans: Relevance for Protection during Systemic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Blanca; Prieto, Daniel; Pitarch, Aida; Gil, Concha; Pla, Jesús; Díez-Orejas, Rosalía

    2017-01-06

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts of most individuals that acts as an opportunistic pathogen when the host immune response is reduced. Here, we established different immunocompetent murine models to analyze the antibody responses to the C. albicans proteome during commensalism, commensalism followed by infection, and infection (C, C+I, and I models, respectively). Serum anti-C. albicans IgG antibody levels were higher in colonized mice than in infected mice. The antibody responses during gut commensalism (up to 55 days of colonization) mainly focused on C. albicans proteins involved in stress response and metabolism and differed in both models of commensalism. Different serum IgG antibody-reactivity profiles were also found over time among the three murine models. C. albicans gut colonization protected mice from an intravenous lethal fungal challenge, emphasizing the benefits of fungal gut colonization. This work highlights the importance of fungal gut colonization for future immune prophylactic therapies.

  11. Immunomodulating Effect of Cyclophosphamide on the Mice Infected with Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aziz japoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent that stops the replication of DNA, which is used to treat various types of cancer and some autoimmune disorders. This study was aimed at then evaluating the immunomodulating effect of cyclophosphamide (Cy on the immune system of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice.Materials & Methods: The  study was performed on three groups of mice consisting of vaccinated, non-vaccinated and control groups. Vaccination was carried out by three separated courses of C. albicans injection intraperitoneally.  Then,  the  vaccinated group  received Cy  on  day  zero  and  were  challenged  with  lethal  doses of  C. albicans  on  days  zero, one, 3, 6 and 12 post-Cy injection. Non-vaccinated group received Cy on day zero and similar to vaccinated ones were challenged with lethal doses of the organism. The control groups received  just  Cy  on  day  zero  and  were  sacrificed  on days  post-Cy injection. Then, the hemogram and the spleen and the renal tissues were studied microscopically and macroscopically.Results: In the vaccinated group, an increase in survival time, the number of polymorphonuclear and the significant hyperplasia in the white pulp on days 6 and 12 post-Cy injection were noticed. In non-vaccinated ones, these factors had significant decrease on days 1 and 3. Conclusion: It is concluded that the hyperplasia in the white pulp of spleen and an increasing in peripheral polymorphonuclear due to the selective effects of Cy could effectively protect the animal against C. albicans infection.

  12. Identification of infection- and defense-related genes via a dynamic host-pathogen interaction network using a Candida albicans-zebrafish infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Zong-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chao, Chun-Cheih; Liu, Fu-Chen; Lan, Chung-Yu; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans infections and candidiasis are difficult to treat and create very serious therapeutic challenges. In this study, based on interactive time profile microarray data of C. albicans and zebrafish during infection, the infection-related protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of the two species and the intercellular PPI network between host and pathogen were simultaneously constructed by a dynamic interaction model, modeled as an integrated network consisting of intercellular invasion and cellular defense processes during infection. The signal transduction pathways in regulating morphogenesis and hyphal growth of C. albicans were further investigated based on significant interactions found in the intercellular PPI network. Two cellular networks were also developed corresponding to the different infection stages (adhesion and invasion), and then compared with each other to identify proteins from which we can gain more insight into the pathogenic role of hyphal development in the C. albicans infection process. Important defense-related proteins in zebrafish were predicted using the same approach. The hyphal growth PPI network, zebrafish PPI network and host-pathogen intercellular PPI network were combined to form an integrated infectious PPI network that helps us understand the systematic mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of C. albicans and the immune response of the host, and may help improve medical therapies and facilitate the development of new antifungal drugs. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The role of Candida albicans AP-1 protein against host derived ROS in in vivo models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Charu; Pastor, Kelly; Gonzalez, Arely Y; Lorenz, Michael C; Rao, Reeta P

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing mucosal infections that are difficult to eliminate and systemic infections that are often lethal primarily due to defects in the host's innate status. Here we demonstrate the utility of Caenorhabditis elegans, a model host to study innate immunity, by exploring the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical innate response against C. albicans infections. Much like a human host, the nematode's innate immune response is activated to produce ROS in response to fungal infection. We use the C. albicans cap1 mutant, which is susceptible to ROS, as a tool to dissect this physiological innate immune response and show that cap1 mutants fail to cause disease and death, except in bli-3 mutant worms that are unable to produce ROS because of a defective NADPH oxidase. We further validate the ROS-mediated host defense mechanism in mammalian phagocytes by demonstrating that chemical inhibition of the NADPH oxidase in cultured macrophages enables the otherwise susceptible cap1 mutant to resists ROS-mediated phagolysis. Loss of CAP1 confers minimal attenuation of virulence in a disseminated mouse model, suggesting that CAP1-independent mechanisms contribute to pathogen survival in vivo. Our findings underscore a central theme in the process of infection-the intricate balance between the virulence strategies employed by C. albicans and the host's innate immune system and validates C. elegans as a simple model host to dissect this balance at the molecular level.

  14. Role of IFN-gamma in immune responses to Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbo, Daniel; Maneu, Victoria; Gil, María Luisa

    2014-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent etiologic agent that causes opportunistic fungal infections called candidiasis, a disease whose systemic manifestation could prove fatal and whose incidence is increasing as a result of an expanding immunocompromised population. Here we review the role of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in host protection against invasive candidiasis. This cytokine plays an essential role in both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response to candidiasis. We focus on recent progress on host-pathogen interactions leading to the production of IFN-gamma by host cells. IFN-gamma is produced by CD4 Th1, CD8, gamma delta T, and natural killer (NK) cells, essentially in response to both IL-12 and/or IL-18; more recently, a subset of C. albicans -specific Th17 cells have been described to produce both IL-17 and IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma plays an important role in the regulation of the immune system as well as in the control of the infectious process, as it is required for optimal activation of phagocytes, collaborates in the generation of protective antibody response, and favors the development of a Th1 protective response.

  15. Cervical Bone Graft Candida albicans Osteomyelitis: Management Strategies for an Uncommon Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembilla, Carlo; Lanterna, Luigi Andrea; Risso, Andrea; Bonaldi, Giuseppe; Gritti, Paolo; Resmini, Bruno; Viscone, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Candida osteomyelitis in the current literature is an emerging infection. The factors contributing to its emergence include a growing population of immunosuppressed patients, invasive surgeries, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injection drug users, and alcohol abuse. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion. The insidious progression of infection and the nonspecificity of laboratory and radiologic findings may contribute to a delay in diagnosis. The current case concerns a 27-year-old man with a spinal cord injury who, after undergoing anterior cervical fixation and fusion surgery, developed postoperative systemic bacterial infection and required long-term antibiotic therapy. After six months, a CT scan demonstrated an almost complete anterior dislocation of the implants caused by massive bone destruction and reabsorption in Candida albicans infection. The patient underwent a second intervention consisting firstly of a posterior approach with C4-C7 fixation and fusion, followed by a second anterior approach with a corpectomy of C5 and C6, a tricortical bone grafting from the iliac crest, and C4-C7 plating. The antifungal therapy with fluconazole was effective without surgical debridement of the bone graft, despite the fact that signs of the bone graft being infected were seen from the first cervical CT scans carried out after one month.

  16. Cervical Bone Graft Candida albicans Osteomyelitis: Management Strategies for an Uncommon Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Brembilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida osteomyelitis in the current literature is an emerging infection. The factors contributing to its emergence include a growing population of immunosuppressed patients, invasive surgeries, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injection drug users, and alcohol abuse. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion. The insidious progression of infection and the nonspecificity of laboratory and radiologic findings may contribute to a delay in diagnosis. The current case concerns a 27-year-old man with a spinal cord injury who, after undergoing anterior cervical fixation and fusion surgery, developed postoperative systemic bacterial infection and required long-term antibiotic therapy. After six months, a CT scan demonstrated an almost complete anterior dislocation of the implants caused by massive bone destruction and reabsorption in Candida albicans infection. The patient underwent a second intervention consisting firstly of a posterior approach with C4–C7 fixation and fusion, followed by a second anterior approach with a corpectomy of C5 and C6, a tricortical bone grafting from the iliac crest, and C4–C7 plating. The antifungal therapy with fluconazole was effective without surgical debridement of the bone graft, despite the fact that signs of the bone graft being infected were seen from the first cervical CT scans carried out after one month.

  17. Non-albicans Candida species in blood stream infections in a tertiary care hospital at New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Jaswinder Kaur; Wattal, Chand; Goel, Neeraj; Raveendran, Reena; Datta, S; Prasad, Kamaljeet

    2012-12-01

    During recent decades, there has been a change in the epidemiology of Candida infections, characterized by a progressive shift from a predominance of Candida albicans to non-albicans Candida species. This study was undertaken to analyze the change in the epidemiology of candidaemia and antifungal use at tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India, over a period of 10 years. A retrospective review of candidaemia between 1999 and 2008 and antifungal use from 2000 to 2008 was performed at Sir Ganga Ram Hosptial, New Delhi. Initially (1999-2005), isolates were differentiated as C. albicans and non- albicans Candida species. Between 2006-2008, these were identified to the species level and antifungal susceptibility was performed. The occurrence of candidaemia and total antifungal use increased significantly. Candidaemia due to non-albicans species increased and this was correlated with an increasing use of fluconazole. There was emergence and increased isolation of a novel species C. haemulonii with decreased susceptibility to both amphotericin B and azoles. Overall, sensitivities of 89.6, 90.9, 88.6, 68.8 and 54.3 per cent to amphotericin B, 5 flucytosine, voriconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole, respectively were observed. Cross-resistance or reduced susceptibility to both fluconazole (MIC >16 μg/ml) and voriconazole was observed in 11.3 per cent isolates. The study demonstrates a shift to non-albicans Candida species causing fungaemia and the emergence of amphotericin B and azole resistant novel species, C. haemulonii. Decreased susceptibility to fluconazole, as well as the threat of emergence of cross-resistance to voriconazole in the background of high azole consumption may limit the use of these agents as a presumptive therapy for Candida blood stream infections (BSI).

  18. Candida albicans infection in free-living populations of hihi (stitchbird; Notiomystis cincta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, R J; Alley, M R; Castro, I

    2010-12-01

    To describe the occurrence of candidiasis in hihi (stitch-bird; Notiomystis cincta) nestlings, and investigate the carriage and impact of Candida albicans infection in a free-living population of hihi. Mortality of nestlings was investigated in a reintroduced population of the endangered, endemic hihi at Zealandia: Karori Sanctuary, Wellington, New Zealand. Oral and faecal samples were collected from live hihi nestlings, for microbiological examination, between October 2008 and April 2009. All hihi that died and could be recovered were submitted to the New Zealand Wildlife Health Centre (NZWHC) at Massey University, for post-mortem examination. The results were compared with data obtained retrospectively from the National Wildlife Mortality (NWM) database for two other reintroduced populations of hihi on Mokoia and Tiritiri Matangi Islands. Fifty chicks fledged from 82 eggs hatched during the 2008-2009 breeding season at Zealandia: Karori Sanctuary. Thirty-four live nestlings were sampled from 11 nests, and C. albicans was isolated from gastrointestinal swabs of 13 live nestlings from four nest sites. Eight (62%) of those nestlings survived to fledge, compared with 17/21 (81%) of those that tested negative (p=0.254; Fisher's exact test). Of the 32 hihi nestlings that died during the period of the study, 25 were recovered for necropsy. Histopathological examination revealed candidiasis was a factor in the deaths of four nestlings. An adult hihi that died during the period of the study at Zealandia: Karori Sanctuary was also found to have candidiasis. Retrospective analysis of data from the NWM database revealed candidiasis was also a factor in the deaths of five nestlings aged between 1 and 10 days from Mokoia Island, and of three nestlings <5 days old and one adult from Tiritiri Matangi Island. Candida albicans was isolated from 38% of hihi nestlings sampled in this study, and vertical transmission of this organism from parent to offspring is likely to occur. Some

  19. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

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    Freshta Akbari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs. Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs.

  20. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu-Chao; Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Lan, Chung-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for bo...

  1. Concanavalin-A induces IL-17 production during the course of Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paula Galdino Cardin; Custódio, Luiz Antonio; Conchon-Costa, Ivete; Andrade, Célia Guadalupe Tardeli de Jesus; Quirino, Gustavo Fernando da Silva; de Almeida, Ricardo Sergio Couto; Felipe, Ionice

    2012-03-01

    In a previous study, our group verified that 100% of mice survived to a lethal dose of Candida albicans following pretreatment with concanavalin-A (Con-A) for 3 days. This work proposed to investigate whether treatment could mediate an adaptative immune response involving T(H) 17 cells. A significant increase in IL-17 levels at 6 h postinfection was observed and was maintained up to 18 h in the Con-A group, whereas in control mice, a reduction in this cytokine was verified. In addition, T(H) 17 cells develop in the presence of TGF-β, IL-1 β, and IL-6 that were increased significantly 2 h postinfection in Con-A-treated mice. Macrophages were involved in the process, engulfing greater numbers of yeast cells, and were activated through TNF-α and interferon-γ produced at significant levels at 2 h postinfection. A significant increase in IL-12 levels was also observed at 2 h postinfection. Thus, activated macrophages were probably more capable of killing and processing Candida antigens, signalizing an adaptative immune response. Macrophages from controls did not prevent yeast-to-hyphae transition and were partially destroyed, as shown in scanning microscopy. These results suggest that treatment with Con-A facilitated the triggering of T(H) 17 and T(H) 1 responses via IL-17 and IFN-γ production, leading to the resolution of C. albicans infection. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

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    Sara eAmorim-Vaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify C. albicans transcription factors (TF involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney fungal burden significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in G. mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25 % of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects, a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching fungal burden phenotypes were observed in 50 % of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4 % concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the pool effect. After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adaptation.

  3. Characteristics of experimental Candida albicans infection of the central nervous system in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H S; Sáez-Llorens, X; Grimprel, E; Argyle, J C; Olsen, K D; McCracken, G H

    1991-08-01

    Different concentrations (10(7), 10(5), 10(3) cfu/ml) of Candida albicans were injected intracisternally in rabbits. The highest inoculum was fatal within 14 h in all animals. In recipients of 10(5) and 10(3) cfu/ml inocula, the mean +/- SD peak cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) concentrations were 1.6 +/- 2.42 and 0.3 +/- 0.59 ng/ml, respectively, at 6 h; the mean +/- SD CSF leukocyte and protein concentrations were 6291 +/- 6515 and 453 +/- 674 cells/mm3 (at 24 h) and 118 +/- 90 and 109 +/- 122 mg/dl (at 12 and 24 h), respectively. At 6-10 days after inoculation, a second peak of TNF alpha activity was accompanied by increased CSF inflammation. Mortality in the 10(5) and 10(3) cfu/ml inoculum groups was 56% and 22%, respectively. Fatal infection was associated with higher second CSF peak TNF alpha and leukocyte concentrations and a larger proportion of culture-positive CSF samples. Histopathology revealed hyphal invasion, vasculitis, abscesses, and acute and chronic inflammatory infiltration of meninges and brain parenchyma. This model can be useful for evaluation of the pathogenesis and therapy of central nervous system fungal infections.

  4. Quantitative relationships of Candida albicans infections and dressing patterns in Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegbe, I A; Elegbe, I

    1983-04-01

    Candida albicans colony counts were far higher in patients with vaginitis wearing tight fitting clothing than in patients wearing loose fitting clothing. In Ile-Ife, Nigeria, tight fitting dresses, woolen and corduroy jeans, coupled with nylon underwear, appear to create an environment favorable to Candida albicans colonization.

  5. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

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    Lin Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3 adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  6. Thiamine antivitamins--an opportunity of therapy of fungal infections caused by Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemieniuk, Magdalena; Czyzewska, Urszula; Strumilo, Slawomir; Tylicki, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Severe skin diseases and systemic fungaemia are caused by Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida albicans respectively. Antifungal therapies are less effective because of chronic character of infections and high percentage of relapses. Therefore, there is a great need to develop new strategies of antifungal therapies. We previously found that oxythiamine decreases proliferation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), therefore we suggest that thiamine antivitamins can be considered as antifungal agents. The aim of this study was the comparison of thiamine antivitamins (oxythiamine, amprolium, thiochrome, tetrahydrothiamine and tetrahydrooxythiamine) inhibitory effect on the growth rate and energetic metabolism efficiency in non-pathogenic S. cerevisiae and two potentially pathogenic species M. pachydermatis and C. albicans. Investigated species were cultured on a Sabouraud medium supplemented with trace elements in the presence (40 mg l(-1)) or absence of each tested antivitamins to estimate their influence on growth rate, enzyme activity and kinetic parameters of pyruvate decarboxylase and malate dehydrogenase of each tested species. Oxythiamine was the only antivitamin with antifungal potential. M. pachydermatis and S. cerevisiae were the most sensitive, whereas C. albicans was the least sensitive to oxythiamine action. Oxythiamine can be considered as supportive agent in superficial mycoses treatment, especially those caused by species from the genus Malassezia. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Infection related stress adaptations in the secretome and wall proteome of Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgo, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Alice Sorgo's main research question concerns the adaptability of the wall proteome and secretome of the opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. The question is how do these subproteomes adapt to environmental stess (high temperatures, iron restriction, antifungal drugs) and how do these

  8. Radiotherapy Reduced Salivary Flow Rate and Might Induced C. albicans Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Surjadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has impact in oral health especially on the secretion capacity of the salivary glands. Another impact is the increase of Candida albicans colony. Objectives: To evaluate salivary flow in relation with Candida albicans colony in head and neck cancer patients during and after radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-four head and neck cancer patients in Dharmais Cancer Hospital, Jakarta who were undergoing radiotherapy or had undergone radiotherapy and 24 match healthy volunteers were included in the study. Clinical observation carried out by collecting unstimulated salivary flow rate and followed by culture of Candida in Saboraud agar medium. Data were analyzed statistically by Chi-square. Results: Nasopharynx cancer was the most frequent type of head and neck cancers (87.5% followed by tongue cancer (12.5% and and found in 41-50 years old patients and 51-60 years old patients respectively, with male predilection compare to female (17:7. Approxiamtely 87.5% of subjects showed decreased salivary flow rate (1.01-1.50mL/10min during and after radiotherapy. However, 91.7% of cancer patients had increased C.albicans colony during and after radiotherapy compared to control (p=0.00. Conclusion: This study showed that radiotherapy induced hyposalivation and might increase the C.albicans colony.  

  9. Role of extracellular polymeric substances in polymicrobial biofilm infections of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans modelled in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jillian E; Houston, Asia; Adams, Clare; Edwards, Sarah; Kjellerup, Birthe V

    2017-07-31

    Biofilms are formed by communities of microorganisms living in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix attached to a surface. When living in a biofilm microorganisms change phenotype and thus are less susceptible to antibiotic treatment and biofilm infections can become severe. The aim of this study was to determine if the presence of multikingdom microorganisms alters the virulence of a biofilm infection in a host organism. The coexistence of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis in biofilm was examined in the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans. It was evaluated if the hyphal form of C. albicans and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed by S. epidermidis increases biofilm virulence. Survival assays were performed, where C. elegans nematodes were exposed to S. epidermidis and C. albicans. Single inoculation assays showed a decreased survival rate after 2 days following exposure, while dual inoculation assays showed that a clinical S. epidermidis strain together with C. albicans significantly increased the virulence and decreased nematode survival. EPS seem to interfere with the bacterial attachment to hyphae, since the EPS overproducing S. epidermidis strain was most virulent. The clinical S. epidermidis paired with C. albicans led to a severe infection in the nematodes resulting in reduced survival. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Investigation of minor species Candida africana, Candida stellatoidea and Candida dubliniensis in the Candida albicans complex among Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngouana, Thierry K; Krasteva, Donika; Drakulovski, Pascal; Toghueo, Rufin K; Kouanfack, Charles; Ambe, Akaba; Reynes, Jacques; Delaporte, Eric; Boyom, Fabrice F; Mallié, Michèle; Bertout, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Minor species of the Candida albicans complex may cause overestimation of the epidemiology of C. albicans, and misidentifications could mask their implication in human pathology. Authors determined the occurrence of minor species of the C. albicans complex (C. africana, C. dubliniensis and C. stellatoidea) among Yaoundé HIV-infected patients, Cameroon. Stool, vaginal discharge, urine and oropharyngeal samples were analysed by mycological diagnosis. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and mass spectrometry (MS; carried out by the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight MS protocol). Candida albicans isolates were thereafter submitted to the PCR amplification of the Hwp1 gene. The susceptibility of isolates to antifungal drugs was tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 protocol. From 115 C. albicans obtained isolates, neither C. dubliniensis nor C. stellatoidea was observed; two strains of C. africana (422PV and 448PV) were identified by PCR electrophoretic profiles at 700 bp. These two C. africana strains were vaginal isolates. The isolate 448PV was resistant to ketoconazole at the minimal inhibitory concentration of 2 μg ml(-1), and showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B at 1 μg ml(-1). This first report on C. africana occurrence in Cameroon brings clues for the understanding of the global epidemiology of this yeast as well as that of minor species of the C. albicans complex. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Importance of the Candida albicans cell wall during commensalism and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Neil A R; Hube, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    An imbalance of the normal microbial flora, breakage of epithelial barriers or dysfunction of the immune system favour the transition of the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans from a commensal to a pathogen. C. albicans has evolved to be adapted as a commensal on mucosal surfaces. As a commensal it has also acquired attributes, which are necessary to avoid or overcome the host defence mechanisms. The human host has also co-evolved to recognize and eliminate potential fungal invaders. Many of the fungal genes that have been the focus of this co-evolutionary process encode cell wall components. In this review, we will discuss the transition from commensalism to pathogenesis, the key players of the fungal cell surface that are important for this transition, the role of the morphology and the mechanisms of host recognition and response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, François L; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-02-15

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen.

  13. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  14. Biodistribution of 99mTc-ketoconazole in infection initiated by candida albicans, staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizky Juwita Sugiharti; Iim Halimah; Isa Mahendra; Maula Eka Sriyani

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major health problem and cause of death worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Nuclear medicine imaging, with better sensitivity, offers an attractive option for diagnosis of infections. 99m Tc-ketoconazole was radiolabeled antibiotic which synthesized by labeling ketoconazole with radionuclide technetium-99m. This radiopharmaceutical is expected to be applied for detection of infection in nuclear medicine therefore 99m Tc-ketoconazole must be selectively concentrated in infection sites. Hence, evaluations of 99m Tc-ketoconazole to detect and locate infection caused by some microorganisms in mice have been conducted. The biodistribution study showed accumulation of 99m Tc ketoconazole in infected thigh at 1 hour p.i with target/non target ratio (T/NT) 3.04 for Candida albicans, 1.93 for Staphylococcus aureus and 2.81 for Escherichia coli. This study showed that 99m Tc-ketoconazole is a promising radiopharmaceutical to detect infection rapidly with high sensitivity. (author)

  15. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in HIV Infection: Analysis of Impaired Mucosal Immune Response to Candida albicans in Mice Expressing the HIV-1 Transgene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis de Repentigny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IL-17-producing Th17 cells are of critical importance in host defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC. Speculation about defective Th17 responses to oral C. albicans infection in the context of HIV infection prompted an investigation of innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in transgenic mice expressing the genome of HIV-1 in immune cells and displaying an AIDS-like disease. Defective IL-17 and IL-22-dependent mucosal responses to C. albicans were found to determine susceptibility to OPC in these transgenic mice. Innate phagocytes were quantitatively and functionally intact, and individually dispensable for control of OPC and to prevent systemic dissemination of Candida to deep organs. CD8+ T-cells recruited to the oral mucosa of the transgenic mice limited the proliferation of C. albicans in these conditions of CD4+ T-cell deficiency. Therefore, the immunopathogenesis of OPC in the context of HIV infection involves defective T-cell-mediated immunity, failure of crosstalk with innate mucosal immune effector mechanisms, and compensatory cell responses, which limit Candida infection to the oral mucosa and prevent systemic dissemination.

  16. Pathological analysis of the Candida albicans-infected tongue tissues of a murine oral candidiasis model in the early infection stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Miyasaka, Takahiro; Abe, Shigeru; Satoh, Tazuko

    2013-04-01

    The early pathological process of Candida infection and immunological responses in tongues of the mice with experimental oral candidiasis was analysed. CD-1 mice, pretreated by prednisolone were orally inoculated with Candida albicans. Symptoms were monitored by measuring the area of white tongue coating and number of viable Candida cells in oral cavity. The histopathological analysis was carried by PAS-stain and immunofluorescent staining. IL-4, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, TNF-α in recovered from the homogenates of the tongues were measured by ELISA. The fungus invaded the tongue surface of the mice and white patches developed within 24h after inoculation. Histopathological examination indicated the presence of local acute inflammation in superficial tissues of tongues covered by mycelium of C. albicans. Pathological exacerbation was observed from 24 to 48 h after the inoculation and from then the symptoms of oral candidiasis appeared to move into the recovery phase. Inflammatory cells mainly consisting of neutrophils was accumulated and located under the lesions covered by Candida-hyphae. An increase in IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in tongue homogenates was observed at 48 h after inoculation. The worst condition in the pathological process in experimental oral candidiasis was found 48 h after C. albicans inoculation. When the surface of the Candida-inoculated tongues was covered with Candida-hyphae, a dense accumulation of neutrophils was observed under the lesions and homogenates of the tongues contained increased levels of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ. These suggested that local pathological condition of Candida-infected tongues may be affected by neutrophils accumulation and increased levels of some cytokines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Virulence factors of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Piłat, Joanna; Siennicka, Katarzyna; Magda, Urszula; Kurzatkowski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common etiological factor of opportunistic human fungal infections. In this review, we focus on the major virulence factors that mediate the pathogenesis of C. albicans. Among these virulence factors, secreted aspartyl proteases, adherence, pleomorphism are the most important features of C. albicans infections. Ability to exist as different pleomorphic forms is defined as pleomorphism. A number of quorum sensing (QS) molecules have been described which affect morphogenesis process in C. albicans. Furthermore, the morphological transition of C. albicans in response to changing environmental conditions represent a means by which the strain adapts to different biological niches. Furthermore, every morphotype has own virulence profile and each pleomorphic form provide critical functions required for pathogenesis. Candida albicans is a producer of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Among them lipases, phospholipases and secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are most significant in virulence. Sap proteins contribute to pathogenesis by digestion of host cell membranes and molecules of the host immune system to avoid antimicrobial attack by the host. One of the key features in the development of candidiasis is adhesion ofC. albicans to buccal and vaginal epithelial cells. The adhesion to host cells represents the first step in the internalization process which involves adhesins. Knowledge of the role of the various C. albicans' virulence factors during in vivo infections is still incomplete, therefore further studies including quantification of genes expression and histopathological examination of tissues damage are required to fully understand pathogenesis of this opportunistic pathogen.

  18. Phenotypic switching and its influence on expression of virulence factors by Candida albicans causing candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of the present study was to determine the degree of expression of virulence factors such as adherence, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH and production of proteinase by different morphological forms of Candida albicans causing oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals. Methods : C. albicans 3153A and two strains isolated from oral thrush in HIV infected individuals were induced to undergo phenotypic switching by exposure to UV light and the degree of expression of virulence factors by the different morphological forms was studied. Results : Three different morphological forms of C. albicans were obtained namely, star (S, wrinkled (W and ring (R types from the original smooth (O variety. It was found that proteinase production was greatest with the W type followed by the R type and O type. The S type produced the least proteinase. Expression of cell surface hydrophobicity and adherence was greatest in the O type followed by the R and then the W type and finally the S type. Conclusions : The differential expression of virulence factors occurs with different phenotypic forms of C. albicans and this may provide a particular morphological type with a distinct advantage over other types in causing candidiasis.

  19. Virulence factors and genetic variability of vaginal Candida albicans isolates from HIV-infected women in the post-highly active antiretroviral era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Cristina Mastellaro Delvas Zanni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC in HIV-infected (HIV+ women is a serious public health problem. However, little is known about the virulence mechanisms of vaginal Candida albicans from HIV+ women in the post-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the expression of key virulence factors and genetic variability of 26 vaginal C. albicans strains isolated from HIV+ women undergoing HAART and 18 from HIV-uninfected (HIV- women. In general, we observed that C. albicans from HIV+ women receiving HAART showed lower expression of virulence factors compared with C. albicans from HIV- women, except for the proteinase activity which is highly expressed. The results in HIV-women further suggest that virulence factors appear to be expressed in response to the yeast stress, in the presence of an adequate immune response. Furthermore, the RAPD results showed a high heterogeneity among isolates from both groups of women. These findings in HIV+ women using HAART will help to improve the monitoring of vaginal yeast infections and the quality of life of patients.

  20. Thymus vulgaris L. and thymol assist murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) in the control of in vitro infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jonatas Rafael; Figueira, Leandro Wagner; Sper, Fábia Lugli; Meccatti, Vanessa Marques; Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias

    2017-08-01

    Microorganisms are capable to combat defense cells by means of strategies that contribute to their stabilization and proliferation in invaded tissues. Frequently antimicrobial-resistant strains appear; therefore, alternative methods to control them must be investigated, for example, the use of plant products. The capacity of the thyme extract (Thymus vulgaris L.) and phytocompound thymol in the control of in vitro infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans in murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) was evaluated. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the plant products were used. The effect of these MIC were analyzed in the assays of phagocytosis and immunoregulation by analysis of the production of cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-10) and nitric oxide (NO). The plant products effectively assisted the macrophages in the phagocytosis of microorganisms, presenting significant reductions of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. The macrophages also regulated the production of inflammatory mediators in the infections by S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans. In addition, thyme provided a satisfactory effect in response to the bacterial infections, regarding generation of NO. Thus, the effectiveness of the thyme and thymol to control in vitro infections by S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans was observed. Phagocytosis of S. aureus by RAW 264.7 was enhanced with thymol Thyme enhanced the phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa by RAW 264.7 Plant products provided immunoregulation of inflammatory cytokines Production of nitric oxide was improved with the treatments in bacterial infections.

  1. In vitro activities of voriconazole (UK-109,496) against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans isolates from oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhnke, M; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Trautmann, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Candida albicans to a new antifungal triazole, voriconazole (UK-109,496), was investigated in 105 isolates obtained from the oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to study this drug's activity against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates. MICs were determined by a broth microdilution technique according to document M27-T from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and by using a broth microdilution techni...

  2. Cervical Bone Graft Candida albicans Osteomyelitis: Management Strategies for an Uncommon Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brembilla, Carlo; Lanterna, Luigi Andrea; Risso, Andrea; Bonaldi, Giuseppe; Gritti, Paolo; Resmini, Bruno; Viscone, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Candida osteomyelitis in the current literature is an emerging infection. The factors contributing to its emergence include a growing population of immunosuppressed patients, invasive surgeries, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injection drug users, and alcohol abuse. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion. The insidious progression of infection and the nonspecificity of laboratory and radiologic findings may contribute to a delay in diagnosis. The current case concerns a 27-year-old ma...

  3. Oral-resident natural Th17 cells and γδ T cells control opportunistic Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R; Peterson, Alanna C; Brane, Lucas; Huppler, Anna R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Whibley, Natasha; Garg, Abhishek V; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Gibson, Gregory A; Mamo, Anna J; Osborne, Lisa C; Bishu, Shrinivas; Ghilardi, Nico; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Watkins, Simon C; Artis, David; McGeachy, Mandy J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-09-22

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans. OPC is frequent in HIV/AIDS, implicating adaptive immunity. Mice are naive to Candida, yet IL-17 is induced within 24 h of infection, and susceptibility is strongly dependent on IL-17R signaling. We sought to identify the source of IL-17 during the early innate response to candidiasis. We show that innate responses to Candida require an intact TCR, as SCID, IL-7Rα(-/-), and Rag1(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC, and blockade of TCR signaling by cyclosporine induced susceptibility. Using fate-tracking IL-17 reporter mice, we found that IL-17 is produced within 1-2 d by tongue-resident populations of γδ T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD44(hi)TCRβ(+)CCR6(+) natural Th17 (nTh17) cells, but not by TCR-deficient innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) or NK cells. These cells function redundantly, as TCR-β(-/-) and TCR-δ(-/-) mice were both resistant to OPC. Whereas γδ T cells were previously shown to produce IL-17 during dermal candidiasis and are known to mediate host defense at mucosal surfaces, nTh17 cells are poorly understood. The oral nTh17 population expanded rapidly after OPC, exhibited high TCR-β clonal diversity, and was absent in Rag1(-/-), IL-7Rα(-/-), and germ-free mice. These findings indicate that nTh17 and γδ T cells, but not ILCs, are key mucosal sentinels that control oral pathogens. © 2014 Conti et al.

  4. In vitro activities of voriconazole (UK-109,496) against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans isolates from oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, M; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Trautmann, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Candida albicans to a new antifungal triazole, voriconazole (UK-109,496), was investigated in 105 isolates obtained from the oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to study this drug's activity against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates. MICs were determined by a broth microdilution technique according to document M27-T from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and by using a broth microdilution technique and a synthetic high-resolution medium. These antifungal susceptibility testing methods showed high levels of agreement (93% for fluconazole and 86% for voriconazole). Data from in vitro studies showed that voriconazole has good activity against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans isolates; the MICs at which 90% of all isolates were inhibited were 0.19 to 0.39 microgram/ml. We found that for isolates for which fluconazole MICs were high, voriconazole MICs were proportionally higher than those for fluconazole-susceptible C.albicans (P < 0.001). Pretreatment isolates from six patients with fluconazole-refractory esophageal candidiasis were included in the study. For these isolates the MICs were < or = 0.39 microgram/ml, and all patients responded to voriconazole. These results suggest that voriconazole is effective even in the treatment of fluconazole-refractory esophageal candidiasis and should be studied further to determine its clinical relevance in patients with HIV infection. PMID:9055995

  5. Purification and comparison of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in Candida albicans isolates from Malaysian and Iranian patients and infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, V; Shokri, H; Khosravi, A R; Akim, A; Amri Saroukolaei, S

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to purify and compare the concentration ratios of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in clinical isolates of Candida albicans (C. albicans) obtained from Malaysian and Iranian patients and infected mice. Hsp90 was extracted using glass beads and ultracentrifugation from yeast cells and purified by ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-cellulose) and followed by affinity chromatography (hydroxyapatite). Purity of Hsp90 was controlled by SDS-PAGE and its identification was realized by immunoblotting test. The graphs of ion exchange and affinity chromatography showed one peak in all C. albicans isolates obtained from both Malaysian and Iranian samples, infected mice and under high-thermal (42°C) and low-thermal (25°C) shock. In immunoblotting, the location of Hsp90 fragments was obtained around 47, 75 and 82kDa. The least average concentration ratios of Hsp90 were 0.350 and 0.240mg/g for Malaysian and Iranian isolates at 25°C, respectively, while the highest average concentration ratios of Hsp90 were 3.05 and 2.600mg/g for Malaysian and Iranian isolates at 42°C, respectively. There were differences in the ratio amount of Hsp90 between Malaysian isolates (1.01±0.07mg/g) and mice kidneys (1.23±0.28mg/g) as well as between Iranian isolates (0.70±0.19mg/g) and mice kidneys (1.00±0.28mg/g) (Pisolates, samples treated with temperatures (25°C or 42°C) and before and after infecting the mice (37°C), indicating higher virulent nature of this yeast species in high temperature in human and animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Phospholipase B enzyme expression is not associated with other virulence attributes in Candida albicans isolates from patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Y H; Dassanayake, R S; Jayatilake, J A M S; Cheung, B P K; Yau, J Y Y; Yeung, K W S; Samaranayake, L P

    2005-06-01

    The extracellular phospholipases of Candida albicans are considered to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of human infections. Therefore 30 clinical isolates of C. albicans from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals were screened for phospholipase production in vitro (using an egg-yolk-agar medium). Two groups of six isolates with positive (group A) or deficient (group B) phospholipase activity were then analysed for phospholipase B1 (PLB1) gene expression both in egg-yolk-agar and yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) broth media. A total of four virulence attributes of these two groups were in turn characterized, namely their germ-tube formation, cell-surface-hydrophobicity (CSH), adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (ABEC) and haemolysin production, and these factors were subsequently correlated with PLB1 expression. In the phospholipase-producing isolates (group A) a positive correlation was demonstrated between phospholipase production and the degree of PLB1 expression in YPD medium (r = 0.96, P medium. Further, PLB1 expression in egg-yolk agar was less than that in YPD medium, although a positive correlation was seen between the expression levels on regression analysis (r = 0.86, P = 0.026). Surprisingly, however, no significant associations were observed in either growth media between PLB1 expression and any of the four pathogenic attributes examined (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was seen between CSH and ABEC (r = 0.74) in group A isolates. The phospholipase-deficient group B, however, demonstrated a significant correlation between the latter parameters (r = +0.50) and also between germ-tube formation and ABEC (r = -0.59), and germ-tube formation and haemolysin production (r = +0.31). It appears that in oral C. albicans isolates in HIV infection there may be no significant association between the degree of PLB1 expression and other widely recognized major virulence attributes.

  7. A Case of Pyriform Sinus Fistula Infection with Double Tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Shino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyriform sinus fistula is a rare clinical entity and the precise origin remains controversial. The fistula is discovered among patients with acute suppurative thyroiditis or deep neck infection of the left side of the neck and is usually located in the left pyriform sinus. To the best of our knowledge, only a single tract has been reported to be responsible for pyriform sinus fistula infection. We present a case of a 13-year-old female patient with a pyriform sinus fistula that caused a deep infection of the left side of the neck and showed double-tract involvement discovered during surgical resection of the entire fistula. Both tracts arose around the pyriform sinus and terminated at the upper portion of the left lobe of the thyroid.

  8. Interplay between Candida albicans and the Mammalian Innate Host Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Chin; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kullberg, Bart-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is both the most common fungal commensal microorganism in healthy individuals and the major fungal pathogen causing high mortality in at-risk populations, especially immunocompromised patients. In this review, we summarize the interplay between the host innate system and C. albicans, ranging from how the host recognizes, responds, and clears C. albicans infection to how C. albicans evades, dampens, and escapes from host innate immunity. PMID:22252867

  9. Double gloving to reduce surgical cross-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J; Parkinson, H

    2006-07-19

    The invasive nature of surgery, with its increased exposure to blood, means that during surgery there is a high risk of transfer of pathogens. Pathogens can be transferred through contact between surgical patients and the surgical team, resulting in post-operative or blood borne infections in patients or blood borne infections in the surgical team. Both patients and the surgical team need to be protected from this risk. This risk can be reduced by implementing protective barriers such as wearing surgical gloves. Wearing two pairs of surgical gloves, triple gloves, glove liners or cloth outer gloves, as opposed to one pair, is considered to provide an additional barrier and further reduce the risk of contamination. The primary objective of this review was to determine if additional glove protection reduces the number of surgical site or blood borne infections in patients or the surgical team. The secondary objective was to determine if additional glove protection reduces the number of perforations to the innermost pair of surgical gloves. The innermost gloves (next to skin) compared with the outermost gloves are considered to be the last barrier between the patient and the surgical team. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (January 2006), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)(The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2005). We also contacted glove manufacturing companies and professional organisations. Randomised controlled trials involving: single gloving, double gloving, triple gloving, glove liners, knitted outer gloves, steel weave outer gloves and perforation indicator systems. Both authors independently assessed the relevance and quality of each trial. Data was extracted by one author and cross checked for accuracy by the second author. Two trials were found which addressed the primary outcome, namely, surgical site infections in patients. Both trials reported no infections. Thirty one randomised controlled trials

  10. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Issam; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-02-01

    To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent.

  11. Comparative Phenotypic Analysis of the Major Fungal Pathogens Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Linda M.; Schröder, Markus S.; Turner, Siobhán A.; Taff, Heather; Andes, David; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Gácser, Attila; Ames, Lauren; Haynes, Ken; Higgins, Desmond G.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans are human fungal pathogens that belong to the CTG clade in the Saccharomycotina. In contrast to C. albicans, relatively little is known about the virulence properties of C. parapsilosis, a pathogen particularly associated with infections of premature neonates. We describe here the construction of C. parapsilosis strains carrying double allele deletions of 100 transcription factors, protein kinases and species-specific genes. Two independent deletions were constructed for each target gene. Growth in >40 conditions was tested, including carbon source, temperature, and the presence of antifungal drugs. The phenotypes were compared to C. albicans strains with deletions of orthologous transcription factors. We found that many phenotypes are shared between the two species, such as the role of Upc2 as a regulator of azole resistance, and of CAP1 in the oxidative stress response. Others are unique to one species. For example, Cph2 plays a role in the hypoxic response in C. parapsilosis but not in C. albicans. We found extensive divergence between the biofilm regulators of the two species. We identified seven transcription factors and one protein kinase that are required for biofilm development in C. parapsilosis. Only three (Efg1, Bcr1 and Ace2) have similar effects on C. albicans biofilms, whereas Cph2, Czf1, Gzf3 and Ume6 have major roles in C. parapsilosis only. Two transcription factors (Brg1 and Tec1) with well-characterized roles in biofilm formation in C. albicans do not have the same function in C. parapsilosis. We also compared the transcription profile of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans biofilms. Our analysis suggests the processes shared between the two species are predominantly metabolic, and that Cph2 and Bcr1 are major biofilm regulators in C. parapsilosis. PMID:25233198

  12. Localization of extracellular matrix laminin and fibronectin in male rats infected by candida albicans, with the property expected as facilitator molecules and treated by pomegranate extract and nystatin as antifungal substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumolosasi, E.S.; Barlian, A.; Sukandar, E.Y.

    1998-12-16

    Candida albicans is one of the parasitic fungi that often infects the tissue's surface in human. Nystatin has been long known as the most potent antifungal drug. One of natural products, Punica granatum, was shown to have antifungal effect as the result of ten years' investigation. In this research, male rats that were infected by C. albicans orally for 24 hours were cured by P. granatum extract with a dose of 50 mg/200 g body weight and by Nystatin 9.10{sup 3} IU/200 g body weight. Fifteen hours later, the rats were sacrificed and the small intestines were prepared for histology with semithin sectioning method. Microscopic observations showed that the inflammation occurred in the small intestines of the infected rats without any medication. However, for the rats that were treated with P. granatum extract, the small intestine area was almost in the similar condition with nin-infected rats. The small intestine of the rats treated by Nystatin showed minor inflammation. The immunocytochemistry procedure in this research still need modification to be able to detect Laminin and Fibronectin and clarify their roles in the invasion of C. albicans. (author)

  13. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on C. albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions. PMID:26276374

  14. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on Candida albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Diverse double-stranded RNA viruses infecting fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most of reported fungal viruses (mycoviruses) have double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes. This may reflect the simple, easy method for mycovirus hunting that entails detection of dsRNAs as a sign of viral infections. There are an increasing number of screens of various fungi, particularly phytopathogenic fungi for viruses pathogenic to host fungi or able to confer hypovirulence to them. This bases on an attractive research field of biological control of fungal plant diseases using viruses (virocontrol), mainly targeting important phytopathogenic fungi. While isolated viruses usually induce asymptomatic symptoms, they show a considerably high level of diversity. As of 2014, fungal dsRNA viruses are classified into six families: Reoviridae, Totiviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, Megabirnaviridae and Quadriviridae. These exclude unassigned mycoviruses which will definitely be placed into distinct families and/or genera. In this review article, dsRNA viruses isolated from the kingdom Fungi including as-yet-unclassified taxa are overviewed. Some recent achievements in the related field are briefly introduced as well.

  16. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  17. Study the Effect of KSL-W on Inflammatory Response of Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Following Candida albicans Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    antimicrobial activity and could play a role in protection against the emergence of pathogenic microbiota . Scientists including Dr. Kai J Lung et al...tract, and vagina in human eings and domestic animals. This ubiquitous fungus is the most ommon cause of mucosal and invasive fungal infections

  18. Emerging azole resistance among Candida albicans from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated yeasts in clinical laboratories and accounts for up to 80 % of the yeasts recovered from sites of infection. The study was set out to determine antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to establish the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) to ...

  19. Efficacy of ferulic acid encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles against Candida albicans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Richa; Pemmaraju, Suma C; Sharma, Asvene K; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen is a major causative agent of superficial to systemic life-threating biofilm infections on indwelling medical devices. These biofilms acts as double edge swords owing to their resistance towards antibiotics and immunological barriers. To overcome this threat ferulic acid encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles (FA-CSNPs) were formulated to assess its efficacy as an antibiofilm agent against C. albicans. These FA-CSNPs were synthesized using ionotropic gelation method and observed through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and fluorescent microscopy. Assessment of successful encapsulation and stability of ferulic acid into chitosan nanoparticles was made using Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR), (1)H NMR and thermal analyses. Synthesized FA-CSNPs, were found to be cytocompatible, when tested using Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. XTT assay revealed that FA-CSNPs reduced the cell metabolic activity of C. albicans upto 22.5% as compared to native ferulic acid (63%) and unloaded CSNPs (88%) after 24 h incubation. Disruption of C. albicans biofilm architecture was visualized by FESEM. Results highlighted the potential of FA-CSNPs to be used as an effective alternative to the conventional antifungal therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of albicans vs. non-albicans candidemia in French intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia raises numerous therapeutic issues for intensive care physicians. Epidemiological data that could guide the choice of initial therapy are still required. This analysis sought to compare the characteristics of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species with those of ICU patients with candidemia due to Candida albicans. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter, French study was conducted from October 2005 to May 2006. Patients exhibiting candidemia developed during ICU stay and exclusively due either to one or more non-albicans Candida species or to C. albicans were selected. The data collected included patient characteristics on ICU admission and at the onset of candidemia. Results Among the 136 patients analyzed, 78 (57.4%) had candidemia caused by C. albicans. These patients had earlier onset of infection (11.1 ± 14.2 days after ICU admission vs. 17.4 ± 17.7, p = 0.02), higher severity scores on ICU admission (SOFA: 10.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 4.6, p = 0.03; SAPS II: 57.4 ± 22.8 vs. 48.7 ± 15.5, P = 0.015), and were less often neutropenic (2.6% vs. 12%, p = 0.04) than patients with candidemia due to non-albicans Candida species. Conclusions Although patients infected with Candida albicans differed from patients infected with non-albicans Candida species for a few characteristics, no clinical factor appeared pertinent enough to guide the choice of empirical antifungal therapy in ICU. PMID:20507569

  1. Immune response of gilts to single and double infection with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijangwad, Anchalee; Stott, Christopher James; Temeeyasen, Gun; Senasuthum, Raweewan; Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Tantituvanont, Angkana; Nilubol, Dachrit

    2017-07-01

    Immune response of gilts following single and double infection with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) at gilt acclimatization and prepartum were investigated. One hundred PEDV-naïve gilts were divided into two groups: negative (Neg) and feedback (FB) groups. Antibody responses in serum, colostrum, and milk samples were measured by IgG/IgA ELISA and virus neutralization assay (VN). Fecal shedding was investigated using RT-PCR. In summary, a single infection at gilt acclimatization resulted in slightly increased serum antibody titers as determined by VN assay and IgG ELISA, but not by IgA ELISA. Viral RNA was detected in fecal samples up to 6 days post-exposure. A double infection at prepartum resulted in significantly increased IgA and VN titers in milk samples compared to the single-infection group. No fecal shedding was detected following the double infection.

  2. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis.

  3. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  4. Undecylenic Acid Inhibits Morphogenesis of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    McLain, Nealoo; Ascanio, Rhoda; Baker, Carol; Strohaver, Robert A.; Dolan, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    Resilient liners are frequently used to treat denture stomatitis, a condition often associated with Candida albicans infections. Of 10 liners tested, 2 were found to inhibit the switch from the yeast form to hyphae and a third was found to stimulate this switch. The inhibitor was determined to be undecylenic acid.

  5. Undecylenic acid inhibits morphogenesis of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, N; Ascanio, R; Baker, C; Strohaver, R A; Dolan, J W

    2000-10-01

    Resilient liners are frequently used to treat denture stomatitis, a condition often associated with Candida albicans infections. Of 10 liners tested, 2 were found to inhibit the switch from the yeast form to hyphae and a third was found to stimulate this switch. The inhibitor was determined to be undecylenic acid.

  6. Alternative Candida albicans lifestyles: growth on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Carol A; Vinces, Marcelo D

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, causes a wide variety of human diseases such as oral thrush and disseminated candidiasis. Many aspects of C. albicans physiology have been studied during liquid growth, but in its natural environment, the gastrointestinal tract of a mammalian host, the organism associates with surfaces. Growth on a surface triggers several behaviors, such as biofilm formation, invasion, and thigmotropism, that are important for infection. Recent discoveries have identified factors that regulate these behaviors and revealed the importance of these behaviors for pathogenesis.

  7. Comparison of Adherence of Candida Albicans on Amalgam, Light Cure Composite and Glass Ionomer: an In vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Azizi A.; Falahati M.; Heshmat H.; Entezari N.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in the human oral cavity. 85% of this infection is caused by Candida albicans. Although there is considerable information about the adhesion of Candida albicans to the epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there are very few studies in regard to the adhesion of Candida albicans to various restorative dental materials.Purpose: This study aimed to compare the adhesion of Candida albicans to three restorative materials, a...

  8. Polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly (Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid and graphene oxide nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory and apoptotic responses in Candida albicans-infected vaginal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Doug Wagner

    Full Text Available Mucous-penetrating nanoparticles consisting of poly lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PEG could improve targeting of microbicidal drugs for sexually transmitted diseases by intravaginal inoculation. Nanoparticles can induce inflammatory responses, which may exacerbate the inflammation that occurs in the vaginal tracts of women with yeast infections. This study evaluated the effects of these drug-delivery nanoparticles on VK2(E6/E7 vaginal epithelial cell proinflammatory responses to Candida albicans yeast infections. Vaginal epithelial cell monolayers were infected with C. albicans and exposed to 100 μg/ml 49.5 nm PLGA-PEG nanospheres or 20 μg/ml 1.1 x 500 nm PEG-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PEG sheets. The cells were assessed for changes in mRNA and protein expression of inflammation-related genes by RT-qPCR and physiological markers of cell stress using high content analysis and flow cytometry. C. albicans exposure suppressed apoptotic gene expression, but induced oxidative stress in the cells. The nanomaterials induced cytotoxicity and programmed cell death responses alone and with C. albicans. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles induced mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes and induced poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, increased BAX/BCL2 ratios, and chromatin condensation indicative of apoptosis. They also induced autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and DNA damage. They caused the cells to excrete inflammatory recruitment molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1, interleukin-1α (IL1A, interleukin-1β (IL1B, calprotectin (S100A8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF. GO-PEG nanoparticles induced expression of necrosis-related genes and cytotoxicity. They reduced autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic gene expression responses. The results show that stealth nanoparticle drug-delivery vehicles may cause intracellular damage to vaginal epithelial cells by several mechanisms and that

  9. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  10. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Tati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC, we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  11. Candida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisation in C. dubliniensis. Comparative global gene expression analyses have also been used to investigate differences in the ability of the two species to tolerate environmental stress and to produce hyphae, two traits that are likely to play a role in the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, these data suggest that C. dubliniensis is in the process of undergoing reductive evolution and may have become adapted for growth in a specialized anatomic niche.

  12. Candida albicans Hyphae: From Growth Initiation to Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar V. Desai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a commensal resident of the human gastrointestinal and genital tracts. Under conditions such as dysbiosis, host immune perturbances, or the presence of catheters/implanted medical devices, the fungus may cause debilitating mucosal or fatal systemic infections. The ability of C. albicans to grow as long filamentous hyphae is critical for its pathogenic potential as it allows the fungus to invade the underlying substratum. In this brief review, I will outline the current understanding regarding the mechanistic regulation of hyphal growth and invasion in C. albicans.

  13. Interactions Between Candida albicans and Host Interações entre Candida albicans e Hospedeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane De Rossi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans can cause grave infections in patients who are immunocompromised by diseases, by surgery, or by immunesupresive therapy. The high levels of morbidity and mortality resulting from those infections in hospitalized patients show that C. albicans became a prominent human pathogen. Although the host immune system is the major factor balancing the transition from commensalisms to pathogenicity, several virulence attributes expressed by C. albicans, such as adhesion factors, phenotypic switching, dimorphic behavior, and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, might contribute to the persistence of colonization as well as the development of symptomatic episodes. Host defense against candidiasis relies mainly on the ingestion and elimination of C. albicans by phagocytic cells, which present receptors Toll-like 4, dectin–1 associated to receptors Toll-like2 and mannose receptors. The cytokine IL-10 (IL-10 produced by phagocytes has a crucial role on susceptibility of host fungal infection, whereas IL-10 produced by regulatory T cells is mainly responsible by commensalisms. In contrast, productions of tumour necrosis factor - α (TNF-α, interleukin–1 β (lL-1 β, (IL-6 and (Il-12 provided protective cell–mediated immunity. The interferon-γ produced by natural killer and TH1 cells stimulates migration of phagocytes and major efficacy on destruction of fungi. In epithelial cells from mucosas the NOD-like receptors and defensins-β cytoplasmatic prevent the translocation of C. albicans from microbiota to tissues, which are modulated by IL-1 β, Il-17 and Il-22 cytokines. to pathogenicity, several virulence attributes expressed by C. albicans, such as adhesion factors, phenotypic switching, dimorphic behavior, and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, might contribute to the persistence of colonization as well as the development of symptomatic episodes. Host defense against candidiasis relies mainly on the ingestion and elimination of C. albicans

  14. Manipulation of host diet to reduce gastrointestinal colonization by the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal ...

  15. The antibacterial agent, moxifloxacin inhibits virulence factors of Candida albicans through multitargeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Ashwini; Bansode, Bhagyashree; Phule, Datta; Shelar, Amruta; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, Wasudev; Kharat, Kiran; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2017-05-01

    Fluoroquinolines are broad spectrum fourth generation antibiotics. Some of the Fluoroquinolines exhibit antifungal activity. We are reporting the potential mechanism of action of a fluoroquinoline antibiotic, moxifloxacin on the growth, morphogenesis and biofilm formation of the human pathogen Candida albicans. Moxifloxacin was found to be Candidacidal in nature. Moxifloxacin seems to inhibit the yeast to Hyphal morphogenesis by affecting signaling pathways. It arrested the cell cycle of C. albicans at S phase. Docking of moxifloxacin with predicted structure of C. albicans DNA Topoisomerase II suggests that moxifloxacin may bind and inhibit the activity of DNA Topoisomerase II in C. albicans. Moxifloxacin could be used as a dual purpose antibiotic for treating mixed infections caused by bacteria as well as C. albicans. In addition chances of developing moxifloxacin resistance in C. albicans are less considering the fact that moxifloxacin may target multiple steps in yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans.

  16. Comparison of the hemolytic activity between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodnei Dennis Rossoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to produce enzymes, such as hemolysins, is an important virulence factor for the genus Candida.The objective of this study was to compare the hemolytic activity between C. albicansand non-albicans Candida species. Fifty strains of Candida species, isolated from the oral cavity of patients infected with HIV were studied. The isolates included the following species: C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. Hemolysin production was evaluated on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol, blood, and glucose. A loop-full of pure Candidaculture was spot-inoculated onto plates and incubated at 37ºC for 24 h in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Hemolytic activity was defined as the formation of a translucent halo around the colonies. All C. albicansstrains that were studied produced hemolysins. Among the non-albicans Candidaspecies, 86% exhibited hemolytic activity. Only C. guilliermondiiand some C. parapsilosis isolates were negative for this enzyme. In conclusion, most non-albicans Candidaspecies had a similar ability to produce hemolysins when compared to C. albicans.

  17. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  18. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael B; Salcedo, Eugenia C; Lohse, Matthew B; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R; Johnson, Alexander D; Craik, Charles S; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2016-09-13

    Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. albicans is a major cause of life-threatening infections. This work provides a global characterization of secreted proteolytic activity produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms. We identify activity from the proteases Sap5 and Sap6 as highly upregulated during C. albicans biofilm formation and develop Sap-cleavable fluorogenic substrates that enable the detection of biofilms from C. albicans and also

  19. Symbiotic Plant Peptides Eliminate Candida albicans Both In Vitro and in an Epithelial Infection Model and Inhibit the Proliferation of Immortalized Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilla Ördögh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of multidrug-resistant microbes now emerging necessitates the identification of novel antimicrobial agents. Plants produce a great variety of antimicrobial peptides including hundreds of small, nodule-specific cysteine-rich NCR peptides that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, govern the differentiation of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria and, in vitro, can display potent antibacterial activities. In this study, the potential candidacidal activity of 19 NCR peptides was investigated. Cationic NCR peptides having an isoelectric point above 9 were efficient in killing Candida albicans, one of the most common fungal pathogens of humans. None of the tested NCR peptides were toxic for immortalized human epithelial cells at concentrations that effectively killed the fungus; however, at higher concentrations, some of them inhibited the division of the cells. Furthermore, the cationic peptides successfully inhibited C. albicans induced human epithelial cell death in an in vitro coculture model. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cationic NCR peptides in the treatment of candidiasis.

  20. Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinases in virulence and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglik, Julian R; Challacombe, Stephen J; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis.

  1. Quercetin Sensitizes Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans To Induce Apoptotic Cell Death by Modulating Quorum Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B. N.; Upreti, D. K.; Singh, B. R.; Pandey, G.; Verma, S.; Roy, S.; Naqvi, A. H.; Rawat, A. K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC...

  2. Budding off: bringing functional genomics to Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew Z.

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are the most prevalent human fungal pathogens, with Candida albicans being the most clinically relevant species. Candida albicans resides as a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract but is a frequent cause of opportunistic mucosal and systemic infections. Investigation of C. albicans virulence has traditionally relied on candidate gene approaches, but recent advances in functional genomics have now facilitated global, unbiased studies of gene function. Such studies include comparative genomics (both between and within Candida species), analysis of total RNA expression, and regulation and delineation of protein–DNA interactions. Additionally, large collections of mutant strains have begun to aid systematic screening of clinically relevant phenotypes. Here, we will highlight the development of functional genomics in C. albicans and discuss the use of these approaches to addressing both commensalism and pathogenesis in this species. PMID:26424829

  3. Molecular genetic techniques for gene manipulation in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu-Rong; Yan, Lan; Lv, Quan-Zhen; Zhou, Mi; Sui, Xue; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen in humans due to its high frequency as an opportunistic and pathogenic fungus causing superficial as well as invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. An understanding of gene function in C. albicans is necessary to study the molecular basis of its pathogenesis, virulence and drug resistance. Several manipulation techniques have been used for investigation of gene function in C. albicans, including gene disruption, controlled gene expression, protein tagging, gene reintegration, and overexpression. In this review, the main cassettes containing selectable markers used for gene manipulation in C. albicans are summarized; the advantages and limitations of these cassettes are discussed concerning the influences on the target gene expression and the virulence of the mutant strains. PMID:24759671

  4. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  5. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  6. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32 P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  7. Cranberries vs antibiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: a randomized double-blind noninferiority trial in premenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle A. J.; ter Riet, Gerben; Nys, Sita; van der Wal, Willem M.; de Borgie, Corianne A. J. M.; de Reijke, Theo M.; Prins, Jan M.; Koeijers, Jeanne; Verbon, Annelies; Stobberingh, Ellen; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of uropathogens resistant to antimicrobial agents has stimulated interest in cranberries to prevent recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). In a double-blind, double-dummy noninferiority trial, 221 premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs were randomized to 12-month

  8. Double-stranded RNA viral infection of Trichomonas vaginalis (TVV1) in Iranian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaliha, Khadijeh; Masoumi-Asl, Hossein; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Tabatabaei, Azardokht; Naghdalipoor, Mehri

    2017-08-01

    The Totiviridae family includes a number of viruses that can infect protozoan parasites such as Leishmania and Giardia and fungi like Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis are also infected with one or more double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. In this study, the frequency of Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV1) was evaluated in Iranian isolates of T. vaginalis in Tehran, Iran. One thousand five hundred vaginal samples were collected from patients attending obstetrics and gynaecology hospitals associated with Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran from October 2015 to September 2016. Trichomonas vaginalis isolates were cultured in Diamond's modified medium. Nucleic acids were extracted using a DNA/RNA extraction kit and RT-PCR was performed. Among 1500 collected vaginal samples, 8 (0.53%) cases of T. vaginalis infection were found. Half (4/8) of the T. vaginalis positive cases were infected with TVV1. Phylogenetic mapping indicated that the Iranian isolates were most closely related to TVV1-OC5, TVV1-UR1. Iranian isolates of T. vaginalis were infected with TVV1. The frequency of viral infection (TVV1) in T. vaginalis isolates found in this study is higher than previously reported in Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Candida albicans septicemia in a premature infant successfully treated with oral fluconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodé, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Lars; Hjelt, K

    1992-01-01

    A premature male infant, birth-weight 1460 g, was treated successfully for a Candida albicans septicemia with orally administered fluconazole for 20 days. Dosage was 5 mg/kg/day. No side effects were seen. Fluconazole may present a major progress in treatment of invasive C. albicans infections in...... in neonatology....

  10. Candida albicans septicemia in a premature infant successfully treated with oral fluconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodé, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Lars; Hjelt, K

    1992-01-01

    A premature male infant, birth-weight 1460 g, was treated successfully for a Candida albicans septicemia with orally administered fluconazole for 20 days. Dosage was 5 mg/kg/day. No side effects were seen. Fluconazole may present a major progress in treatment of invasive C. albicans infections...

  11. Effectiveness of magnetic fluid hyperthermia against Candida albicans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Barbara; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Czernel, Grzegorz; Duluk, Tomasz; Marczuk, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated fungal pathogens causing opportunistic infections in humans. Targeted magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising method in thermal therapy facilitating selective heating of pathogen cells like C. albicans. In the paper, we used meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and functionalised anti-C. albicans immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to investigate the potential of MFH in combating C. albicans cells in vitro. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy it was found that synthesised MNPs exhibited superparamagnetic phenomena. On the basis of calorimetric experiments, the maximum SAR (specific absorption rate) was found and a proper concentration of MNPs was established to control the temperature. MFH based on both DMSA-coated MNPs and functionalised anti-C. albicans IMNPs was more effective in combating C. albicans cells in vitro than thermostat hyperthermia. Especially promising results were obtained using functionalised IMNPs, which eradicated most of the pathogen colonies at the temperature of 43 °C.

  12. Innate immunity to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kiyoura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is not a pathogen in healthy individuals, but can cause severe systemic candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has various virulence factors and activates the innate immune system. Specifically, C. albicans induces proinflammatory cytokine production in various cell types via many receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. This microorganism also promotes phagocytosis via CLRs on macrophages. In a previous study, we found that C. albicans induces the production of galectin-3, which is a known CLR that kills C. albicans. This review indicates that the use of mouthwash containing an antimicrobial peptide or protein might be a useful new oral care method for the prevention of oral candidiasis.

  13. Ertapenem-Containing Double-Carbapenem Therapy for Treatment of Infections Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cprek, Jessica B; Gallagher, Jason C

    2016-01-01

    We describe outcomes of patients with infections with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) who received ertapenem-containing double-carbapenem therapy (ECDCT). Clinical success was observed in 7/18 (39%) patients overall: bloodstream infections, 3/7 (43%); pneumonia, 1/5 (20%); intraabdominal infections, 0/2 (0%); urinary tract infections, 2/3 (67%); and a skin and skin structure infection, 1/1 (100%). Microbiologic success was observed in 11/14 (79%) evaluable patients; 5/18 (28%) patients died. ECDCT may be effective for CRKP infections with limited treatment options. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Epidemiology of Candida albicans and non-C.albicans of neonatal candidemia at a tertiary care hospital in western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinjian; Ding, Yanling; Wei, Ba; Wang, Lin; Xu, Shaolin; Qin, Peixu; Wei, Liuhua; Jiang, Lijun

    2017-05-06

    Although the majority of Candida infections occur in the developing world, candidemia epidemiology is poorly understood in these countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of non-Candida albicans (non-C. albicans) candidemia among neonates at Liuzhou Maternity and Child Healthcare Hospital in China. A retrospective review of all positive blood culture about Candida species in neonatal intensive care unit was conducted between January 2012 and November 2015. Information about demographics, risk factors and outcome of candidemia were collected. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify the risk factors associated with the development of non-C.albicans candidemia. The prevalence of candidemia in infants was 1.4%. Non-C.albicans was responsible for 56.5% of neonatal candidemia. The predisposing factors for development of non-C.albicans candidemia among infants included mechanical ventilation [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 3.13, 1.07-9.14; P = 0.037] and use of assisted reproductive technology (OR, 95%CI = 4.52, 1.39-14.77; P = 0.012). The overall mortality rate of candidemia was 8.7% and non-C.albicans attributed to 83.3% of all mortalities. Non-C.albicans species are the major cause of candidemia in local neonatal group. The study highlights the urgent needs to evaluate the possibility of development of non-C.albicans candidemia in neonates exposed to these risk factors and much emphasis must be laid on the early implementation of medical intervention to reduce the incidences of candidemia in neonates.

  15. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is considered as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. Acrylic dentures, acting as reservoirs, play an important role in increasing the risk from Candida colonisation. Thus, this review discusses what is currently known about the adhesion of non-albicans Candida species of oral origin to buccal epithelial cells and denture acrylics.

  16. Iron supplementation in HIV-infected Malawian children with anemia: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esan, Michael O.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Nkhoma, Ernest; Musicha, Crispin; White, Sarah A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Phiri, Kamija S.

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown whether iron supplementation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children living in regions with high infection pressure is safe or beneficial. A 2-arm, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the effects of iron supplementation on hemoglobin, HIV

  17. A novel immunocompetent murine model for Candida albicans-promoted oral epithelial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, P P; Mallya, S; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2009-03-01

    Candida albicans is a common opportunistic pathogen found in the oral mucosa. Clinical observations indicate a significant positive association between oral Candida carriage or infection and oral epithelial dysplasia/neoplasia. The aim of this study was to test whether C. albicans is able to promote epithelial dysplasia or carcinoma in a mouse model of infection where a carcinogen (4 Nitroquinoline 1-oxide [4NQO]) was used as initiator of neoplasia. Mice were divided into four groups: group 1 received 4NQO alone; group 2 received 4NQO followed by C. albicans (ATCC 90234); group 3 received vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by C. albicans and group 4 was untreated. Although 4NQO treated mice did not develop oral lesions, mice exposed to both 4NQO and C. albicans developed oral dysplastic lesions 19 weeks after exposure to 4NQO. Mice challenged with C. albicans only developed hyperplastic lesions. The expression of Ki-67 and p16, two cell-cycle associated proteins that are frequently deregulated in oral dysplasia/neoplasia, was also tested in these lesions. Ki-67 and p16 expression increased from normal to hyperplastic to dysplastic mucosa and was highest in the group exposed to both 4NQO and C. albicans. In conclusion, we showed that C. albicans plays a role in the promotion of oral dysplasia in a mouse model of infection when 4NQO was used as initiator of oral neoplasia.

  18. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humidah Alanazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P<0.01 sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P<0.01 resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P<0.01 slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers.

  19. Double vs single internal thoracic artery harvesting in diabetic patients: role in perioperative infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolari Alessandro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the role in the onset of surgical site infections of bilateral internal thoracic arteries harvesting in patients with decompensated preoperative glycemia. Methods 81 consecutive patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus underwent elective CABG harvesting single or double internal thoracic arteries. Single left ITA was harvested in 41 patients (Group 1, 50.6%, BITAs were harvested in 40 (Group 2, 49.4%. The major clinical end points analyzed in this study were infection rate, type of infection, duration of infection, infection relapse rate and total hospital length of stay. Results Five patients developed sternal SSI in the perioperative period, 2 in group 1 and 3 in group 2 without significant difference. All sternal SSIs were superficial with no sternal dehiscence. The development of infection from the time of surgery took 18.5 ± 2.1 and 7.3 ± 3.0 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. The infections were treated with wound irrigation and debridement, and with VAC therapy as well as with antibiotics. The VAC system was removed after a mean of 12.8 ± 5.1 days, when sterilization was achieved. The overall survival estimate at 1 year was 98.7%. Only BMI was a significant predictor of SSI using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis (Odds Ratio: 1.34; 95%Conficdence Interval: 1.02–1.83; p value: 0.04. In the model, the use of BITA was not an independent predictor of SSI. Conclusion CABG with bilateral pedicled ITAs grafting could be performed safely even in diabetics with poor preoperative glycaemic control.

  20. [Bacterial infections as seen from the eukaryotic genome: DNA double strand breaks, inflammation and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemercier, Claudie

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies report that infection by pathogenic bacteria alters the host genome, producing highly hazardous DNA double strand breaks for the eukaryotic cell. Even when DNA repair occurs, it often leaves "scars" on chromosomes that might generate genomic instability at the next cell division. Chronic intestinal inflammation promotes the expansion of genotoxic bacteria in the intestinal microbiote which in turn triggers tumor formation and colon carcinomas. Bacteria act at the level of the host DNA repair machinery. They also highjack the host cell cycle to allow themselves time for replication in an appropriate reservoir. However, except in the case of bacteria carrying the CDT nuclease, the molecular mechanisms responsible for DNA lesions are not well understood, even if reactive oxygen species released during infection make good candidates. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  1. Immune response to Candida albicans Resposta imune a Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Jabur Gaziri

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans causes infections of the skin, oral cavity and esophagus, gastrointestinal tract, vagina and vascular system. Most infections occur in immunocompromised hosts or debilitated patients. More than 90% of HIV positive patients suffer from mucosal candidiasis at least once in the course of this disease. The overall severity and chronicity of oral candidiasis in patients with AIDS are mainly attributed to the HIV-induced immune deficiency in the affected individuals, namely, the loss of T-helper cells and reduction in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. In mucosal colonization and systemic infections of mice by this fungus, Th1 cells mediate phagocyte-dependent protection, whose most important cytokines are IL-2, IFN-ã, TNF-á and IL-12. In contrast, production of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL- 10 by Th2 cells are associated with disactivation of phagocytes and disease progression. Possibly, the growth of filamentous forms is better adapted to evade the cells of the immune system, whereas the yeast form may be the mode of proliferation in infected tissues. By the discriminative production of IL- 12 or IL-4 in response to the yeast or filamentous forms respectively, dendritic cells acquire the capacity of inducing the differentiation of CD4+ cells towards the Th1 or Th2 phenotypes. Candida albicans causa infecções na pele, cavidade oral e esôfago, trato gastrointestinal, vagina e sistema vascular de humanos. As infecções ocorrem em hospedeiros imunocomprometidos ou pacientes debilitados. Acima de 90% dos pacientes HIV+ sofrem de candidíase de mucosas ao menos uma vez no decorrer da doença. A severidade e cronicidade da candidíase oral em pacientes com AIDS são atribuídas, principalmente, à imunodeficiência induzida pelo HIV nos indivíduos afetados, a saber, perda de funções de célula T auxiliar e redução do número de linfócitos T CD4. Na colonização de mucosas e infecções sistêmicas de camundongos por

  2. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook; Koh, Yoon-Woo; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Park, Jung-Mi

    2008-01-01

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  3. Model of experimental infection in healthy and immunosuppressed swiss albino mice (Mus musculus using Candida albicans strains with different patterns of enzymatic activity Modelo de infecção experimental em camundongos albino swiss (Mus musculus sadios e imunossuprimidos utilizando cepas de Candida albicans com diferentes padrões de atividade enzimática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme M. Chaves

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to evaluate Candida albicans virulence in vivo, two strains selected were based on their phospholipase and proteinase activity, and used in a model of experimental infection. One strain, isolated from vaginal secretion, was stocked at the URM Culture Collection for 43 years and presented high phospholipase (Pz=0.217 and proteinase (1.386 U.mL-1 activity. The other strain was a fresh strain isolated from oropharyngeal secretion of an AIDS patient, and presented low phospholipase (Pz=0.482 and proteinase (0.780 U.mL-1 activity. The strains were inoculated via intraperitoneum in immunosuppressed and non-immunosuppressed mice (Mus musculus and the infection was evaluated over a period of 21 days. Liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys were aseptically removed and the blood of the animals was collected every 72 h. The number of colony forming units (c.f.u isolated from each organ was counted and a histopathologic examination was performed. The freshly isolated strain was more virulent than the stocked strain, as shown by the number of positive cultures and severity of the lesions observed at the histopathologic examination. A correlation between the in vitro enzymatic activity and the in vivo virulence was not observed.Com o objetivo de avaliar a virulência de Candida albicans in vivo, foram selecionadas duas cepas de acordo com a atividade enzimática de fosfolipase e protease, para utilização em modelo de infecção experimental. Utilizou-se um isolado de secreção vaginal, estocado na Micoteca URM por 43 anos com alta atividade de fosfolipase (Pz=0.217 e de protease (1.386 U.mL-1, e outro recém-isolado de secreção orofaríngea de paciente com AIDS, o qual apresentou baixa atividade de fosfolipase (Pz=0.482 e de protease (0.780 U.mL-1. As amostras foram inoculadas por via intra-peritoneal em camundongos (Mus musculus na presença e ausência de imunossupressão e a infecção foi avaliada durante 21 dias. A cada 72 h foram

  4. Hyphal content determines the compression strength of Candida albicans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paramonova, Ekaterina; Krom, Bastiaan P.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated human fungal pathogen among species causing biofilm-related clinical infections. Mechanical properties of Candida biofilms have hitherto been given no attention, despite the fact that mechanical properties are important for selection of treatment or

  5. Functional genomics identifies type I interferon pathway as central for host defense against Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, Sanne P.; Ng, Aylwin; Kumar, Vinod; Johnson, Melissa D.; Plantinga, Theo S.; van Diemen, Cleo; Arts, Peer; Verwiel, Eugene T. P.; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Fransen, Karin; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Oosting, Marije; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Hoischen, Alexander; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Scott, William K.; Perfect, John R.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen causing mucosal and systemic infections. However, human antifungal immunity remains poorly defined. Here by integrating transcriptional analysis and functional genomics, we identified Candida-specific host defence mechanisms in humans.

  6. Differentiation between Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis using hypertonic Sabouraud broth and tobacco agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Silveira-Gomes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised hosts are caused by Candida species, and the majority of such infections are due to Candida albicans. However, the emerging pathogen Candida dubliniensis demonstrates several phenotypic characteristics in common with C. albicans, such as production of germ tubes and chlamydospores, calling attention to the development of stable resistance to fluconazole in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of biochemistry identification in the differentiating between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, by phenotyping of yeast identified as C. albicans. METHODS: Seventy-nine isolates identified as C. albicans by the API system ID 32C were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar at 30°C for 24-48h and then inoculated on hypertonic Sabouraud broth and tobacco agar. RESULTS: Our results showed that 17 (21.5% isolates were growth-inhibited on hypertonic Sabouraud broth, a phenotypic trait inconsistent with C. albicans in this medium. However, the results observed on tobacco agar showed that only 9 (11.4% of the growth-inhibited isolates produced characteristic colonies of C. dubliniensis (rough colonies, yellowish-brown with abundant fragments of hyphae and chlamydospores. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that this method is a simple tool for screening C. albicans and non-albicans yeast and for verification of automated identification.

  7. Differentiation between Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis using hypertonic Sabouraud broth and tobacco agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Gomes, Fabíola; Sarmento, Dayse Nogueira; Espírito-Santo, Elaine Patrícia Tavares do; Souza, Nádia de Oliveira; Pinto, Thifany Mendes; Marques-da-Silva, Silvia Helena

    2011-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised hosts are caused by Candida species, and the majority of such infections are due to Candida albicans. However, the emerging pathogen Candida dubliniensis demonstrates several phenotypic characteristics in common with C. albicans, such as production of germ tubes and chlamydospores, calling attention to the development of stable resistance to fluconazole in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of biochemistry identification in the differentiating between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, by phenotyping of yeast identified as C. albicans. Seventy-nine isolates identified as C. albicans by the API system ID 32C were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar at 30°C for 24-48h and then inoculated on hypertonic Sabouraud broth and tobacco agar. Our results showed that 17 (21.5%) isolates were growth-inhibited on hypertonic Sabouraud broth, a phenotypic trait inconsistent with C. albicans in this medium. However, the results observed on tobacco agar showed that only 9 (11.4%) of the growth-inhibited isolates produced characteristic colonies of C. dubliniensis (rough colonies, yellowish-brown with abundant fragments of hyphae and chlamydospores). The results suggest that this method is a simple tool for screening C. albicans and non-albicans yeast and for verification of automated identification.

  8. Azithromycin in Labor Lowers Clinical Infections in Mothers and Newborns: A Double-Blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwalana, Claire; Camara, Bully; Bottomley, Christian; Goodier, Sean; Bojang, Abdoulie; Kampmann, Beate; Ceesay, Samba; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Roca, Anna

    2017-02-01

    We have recently completed a proof-of-concept trial showing that bacterial colonization decreased in women and newborns after the administration of azithromycin during labor. Here, we aim to assess the effect of the intervention on maternal and neonatal clinical infections. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Gambian women in labor were given either an oral dose of azithromycin (2 g) or placebo. Follow-up was conducted for 8 weeks after delivery. From April 2013 to April 2014, we recruited 829 mothers and their 830 newborns. Sixteen infants died during the follow-up period (8 per arm). No maternal deaths or serious adverse events related to the intervention were reported. Maternal infections were lower in the azithromycin group (3.6% vs 9.2%; relative risk [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.71; P = .002), as was the prevalence of mastitis (1.4% vs 5.1%; RR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.70; P = .005) and fever (1.9% vs 5.8%; RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.15-0.74; P = .006). Among newborns, the overall prevalence of infections was also lower in the azithromycin group (18.1% vs 23.8%; RR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58-0.99; P = .052) and there was a marked difference in prevalence of skin infections (3.1% vs 6.4%; RR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.93; P = .034). Azithromycin given to women in labor decreases infections in both women and newborns during the puerperal period. Larger studies designed to evaluate the effect of the intervention on severe morbidity and mortality are warranted. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Arachidonic acid affects biofilm formation and PGE2 level in Candida albicans and non-albicans species in presence of subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Ali, Shakir; Shukla, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans utilizes arachidonic acid (AA) released during the course of infection (Candidiasis) from phospholipids of infected host cell membranes and synthesizes extracellular prostaglandin(s) which play an important role in hyphae formation and host cell damage. C. albicans biofilms secrete significantly more prostaglandin(s) and evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to majority of antifungal drugs. AA influences the saturation level of lipids and fluidity of yeast cell membranes. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AA alone or in combination with antifungal agents on biofilm formation and production of prostaglandin (PGE2) in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans amphotericin B resistant strain (AmBR). Maximum biofilm formation was found to be in the case of C. albicans compared to C. non-albicans species. However, among the non-albicans species C. tropicalis exhibited highest biofilm formation. Treatment with AA in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and terbinafine separately exhibited significant (p<0.05) reduction in biofilm formation against C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and AmBR as compared to their individual effect. Further, these two antifungal agents in combination with AA caused an increase in production of prostaglandin from fungal cell itself which was significant (p<0.05) in case of all the strains tested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. White-opaque Switching in Different Mating Type-like Locus Gene Types of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Min; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Tanaka, Reiko; Li, Ruo-Yu; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans (C. albicans) can become a pathogen causing superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Many phenotypic attributes contribute to its capacity to colonize human organs. In our study, 93 C. albicans isolates from patients of various candidiasis in a hospital of China were surveyed. We aimed to investigate the white-opaque (WO) switching competence, drug sensitivity, and virulence of mating type-like (MTL) a/α isolates. Methods: Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene and the MTL configuration were detected in all the isolates by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. White/opaque phenotype and doubling time of cell growth were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agent were measured using broth microdilution method. Results: Sixty-four isolates (69.6%) were classified to serotype A, 19 (20.6%) to serotype B, and 9 (9.8%) to serotype C. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates were divided into four different subgroups of ITS genotypes. Most of our clinical isolates were MTLa/α type, while 6.8% remained MTLa or MTLα type. The frequency of opaque phenotype was 71.0% (66 isolates). Following the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3, all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin and a few (0.6–3.2%) of them showed resistance against amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. Conclusions: From these analyses, there were comparatively more C. albicans strains classified into serotype B, and the frequency of opaque phase strains was significant in the clinical isolates from China. Genetic, phenotypic, or drug susceptibility patterns were not significantly different from previous studies. MTLa/α isolates could also undergo WO switching which facilitates their survival. PMID:27824006

  11. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  12. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, Thabiso E.; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H.; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties. PMID:28277904

  13. Psd1 Effects on Candida albicans Planktonic Cells and Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Silva, Patrícia M; Felício, Mário R; de Medeiros, Luciano N; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Santos, Nuno C

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important human pathogen, causing opportunistic infections. The adhesion of planktonic cells to a substrate is the first step for biofilm development. The antimicrobial peptide (AMP) Ps d1 is a defensin isolated from Pisum sativum seeds. We tested the effects of this AMP on C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, comparing its activity with amphotericin B and fluconazole. Three C. albicans variants were studied, one of them a mutant deficient in glucosylceramide synthase, conferring resistance to Ps d1 antifungal action. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to assess morphological and biomechanical changes on fungal cells. Surface alterations, with membrane disruption and leakage of cellular contents, were observed. Cytometry assays and confocal microscopy imaging showed that Ps d1 causes cell death, in a time and concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate Ps d1 pleiotropic action against a relevant fungal human pathogen, suggesting its use as natural antimycotic agent.

  14. [Adhesion of clinical Candida albicans isolate to buccal epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A

    1999-01-01

    Mucosal adherence and germ tube formation are considered to be important virulence factors of C. albicans. Adherence is a precondition for colonisation and invasion. We investigated 11 clinical isolates (among them 5 cases recovered from oesophageal thrush) for quantification of the two characteristics and correlated the results with clinical data. Adherence was measured on buccal epithelial cells and the continuous flow culture was used for quantification of germ tube formation. Adherence of strains recovered from clinically, culturally and serologically confirmed oesophageal thrush adhered stronger to buccal epithelial cells than isolates from patients with heavy colonisation without signs of candidosis. Strains with stronger adherence showed a significantly faster and an increased germ tube formation in the continuous flow culture. Strains from oesophageal thrush therefore show a more marked expression of the investigated virulence factors. Therefore a good adherence is a necessity for infection of the oesophagus by C. albicans. The preferential isolation of C. albicans from oesophageal thrush (> 90%) supports this assumption.

  15. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  16. Functional Genomic Analysis of Candida albicans Adherence Reveals a Key Role for the Arp2/3 Complex in Cell Wall Remodelling and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason A; Robbins, Nicole; Xie, Jinglin L; Ketela, Troy; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-11-01

    Fungal biofilms are complex, structured communities that can form on surfaces such as catheters and other indwelling medical devices. Biofilms are of particular concern with Candida albicans, one of the leading opportunistic fungal pathogens of humans. C. albicans biofilms include yeast and filamentous cells that are surrounded by an extracellular matrix, and they are intrinsically resistant to antifungal drugs such that resolving biofilm infections often requires surgery to remove the contaminated device. C. albicans biofilms form through a regulated process of adhesion to surfaces, filamentation, maturation, and ultimately dispersion. To uncover new strategies to block the initial stages of biofilm formation, we utilized a functional genomic approach to identify genes that modulate C. albicans adherence. We screened a library of 1,481 double barcoded doxycycline-repressible conditional gene expression strains covering ~25% of the C. albicans genome. We identified five genes for which transcriptional repression impaired adherence, including: ARC18, PMT1, MNN9, SPT7, and orf19.831. The most severe adherence defect was observed upon transcriptional repression of ARC18, which encodes a member of the Arp2/3 complex that is involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. Depletion of components of the Arp2/3 complex not only impaired adherence, but also caused reduced biofilm formation, increased cell surface hydrophobicity, and increased exposure of cell wall chitin and β-glucans. Reduced function of the Arp2/3 complex led to impaired cell wall integrity and activation of Rho1-mediated cell wall stress responses, thereby causing cell wall remodelling and reduced adherence. Thus, we identify important functional relationships between cell wall stress responses and a novel mechanism that controls adherence and biofilm formation, thereby illuminating novel strategies to cripple a leading fungal pathogen of humans.

  17. A double-stranded RNA as the genome of a potential virus infecting Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weixia; Chen, Jishuang

    2009-08-01

    Preparations of double-stranded (ds) RNAs extracted from naturally infected Vicia faba Linn. growing in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, Eastern China displayed 3 dominant bands (FaR1, FaR2, and FaR3). FaR2 and FaR3 were found to be identical to the genomic dsRNAs of a recently reported Vicia cryptic virus (VCV). The positive strand of FaR1 contained two large open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs were found to have certain similarities to the putative capsid protein [ABO36237] and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [ABC96788], respectively, of Tomato yellow stunt virus. Thus, FaR1 may represent the genome of a new dsRNA virus, which we have named Vicia cryptic virus M.

  18. CHRONIC HEPATITIS WITH DOUBLE B/C INFECTION: VIROLOGICAL, CLINICAL, MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudanova, O P; Shubina, M E; Belavina, I A; Elpaeva, E A; Pisareva, M M; Grudinin, M P; Kiselev, O I

    To estimate the r, virological and clinical characteristics of chronic viral hepatitis (CVH) with double B/C infection. We examined 282 patients with CVH. Genomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were studied by PCR in blood and liver (AmpliSens HBV and Amplisens HCV Russia), nuclear proteins (HBcorAg HBV and NS3 HCV) were determined by immunohistochemical method (Novocastra, UK), HBVgenome was sequenced by the Sanger method using ABI prism BigDye Terminator v3.1 kits and ABIPRISM 3100 analyzer (AppliedBiosystems, USA). Indices of histological activity (HAI), fibrosis, and portal vein (PV) congestion index (CI) were calculated by formula CI=SBB/LB V where S is P V cross section area in cm2 and LB V - linear blood flow velocity in cm/s (Vivid Pro- 7 apparatus, USA). CVH with double B/C infection was diagnosed in 85 (30.1%) patients including 44.7% with viral genomes and proteins in the live; 42.4% with HCVviremia, and 12.9% with HBJV/HCVviremia. Maximum CVH activity was documented in patients with latent HBV/HCVviremia (ALT 157.2±59.2 U/, HAI 11.6±1.3,fibrosis 2.8±0.7, C1 0.059±0.005); it was minimal inpatients.without viremia (Alt 76.25±63.0 U/I, HAI 6.7+-0.6,fibrosis 1.7±0.5, CI 0.042±0.001;p inflamation,fibrosis, and PV congestion was associated with HBV/HCV viremia and the lowest with intrahepatic localization of both viruses.

  19. Development and regulation of single- and multi-species Candida albicans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Gulati, Megha; Johnson, Alexander D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota and asymptomatically colonizes healthy individuals. However, it is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe, and often fatal, bloodstream infections. The medical impact of C. albicans typically depends on its ability to form biofilms, which are closely packed communities of cells that attach to surfaces, such as tissues and implanted medical devices. In this Review, we provide an overview of the processes involved in the formation of C. albicans biofilms and discuss the core transcriptional network that regulates biofilm development. We also consider some of the advantages that biofilms provide to C. albicans in comparison with planktonic growth and explore polymicrobial biofilms that are formed by C. albicans and certain bacterial species. PMID:29062072

  20. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known,...

  1. The effect of squalene on inflammation factors induced by candida albicans in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Haeng [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In the present study, whether squalene treatment relives inflammatory reactions induced by Candida albicans was checked. The experiment was conducted in vivo using seven experimental animals (ICR mice) per experimental group. Among C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were observed using the ELISA kits method. Through the experiment, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. In the group infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing NO generation in renal tissues both on the 1st and 3rd days (p < 0.05). 2. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing TNF-α generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). 3. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing IL-6 generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). In conclusion, it could be seen that for squalene to suppress C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, preemptively supplying SQ should be effective. Therefore, effects for recovery from C. albicans-induced immunodepression can be expected from SQ treatment.

  2. The effect of squalene on inflammation factors induced by candida albicans in vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Haeng

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, whether squalene treatment relives inflammatory reactions induced by Candida albicans was checked. The experiment was conducted in vivo using seven experimental animals (ICR mice) per experimental group. Among C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were observed using the ELISA kits method. Through the experiment, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. In the group infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing NO generation in renal tissues both on the 1st and 3rd days (p < 0.05). 2. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing TNF-α generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). 3. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing IL-6 generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). In conclusion, it could be seen that for squalene to suppress C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, preemptively supplying SQ should be effective. Therefore, effects for recovery from C. albicans-induced immunodepression can be expected from SQ treatment

  3. Adherence of yeast and filamentous forms of Candida albicans to cultured enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Stephen M; Bendel, Catherine M; Hess, Donavon J; Erlandsen, Stanley L; Wells, Carol L

    2002-03-01

    Systemic candidiasis is a major cause of complicating infections in intensive care units. Morbidity and mortality are high, even in those who receive appropriate antifungal therapy. Because the intestinal tract is considered a major portal of entry for systemic candidiasis, experiments were designed to clarify the ability of yeast and filamentous forms, as well as the INT1 gene product, to influence adherence of Candida albicans to the intestinal epithelium. Controlled. University teaching hospital research laboratory. Mature Caco-2 and HT-29 cultured enterocytes. C. albicans INT1 mutant strains, defective in filament production, were used to observe the ultrastructural surface interactions of C. albicans with cultured intestinal epithelial cells, namely Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. These mutant strains also were used to quantify the effect of the INT1 gene product on C. albicans adherence (yeast and filamentous forms) to cultured enterocytes. Ultrastructural surface interactions of C. albicans with cultured enterocytes were observed with high resolution scanning electron microscopy. C. albicans adherence to cultured enterocytes was quantified by using a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both yeast and filamentous forms of C. albicans appeared tightly adherent to the apical surface of cultured enterocytes, and INT1 appeared to have little, if any, effect on these ultrastructural surface interactions. The distal ends of C. albicans filaments appeared to mediate adherence to enterocyte apical microvilli, and thigmotropism (contact guidance) appeared to play a role in C. albicans adherence. The absence of functional INT1 was associated with decreased adherence of C. albicans yeast forms to cultured enterocytes. Although functional INT1 appeared to facilitate adherence of C. albicans yeast forms to cultured enterocytes, the role of INT1 in adherence of filamentous forms was unclear, and both yeast and filamentous forms could adhere to, and perhaps invade, the

  4. A novel immune evasion strategy of candida albicans: proteolytic cleavage of a salivary antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy F Meiller

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal candidiasis is an opportunistic infection considered to be a harbinger of AIDS. The etiologic agent Candida albicans is a fungal species commonly colonizing human mucosal surfaces. However, under conditions of immune dysfunction, colonizing C. albicans can become an opportunistic pathogen causing superficial or even life-threatening infections. The reasons behind this transition, however, are not clear. In the oral cavity, salivary antimicrobial peptides are considered to be an important part of the host innate defense system in the prevention of microbial colonization. Histatin-5 specifically has exhibited potent activity against C. albicans. Our previous studies have shown histatin-5 levels to be significantly reduced in the saliva of HIV+ individuals, indicating an important role for histatin-5 in keeping C. albicans in its commensal stage. The versatility in the pathogenic potential of C. albicans is the result of its ability to adapt through the regulation of virulence determinants, most notably of which are proteolytic enzymes (Saps, involved in tissue degradation. In this study, we show that C. albicans cells efficiently and rapidly degrade histatin-5, resulting in loss of its anti-candidal potency. In addition, we demonstrate that this cellular activity is due to proteolysis by a member of the secreted aspartic proteases (Sap family involved in C. albicans pathogenesis. Specifically, the proteolysis was attributed to Sap9, in turn identifying histatin-5 as the first host-specific substrate for that isoenzyme. These findings demonstrate for the first time the ability of a specific C. albicans enzyme to degrade and deactivate a host antimicrobial peptide involved in the protection of the oral mucosa against C. albicans, thereby providing new insights into the factors directing the transition of C. albicans from commensal to pathogen, with important clinical implications for alternative therapy. This report characterizes the

  5. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  6. Inhibitors of the glyoxylate cycle enzyme ICL1 in Candida albicans for potential use as antifungal agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Leong Cheah

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes candidiasis in humans. In recent years, metabolic pathways in C. albicans have been explored as potential antifungal targets to treat candidiasis. The glyoxylate cycle, which enables C. albicans to survive in nutrient-limited host niches and its. Key enzymes (e.g., isocitrate lyase (ICL1, are particularly attractive antifungal targets for C. albicans. In this study, we used a new screening approach that better reflects the physiological environment that C. albicans cells experience during infection to identify potential inhibitors of ICL. Three compounds (caffeic acid (CAFF, rosmarinic acid (ROS, and apigenin (API were found to have antifungal activity against C. albicans when tested under glucose-depleted conditions. We further confirmed the inhibitory potential of these compounds against ICL using the ICL enzyme assay. Lastly, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these compounds using Lipinski's rule-of-five and ADMET analysis.

  7. Prevalence of candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesion of early childhood caries (ECC) according to sampling site

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Sefidgar, Seyed Ali Asghar; Eyzadian, Haniyeh; Gharakhani, Samaneh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans may have cariogenic potential but its role in caries etiology has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine candida albicans in supragingival dental plaque and infected dentine of cervical and proximal in early childhood caries (ECC).

  8. The role of micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans) in the pathogenesis of breast pain and infection in lactating women: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Cullinane, Meabh; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Donath, Susan M; Bennett, Catherine M; Cooklin, Amanda R; Fisher, Jane R W; Payne, Matthew S

    2011-07-22

    The CASTLE (Candida and Staphylococcus Transmission: Longitudinal Evaluation) study will investigate the micro-organisms involved in the development of mastitis and "breast thrush" among breastfeeding women. To date, the organism(s) associated with the development of breast thrush have not been identified. The CASTLE study will also investigate the impact of physical health problems and breastfeeding problems on maternal psychological health in the early postpartum period. The CASTLE study is a longitudinal descriptive study designed to investigate the role of Staphylococcus spp (species) and Candida spp in breast pain and infection among lactating women, and to describe the transmission dynamics of S. aureus and Candida spp between mother and infant. The relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum health problems as well as maternal psychological well-being is also being investigated. A prospective cohort of four hundred nulliparous women who are at least thirty six weeks gestation pregnant are being recruited from two hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (November 2009 to June 2011). At recruitment, nasal, nipple (both breasts) and vaginal swabs are taken and participants complete a questionnaire asking about previous known staphylococcal and candidal infections. Following the birth, participants are followed-up six times: in hospital and then at home weekly until four weeks postpartum. Participants complete a questionnaire at each time points to collect information about breastfeeding problems and postpartum health problems. Nasal and nipple swabs and breast milk samples are collected from the mother. Oral and nasal swabs are collected from the baby. A telephone interview is conducted at eight weeks postpartum to collect information about postpartum health problems and breastfeeding problems, such as mastitis and nipple and breast pain. This study is the first longitudinal study of the role of both staphylococcal and candidal colonisation in breast infections

  9. The role of micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans in the pathogenesis of breast pain and infection in lactating women: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabrizi Sepehr N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CASTLE (Candida and Staphylococcus Transmission: Longitudinal Evaluation study will investigate the micro-organisms involved in the development of mastitis and "breast thrush" among breastfeeding women. To date, the organism(s associated with the development of breast thrush have not been identified. The CASTLE study will also investigate the impact of physical health problems and breastfeeding problems on maternal psychological health in the early postpartum period. Methods/Design The CASTLE study is a longitudinal descriptive study designed to investigate the role of Staphylococcus spp (species and Candida spp in breast pain and infection among lactating women, and to describe the transmission dynamics of S. aureus and Candida spp between mother and infant. The relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum health problems as well as maternal psychological well-being is also being investigated. A prospective cohort of four hundred nulliparous women who are at least thirty six weeks gestation pregnant are being recruited from two hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (November 2009 to June 2011. At recruitment, nasal, nipple (both breasts and vaginal swabs are taken and participants complete a questionnaire asking about previous known staphylococcal and candidal infections. Following the birth, participants are followed-up six times: in hospital and then at home weekly until four weeks postpartum. Participants complete a questionnaire at each time points to collect information about breastfeeding problems and postpartum health problems. Nasal and nipple swabs and breast milk samples are collected from the mother. Oral and nasal swabs are collected from the baby. A telephone interview is conducted at eight weeks postpartum to collect information about postpartum health problems and breastfeeding problems, such as mastitis and nipple and breast pain. Discussion This study is the first longitudinal study of the role of both

  10. Factors supporting cysteine tolerance and sulfite production in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity.

  11. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  12. Iron-dependency of biological properties of Candida albicans

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    V. V. Leonov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candidal infections occur in individuals with humoral or cell immunity deficiency. Any disorders of iron metabolism promote immune deficiency and abnormal sensitivity to infections. Potential modification of biological properties of Candida spp. in disorders of iron metabolism has not been discussed. Aim: To clarify the effects of iron metabolism disorders on the modification of biological properties of C.  albicans. Materials and methods: Growth kinetics of reference strain (24433 АТСС and clinical isolates of C.  albicans (n=20 depending on the concentration of Fe2+ ions in the broth and serum of blood donors with various types of iron metabolism (n=2 was studied by turbidimetry. We also assessed the expression of the adhesion gen (als3, hemolytic phospholipase C genes (plb1, plb2, plс and aspartic protease gene (sap1 in serum of donors with various iron levels. Results: Growth parameters of all C. albicans strains studied depends on the iron levels in the medium. The calculated constant of affinity to Fe2+ (Ks for C. albicans strains was in the range from 179.5 to 1863.3 μM. Clinical isolates are more iron-dependent (179.5albicans and is associated with overexpression of all virulence genes studied. Incubation of C.  albicans with iron-deficient and iron-loaded sera results in an increase in the growth rate up to 0.017 h-1 and 0.012 h-1, respectively, but is associated with a  reduction in expression of the major virulence genes. Conclusion: Biological properties of C. albicans are modified depending on the iron metabolism of the host. In those with normal iron metabolism, immune system suppresses Candida growth. Excess iron levels may promote candidiasis, whereas in iron

  13. Candida albicans Carriage in Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC and Maternal Relatedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xiao

    with C. albicans wild-type strain SC5314. Interestingly, the regression analysis showed that factors such as antibiotic usage, birth weight, inhaler use, brushing frequency, and daycare attendance had no significant effect on the oral carriage of C. albicans in the S-ECC children.Our results reveal that both the child with S-ECC and the mother were highly infected with C. albicans, while most of the strains were genetically related, suggesting that the mother might be a source for C. albicans acquisition in the oral cavity of children affected by the disease.

  14. Candida albicans Carriage in Children with Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC) and Maternal Relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Moon, Yonghwi; Li, Lihua; Rustchenko, Elena; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Feng, Changyong; Gill, Steven R; McLaren, Sean; Malmstrom, Hans; Ren, Yanfang; Quivey, Robert; Koo, Hyun; Kopycka-Kedzierawski, Dorota T

    2016-01-01

    . albicans wild-type strain SC5314. Interestingly, the regression analysis showed that factors such as antibiotic usage, birth weight, inhaler use, brushing frequency, and daycare attendance had no significant effect on the oral carriage of C. albicans in the S-ECC children. Our results reveal that both the child with S-ECC and the mother were highly infected with C. albicans, while most of the strains were genetically related, suggesting that the mother might be a source for C. albicans acquisition in the oral cavity of children affected by the disease.

  15. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  16. [The effects of an aroma candy on oral Candida albicans colony-forming units (CFU) and oral hygiene states in healthy elderly carrying Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Ezawa, Kunio; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Taiji; Kishi, Akinobu; Satou, Nobuya; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    In a preceding paper, we showed that aroma candy containing oligonol, capric acid, and cinnamon (cassia) powder had potent inhibitory activity against mycelial growth of Candida albicans in vitro and protective activity against murine oral candidiasis. In order to assess the effects of this candy (the test candy) on oral C. albicans colony-forming units (CFU) and oral hygiene states, a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover comparative study was performed. Twenty subjects were divided into two groups. One group ingested the test candy in the first 7 days followed by 2 weeks washing-off period, then ingested the placebo candy (control candy) for 7 days. The other group was vice versa. C. albicans CFU in all oral rinse samples from the subjects before and after 7 days ingestion of candy was measured. The degree of oral malodor in all subjects was monitored using a portable measuring instrument. The results showed no statistically significant difference between test-candy group and placebo group for C. albicans CFU. However, C. albicans CFU in test-candy group with>4,000 CFUs was significantly decreased after 7 days ingestion of test-candy (poral malodor in the test-candy group was significantly decreased after 7 days ingestion of test-candy (poral hygiene states indicated that in the test-candy group, oral malodor, glutinous feeling, and refreshing feeling significantly improved in comparison with control-candy group (poral health care of elderly carrying C. albicans.

  17. Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 inhibits adhesion of Candida albicans by interacting with yeast cell-wall carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Wen Tsai

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the major fungal pathogen of humans. Fungal adhesion to host cells is the first step of mucosal infiltration. Antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the initial mucosal defense against C. albicans infection. LL-37 is the only member of the human cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides and is commonly expressed in various tissues and cells, including epithelial cells of both the oral cavity and urogenital tract. We found that, at sufficiently low concentrations that do not kill the fungus, LL-37 was still able to reduce C. albicans infectivity by inhibiting C. albicans adhesion to plastic surfaces, oral epidermoid OECM-1 cells, and urinary bladders of female BALB/c mice. Moreover, LL-37-treated C. albicans floating cells that did not adhere to the underlying substratum aggregated as a consequence of LL-37 bound to the cell surfaces. According to the results of a competition assay, the inhibitory effects of LL-37 on cell adhesion and aggregation were mediated by its preferential binding to mannan, the main component of the C. albicans cell wall, and partially by its ability to bind chitin or glucan, which underlie the mannan layer. Therefore, targeting of cell-wall carbohydrates by LL-37 provides a new strategy to prevent C. albicans infection, and LL-37 is a useful, new tool to screen for other C. albicans components involved in adhesion.

  18. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later chall...

  19. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, Wylly Ara?jo; de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; de Luna, Giliara Carol Diniz Gomes; Lima, Igara Oliveira; Wanderley, Paulo Alves; de Lima, Rita Baltazar; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO) was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-t...

  20. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Gidrol, X.; Lemercier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  1. Recurrent Candida albicans Ventriculitis Treated with Intraventricular Liposomal Amphotericin B

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    Demet Toprak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS infection with Candida is rare but significant because of its high morbidity and mortality. When present, it is commonly seen among immunocompromised and hospitalized patients. Herein, we describe a case of a four-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL who experienced recurrent Candida albicans meningitis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B at first attack, but 25 days after discharge he was readmitted to hospital with symptoms of meningitis. Candida albicans was grown in CFS culture again and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed ventriculitis. We administered liposomal amphotericin B both intravenously and intraventricularly and favorable result was achieved without any adverse effects. Intraventricular amphotericin B may be considered for the treatment of recurrent CNS Candida infections in addition to intravenous administration.

  2. Elevated Cell Wall Chitin in Candida albicans Confers Echinocandin Resistance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keunsook K.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Walker, Louise A.; Odds, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans cells with increased cell wall chitin have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether C. albicans cells with elevated chitin levels have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vivo. BALB/c mice were infected with C. albicans cells with normal chitin levels and compared to mice infected with high-chitin cells. Caspofungin therapy was initiated at 24 h postinfection. Mice infected with chitin-normal cells were successfully treated with caspofungin, as indicated by reduced kidney fungal burdens, reduced weight loss, and decreased C. albicans density in kidney lesions. In contrast, mice infected with high-chitin C. albicans cells were less susceptible to caspofungin, as they had higher kidney fungal burdens and greater weight loss during early infection. Cells recovered from mouse kidneys at 24 h postinfection with high-chitin cells had 1.6-fold higher chitin levels than cells from mice infected with chitin-normal cells and maintained a significantly reduced susceptibility to caspofungin when tested in vitro. At 48 h postinfection, caspofungin treatment induced a further increase in chitin content of C. albicans cells harvested from kidneys compared to saline treatment. Some of the recovered clones had acquired, at a low frequency, a point mutation in FKS1 resulting in a S645Y amino acid substitution, a mutation known to confer echinocandin resistance. This occurred even in cells that had not been exposed to caspofungin. Our results suggest that the efficacy of caspofungin against C. albicans was reduced in vivo due to either elevation of chitin levels in the cell wall or acquisition of FKS1 point mutations. PMID:21986821

  3. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Kearney T W; Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient's immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of susceptible

  4. Candida albicans Hom6 is a homoserine dehydrogenase involved in protein synthesis and cell adhesion

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    Pei-Wen Tsai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Candida albicans is a common fungal pathogen in humans. In healthy individuals, C. albicans represents a harmless commensal organism, but infections can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. The complete genome sequence of C. albicans is extremely useful for identifying genes that may be potential drug targets and important for pathogenic virulence. However, there are still many uncharacterized genes in the Candida genome database. In this study, we investigated C. albicans Hom6, the functions of which remain undetermined experimentally. Methods: HOM6-deleted and HOM6-reintegrated mutant strains were constructed. The mutant strains were compared with wild-type in their growth in various media and enzyme activity. Effects of HOM6 deletion on translation were further investigated by cell susceptibility to hygromycin B or cycloheximide, as well as by polysome profiling, and cell adhesion to polystyrene was also determined. Results: C. albicans Hom6 exhibits homoserine dehydrogenase activity and is involved in the biosynthesis of methionine and threonine. HOM6 deletion caused translational arrest in cells grown under amino acid starvation conditions. Additionally, Hom6 protein was found in both cytosolic and cell-wall fractions of cultured cells. Furthermore, HOM6 deletion reduced C. albicans cell adhesion to polystyrene, which is a common plastic used in many medical devices. Conclusion: Given that there is no Hom6 homologue in mammalian cells, our results provided an important foundation for future development of new antifungal drugs. Keywords: Candida albicans, cell adhesion, Hom6, homoserine dehydrogenase, protein synthesis

  5. Regulation of Candida albicans Interaction with Macrophages through the Activation of HOG Pathway by Genistein

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    Shuna Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The severity of infections caused by Candida albicans, the most common opportunistic human fungal pathogen, needs rapid and effective antifungal treatments. One of the effective ways is to control the virulence factors of the pathogen. Therefore, the current study examined the effects of genistein, a natural isoflavone present in soybeans, on C. albicans. The genistein-treated C. albicans cells were then exposed to macrophages. Although no inhibition effect on the growth rates of C. albicans was noted an enhancement of the immune response to macrophages has been observed, indicated by phagocytosis and release of cytokines TNF-α and IL-10. The effect of genistein on the enhanced phagocytosis can be mimicked by the fungicides fludioxonil or iprodione, which inhibit the histidine kinase Cos1p and lead to activation of HOG pathway. The western blot results showed a clear phosphorylation of Hog1p in the wild type strain of C. albicans after incubation with genistein. In addition, effects of genistein on the phosphorylation of Hog1p in the histidine kinase mutants Δcos1 and Δsln1 were also observed. Our results thus indicate a new bio-activity of genistein on C. albicans by activation of the HOG pathway of the human pathogen C. albicans.

  6. Rapid detection of Candida albicans in clinical blood samples by using a TaqMan-based PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaroufi, Younes; Heymans, Corine; De Bruyne, Jean-Marc; Duchateau, Valerie; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Aoun, Michel; Crokaert, Françoise

    2003-07-01

    We describe a rapid and reproducible PCR assay for quantitation of the Candida albicans ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in clinical blood samples based on the TaqMan principle (Applied Biosystems), in which a signal is generated by cleavage of a template-specific probe during amplification. We used two fluorogenic probes based on universal, fungus-specific primers, one for the detection of C. albicans species DNA and one for the detection of all Candida genus DNA. C. albicans blastoconidia mixed with whole blood in a titration experiment yielded a linear PCR signal over a range of 3 orders of magnitude. The TaqMan-based PCR assay for C. albicans exhibited a low limit of detection (5 CFU/ml of blood) and an excellent reproducibility (96 to 99%). While the C. albicans species-specific probe had 100% specificity for C. albicans, all Candida genus-specific probes cross-reacted with other organisms likely to coinfect patients with C. albicans infections. On the basis of these data, we determined the C. albicans loads with a species-specific probe from 122 blood samples from 61 hematology or oncology patients with clinically proven or suspected systemic Candida infections. Eleven positive samples exhibited a wide range of C. albicans loads, extending from 5 to 100,475 CFU/ml of blood. The sensitivity and specificity of the present assay were 100 and 97%, respectively, compared with the results of blood culture. These data indicate that the TaqMan-based PCR assay for quantitation of C. albicans with a species-specific probe provides an attractive alternative for the identification and quantitation of C. albicans rDNA in pure cultures and blood samples.

  7. Two's a crowd? Crowding effect in a parasitic castrator drives differences in reproductive resource allocation in single vs double infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Caitlin R; Moron, Nancy A; Kuris, Armand M

    2017-04-01

    The 'crowding effect' is a result of competition by parasites within a host for finite resources. Typically, the severity of this effect increases with increasing numbers of parasites within a host and manifests in reduced body size and thus fitness. Evidence for the crowding effect is mixed - while some have found negative effects, others have found a positive effect of increased parasite load on parasite fitness. Parasites are consumers with diverse trophic strategies reflected in their life history traits. These distinctions are useful to predict the effects of crowding. We studied a parasitic castrator, a parasite that usurps host reproductive energy and renders the host sterile. Parasitic castrators typically occur as single infections within hosts. With multiple parasitic castrators, we expect strong competition and evidence of crowding. We directly assess the effect of crowding on reproductive success in a barnacle population infected by a unique parasitic castrator, Hemioniscus balani, an isopod parasite that infects and blocks reproduction of barnacles. We find (1) strong evidence of crowding in double infections, (2) increased frequency of double infections in larger barnacle hosts with more resources and (3) perfect compensation in egg production, supporting strong space limitation. Our results document that the effects of crowding are particularly severe for this parasitic castrator, and may be applicable to other castrators that are also resource or space limited.

  8. Complement and innate immune evasion strategies of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanshan; Skerka, Christine; Kurzai, Oliver; Zipfel, Peter F

    2013-12-15

    Candida albicans is a medically important fungus that can cause a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections to disseminated disease, which manifests primarily in immuno-compromised individuals. Despite the currently applied anti-fungal therapies, both mortality and morbidity caused by this human pathogenic fungus are still unacceptably high. Therefore new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to prevent fungal infection. In order to define new targets for combating fungal disease, there is a need to understand the immune evasion strategies of C. albicans in detail. In this review, we summarize different sophisticated immune evasion strategies that are utilized by C. albicans. The description of the molecular mechanisms used for immune evasion does on one hand help to understand the infection process, and on the other hand provides valuable information to define new strategies and diagnostic approaches to fight and interfere with Candida infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of phospholipase activity of Candida albicans and non albicans isolated from women of reproductive age with vulvovaginal candidiasis in rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Fule

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is most common accounting for 17 to 39% of symptomatic women. Both Candida albicans and non albicans Candida species are involved in VVC. Amongst various virulence factors proposed for Candida, extracellular phospholipases is one of the virulence factor implicated in its pathogenicity. With this background the present study was carried out to find the prevalence of different Candida species and to detect phospholipase producing strains isolated from symptomatic women with VVC. Materials and Methods: At least two vaginal swabs from 156 women of reproductive age with abnormal vaginal discharge were collected. Direct microscopy and Gram′s stained smear examined for presence of budding yeast and pseudo mycelia followed by isolation and identification of Candida species. Extracellular phospholipase activity was studied by inoculating all isolates on Sabouraud′s dextrose egg yolk agar (SDA medium. Results: Of the 156 women with curdy white discharge alone or in combination with other signs, 59 (37.82% women showed laboratory evidence of VVC. A total of 31 (52.54% women had curdy white discharge followed by 12 (20.33% with other signs and symptoms. C. albicans (62.59% and non albicans Candida (37.28% in a ratio of 1.68:1 were isolated. Of the 37 strains of C. albians 30 (81.08% showed the enzyme activity. Seventeen (56.66% strains showed higher Pz value of < 0.70 (++++. Conclusion: Although there may be typical clinical presentation of Candidiasis. all the patients did not show laboratory evidence of infection. Pregnancy was found to be major risk factor for development of VVC. C. albicans was prevalent species but non albicans species were also frequently isolated. Extracellular phospholipase activity was seen in C. albicans and not in non albicans Candida isolates.

  10. Recurrent episodes of Candidemia due to Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans with acquired echinocandin resistance

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    Marine Grosset

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed fungal infection and acquired echinocandin resistance of Candida spp. remain infrequent. In this study we have reported the case of a patient hospitalized for tuberculosis who experienced multiple infections due to three common Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis. Furthermore, consecutive isolates from blood cultures and heart valve were found resistant to azoles (C. tropicalis and to echinocandin with either novel (C. tropicalis or previously described (C. albicans missense mutations in the Fks gene.

  11. Role of secreted aspartyl proteases in Candida albicans virulence, host immune response and immunoprotection in murine disseminated candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Isabel Alexandra Duarte Ferreira Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências (ramo de conhecimento em Biologia) The polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is an important opportunistic human pathogen and the most common causative agent of fungal invasive infections. Host physical barriers and immune system integrity are crucial factors in controlling the establishment of Candida infections. However, the high adaptability of C. albicans to different host niches is also a determinant factor. The host-fungus interplay is dynami...

  12. Genetic variability of Candida albicans in HIV/AIDS patient with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rahayu, Retno Puji; P, Widiyanti; M, Arfijanto

    2012-01-01

    Background: Oral candidiasis is the mostly found oral manifestation in HIV/AIDS infected patient caused by immunocompromised especially immunodeficiency. Clinical symptoms is severe pain in oral cavity and dry mouth because of xerostomia which cause the loss of appetite. Candida albicans (C. albicans) is normal flora in oral cavity which plays as opportunistic pathogen and also the cause of oral candidiasis. Almost 90% of HIV–infected patient have oral candidiasis. This condition is clinical ...

  13. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  14. Hydrolytic enzymes as virulence factors of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Martin; Borelli, Claudia; Korting, Hans C; Hube, Bernhard

    2005-11-01

    Candida albicans is a facultative pathogenic micro-organism that has developed several virulence traits enabling invasion of host tissues and avoidance of host defence mechanisms. Virulence factors that contribute to this process are the hydrolytic enzymes. Most of them are extracellularly secreted by the fungus. The most discussed hydrolytic enzymes produced by C. albicans are secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps). The role of these Saps for C. albicans infections was carefully evaluated in numerous studies, whereas only little is known about the physiological role of the secreted phospholipases (PL) and almost nothing about the involvement of lipases (Lip) in virulence. They may play an important role in the pathogenicity of candidosis and their hydrolytic activity probably has a number of possible functions in addition to the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrition. Saps as the best-studied member of this group of hydrolytic enzymes contribute to host tissue invasion by digesting or destroying cell membranes and by degrading host surface molecules. There is also some evidence that hydrolytic enzymes are able to attack cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial activity. High hydrolytic activity with broad substrate specificity has been found in several Candida species, most notably in C. albicans. This activity is attributed to multigene families with at least 10 members for Saps and Lips and several members for PL B. Distinct members of these gene families are differentially regulated in various Candida infections. In future, prevention and control of Candida infections might be achieved by pharmacological or immunological tools specifically modulated to inhibit virulence factors, e.g. the family of Saps.

  15. Regulatory networks controlling nitrogen sensing and uptake in Candida albicans.

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    Shruthi Ramachandra

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is one of the key nutrients for microbial growth. During infection, pathogenic fungi like C. albicans need to acquire nitrogen from a broad range of different and changing sources inside the host. Detecting the available nitrogen sources and adjusting the expression of genes for their uptake and degradation is therefore crucial for survival and growth as well as for establishing an infection. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional response of C. albicans to nitrogen starvation and feeding with the infection-relevant nitrogen sources arginine and bovine serum albumin (BSA, representing amino acids and proteins, respectively. The response to nitrogen starvation was marked by an immediate repression of protein synthesis and an up-regulation of general amino acid permeases, as well as an up-regulation of autophagal processes in its later stages. Feeding with arginine led to a fast reduction in expression of general permeases for amino acids and to resumption of protein synthesis. The response to BSA feeding was generally slower, and was additionally characterized by an up-regulation of oligopeptide transporter genes. From time-series data, we inferred network interaction models for genes relevant in nitrogen detection and uptake. Each individual network was found to be largely specific for the experimental condition (starvation or feeding with arginine or BSA. In addition, we detected several novel connections between regulator and effector genes, with putative roles in nitrogen uptake. We conclude that C. albicans adopts a particular nitrogen response network, defined by sets of specific gene-gene connections for each environmental condition. All together, they form a grid of possible gene regulatory networks, increasing the transcriptional flexibility of C. albicans.

  16. Regulatory networks controlling nitrogen sensing and uptake in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Shruthi; Linde, Jörg; Brock, Matthias; Guthke, Reinhard; Hube, Bernhard; Brunke, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the key nutrients for microbial growth. During infection, pathogenic fungi like C. albicans need to acquire nitrogen from a broad range of different and changing sources inside the host. Detecting the available nitrogen sources and adjusting the expression of genes for their uptake and degradation is therefore crucial for survival and growth as well as for establishing an infection. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional response of C. albicans to nitrogen starvation and feeding with the infection-relevant nitrogen sources arginine and bovine serum albumin (BSA), representing amino acids and proteins, respectively. The response to nitrogen starvation was marked by an immediate repression of protein synthesis and an up-regulation of general amino acid permeases, as well as an up-regulation of autophagal processes in its later stages. Feeding with arginine led to a fast reduction in expression of general permeases for amino acids and to resumption of protein synthesis. The response to BSA feeding was generally slower, and was additionally characterized by an up-regulation of oligopeptide transporter genes. From time-series data, we inferred network interaction models for genes relevant in nitrogen detection and uptake. Each individual network was found to be largely specific for the experimental condition (starvation or feeding with arginine or BSA). In addition, we detected several novel connections between regulator and effector genes, with putative roles in nitrogen uptake. We conclude that C. albicans adopts a particular nitrogen response network, defined by sets of specific gene-gene connections for each environmental condition. All together, they form a grid of possible gene regulatory networks, increasing the transcriptional flexibility of C. albicans.

  17. Differential virulence of Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis: A role for Tor1 kinase?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sullivan, Derek J

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are two very closely related species of pathogenic yeast. C. albicans is the most prevalent species in the human gastrointestinal tract and is responsible for far more opportunistic infections in comparison with C. dubliniensis. This disparity is likely to be due to the reduced ability of C. dubliniensis to undergo the yeast to hypha transition, a change in morphology that plays an important role in C. albicans virulence. We have recently shown that hypha formation by C. dubliniensis is specifically repressed by nutrients at alkaline pH. In this article, we present new data showing that this can be partly reversed by treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient sensing kinase Tor1 (Target Of Rapamycin). We also provide a speculative model to describe why C. albicans filaments more efficiently in nutrient rich environments, citing recently described data on Mds3, a pH responsive regulator of Tor1 kinase activity.

  18. Candida albicans-associated necrotizing vasculitis producing life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sargent, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Patients undergoing treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for fungal infections including disseminated candidiasis. We describe a case of systemic Candida albicans infection associated with life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to unusual necrotizing vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract. We explore the association between Candida and such vasculopathy.

  19. Flavodoxin-Like Proteins Protect Candida albicans from Oxidative Stress and Promote Virulence.

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    Lifang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes lethal systemic infections in humans. To better define how pathogens resist oxidative attack by the immune system, we examined a family of four Flavodoxin-Like Proteins (FLPs in C. albicans. In agreement with previous studies showing that FLPs in bacteria and plants act as NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases, a C. albicans quadruple mutant lacking all four FLPs (pst1Δ, pst2Δ, pst3Δ, ycp4Δ was more sensitive to benzoquinone. Interestingly, the quadruple mutant was also more sensitive to a variety of oxidants. Quinone reductase activity confers important antioxidant effects because resistance to oxidation was restored in the quadruple mutant by expressing either Escherichia coli wrbA or mammalian NQO1, two distinct types of quinone reductases. FLPs were detected at the plasma membrane in C. albicans, and the quadruple mutant was more sensitive to linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that can auto-oxidize and promote lipid peroxidation. These observations suggested that FLPs reduce ubiquinone (coenzyme Q, enabling it to serve as an antioxidant in the membrane. In support of this, a C. albicans coq3Δ mutant that fails to synthesize ubiquinone was also highly sensitive to oxidative stress. FLPs are critical for survival in the host, as the quadruple mutant was avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis under conditions where infection with wild type C. albicans was lethal. The quadruple mutant cells initially grew well in kidneys, the major site of C. albicans growth in mice, but then declined after the influx of neutrophils and by day 4 post-infection 33% of the mice cleared the infection. Thus, FLPs and ubiquinone are important new antioxidant mechanisms that are critical for fungal virulence. The potential of FLPs as novel targets for antifungal therapy is further underscored by their absence in mammalian cells.

  20. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

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    David W. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exists between the potentially damaging effects of Candida virulence factors and the nature of the immune response elicited by the host. Frequently, it is changes in host factors that lead to Candida seemingly changing from a commensal to pathogenic existence. However, given the often reported heterogeneity in morphological and biochemical factors that exist between Candida species and indeed strains of C. albicans, it may also be the fact that colonising strains differ in the way they exploit resources to allow persistence at mucosal surfaces and as a consequence this too may affect the way Candida interacts with epithelial cells. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of some of the possible interactions that may occur between C. albicans and host epithelial surfaces that may in turn dictate whether Candida removal, its commensal persistence or infection follows.

  1. Candida albicans induces pro-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic signals in macrophages as revealed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reales-Calderón, Jose Antonio; Sylvester, Marc; Strijbis, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a pivotal role in the prevention of Candida albicans infections. Yeast recognition and phagocytosis by macrophages is mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) that initiate downstream signal transduction cascades by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We exposed...... RAW 264.7 macrophages to C. albicans for 3h and used SILAC to quantify macrophage proteins and phosphoproteins by mass spectrometry to study the effects of infection. We identified 53 macrophage up-regulated proteins and 15 less abundant in the presence of C. albicans out of a total of 2071 identified...... of apoptotic markers revealed that anti-apoptotic signals prevailed during the interaction of the yeast. Our proteomics study suggests that besides inflammation, apoptosis is a central pathway in the immune defense against C. albicans infection....

  2. Genetics of Candida albicans, a diploid human fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Suzanne M; Johnson, Alexander D

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans is a species of fungus that typically resides in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It is also the most common human fungal pathogen, causing a variety of skin and soft tissue infections in healthy people and more virulent invasive and disseminated diseases in patients with compromised immune systems. How this microorganism manages to persist in healthy hosts but also to cause a spectrum of disease states in the immunocompromised host are questions of significant biological interest as well as major clinical and economic importance. In this review, we describe recent developments in population genetics, the mating process, and gene disruption technology that are providing much needed experimental insights into the biology of C. albicans.

  3. CANDIDA ALBICANS AND NON-ALBICANS SPECIES AS ETIOLOGICAL AGENT OF VAGINITIS IN PREGNANT AND NONPREGNANT WOMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Mirela; Hukić, Mirsada

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidosis. The objectives of our study were: to make determination of the microscopic findings of vaginal swab, frequency of Candida species in the culture of pregnant women and patients who are not pregnant, determine the Candida species in all cultures, and to determine the frequency and differences in the frequency of C. albicans and other non-albicans species. In one year study performed during 2006 year, we tested patients of Gynaecology and Obstetrics clinic of the Clinical Centre in Sarajevo and Gynaecology department of the General hospital in Sarajevo. 447 woman included in the study were separated in two groups: 203 pregnant (in the last trimester of pregnancy), and 244 non-pregnant woman in period of fertility. Each vaginal swab was examined microscopically. The yeast, number of colonies, and the species of Candida were determined on Sabouraud dextrose agar with presence of antibiotics. For determination of Candida species, we used germ tube test for detection of C. albicans, and cultivation on the selective medium and assimilation tests for detection of non-albicans species. The results indicated positive microscopic findings in the test group (40,9%), as well as greater number of positive cultures (46,8%). The most commonly detected species for both groups was C. albicans (test group 40.9% and control group 23,0%). The most commonly detected non-albicans species for the test group were C. glabrata (4,2 %) and C. krusei (3,2%), and for the control group were C. glabrata (3,2%) and C. parapsilosis (3,2%). The microscopic findings correlated with the number of colonies in positive cultures. In the test group, we found an increased number of yeasts (64,3%), and the pseudopyphae and blastopores by microscopic examination as an indication of infection. In the control group, we found a small number of yeasts (64,6%), in the form of blastopores, as an indication of the candida colonisation. Our

  4. Clinical strains of Lactobacillus reduce the filamentation of Candida albicans and protect Galleria mellonella against experimental candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Dos Santos Velloso, Marisol; Figueiredo, Lívia Mara Alves; Martins, Carolina Pistille; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2018-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can grow as yeast or filaments, depending on the environmental conditions. The filamentous form is of particular interest because it can play a direct role in adherence and pathogenicity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three clinical strains of Lactobacillus on C. albicans filamentation as well as their probiotic potential in pathogen-host interactions via an experimental candidiasis model study in Galleria mellonella. We used the reference strain Candida albicans ATCC 18804 and three clinical strains of Lactobacillus: L. rhamnosus strain 5.2, L. paracasei strain 20.3, and L. fermentum strain 20.4. First, the capacity of C. albicans to form hyphae was tested in vitro through association with the Lactobacillus strains. After that, we verified the ability of these strains to attenuate experimental candidiasis in a Galleria mellonella model through a survival curve assay. Regarding the filamentation assay, a significant reduction in hyphae formation of up to 57% was observed when C. albicans was incubated in the presence of the Lactobacillus strains, compared to a control group composed of only C. albicans. In addition, when the larvae were pretreated with Lactobacillus spp. prior to C. albicans infection, the survival rate of G. mellonela increased in all experimental groups. We concluded that Lactobacillus influences the growth and expression C. albicans virulence factors, which may interfere with the pathogenicity of these microorganisms.

  5. Effect of hookworm infection on wheat challenge in celiac disease--a randomised double-blinded placebo controlled trial.

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    A James Daveson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The association between hygiene and prevalence of autoimmune disease has been attributed in part to enteric helminth infection. A pilot study of experimental infection with the hookworm Necator americanus was undertaken among a group of otherwise healthy people with celiac disease to test the potential of the helminth to suppress the immunopathology induced by gluten. METHODS: In a 21-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, we explored the effects of N. americanus infection in 20 healthy, helminth-naïve adults with celiac disease well controlled by diet. Staged cutaneous inoculations with 10 and 5 infective 3(rd stage hookworm larvae or placebo were performed at week-0 and -12 respectively. At week-20, a five day oral wheat challenge equivalent to 16 grams of gluten per day was undertaken. Primary outcomes included duodenal Marsh score and quantification of the immunodominant α-gliadin peptide (QE65-specific systemic interferon-γ-producing cells by ELISpot pre- and post-wheat challenge. RESULTS: Enteric colonisation with hookworm established in all 10 cases, resulting in transiently painful enteritis in 5. Chronic infection was asymptomatic, with no effect on hemoglobin levels. Although some duodenal eosinophilia was apparent, hookworm-infected mucosa retained a healthy appearance. In both groups, wheat challenge caused deterioration in both primary and several secondary outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Experimental N. americanus infection proved to be safe and enabled testing its effect on a range of measures of the human autoimmune response. Infection imposed no obvious benefit on pathology. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00671138.

  6. Candida albicans keratitis in an immunocompromised patient

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    H Mohammed J Hassan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available H Mohammed J Hassan1, Theocharis Papanikolaou2, Georgios Mariatos1, Amany Hammad3, Hala Hassan41Ophthalmology Department, Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, South Yorkshire, England, UK; 2Ophthalmology Department, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, England, UK; 3Ophthalmology Department, Rotherham Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, England, UK; 4Corneal and External Disease Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, England, UKPurpose: When investigating a case of unexplained corneal ulceration, we need to think of fungal infection and any predisposing factors.Methods: A case study of a corneal ulceration in a patient who was HIV positive with a devastating visual outcome.Results: Therapeutic corneal graft was necessary due to corneal perforation. Immunocompromised state of patient was retrospectively diagnosed.Conclusions: Candida albicans keratitis is an opportunistic infection of a compromised cornea, and sometimes unknowingly compromised host, which can be initially misdiagnosed. Despite intensive antifungal therapy, occasionally patients require corneal grafting to improve vision, and before it is possible to establish an accurate diagnosis.Keywords: fungal keratitis, corneal perforation, keratoplasty, human immunodeficiency virus, HIV

  7. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mou...

  8. Role of Ess1 in growth, morphogenetic switching, and RNA polymerase II transcription in Candida albicans.

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    Dhanushki Samaranayake

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a fungal pathogen that causes potentially fatal infections among immune-compromised individuals. The emergence of drug resistant C. albicans strains makes it important to identify new antifungal drug targets. Among potential targets are enzymes known as peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases that catalyze isomerization of peptide bonds preceding proline. We are investigating a PPIase called Ess1, which is conserved in all major human pathogenic fungi. Previously, we reported that C. albicans Ess1 is essential for growth and morphogenetic switching. In the present study, we re-evaluated these findings using more rigorous genetic analyses, including the use of additional CaESS1 mutant alleles, distinct marker genes, and the engineering of suitably-matched isogenic control strains. The results confirm that CaEss1 is essential for growth in C. albicans, but show that reduction of CaESS1 gene dosage by half (δ/+ does not interfere with morphogenetic switching. However, further reduction of CaEss1 levels using a conditional allele does reduce morphogenetic switching. We also examine the role of the linker α-helix that distinguishes C. albicans Ess1 from the human Pin1 enzyme, and present results of a genome-wide transcriptome analysis. The latter analysis indicates that CaEss1 has a conserved role in regulation of RNA polymerase II function, and is required for efficient termination of small nucleolar RNAs and repression of cryptic transcription in C. albicans.

  9. The inhibitory activity of linalool against the filamentous growth and biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Lai, Wen-Lin; Chuang, Kuei-Chin; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Candida spp. are part of the natural human microbiota, but they also represent important opportunistic human pathogens. Biofilm-associated Candida albicans infections are clinically relevant due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the ability of linalool to inhibit the formation of C. albicans biofilms and reduce existing C. albicans biofilms. Linalool exhibited antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 mM. Sub-MIC concentrations of linalool also inhibited the formation of germ tubes and biofilms in that strain. The defective architecture composition of C. albicans biofilms exposed to linalool was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The expression levels of the adhesin genes HWP1 and ALS3 were downregulated by linalool, as assessed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYR1 and CPH1, which encode components of the cAMP-PKA and MAPK hyphal formation regulatory pathways, respectively, were also suppressed by linalool, as was the gene encoding their upstream regulator, Ras1. The expression levels of long-term hyphae maintenance associated genes, including UME6, HGC1, and EED1, were all suppressed by linalool. These results indicate that linalool may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of candidiasis associated with medical devices because it interferes with the morphological switch and biofilm formation of C. albicans.

  10. Antibiofilm and Antihyphal Activities of Cedar Leaf Essential Oil, Camphor, and Fenchone Derivatives against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjith Kumar Manoharan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans can form biofilms composed of yeast, hyphal, and pseudohyphal elements, and C. albicans cells in the hyphal stage could be a virulence factor. The present study describes the chemical composition, antibiofilm, and antihyphal activities of cedar leaf essential oil (CLEO, which was found to possess remarkable antibiofilm activity against C. albicans but not to affect its planktonic cell growth. Nineteen components were identified in CLEO by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and phenolics were the main constituents. Of these, camphor, fenchone, fenchyl alcohol, α-thujone, and borneol significantly reduced C. albicans biofilm formation. Notably, treatments with CLEO, camphor, or fenchyl alcohol at 0.01% clearly inhibited hyphal formation, and this inhibition appeared to be largely responsible for their antibiofilm effects. Transcriptomic analyses indicated that camphor and fenchyl alcohol downregulated some hypha-specific and biofilm related genes (ECE1, ECE2, RBT1, and EED1. Furthermore, camphor and fenchyl alcohol reduced C. albicans virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model. These results demonstrate CLEO, camphor, and fenchyl alcohol might be useful for controlling C. albicans infections.

  11. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus in the Era of Capsule Endoscopy and Double Balloon Enteroscopy Complicated by Multifocal Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus Infection

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    Shabana F. Pasha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare etiology of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding characterized by bleeding into the pancreatic duct. The diagnosis may be delayed for months to years, due to the episodic nature of bleeding and failure to consider the diagnosis. Patients often undergo multiple endoscopies and radiologic evaluations prior to diagnosis. Incidental gastrointestinal findings may lead to unnecessary endoscopic and surgical interventions. This report describes a patient with hemosuccus pancreaticus diagnosed in the era of video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy, whose management was complicated by multifocal Mycobacteria chelonae/abscessus infection.

  12. Efek Antijamur Minyak Atsiri Jahe Merah (Zingiber officinale Var. Rubrum terhadap Candida albicans

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    Hermina Karuna Atmaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Candida albicans infections is increasing in the society. Therefore, an effective and affordable antifungal drug with minimal side effect is needed. Ginger (Zingiber officinale is a traditional herb which has an antifungal effect in its volatile oil. Objective: To investigate antifungal effect of volatile oil from Zingiber officinale var rubrum against C. albicans in vitro, to determine the optimum concentration, and finally to determine the correlation between the various concentrations of the oil and the inhibition zone. Material and method: Strain C. albicans tested was obtained from the Department of Parasitology, Medical Faculty, University of Indonesia. Volatile oil of Zingiber officinale var. rubrum was produced from water and steam distillation of fresh ginger in BALLITRO, Bogor. Concentrations of the volatile oil used were 100%, 50%, 25%, 12,5% 6.25%, 3.125%, 1.56% and 0.78%. Methods used were colony counting and disk diffusion method (by using 6 mm blank disk. The specimens were divided into two groups, treatment group (C. albicans with application of volatile oil and control group (C. albicans without application of volatile oil. Result: There was a significant decrease in the amount of C. albicans colonies from 3.125% to 6.25% of concentration. The amount of C. albicans colonies at concentration 6.25% was also significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, there was strong and positive correlation between the concentration of the volatile oil and the inhibition zone. Conclusion: Volatile oil from Zingiber officinale var. rubrum has an antifungal effect against C. albicans in vitro with optimum concentration at 6.25%. Increasing concentrations of the oil correlates with increasing inhibition zome.

  13. [Whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis assay for Candida albicans based on flow cytometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengxin; Chen, Jing; Wang, Xianling; Zhao, Bohua; Hou, Tianwen

    2015-04-01

    To establish a whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis assay for Candida albicans (C.albicans) based on flow cytometry (FCM). C.albicans of mid-logarithmic growth phase was labeled by fluorescence probe carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE), and then added into CD45-PC5 pre-stained human whole blood cells at a 10:1 multiplicity of infection (MOI) in 37DegreesCelsius. The cells were incubated for 10, 30 and 60 minutes. Phagocytosis rate of C.albicans by the CD45 positive cells in the blood was determined by FCM. In yeast extract peptone dextrose medium (YPD) and under the conditions of 37DegreesCelsius and 50 mL/L CO2, the logarithmic growth phase of C.albicans SC5314 was from the 5th to 11th hour. C.albicans were well stained by 10 mmol/L CFDA-SE after 30-minute incubation. After 10-, 30- and 60-minute incubation with SC5314 C.albicans with CD45⁺ cells, the phagocytosis rates measured by FCM were (80.1 ± 6.1)%, (83.8 ± 7.7)% and (92.3 ± 11.2)% for the neutrophils, (11.2 ± 3.6)%, (15.8 ± 4.4)% and (27.7 ± 6.8)% for the monocytes and (0.9 ± 0.3)%, (0.8 ± 0.4)% and (5.2 ± 1.6)% for the lymphocytes. The method for measuring whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis of C.albicans based on FCM is successfully established, and 30 minutes are the proper incubation time for the phagocytosis assay.

  14. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Pathogenic Candida albicans Isolates Collected from a Teaching Hospital in Shanghai, China: A Molecular Epidemiology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhu, Junhao; Gao, Qian; Chen, Min; Zhu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Molecular typing of Candida albicans is important for studying the population structure and epidemiology of this opportunistic yeast, such as population dynamics, nosocomial infections, multiple infections and microevolution. The genetic diversity of C. albicans has been rarely studied in China. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure of 62 C. albicans isolates collected from 40 patients from Huashan Hospital in Shanghai, China. A total of 50 diploid sequence types (DSTs) were identified in the 62 C. albicans isolates, with 41 newly identified DSTs. Based on cluster analysis, the 62 isolates were classified into nine existing clades and two new clades (namely clades New 1 and New 2). The majority of the isolates were clustered into three clades, clade 6 (37.5%), clade 1 (15.0%) and clade 17 (15.0%). Isolates of clade New 2 were specifically identified in East Asia. We identified three cases of potential nosocomial transmission based on association analysis between patients’ clinical data and the genotypes of corresponding isolates. Finally, by analyzing the genotypes of serial isolates we further demonstrated that the microevolution of C. albicans was due to loss of heterozygosity. Our study represents the first molecular typing of C. albicans in eastern China, and we confirmed that MLST is a useful tool for studying the epidemiology and evolution of C. albicans. PMID:25919124

  15. Reduced CX3CL1 secretion contributes to the susceptibility of oral leukoplakia-associated fibroblasts to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Candida leukoplakia (OLK is a kind of oral leukoplakia combined with chronic candidal infection, which plays an important role in the malignant transformation of OLK. However, little is known about the etiology, including susceptibility of leukoplakia to candidal adhesion, invasion and infection. Some antimicrobial peptides secreted by oral epithelial cells or fibroblasts potentially have antifungal activities against Candida albicans (C. albicans. In this study, we established three co-culture models to simulate different C. albicans-fibroblasts interactions during progression of candida leukoplakia. The susceptibility of oral leukoplakia-associated fibroblasts (LKAFs to C. albicans and its underlying mechanism were determined. Samples of 14 LKAFs and 10 normal fibroblasts (NFs were collected. The co-culture models showed that LKAFs had promoted the adhesion, invasion, and survival of C. albicans compared with NFs. CX3CL1, a chemokine with antifungal activity, was less abundant in LKAFs than NFs. Overexpression of CX3CL1 via transfection in LKAFs could partly restore the resistance to C. albicans. We also showed that inhibition of ERK could suppress CX3CL1 secretion. While phosphor-ERK was inhibited in LKAFs compared with NFs. Besides, the expression of a shedding enzyme for CX3CL1, disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain (ADAM 17 was decreased in LKAFs than NFs. In conclusion, LKAFs produced and secreted less CX3CL1 by inhibiting the ERK signaling pathway, thereby contributing to impaired cell resistance to C. albicans.

  16. Reduced CX3CL1 Secretion Contributes to the Susceptibility of Oral Leukoplakia-Associated Fibroblasts toCandida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Li, Duo; Shi, Xueke; Gao, Qinghong; Wei, Changlei; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Candida leukoplakia (OLK) is a kind of oral leukoplakia combined with chronic candidal infection, which plays an important role in the malignant transformation of OLK. However, little is known about the etiology, including susceptibility of leukoplakia to candidal adhesion, invasion and infection. Some antimicrobial peptides secreted by oral epithelial cells or fibroblasts potentially have antifungal activities against Candida albicans (C. albicans) . In this study, we established three co-culture models to simulate different C. albican s-fibroblasts interactions during progression of candida leukoplakia. The susceptibility of oral leukoplakia-associated fibroblasts (LKAFs) to C. albicans and its underlying mechanism were determined. Samples of 14 LKAFs and 10 normal fibroblasts (NFs) were collected. The co-culture models showed that LKAFs had promoted the adhesion, invasion, and survival of C. albicans compared with NFs. CX3CL1, a chemokine with antifungal activity, was less abundant in LKAFs than NFs. Overexpression of CX3CL1 via transfection in LKAFs could partly restore the resistance to C. albicans . We also showed that inhibition of ERK could suppress CX3CL1 secretion. While phosphor-ERK was inhibited in LKAFs compared with NFs. Besides, the mRNA expression of a shedding enzyme for CX3CL1, disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 17 was decreased in LKAFs than NFs. In conclusion, LKAFs produced and secreted less CX3CL1 by inhibiting the ERK signaling pathway, thereby contributing to impaired cell resistance to C. albicans .

  17. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Pathogenic Candida albicans Isolates Collected from a Teaching Hospital in Shanghai, China: A Molecular Epidemiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kefei; Luo, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhu, Junhao; Gao, Qian; Chen, Min; Zhu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Molecular typing of Candida albicans is important for studying the population structure and epidemiology of this opportunistic yeast, such as population dynamics, nosocomial infections, multiple infections and microevolution. The genetic diversity of C. albicans has been rarely studied in China. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure of 62 C. albicans isolates collected from 40 patients from Huashan Hospital in Shanghai, China. A total of 50 diploid sequence types (DSTs) were identified in the 62 C. albicans isolates, with 41 newly identified DSTs. Based on cluster analysis, the 62 isolates were classified into nine existing clades and two new clades (namely clades New 1 and New 2). The majority of the isolates were clustered into three clades, clade 6 (37.5%), clade 1 (15.0%) and clade 17 (15.0%). Isolates of clade New 2 were specifically identified in East Asia. We identified three cases of potential nosocomial transmission based on association analysis between patients' clinical data and the genotypes of corresponding isolates. Finally, by analyzing the genotypes of serial isolates we further demonstrated that the microevolution of C. albicans was due to loss of heterozygosity. Our study represents the first molecular typing of C. albicans in eastern China, and we confirmed that MLST is a useful tool for studying the epidemiology and evolution of C. albicans.

  18. First report of Ditylenchus gallaeformans in Miconia albicans from the Brazilian Cerrado, State of Goiás

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    Rodrigo Vieira da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Miconia albicans (Melastomataceae, whose common name is canela-de-velha, is a native plant of the tropical region that is abundant in the Cerrado biome. A nematode species was found parasitizing M. albicans, causing severe deformation and gall-like structures on the infected leaves and inflorescences. Morphological, morphometric and molecular characterizations identified the nematode as Ditylenchus gallaeformans. This nematode has great potential as a biocontrol agent of plants in the family Melastomataceae, which are invasive weeds in ecosystems of the Pacific Islands. This is the first report of D. gallaeformans parasitizing M. albicans in the Cerrado of the state of Goiás.

  19. Relative Abundances of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata in In Vitro Coculture Biofilms Impact Biofilm Structure and Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michelle L; Jayaraman, Arul; Kao, Katy C

    2018-04-15

    Candida is a member of the normal human microbiota and often resides on mucosal surfaces such as the oral cavity or the gastrointestinal tract. In addition to their commensality, Candida species can opportunistically become pathogenic if the host microbiota is disrupted or if the host immune system becomes compromised. An important factor for Candida pathogenesis is its ability to form biofilm communities. The two most medically important species- Candida albicans and Candida glabrata -are often coisolated from infection sites, suggesting the importance of Candida coculture biofilms. In this work, we report that biofilm formation of the coculture population depends on the relative ratio of starting cell concentrations of C. albicans and C. glabrata When using a starting ratio of C. albicans to C. glabrata of 1:3, ∼6.5- and ∼2.5-fold increases in biofilm biomass were observed relative to those of a C. albicans monoculture and a C. albicans / C. glabrata ratio of 1:1, respectively. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the heterogeneity and complex structures composed of long C. albicans hyphae and C. glabrata cell clusters in the coculture biofilms, and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) studies showed increases in the relative expression of the HWP1 and ALS3 adhesion genes in the C. albicans / C. glabrata 1:3 biofilm compared to that in the C. albicans monoculture biofilm. Additionally, only the 1:3 C. albicans / C. glabrata biofilm demonstrated an increased resistance to the antifungal drug caspofungin. Overall, the results suggest that interspecific interactions between these two fungal pathogens increase biofilm formation and virulence-related gene expression in a coculture composition-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans and Candida glabrata are often coisolated during infection, and the occurrence of coisolation increases with increasing inflammation, suggesting possible synergistic interactions between the two Candida species in

  20. An unusual double fungal infection of the bladder due to Candida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G.V. KandaSwamy

    rarely pathogenic to humans, but may cause skin lesions, keratitis, onychomycosis, sinusitis and pulmonary infections [2]. Candida infection is synonymous with fungal cystitis, but cladosporium involving the bladder has virtually been unheard of. Case report. A 37-year-old diabetic female, mother of one child, presented with ...

  1. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Candida albicans lumbar spondylodiscitis in an intravenous drug user: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Chen, Wei Liang; Yen, Hua-Cheng

    2013-12-11

    Spondylodiscitis leads to debility, and few data exist on Candida spondylodiscitis in patients with intravenous drug use. We present a case of Candida albicans lumbar spondylodiscitis in a patient with intravenous drug use. This patient was treated with surgical debridement and 9 months of fluconazole therapy, and the neurological deficits resolved completely. The infection did not recur clinically or radiologically during 9 months of follow-up. Although Candida albicans lumbar spondylodiscitis is rare, Candida should be suspected as a causative pathogen in patients with intravenous drug use except for Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As soon as Candida albicans lumbar spondylodiscitis is suspected, magnetic resonance imaging and percutaneous biopsy should be performed. Surgical intervention combined with treatment with antifungal medications can successfully eradicate the infection and resolve the neurological deficits.

  3. Artemisinins, new miconazole potentiators resulting in increased activity against Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cremer, Kaat; Lanckacker, Ellen; Cools, Tanne L; Bax, Marijke; De Brucker, Katrijn; Cos, Paul; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal biofilm-related fungal infections are very common, and the incidence of recurrent oral and vulvovaginal candidiasis is significant. As resistance to azoles (the preferred treatment) is occurring, we aimed at identifying compounds that increase the activity of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms. We screened 1,600 compounds of a drug-repositioning library in combination with a subinhibitory concentration of miconazole. Synergy between the best identified potentiators and miconazole was characterized by checkerboard analyses and fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Hexachlorophene, pyrvinium pamoate, and artesunate act synergistically with miconazole in affecting C. albicans biofilms. Synergy was most pronounced for artesunate and structural homologues thereof. No synergistic effect could be observed between artesunate and fluconazole, caspofungin, or amphotericin B. Our data reveal enhancement of the antibiofilm activity of miconazole by artesunate, pointing to potential combination therapy consisting of miconazole and artesunate to treat C. albicans biofilm-related infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Glycosylation of Candida albicans cell wall proteins is critical for induction of innate immune responses and apoptosis of epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Wagener

    Full Text Available C. albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen of humans, causing local and superficial mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Given that the key structure mediating host-C. albicans interactions is the fungal cell wall, we aimed to identify features of the cell wall inducing epithelial responses and be associated with fungal pathogenesis. We demonstrate here the importance of cell wall protein glycosylation in epithelial immune activation with a predominant role for the highly branched N-glycosylation residues. Moreover, these glycan moieties induce growth arrest and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Using an in vitro model of oral candidosis we demonstrate, that apoptosis induction by C. albicans wild-type occurs in early stage of infection and strongly depends on intact cell wall protein glycosylation. These novel findings demonstrate that glycosylation of the C. albicans cell wall proteins appears essential for modulation of epithelial immunity and apoptosis induction, both of which may promote fungal pathogenesis in vivo.

  5. Culture Supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Adhesion to HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuko; Cho, Otomi; Sugita, Takashi; Ogishima, Daiki; Takeda, Satoru

    2018-03-30

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common superficial infection of the vaginal mucous membranes caused by the fungus Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to assess the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of the culture supernatants of Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus, the predominant microbiota in Asian healthy women, on C. albicans biofilm formation. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was also investigated. Candida albicans biofilm was formed on polystyrene flat-bottomed 96-well plates, and the inhibitory effects on the initial colonization and maturation phases were determined using the XTT reduction assay. The expression levels of biofilm formation-associated genes (HWP1, ECE1, ALS3, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, and CPH1) were determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The inhibition of C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells by Lactobacillus culture supernatant was evaluated by enumerating viable C. albicans cells. The culture supernatants of both Lactobacillus species inhibited the initial colonization and maturation of C. albicans biofilm. The expression levels of all biofilm formation-related genes were downregulated in the presence of Lactobacillus culture supernatant. The culture supernatant also inhibited C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. The culture supernatants of L. gasseri and L. crispatus inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by downregulating biofilm formation-related genes and C. albicans adhesion to HeLa cells. These findings support the notion that Lactobacillus metabolites may be useful alternatives to antifungal drugs for the management of VVC.

  6. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex.

  7. Vulvovaginal candidosis caused by Candida non-albicans, proportion and clinical characteristics in the Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midi Haryani

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC caused by C. non-albicans tends to increase, recently. The aim of this study was to obtain data about proportion and clinical characteristic of C. non-albicans VVC at dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. This is a cross-sectional study on all female patients with symptoms of VVC visiting Obstetri-gynaecology and Dermatovenereology outpatient clinics at dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. All subjects had positive Gram stain, showed Candida spp. on culture with CHROMagar Candida, and had no other specific genital infections. Sixty nine subjects aged 26–44 years old (averaged 29 years old were included in this study. Candida non-albicans was found in 30.4% subject, and consisted of: C. glabrata (61.9%, C. tropicalis (28.6% and C. parapsilosis (9.5%. We found that C. non-albicans VVC infections are more common in women above 45 years old, using non-hormonal contraceptives, whose sexual partner has erythema and pruritus in glands penis, and having the disease for more than 1 year. No differences in clinical symptoms were noted between C. albicans and C. non-albicans infection. We concluded from this study that the proportion of C. non-albicans infections at dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, with C. glabrata represents the most prevalent species. No characteristic clinical symptoms were found from the subjects with C. non-albicans VVC when compared with those infected by C. albicans. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 142-7 Keywords: vulvovaginal candidosis, Candida non-albicans, CHROMagar Candida

  8. Potential disease interaction reinforced: double-virus-infected escaped farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., recaptured in a nearby river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhun, A S; Karlsbakk, E; Isachsen, C H; Omdal, L M; Eide Sørvik, A G; Skaala, Ø; Barlaup, B T; Glover, K A

    2015-02-01

    The role of escaped farmed salmon in spreading infectious agents from aquaculture to wild salmonid populations is largely unknown. This is a case study of potential disease interaction between escaped farmed and wild fish populations. In summer 2012, significant numbers of farmed Atlantic salmon were captured in the Hardangerfjord and in a local river. Genetic analyses of 59 of the escaped salmon and samples collected from six local salmon farms pointed out the most likely source farm, but two other farms had an overlapping genetic profile. The escapees were also analysed for three viruses that are prevalent in fish farming in Norway. Almost all the escaped salmon were infected with salmon alphavirus (SAV) and piscine reovirus (PRV). To use the infection profile to assist genetic methods in identifying the likely farm of origin, samples from the farms were also tested for these viruses. However, in the current case, all the three farms had an infection profile that was similar to that of the escapees. We have shown that double-virus-infected escaped salmon ascend a river close to the likely source farms, reinforcing the potential for spread of viruses to wild salmonids. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Fish Diseases published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Profile and functional analysis of small RNAs derived from Aspergillus fumigatus infected with double-stranded RNA mycoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Selin; Mohorianu, Irina; Xu, Ping; Dalmay, Tamas; Coutts, Robert H A

    2017-05-30

    Mycoviruses are viruses that naturally infect and replicate in fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic pathogen causing fungal lung diseases in humans and animals, was recently shown to harbour several different types of mycoviruses. A well-characterised defence against virus infection is RNA silencing. The A. fumigatus genome encodes essential components of the RNA silencing machinery, including Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) homologues. Active silencing of double-stranded (ds)RNA and the generation of small RNAs (sRNAs) has been shown for several mycoviruses and it is anticipated that a similar mechanism will be activated in A. fumigatus isolates infected with mycoviruses. To investigate the existence and nature of A. fumigatus sRNAs, sRNA-seq libraries of virus-free and virus-infected isolates were created using Scriptminer adapters and compared. Three dsRNA viruses were investigated: Aspergillus fumigatus partitivirus-1 (AfuPV-1, PV), Aspergillus fumigatus chrysovirus (AfuCV, CV) and Aspergillus fumigatus tetramycovirus-1 (AfuTmV-1, NK) which were selected because they induce phenotypic changes such as coloration and sectoring. The dsRNAs of all three viruses, which included two conventionally encapsidated ones PV and CV and one unencapsidated example NK, were silenced and yielded characteristic vsiRNAs together with co-incidental silencing of host fungal genes which shared sequence homology with the viral genomes. Virus-derived sRNAs were detected and characterised in the presence of virus infection. Differentially expressed A. fumigatus microRNA-like (miRNA-like) sRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were detected and validated. Host sRNA loci which were differentially expressed as a result of virus infection were also identified. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the sRNA profiles of A. fumigatus isolates.

  10. Melanocytes and melanin represent a first line of innate immunity against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Cecilia V; Falconer, Maryanne; Tempio, Fabián; Falcón, Felipe; López, Mercedes; Fuentes, Marisol; Alburquenque, Claudio; Amaro, José; Bucarey, Sergio A; Di Nardo, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Melanocytes are dendritic cells located in the skin and mucosae that synthesize melanin. Some infections induce hypo- or hyperpigmentation, which is associated with the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLR4. Candida albicans is an opportunist pathogen that can switch between blastoconidia and hyphae forms; the latter is associated with invasion. Our objectives in this study were to ascertain whether C. albicans induces pigmentation in melanocytes and whether this process is dependent on TLR activation, as well as relating this with the antifungal activity of melanin as a first line of innate immunity against fungal infections. Normal human melanocytes were stimulated with C. albicans supernatants or with crude extracts of the blastoconidia or hyphae forms, and pigmentation and TLR2/TLR4 expression were measured. Expression of the melanosomal antigens Melan-A and gp100 was examined for any correlation with increased melanin levels or antifungal activity in melanocyte lysates. Melanosomal antigens were induced earlier than cell pigmentation, and hyphae induced stronger melanization than blastoconidia. Notably, when melanocytes were stimulated with crude extracts of C. albicans, the cell surface expression of TLR2/TLR4 began at 48 h post-stimulation and peaked at 72 h. At this time, blastoconidia induced both TLR2 and TLR4 expression, whereas hyphae only induced TLR4 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that melanocytes play a key role in innate immune responses against C. albicans infections by recognizing pathogenic forms of C. albicans via TLR4, resulting in increased melanin content and inhibition of infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Low-Level Laser therapy on the fungal proliferation of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Araújo, Natália C.; Menezes, Rebeca F. d.; Moreno, Lara M.; Santos-Neto, Alexandrino d. P.; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth M.

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans plays an important role in triggering infections in HIV+ patients. The indiscriminate use of antifungals has led to resistance to Candida albicans, which requires new treatment alternatives for oral candidiasis. Low-level laser therapy promotes a considerable improvement in the healing of wounds and in curing illnesses caused by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser radiation on the cell proliferation of Candida albicans in immunosuppressed patients. Six Candida albicans strains that had been isolated from immunosuppressed patients were divided into a control group and experimental groups, which received eight sessions of laser therapy (InGaAlP, λ685nm, P = 30mW, CW, Φ~6 mm and GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW, CW, Φ~6 mm) using dosimetries of 6J/cm2, 8J/cm2, 10J/cm2 and 12J/cm2 for each wavelength and power. The results were not statistically significant (Kruskal Wallis, p > 0.05), although the proliferation of Candida albicans was lower in some of the experimental groups. The dosimetry of 6J/cm2 (GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW) provided lower mean scores than the other groups for the growth of Candida. Further studies are required to confirm whetehr laser therapy is a viable option in the treatment of fungal infections.

  13. The PHR Family: The Role of Extracellular Transglycosylases in Shaping Candida albicans Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Popolo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic microorganism that can become a pathogen causing mild superficial mycosis or more severe invasive infections that can be life-threatening for debilitated patients. In the etiology of invasive infections, key factors are the adaptability of C. albicans to the different niches of the human body and the transition from a yeast form to hypha. Hyphal morphology confers high adhesiveness to the host cells, as well as the ability to penetrate into organs. The cell wall plays a crucial role in the morphological changes C. albicans undergoes in response to specific environmental cues. Among the different categories of enzymes involved in the formation of the fungal cell wall, the GH72 family of transglycosylases plays an important assembly role. These enzymes cut and religate β-(1,3-glucan, the major determinant of cell shape. In C. albicans, the PHR family encodes GH72 enzymes, some of which work in specific environmental conditions. In this review, we will summarize the work from the initial discovery of PHR genes to the study of the pH-dependent expression of PHR1 and PHR2, from the characterization of the gene products to the recent findings concerning the stress response generated by the lack of GH72 activity in C. albicans hyphae.

  14. Candida albicans hyphal invasion: thigmotropism or chemotropism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J M; Stacey, A J; Gilligan, C A

    1999-02-15

    Hyphae of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans exhibit thigmotropic behaviour in vitro, in common with phytopathogenic and saprotrophic fungi. An examination of the literature on C. albicans hyphal penetration of epithelial and endothelial membranes does not support the premise that hyphal thigmotropism plays a major role in tissue invasion. Further experimentation is now required to assess thigmotropic behaviour on host membranes and vaginal epithelial cells are suggested as a test model. It is proposed that while thigmotropism may and invasion of tissue invaginations, chemotropism can explain C. albicans hyphal invasion patterns of both endothelium and epithelium.

  15. Genetic variability of Candida albicans in HIV/AIDS patient with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Puji Rahayu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is the mostly found oral manifestation in HIV/AIDS infected patient caused by immunocompromised especially immunodeficiency. Clinical symptoms is severe pain in oral cavity and dry mouth because of xerostomia which cause the loss of appetite. Candida albicans (C. albicans is normal flora in oral cavity which plays as opportunistic pathogen and also the cause of oral candidiasis. Almost 90% of HIV–infected patient have oral candidiasis. This condition is clinical problem which has not been well-managed yet. C. albicans colonized oral mucous cavity has different genetic variability for each strain. Phenotype of C. albicans has been determined by genetic factor and environtment. This condition stimulate differences of genotype among various strain of C. albicans in the world. Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyze the genetic variability of C.albicans which colonized in the mucous oral cavity of HIV/AIDS patient in Surabaya in the treatment with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS. Methods: This research has been identify and characterize the prevalent strain of C. albicans isolat in Surabaya (East Java in HIV/AIDS infected patient with oral candidiasis by method of Iatron candidal check. The highlight of this research including cytology examination by Papanicoloau staining, C. albicans culture, spheroplast making, DNA isolation and genetic variability checking by randomly amplyfied polymorphism DNA (RAPD. Results: C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of non-HIV patients had a predisposition of farther genetic relationship (genetic distance of 0.452 with C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of HIV ARV and HIV non-ARV patients. The genetic distance was ranging between 0 and 1, where 9 was long genetic distance and 1 was short genetic distance. In contrast, C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of HIV ARV have predisposition of closer genetic relationship (genetic distance of 0.762 with C. albicans colonizing

  16. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denkins, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation addresses questions concerning the effects of UV radiation on the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. UV radiation decreased the survival of Candida-infected mice; however, no correlation was found between suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and the course of lethal infection. This suggested that DTH was not protective against lethal disease with this organism. UV radiation also changed the persistence of the organism in the internal organs. UV-irradiated, infected animals had increased numbers of Candida in their kidneys compared to non-irradiated mice. Sensitization prior to UV irradiation aided clearance of the organism from the kidneys of UV-irradiated mice. These data show that UV radiation suppresses cell-mediated immunity to Candida albicans in mice and increases mortality of Candida-infected mice. Moreover, the data suggest that an increase in environmental UV radiation could increase the severity of pathogenic infections

  17. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of essential oils against Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandras, Narcisa; Nostro, Antonia; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Banche, Giuliana; Ghisetti, Valeria; Del Re, Simonetta; Fucale, Giacomo; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2016-08-30

    The management of Candida infections faces many problems, such as a limited number of antifungal drugs, toxicity, resistance of Candida to commonly antifungal drugs, relapse of Candida infections, and the high cost of antifungal drugs. Though azole antifungal agents and derivatives continue to dominate as drugs of choice against Candida infections, there are many available data referring to the anticandidal activity of essential oils. Since we have previous observed a good antimicrobial activity of some essential oils against filamentous fungi, the aim of this study was to extend the research to evaluate the activity of the same oils on Candida albicans, C.glabrata and C.tropicalis clinical strains, as well as the effects of related components. Essential oils selection was based both on ethnomedicinal use and on proved antibacterial and/or antifungal activity of some of these oils. Fluconazole and voriconazole were used as reference drugs. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) of essential oils (thyme red, fennel, clove, pine, sage, lemon balm, and lavender) and their major components were investigated by the broth microdilution method (BM) and the vapour contact assay (VC). Using BM, pine oil showed the best activity against all strains tested, though C.albicans was more susceptible than C.glabrata and C.tropicalis (MIC50-MIC90 = 0.06 %, v/v). On the contrary, sage oil displayed a weak activity (MIC50-MIC90 = 1 %, v/v). Thyme red oil (MIC50-MIC90 ≤ 0.0038 %, v/v for C.albicans and C.tropicalis, and 0.0078- Candida spp., including fluconazole/voriconazole resistant strains. These data encourage adequately controlled and randomized clinical investigations. The use in vapour phase could have additional advantages without requiring direct contact, resulting in easy of environmental application such as in hospital, and/or in school.

  18. The Functions of Mediator in Candida albicans Support a Role in Shaping Species-Specific Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelicic, Branka; Lo, Tricia L.; Beaurepaire, Cecile; Bantun, Farkad; Quenault, Tara; Boag, Peter R.; Ramm, Georg; Callaghan, Judy; Beilharz, Traude H.; Nantel, André; Peleg, Anton Y.; Traven, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The Mediator complex is an essential co-regulator of RNA polymerase II that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. Here we present the first study of Mediator in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We focused on the Middle domain subunit Med31, the Head domain subunit Med20, and Srb9/Med13 from the Kinase domain. The C. albicans Mediator shares some roles with model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, such as functions in the response to certain stresses and the role of Med31 in the expression of genes regulated by the activator Ace2. The C. albicans Mediator also has additional roles in the transcription of genes associated with virulence, for example genes related to morphogenesis and gene families enriched in pathogens, such as the ALS adhesins. Consistently, Med31, Med20, and Srb9/Med13 contribute to key virulence attributes of C. albicans, filamentation, and biofilm formation; and ALS1 is a biologically relevant target of Med31 for development of biofilms. Furthermore, Med31 affects virulence of C. albicans in the worm infection model. We present evidence that the roles of Med31 and Srb9/Med13 in the expression of the genes encoding cell wall adhesins are different between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans: they are repressors of the FLO genes in S. cerevisiae and are activators of the ALS genes in C. albicans. This suggests that Mediator subunits regulate adhesion in a distinct manner between these two distantly related fungal species. PMID:22496666

  19. The functions of Mediator in Candida albicans support a role in shaping species-specific gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Uwamahoro

    Full Text Available The Mediator complex is an essential co-regulator of RNA polymerase II that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. Here we present the first study of Mediator in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We focused on the Middle domain subunit Med31, the Head domain subunit Med20, and Srb9/Med13 from the Kinase domain. The C. albicans Mediator shares some roles with model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, such as functions in the response to certain stresses and the role of Med31 in the expression of genes regulated by the activator Ace2. The C. albicans Mediator also has additional roles in the transcription of genes associated with virulence, for example genes related to morphogenesis and gene families enriched in pathogens, such as the ALS adhesins. Consistently, Med31, Med20, and Srb9/Med13 contribute to key virulence attributes of C. albicans, filamentation, and biofilm formation; and ALS1 is a biologically relevant target of Med31 for development of biofilms. Furthermore, Med31 affects virulence of C. albicans in the worm infection model. We present evidence that the roles of Med31 and Srb9/Med13 in the expression of the genes encoding cell wall adhesins are different between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans: they are repressors of the FLO genes in S. cerevisiae and are activators of the ALS genes in C. albicans. This suggests that Mediator subunits regulate adhesion in a distinct manner between these two distantly related fungal species.

  20. Whole RNA-Sequencing and Transcriptome Assembly of Candida albicans and Candida africana under Chlamydospore-Inducing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giosa, Domenico; Felice, Maria Rosa; Lawrence, Travis J; Gulati, Megha; Scordino, Fabio; Giuffrè, Letterio; Lo Passo, Carla; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Criseo, Giuseppe; Ardell, David H; Hernday, Aaron D; Nobile, Clarissa J; Romeo, Orazio

    2017-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of life-threatening fungal infections in humans, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Crucial to its success as an opportunistic pathogen is the considerable dynamism of its genome, which readily undergoes genetic changes generating new phenotypes and shaping the evolution of new strains. Candida africana is an intriguing C. albicans biovariant strain that exhibits remarkable genetic and phenotypic differences when compared with standard C. albicans isolates. Candida africana is well-known for its low degree of virulence compared with C. albicans and for its inability to produce chlamydospores that C. albicans, characteristically, produces under certain environmental conditions. Chlamydospores are large, spherical structures, whose biological function is still unknown. For this reason, we have sequenced, assembled, and annotated the whole transcriptomes obtained from an efficient C. albicans chlamydospore-producing clinical strain (GE1), compared with the natural chlamydospore-negative C. africana clinical strain (CBS 11016). The transcriptomes of both C. albicans (GE1) and C. africana (CBS 11016) clinical strains, grown under chlamydospore-inducing conditions, were sequenced and assembled into 7,442 (GE1 strain) and 8,370 (CBS 11016 strain) high quality transcripts, respectively. The release of the first assembly of the C. africana transcriptome will allow future comparative studies to better understand the biology and evolution of this important human fungal pathogen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. A single-stranded RNA copy of the Giardia lamblia virus double-stranded RNA genome is present in the infected Giardia lamblia.

    OpenAIRE

    Furfine, E S; White, T C; Wang, A L; Wang, C C

    1989-01-01

    An isolate of Giardia lamblia infected with the double-stranded RNA virus (GLV) has two major species of RNA that are not present in an uninfected isolate. One of these species is the previously characterized double-stranded RNA genome of GLV (1). The second species of RNA appears to be a full length copy of one strand of the double-stranded RNA genome. This full length single-stranded RNA is not present in viral particles isolated from the growth medium. The cellular concentration of the sin...

  2. Triclosan antagonises fluconazole activity against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    MORAN, GARY

    2012-01-01

    Epub October 4th Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L) triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1? and cdr2? strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole upt...

  3. Estradiol impairs the Th17 immune response against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relloso, Miguel; Aragoneses-Fenoll, Laura; Lasarte, Sandra; Bourgeois, Christelle; Romera, Gema; Kuchler, Karl; Corbí, Angel L; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Nombela, César; Rodríguez-Fernández, José L; Diez-Orejas, Rosalia

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal opportunistic pathogen that is also a member of gastrointestinal and reproductive tract microbiota. Exogenous factors, such as oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, and estradiol, may affect susceptibility to Candida infection, although the mechanisms involved in this process have not been elucidated. We used a systemic candidiasis model to investigate how estradiol confers susceptibility to infection. We report that estradiol increases mouse susceptibility to systemic candidiasis, as in vivo and ex vivo estradiol-treated DCs were less efficient at up-regulating antigen-presenting machinery, pathogen killing, migration, IL-23 production, and triggering of the Th17 immune response. Based on these results, we propose that estradiol impairs DC function, thus explaining the increased susceptibility to infection during estrus.

  4. Influência de Lactobacillus rhamnosus na patogenicidade e na expressão de genes de virulência de Candida albicans: estudo in vitro e in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Felipe de Camargo [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of candidiasis caused by Candida albicans and the adaptability of this species, as well as resistance to antifungal drive the development of research on alternative therapies to control this infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and products of their metabolism against C. albicans, evaluating the pathogenicity and the expression of genes that regulate the formation of C. albicans biofilms in vitro and in vivo in invertebra...

  5. PPARγ controls Dectin-1 expression required for host antifungal defense against Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galès, Amandine; Conduché, Annabelle; Bernad, José

    2010-01-01

    We recently showed that IL-13 or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands attenuate Candida albicans colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Here, using a macrophage-specific Dectin-1 deficient mice model, we demonstrate that Dectin-1 is essential to control fungal...... gastrointestinal infection by PPARgamma ligands. We also show that the phagocytosis of yeast and the release of reactive oxygen intermediates in response to Candida albicans challenge are impaired in macrophages from Dectin-1 deficient mice treated with PPARgamma ligands or IL-13. Although the Mannose Receptor...... is not sufficient to trigger antifungal functions during the alternative activation of macrophages, our data establish the involvement of the Mannose Receptor in the initial recognition of non-opsonized Candida albicans by macrophages. We also demonstrate for the first time that the modulation of Dectin-1...

  6. Oral Immunization Against Candidiasis Using Lactobacillus casei Displaying Enolase 1 from Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Tafuku, Senji; Aoki, Wataru; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Candidiasis is a common fungal infection that is prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. In this study, an oral vaccine against Candida albicans was developed by using the molecular display approach. Enolase 1 protein (Eno1p) of C. albicans was expressed on the Lactobacillus casei cell surface by using poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex A from Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring protein. The Eno1p-displaying L. casei cells were used to immunize mice, which were later challenged with a lethal dose of C. albicans. The data indicated that the vaccine elicited a strong IgG response and increased the survival rate of the vaccinated mice. Furthermore, L. casei acted as a potent adjuvant and induced high antibody titers that were comparable to those induced by strong adjuvants such as the cholera toxin. Overall, the molecular display method can be used to rapidly develop vaccines that can be conveniently administered and require minimal processing.

  7. Inhibitory effects of the essential oils α-longipinene and linalool on biofilm formation and hyphal growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Kim, Soon-Il; Lee, Jintae

    2017-02-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogens, and causes systemic and invasive infections in humans. C. albicans biofilms are composed of yeast and hyphal and pseudohyphal elements, and the transition of yeast to the hyphal stage could be a virulence factor. In this study, diverse essential oils were initially investigated for anti-biofilm activity against C. albicans strains, and cascarilla bark oil and helichrysum oil and their components α-longipinene (a major constituent of both) and linalool were found to markedly inhibit biofilm formation without affecting planktonic cell growth. Moreover, α-longipinene and linalool were found to synergistically reduce biofilm formation. Notably, treatments with cascarilla bark oil, helichrysum oil, α-longipinene, or linalool clearly inhibited hyphal formation, and this appeared to be largely responsible for their anti-biofilm effect. Furthermore, the two essential oils, α-longipinene and linalool, reduced C. albicans virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans.

  8. Sensitivity of Candida albicans to essential oils: are they an alternative to antifungal agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, E; Cantamessa, S; Pavan, M; Novello, G; Massa, N; Rocchetti, A; Berta, G; Gamalero, E

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, responsible for the majority of yeast infections in humans. Essential oils, extracted from aromatic plants, are well-known antimicrobial agents, characterized by a broad spectrum of activities, including antifungal properties. The aim of this work was to assess the sensitivity of 30 different vaginal isolated strains of C. albicans to 12 essential oils, compared to the three main used drugs (clotrimazole, fluconazole and itraconazole). Thirty strains of C. albicans were isolated from vaginal swab on CHROMagar ™ Candida. The agar disc diffusion method was employed to determine the sensitivity to the essential oils. The antifungal activity of the essential oils and antifungal drugs (clotrimazole, itraconazole and fluconazole) were investigated using a microdilution method. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed to get a deep inside on cellular damages. Mint, basil, lavender, tea tree oil, winter savory and oregano essential oils inhibited both the growth and the activity of C. albicans more efficiently than clotrimazole. Damages induced by essential oils at the cellular level were stronger than those caused by clotrimazole. Candida albicans is more sensitive to different essential oils compared to the main used drugs. Moreover, the essential oil affected mainly the cell wall and the membranes of the yeast. The results of this work support the research for new alternatives or complementary therapies against vaginal candidiasis. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Conserved and divergent roles of Bcr1 and CFEM proteins in Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ding

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is a pathogenic fungus that is major cause of hospital-acquired infection, predominantly due to growth as biofilms on indwelling medical devices. It is related to Candida albicans, which remains the most common cause of candidiasis disease in humans. The transcription factor Bcr1 is an important regulator of biofilm formation in vitro in both C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. We show here that C. parapsilosis Bcr1 is required for in vivo biofilm development in a rat catheter model, like C. albicans. By comparing the transcription profiles of a bcr1 deletion in both species we found that regulation of expression of the CFEM family is conserved. In C. albicans, three of the five CFEM cell wall proteins (Rbt5, Pga7 and Csa1 are associated with both biofilm formation and acquisition of iron from heme, which is an important virulence characteristic. In C. parapsilosis, the CFEM family has undergone an expansion to 7 members. Expression of three genes (CFEM2, CFEM3, and CFEM6 is dependent on Bcr1, and is induced in low iron conditions. All three are involved in the acquisition of iron from heme. However, deletion of the three CFEM genes has no effect on biofilm formation in C. parapsilosis. Our data suggest that the role of the CFEM family in iron acquisition is conserved between C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, but their role in biofilm formation is not.

  10. Influence of cancer treatment on the Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavities of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramla, Shilpa; Sharma, Vinay; Patel, Mrudula

    2016-06-01

    Cancer treatment causes mucositis and the manifestation of oral candidiasis. This study investigated the virulence properties and antifungal susceptibilities of Candida albicans isolated from cancer patients undergoing therapy. C. albicans were isolated from 49 patients on cancer treatment and 21 healthy individuals and their virulence attributes measured. A correlation was determined between the length of treatment and the fungal counts and their virulence factors. Although Candida carriage was similar in all the study groups, high quantities of C. albicans and variety of Candida were found in cancer patients. Germ tubes were produced by all the strains. Significantly high number of yeast isolated from radiotherapy and chemotherapy produced large quantities of phospholipase compared to healthy individuals (p albicans. Proteinase production was seen in a significant number of isolates from the radiotherapy group (p albicans in cancer patients on therapy which also increased with the length of chemotherapy suggesting enhanced risk of oral and systemic infection. Therefore, during treatment, prophylactic topical antifungal therapy may be considered.

  11. The game theory of Candida albicans colonization dynamics reveals host status-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Katarzyna M; Herwald, Sanna E; Hogan, Jennifer A; Pierce, Jessica V; Klipp, Edda; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans colonizes the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mammalian hosts as a benign commensal. However, in an immunocompromised host, the fungus is capable of causing life-threatening infection. We previously showed that the major transcription factor Efg1p is differentially expressed in GI-colonizing C. albicans cells dependent on the host immune status. To understand the mechanisms that underlie this host-dependent differential gene expression, we utilized mathematical modeling to dissect host-pathogen interactions. Specifically, we used principles of evolutionary game theory to study the mechanism that governs dynamics of EFG1 expression during C. albicans colonization. Mathematical modeling predicted that down-regulation of EFG1 expression within individual fungal cells occurred at different average rates in different hosts. Rather than using relatively transient signaling pathways to adapt to a new environment, we demonstrate that C. albicans overcomes the host defense strategy by modulating the activity of diverse fungal histone modifying enzymes that control EFG1 expression. Based on our modeling and experimental results we conclude that C. albicans cells sense the local environment of the GI tract and respond to differences by altering EFG1 expression to establish optimal survival strategies. We show that the overall process is governed via modulation of epigenetic regulators of chromatin structure.

  12. Incorporation of triclosan and acridine orange into liposomes for evaluating the susceptibility of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romio, Karla B; Dos Santos, Kevin F; da Silva, Romário J; Pedro, Maria F C; Kalck, Alessandro S; da Silva Sousa, Marcos; Possamai, Leandro M; Souto, Paula C S; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2017-08-01

    Candida albicans is responsible for many of the infections affecting immunocompromised individuals. Although most C. albicans are susceptible to antifungal drugs, uncontrolled use of these drugs has promoted the development of resistance to current antifungals. The clinical implication of resistant strains has led to the search for safer and more effective drugs as well as alternative approaches, such as controlled drug release using liposomes and photodynamic inactivation (PDI), to eliminate pathogens by combining light and photosensitizers. In this study, we used layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly to immobilize triclosan and acridine orange encapsulated in liposomes and investigated the possibility of controlled release using light. Experiments were carried out to examine the susceptibility of C. albicans to PDI. The effects of laser irradiation were investigated by fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and release kinetics. Liposomes were successfully prepared and immobilized using the self-assembly LBL technique. Triclosan was released more quickly when the LBL film was irradiated. The release rate was approximately 40% higher in irradiated films (fluence of 15J/cm 2 ) than in non-irradiated films. The results of the susceptibility experiments and surface morphological analysis indicated that C. albicans cell death is caused by photodynamic inactivation. Liposomes containing triclosan and acridine orange may be useful for inactivating C. albicans using light. Our results lay the foundation for the development of new clinical strategies to control resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Susceptibility of Candida albicans Isolated from Blood to Wickerhamomyces anomalous Mycocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Ana Paula; Persel, Cristiane; Serafin, Cleber Fernando; de Cássia Garcia Simão, Rita; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of infections caused by Candida albicans in developed and developing countries and their resistance to some available antifungal drugs have been viewed as causing a great problem to human health worldwide. In order to find new researched molecules, there are some mycoses secreted by yeasts, especially mycocins produced by Wickerhamomyces anomalus with a broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity. Thus, this trial aimed at evaluating mycocins' activity obtained from environmental W. anomalus cell wall compared to thirty C. albicans strains isolated from blood. Mycocins were extracted from cell walls of three W. anomalus strains (WA40, WA45, and WA92). The 400 μg mL -1 concentration of WA40M1, WA45M2, and WA92M3 mycocin extracts showed the following respective activity results: 96.6, 96.6, and 90.0 % C. albicans strains. WA45M2 and WA92M3 mycocin extracts showed some activity in 3.3 % of C. albicans strains at 50 μg mL -1 concentration. Mycocins extracted from cell walls of three W. anomalus strains named as WA40, WA45, and WA92 showed antifungal activity compared to C. albicans and low degree of hemolysis.

  14. Antifungal effects of undecylenic acid on the biofilm formation of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongmei; Zhao, Yaxin; Yan, Hongxia; Fu, Hongjun; Shen, Yongnian; Lu, Guixia; Mei, Huan; Qiu, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-05-01

    Undecylenic acid can effectively control skin fungal infection, but the mechanism of its fungal inhibition is unclear. Hyphal growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and biofilm formation have been well recognized as important virulence factors for the initiation of skin infection and late development of disseminated infection. In this study, we seek to investigate antifungal mechanisms of undecylenic acid by evaluating the virulence factors of C. albicans during biofilm formation. We found that undecylenic acid inhibits biofilm formation of C. albicans effectively with optimal concentration above 3 mM. In the presence of this compound, the morphological transition from yeast to filamentous phase is abolished ultimately when the concentration of undecylenic acid is above 4 mM. Meanwhile, the cell surface is crumpled, and cells display an atrophic appearance under scanning electron microscopy even with low concentration of drug treatment. On the other hand, the drug treatment decreases the transcriptions of hydrolytic enzymes such as secreted aspartic protease, lipase, and phospholipase. Hyphal formation related genes, like HWP1, are significantly reduced in transcriptional level in drug-treated biofilm condition as well. The down-regulated profile of these genes leads to a poorly organized biofilm in undecylenic acid treated environment.

  15. Therapeutic strategy for pandrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae severe infections: short-course treatment with colistin increases the in vivo and in vitro activity of double carbapenem regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Oliva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae represent an emerging threat due to the high mortality rate and lack of valid antimicrobial combinations, especially when the strain is colistin-resistant. We report a case of bloodstream infection due to pandrug-resistant K. pneumoniae treated successfully with an innovative regimen comprising a combination of colistin plus double carbapenem, along with an in vitro analysis showing the synergistic and bactericidal effect.

  16. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing.

  17. Prevalence of candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesion of early childhood caries (ECC) according to sampling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Sefidgar, Seyed Ali Asghar; Eyzadian, Haniyeh; Gharakhani, Samaneh

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans may have cariogenic potential but its role in caries etiology has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine candida albicans in supragingival dental plaque and infected dentine of cervical and proximal in early childhood caries (ECC). This cross-sectional study was carried out on 6o children aged 2-5 years, which were divided into 3 groups: children with at least one cervical caries; children with at least one proximal caries and caries-free. The infected dentine was collected from cervical and proximal caries lesions and plaque samples were collected from the three groups in order to compare the frequency of candida albicans in the collected sites. All samples were cultured in Sabouraud and CHROMagar medium and the cases that were positive for candida albicans were cultured in germ tube. Data were collected and analyzed. The mean age of the children was 3.9 years. From 100 samples, candida albicans samples were isolated in 55%, mold fungi were found in 29% cases and there was no fungal growth in 16% of the samples. In plaque samples, candida albicans were found in 15% of caries-free samples, 20% of the proximal and 80% of the cervical caries. In samples extracted from the caries, candida albicans were found in 60% of the proximal and 100% of the cervical caries. Mothers with university educational level had children with more cervical decays, caries free and proximal caries, respectively. The results showed that prevalence of Candida albicans in dental plaque and caries lesions of children with early childhood caries were relatively high and the prevalence was higher in cervical caries group.

  18. Plasticity of Candida albicans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karla J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans, the most pervasive fungal pathogen that colonizes humans, forms biofilms that are architecturally complex. They consist of a basal yeast cell polylayer and an upper region of hyphae encapsulated in extracellular matrix. However, biofilms formed in vitro vary as a result of the different conditions employed in models, the methods used to assess biofilm formation, strain differences, and, in a most dramatic fashion, the configuration of the mating type locus (MTL). Therefore, integrating data from different studies can lead to problems of interpretation if such variability is not taken into account. Here we review the conditions and factors that cause biofilm variation, with the goal of engendering awareness that more attention must be paid to the strains employed, the methods used to assess biofilm development, every aspect of the model employed, and the configuration of the MTL locus. We end by posing a set of questions that may be asked in comparing the results of different studies and developing protocols for new ones. This review should engender the notion that not all biofilms are created equal. PMID:27250770

  19. Candida albicans ISW2 Regulates Chlamydospore Suspensor Cell Formation and Virulence In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of chlamydospores by Candida albicans was an established medical diagnostic test to confirm candidiasis before the molecular era. However, the functional role and pathological relevance of this in vitro morphological transition to pathogenesis in vivo remain unclear. We compared the physical properties of in vitro-induced chlamydospores with those of large C. albicans cells purified by density gradient centrifugation from Candida-infected mouse kidneys. The morphological and physical properties of these cells in kidneys of mice infected intravenously with wild type C. albicans confirmed that chlamydospores can form in infected kidneys. A previously reported chlamydospore-null Δisw2/Δisw2 mutant was used to investigate its role in virulence and chlamydospore induction. Virulence of the Δisw2/Δisw2 mutant strain was reduced 3.4-fold compared to wild type C. albicans or the ISW2 reconstituted strain. Altered host inflammatory reactions to the null mutant further indicate that ISW2 is a virulence factor in C. albicans. ISW2 deletion abolished chlamydospore formation within infected mouse kidneys, whereas the reconstituted strain restored chlamydospore formation in kidneys. Under chlamydospore inducing conditions in vitro, deletion of ISW2 significantly delayed chlamydospore formation, and those late induced chlamydospores lacked associated suspensor cells while attaching laterally to hyphae via novel spore-hypha septa. Our findings establish the induction of chlamydospores by C. albicans during mouse kidney colonization. Our results indicate that ISW2 is not strictly required for chlamydospores formation but is necessary for suspensor cell formation. The importance of ISW2 in chlamydospore morphogenesis and virulence may lead to additional insights into morphological differentiation and pathogenesis of C. albicans in the host microenvironment. PMID:27727302

  20. Innate immune recognition of double-stranded RNA triggers increased expression of NKG2D ligands after virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteso, Gloria; Guerra, Susana; Valés-Gómez, Mar; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2017-12-15

    Self/non-self-discrimination by the innate immune system relies on germline-encoded, non-rearranging receptors expressed by innate immune cells recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) receptor is a potent immune-activating receptor that binds human genome-encoded ligands, whose expression is negligible in normal tissues, but increased in stress and disease conditions for reasons that are incompletely understood. Here it is not clear how the immune system reconciles receptor binding of self-proteins with self/non-self-discrimination to avoid autoreactivity. We now report that increased expression of NKG2D ligands after virus infection depends on interferon response factors activated by the detection of viral double-stranded RNA by pattern-recognition receptors (RIG-I/MDA-5) and that NKG2D ligand up-regulation can be blocked by the expression of viral dsRNA-binding proteins. Thus, innate immunity-mediated recognition of viral nucleic acids triggers the infected cell to release interferon for NK cell recruitment and to express NKG2D ligands to become more visible to the immune system. Finally, the observation that NKG2D-ligand induction is a consequence of signaling by pattern-recognition receptors that have been selected over evolutionary time to be highly pathogen-specific explains how the risks of autoreactivity in this system are minimized. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) promotes EIAV replication and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Na, Lei; Fu, Li-Hua; Yang, Fei; Zhu, Chun-Hui; Tang, Li; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jia-Yi; Li, Zhan; Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Cheng-Yao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) have been reported to be functional on various viruses. ADAR1 may exhibit antiviral or proviral activity depending on the type of virus. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is the most well-studied lentivirus with respect to its interaction with ADAR1, and variable results have been reported. In this study, we demonstrated that equine ADAR1 (eADAR1) was a positive regulator of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), another lentivirus of the Retroviridae family. First, eADAR1 significantly promoted EIAV replication, and the enhancement of viral protein expression was associated with the long terminal repeat (LTR) and Rev response element (RRE) regions. Second, the RNA binding domain 1 of eADAR1 was essential only for enhancing LTR-mediated gene expression. Third, in contrast with APOBEC proteins, which have been shown to reduce lentiviral infectivity, eADAR1 increased the EIAV infectivity. This study indicated that eADAR1 was proviral rather than antiviral for EIAV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection of aptamers for Candida albicans by cell-SELEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Alessandra Nunes Duarte

    2017-01-01

    The growing concern with invasive fungal infections, responsible for an alarming mortality rate of immunosuppressed patients and in Intensive Care Units, evidences the need for a fast and specific method for the Candida albicans detection, since this species is identified as one of the main causes of septicemia. Commonly, it is a challenge for clinicians to determine the primary infection foci, the dissemination degree, or whether the site of a particular surgery is involved. Although scintigraphic imaging represents a promising tool for infectious foci detection, it still lacks a methodology for C. albicans diagnosis due to the absence of specific radiotracers for this microorganism. Aptamers are molecules that have almost ideal properties for use as diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, such as high specificity for their molecular targets, lack of immunogenicity and toxicity, high tissue penetration and rapid blood clearance. Aptamers can also be labeled with different radionuclides. This work aims to obtain aptamers for specific binding to C. albicans cells for future application as a radiopharmaceutical. It was used a variation of the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment) technique, termed cell-SELEX, in which cells are the targets for selection. A selection protocol was standardized using a random library of single-stranded oligonucleotides, each containing two fixed regions flanking a sequence of 40 random nucleotides. This library was incubated with C. albicans cells in the presence of competitors. Then, the binding sequences were separated by centrifugation, resuspended and amplified by PCR. The amplification was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. After that, the ligands were purified to obtain a new pool of ssDNA, from which a new incubation was carried out. The selection parameters were gradually modified in order to increase stringency. This cycle was repeated 12 times to allow the selection of sequences with the maximum

  3. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (...

  4. Effects of influenza plus pneumococcal conjugate vaccination versus influenza vaccination alone in preventing respiratory tract infections in children : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Hoes, Arno W; van Loon, Anton M; Hak, Eelko

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of influenza vaccination with or without heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. STUDY DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprising 579 children age 18 to 72 months with

  5. Single-dose fluconazole versus standard 2-week therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.M.; Matee, M.I.N.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Moshi, M.J.; Simon, E.N.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Verweij, P.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection affecting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because of convenience, cost, and reluctance to complicate antiretroviral treatment regimens, single-dose fluconazole may be a favorable regimen for

  6. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Interaction, with Focus on the Role of Eicosanoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Ruan; Ells, Ruan; Swart, Chantel W.; Sebolai, Olihile M.; Albertyn, Jacobus; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is commonly found in mixed infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, especially in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Both of these opportunistic pathogens are able to form resistant biofilms and frequently infect immunocompromised individuals. The interaction between these two pathogens, which includes physical interaction as well as secreted factors, is mainly antagonistic. In addition, research suggests considerable interaction with their host, especially with immunomodulatory lipid mediators, termed eicosanoids. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are both able to utilize arachidonic acid (AA), liberated from the host cells during infection, to form eicosanoids. The production of these eicosanoids, such as Prostaglandin E2, by the host and the pathogens may affect the dynamics of polymicrobial infection and the outcome of infections. It is of considerable importance to elucidate the role of host-produced, as well as pathogen-produced eicosanoids in polymicrobial infection. This review will focus on in vitro as well as in vivo interaction between C. albicans and P. aeruginosa, paying special attention to the role of eicosanoids in the cross-talk between host and the pathogens. PMID:26955357

  7. Double blow: Alien crayfish infected with invasive temnocephalan in South African waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis du Preez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trade in live, freshwater crayfish for ornamental markets, as well as for aquaculture, has grown rapidly and has become the major pathway for the introduction of non-indigenous crayfish species to several countries worldwide. Here we report on the first record of the Australian "redclaw" Cherax quadracarinatus in the natural waters of a game reserve in South Africa. To compound the situation, these redclaw crayfish were infected with a non-indigenous temnocephalan flatworm parasite. Both crayfish and temnocephalan were in full breeding condition, with young. Further spreading of this crayfish to the subtropical, water-rich, northern KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa and southern Mozambique is predicted. Not only might the crayfish compete with indigenous aquatic invertebrates but the non-host-specific temnocephalan might transfer to local decapods, such as freshwater crabs.

  8. Two Novel Relative Double-Stranded RNA Mycoviruses Infecting Fusarium poae Strain SX63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luan; Zhang, Jingze; Zhang, Hailong; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-04-30

    Two novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses, termed Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 2 (FpV2) and Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 3 (FpV3), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium poae strain SX63, and molecularly characterized. FpV2 and FpV3, with respective genome sequences of 9518 and 9419 base pairs (bps), are both predicted to contain two discontinuous open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. A hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) are encoded by ORF1 and ORF2, respectively. Phytoreo_S7 domain (pfam07236) homologs were detected downstream of the RdRp domain (RdRp_4; pfam02123) of the ORF2-coded proteins of both FpV2 and FpV3. The same shifty heptamers (GGAAAAC) were both found immediately before the stop codon UAG of ORF1 in FpV2 and FpV3, which could mediate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Phylogenetic analysis based on RdRp sequences clearly place FpV2 and FpV3 in a taxonomically unassigned dsRNA mycovirus group. Together, with a comparison of genome organization, a new taxonomic family termed Fusagraviridae is proposed to be created to include FpV2- and FpV3-related dsRNA mycoviruses, within which FpV2 and FpV3 would represent two distinct virus species.

  9. Property differences among the four major Candida albicans strain clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Donna M; Castillo, Luis; Nather, Kerstin; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P; Gow, Neil A R; Odds, Frank C

    2009-03-01

    A selection of 43 Candida albicans isolates, chosen to represent the four major strain clades of the species and also intraclade diversity, was screened for their virulence in the murine intravenous challenge model of C. albicans infection, for a range of properties measurable in vitro that might relate to virulence, and for the numbers of midrepeat sequences in genes of the ALS and HYR families. Heterozygosity at the mating type locus and low whole-cell acid phosphatase activity and growth rate at 40 degrees C were found to be significantly positively associated with the most virulent isolates. Acid phosphatase activity and growth in 2 M NaCl were statistically significant variables between clades by univariate analysis. Isolates in different clades also differed significantly in midrepeat sequence alleles of ALS2, ALS4, ALS6, ALS7, ALS9, HYR1, and HYR2. There was no association between the midrepeat alleles of any ALS or HYR gene and the virulence of isolates to mice. Genome-wide transcript profiles of 20 isolates (5 per clade) grown under two conditions showed considerable variation between individual isolates, but only a small number of genes showed statistically significant differential gene expression between clades. Analysis of the expression profiles by overall strain virulence revealed 18 open reading frames differing significantly between isolates of high, intermediate, and low virulence. Four of these genes encoded functions related to phosphate uptake and metabolism. This finding and the significant association between whole-cell acid phosphatase activity and virulence led us to disrupt PHO100, which encodes a predicted periplasmic acid phosphatase. The pho100Delta mutant was mildly but significantly attenuated in terms of survival curves in the mouse model. The study has extended the range of properties known to differ between C. albicans clades and suggests a possible but minor role of phosphate metabolism in the virulence of the species.

  10. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  11. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  12. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  13. Profiling of Candida albicans gene expression during intra-abdominal candidiasis identifies biologic processes involved in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoji; Clancy, Cornelius J; Xu, Wenjie; Schneider, Frank; Hao, Binghua; Mitchell, Aaron P; Nguyen, M Hong

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of intra-abdominal candidiasis is poorly understood. Mice were intraperitoneally infected with Candida albicans (1 × 10(6) colony-forming units) and sterile stool. nanoString assays were used to quantitate messenger RNA for 145 C. albicans genes within the peritoneal cavity at 48 hours. Within 6 hours after infection, mice developed peritonitis, characterized by high yeast burdens, neutrophil influx, and a pH of 7.9 within peritoneal fluid. Organ invasion by hyphae and early abscess formation were evident 6 and 24 hours after infection, respectively; abscesses resolved by day 14. nanoString assays revealed adhesion and responses to alkaline pH, osmolarity, and stress as biologic processes activated in the peritoneal cavity. Disruption of the highly-expressed gene RIM101, which encodes an alkaline-regulated transcription factor, did not impact cellular morphology but reduced both C. albicans burden during early peritonitis and C. albicans persistence within abscesses. RIM101 influenced expression of 49 genes during intra-abdominal candidiasis, including previously unidentified Rim101 targets. Overexpression of the RIM101-dependent gene SAP5, which encodes a secreted protease, restored the ability of a rim101 mutant to persist within abscesses. A mouse model of intra-abdominal candidiasis is valuable for studying pathogenesis and C. albicans gene expression. RIM101 contributes to persistence within intra-abdominal abscesses, at least in part through activation of SAP5.

  14. Early double-negative thymocyte export in Trypanosoma cruzi infection is restricted by sphingosine receptors and associated with human chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Lepletier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments. Acute infection results in severe atrophy of the organ and early release of immature thymocytes into the periphery. To date, the pathophysiological effects of thymic changes promoted by parasite-inducing premature release of thymocytes to the periphery has remained elusive. Herein, we show that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a potent mediator of T cell chemotaxis, plays a role in the exit of immature double-negative thymocytes in experimental Chagas disease. In thymuses from T. cruzi-infected mice we detected reduced transcription of the S1P kinase 1 and 2 genes related to S1P biosynthesis, together with increased transcription of the SGPL1 sphingosine-1-lyase gene, whose product inactivates S1P. These changes were associated with reduced intrathymic levels of S1P kinase activity. Interestingly, double-negative thymocytes from infected animals expressed high levels of the S1P receptor during infection, and migrated to lower levels of S1P. Moreover, during T. cruzi infection, this thymocyte subset expresses high levels of IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines upon polyclonal stimulation. In vivo treatment with the S1P receptor antagonist FTY720 resulted in recovery the numbers of double-negative thymocytes in infected thymuses to physiological levels. Finally, we showed increased numbers of double-negative T cells in the peripheral blood in severe cardiac forms of human Chagas disease.

  15. Early Double-Negative Thymocyte Export in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Restricted by Sphingosine Receptors and Associated with Human Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Almeida, Liliane; Santos, Leonardo; da Silva Sampaio, Luzia; Paredes, Bruno; González, Florencia Belén; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Beloscar, Juan; Bottasso, Oscar; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments. Acute infection results in severe atrophy of the organ and early release of immature thymocytes into the periphery. To date, the pathophysiological effects of thymic changes promoted by parasite-inducing premature release of thymocytes to the periphery has remained elusive. Herein, we show that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent mediator of T cell chemotaxis, plays a role in the exit of immature double-negative thymocytes in experimental Chagas disease. In thymuses from T. cruzi-infected mice we detected reduced transcription of the S1P kinase 1 and 2 genes related to S1P biosynthesis, together with increased transcription of the SGPL1 sphingosine-1-lyase gene, whose product inactivates S1P. These changes were associated with reduced intrathymic levels of S1P kinase activity. Interestingly, double-negative thymocytes from infected animals expressed high levels of the S1P receptor during infection, and migrated to lower levels of S1P. Moreover, during T. cruzi infection, this thymocyte subset expresses high levels of IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines upon polyclonal stimulation. In vivo treatment with the S1P receptor antagonist FTY720 resulted in recovery the numbers of double-negative thymocytes in infected thymuses to physiological levels. Finally, we showed increased numbers of double-negative T cells in the peripheral blood in severe cardiac forms of human Chagas disease. PMID:25330249

  16. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from the rhizome of Javanese turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) against Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. on Candida albicans biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature phase of growth. C. albicans biofilms were formed in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates. The biofilms of C. albicans at different phases of development were exposed to xanthorrhizol at different concentrations (0.5 µg/mL-256 µg/mL) for 24 h. The metabolic activity of cells within the biofilms was quantified using the XTT reduction assay. Sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) were determined at 50% and 80% reduction in the biofilm OD₄₉₀ compared to the control wells. The SMIC₅₀ and SMIC₈₀ of xanthorrhizol against 18 C. albicans biofilms were 4--16 µg/mL and 8--32 µg/mL, respectively. The results demonstrated that the activity of xanthorrhizol in reducing C. albicans biofilms OD₄₉₀ was dependent on the concentration and the phase of growth of biofilm. Xanthorrhizol at concentration of 8 µg/mL completely reduced in biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at adherent phase, whereas 32 µg/mL of xanthorrhizol reduced 87.95% and 67.48 % of biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at intermediate and mature phases, respectively. Xanthorrhizol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro and therefore might have potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A histone deacetylase complex mediates biofilm dispersal and drug resistance in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Clarissa J; Fox, Emily P; Hartooni, Nairi; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Hnisz, Denes; Andes, David R; Kuchler, Karl; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-06-10

    Biofilms are resilient, surface-associated communities of cells with specialized properties (e.g., resistance to drugs and mechanical forces) that are distinct from those of suspension (planktonic) cultures. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is medically relevant because C. albicans infections are highly correlated with implanted medical devices, which provide efficient substrates for biofilm formation; moreover, biofilms are inherently resistant to antifungal drugs. Biofilms are also important for C. albicans to colonize diverse niches of the human host. Here, we describe four core members of a conserved histone deacetylase complex in C. albicans (Set3, Hos2, Snt1, and Sif2) and explore the effects of their mutation on biofilm formation. We find that these histone deacetylase complex members are needed for proper biofilm formation, including dispersal of cells from biofilms and multifactorial drug resistance. Our results underscore the importance of the physical properties of biofilms in contributing to drug resistance and dispersal and lay a foundation for new strategies to target biofilm dispersal as a potential antifungal intervention. Through the formation of biofilms--surface-associated communities of cells--microorganisms can establish infections, become drug resistant, and evade the host immune system. Here we investigate how four core members of a conserved histone deacetylase complex mediate biofilm formation by Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans. We show that this histone deacetylase complex is required for biofilm dispersal, a process through which cells leave the biofilm to establish new infections. We also show that the deacetylase complex mediates biofilm drug resistance. This work provides new insight into how the physical properties of biofilms affect dispersal and drug resistance and suggests new potential antifungal strategies that could be effective against biofilms. Copyright

  18. [Epidemiology, risk factors and in vitro susceptibility in candidaemia due to non-Candida albicans species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Martínez, Elena M; Aller García, Ana Isabel; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) has increased in recent years due to there being a greater number of risk factors. IFI caused by Candida is the most frequent, and although Candida albicans is the most isolated species, there is currently a decrease of C. albicans and an increase of other species of the genus. To analyse the epidemiology, risk factors, and antifungal susceptibility of blood culture isolates of non-C.albicans Candida species in our hospital in the last 12years. A retrospective study was conducted on 107 patients with candidaemia admitted to our hospital. Candida isolates susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, amphotericinB, 5-fluorocytosine, caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin was determined by means of a microdilution technique (Sensititre Yeast One; Izasa, Spain). From a total of 109 strains, 59 belonged to non-C. albicans Candida species: 25 Candida parapsilosis complex, 14 Candida glabrata complex, 13 Candida tropicalis, 4 Candida krusei, 1 Candida lipolytica, 1 Candida membranaefaciens, and 1 Candida pulcherrima. The most common risk factor in adults and children was catheter use. It was observed that 8.5% of those non-C.albicans strains were resistant to fluconazole. The results of this work confirm that it is necessary to know the epidemiology of non-C.albicans Candida species, the in vitro susceptibility of the species involved, and the main risk factors, especially in patients with predisposing conditions. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The yeast form of the fungus Candida albicans promotes persistence in the gut of gnotobiotic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Marie Therese

    2017-01-01

    Many microorganisms that cause systemic, life-threatening infections in humans reside as harmless commensals in our digestive tract. Yet little is known about the biology of these microbes in the gut. Here, we visualize the interface between the human commensal and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and the intestine of mice, a surrogate host. Because the indigenous mouse microbiota restricts C. albicans settlement, we compared the patterns of colonization in the gut of germ free and antibiotic-treated conventionally raised mice. In contrast to the heterogeneous morphologies found in the latter, we establish that in germ free animals the fungus almost uniformly adopts the yeast cell form, a proxy of its commensal state. By screening a collection of C. albicans transcription regulator deletion mutants in gnotobiotic mice, we identify several genes previously unknown to contribute to in vivo fitness. We investigate three of these regulators—ZCF8, ZFU2 and TRY4—and show that indeed they favor the yeast form over other morphologies. Consistent with this finding, we demonstrate that genetically inducing non-yeast cell morphologies is detrimental to the fitness of C. albicans in the gut. Furthermore, the identified regulators promote adherence of the fungus to a surface covered with mucin and to mucus-producing intestinal epithelial cells. In agreement with this result, histology sections indicate that C. albicans dwells in the murine gut in close proximity to the mucus layer. Thus, our findings reveal a set of regulators that endows C. albicans with the ability to endure in the intestine through multiple mechanisms. PMID:29069103

  20. Fluconazole induces rapid high-frequency MTL homozygosis with microbiological polymorphism in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsong-Yih Ou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida albicans, a common fungal pathogen that can cause opportunistic infections, is regarded as an apparently asexual, diploid fungus. A parasexual cycle was previously found between homozygotes with opposite mating type-like loci (MTLa/α. Fluconazole-resistant strains had a higher proportion of MTL homozygotes, whereas MTL homozygous C. albicans was found in only about 3.2% of clinical strains. MTL heterozygotes had a low frequency (1.4 × 10−4 of white–opaque switching to MTL homozygotes in nature. Methods: Here, a reference C. albicans strain (SC5314 was used in a fluconazole-induced assay to obtain standard opaque MTL homozygous strains and first-generation daughter strains from the fluconazole inhibition zone. Further separation methods were employed to produce second- and third-generation daughter strains. Polymerase chain reaction analysis based on MTL genes was used to define MTL genotypes, and microscopic observations, a flow-cytometric assay, and an antifungal E-test were used to compare microbiological characteristics. Results: MTL homozygotes were found at a high frequency (17 of 35; 48.6% in fluconazole-induced first-generation daughter strains, as were morphological polymorphisms, decreased DNA content, and modified antifungal drug susceptibility. High-frequency MTL homozygosity was identified inside the fluconazole inhibition zone within 24 hours. The DNA content of fluconazole-induced daughter strains was reduced compared with their progenitor SC5314 and standard MTL homozygous strains. Conclusion: Treatment with fluconazole, commonly used to treat invasive candidiasis, inhibited the growth of C. albicans and altered its microbiological characteristics. Our results suggest that fluconazole treatment induces the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity and microbiological polymorphism in C. albicans. Keywords: Candida albicans, fluconazole, loss of heterozygosity, mating type-like gene

  1. Horizontal transmission of Candida albicans and evidence of a vaccine response in mice colonized with the fungus.

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    Jim E Cutler

    Full Text Available Disseminated candidiasis is the third leading nosocomial blood stream infection in the United States and is often fatal. We previously showed that disseminated candidiasis was preventable in normal mice by immunization with either a glycopeptide or a peptide synthetic vaccine, both of which were Candida albicans cell wall derived. A weakness of these studies is that, unlike humans, mice do not have a C. albicans GI flora and they lack Candida serum antibodies. We examined the influence of C. albicans GI tract colonization and serum antibodies on mouse vaccination responses to the peptide, Fba, derived from fructose bisphosphate aldolase which has cytosolic and cell wall distributions in the fungus. We evaluated the effect of live C. albicans in drinking water and antimicrobial agents on establishment of Candida colonization of the mouse GI tract. Body mass, C. albicans in feces, and fungal-specific serum antibodies were monitored longitudinally. Unexpectedly, C. albicans colonization occurred in mice that received only antibiotics in their drinking water, provided that the mice were housed in the same room as intentionally colonized mice. The fungal strain in unintentionally colonized mice appeared identical to the strain used for intentional GI-tract colonization. This is the first report of horizontal transmission and spontaneous C. albicans colonization in mice. Importantly, many Candida-colonized mice developed serum fungal-specific antibodies. Despite the GI-tract colonization and presence of serum antibodies, the animals made antibodies in response to the Fba immunogen. This mouse model has potential for elucidating C. albicans horizontal transmission and for exploring factors that induce host defense against disseminated candidiasis. Furthermore, a combined protracted GI-tract colonization with Candida and the possibility of serum antibody responses to the presence of the fungus makes this an attractive mouse model for testing the

  2. Mycosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles from Candida albicans and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To produce and characterize silver nanoparticles using Candida albicans and evaluate its antibacterial properties. Methods: Extracellular silver nanoparticles were biosynthesized using C. albicans. The biomass obtained from cultures of C. albicans was used to synthesize silver nanoparticles in 1.5 mM silver ...

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri strain combination in Helicobacter pylori infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Demichina, Antonella; Maurogiovanni, Giovanni; Principi, Beatrice; Scaccianoce, Giuseppe; Ierardi, Enzo; Russo, Francesco; Riezzo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Cavallo, Luciano; Francavilla, Antonio; Versalovic, James

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the role of a new probiotic preparation (Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475) in Helicobacter pylori infection. Specific probiotic strains play a role in H. pylori infection for their ability to decrease bacterial load and gastritis, prevent antibiotic-associated side effects, and increase the eradication rate. This is a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in a tertiary care setting. A total of 100 H. pylori-positive naive patients received either L. reuteri combination (2×10 Colony Forming Units) or placebo during a 3-phase study (pre-eradication, eradication, and follow-up). All underwent C urea breath test (C-UBT), blood assessments of gastrin-17 (G17), endoscopy, and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. Eradication was confirmed by C-UBT 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Fifty patients were allocated in each group. During pre-eradication period, C-UBT δ decreased by 13% in L. reuteri combination as compared with a 4% increase in placebo (-13.2±34% vs. 4.3±27%; Preuteri combination (6.8±2.9 vs. 4±3.1; Preuteri combination as compared with placebo-reported side effects (40.9% vs. 62.8%; Preuteri combination (28% vs. 12%; Preuteri combination and 65.9% in placebo (P=NS). L. reuteri combination increased eradication rate by 9.1% (odds ratio: 1.5). L. reuteri combination alone is able to exert an inhibitory effect on H. pylori growth, and when administered with eradication therapy, it determines a significant reduction in antibiotic-associated side effects. Moreover, L. reuteri combination was able to decrease serum G17 levels and to (not significantly) increase the H. pylori-eradication rate.

  4. Phage displayed short peptides against cells of Candida albicans demonstrate presence of species, morphology and region specific carbohydrate epitopes.

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    Soshee Anandakumar

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a commensal opportunistic pathogen, which can cause superficial infections as well as systemic infections in immuocompromised hosts. Among nosocomial fungal infections, infections by C. albicans are associated with highest mortality rates even though incidence of infections by other related species is on the rise world over. Since C. albicans and other Candida species differ in their susceptibility to antifungal drug treatment, it is crucial to accurately identify the species for effective drug treatment. Most diagnostic tests that differentiate between C. albicans and other Candida species are time consuming, as they necessarily involve laboratory culturing. Others, which employ highly sensitive PCR based technologies often, yield false positives which is equally dangerous since that leads to unnecessary antifungal treatment. This is the first report of phage display technology based identification of short peptide sequences that can distinguish C. albicans from other closely related species. The peptides also show high degree of specificity towards its different morphological forms. Using fluorescence microscopy, we show that the peptides bind on the surface of these cells and obtained clones that could even specifically bind to only specific regions of cells indicating restricted distribution of the epitopes. What was peculiar and interesting was that the epitopes were carbohydrate in nature. This gives insight into the complexity of the carbohydrate composition of fungal cell walls. In an ELISA format these peptides allow specific detection of relatively small numbers of C. albicans cells. Hence, if used in combination, such a test could help accurate diagnosis and allow physicians to initiate appropriate drug therapy on time.

  5. Biofilm extracellular DNA enhances mixed species biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Polymicrobial infections are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in adults and children. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans are the most frequent combination of organisms isolated from polymicrobial infections. Vascular indwelling catheters are sites for mixed species biofilm formation and pose a significant risk for polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that enhancement of biofilms in a mixed species environment increases patient mortality and morbidity. Results Mixed species biofilms of S. epidermidis and C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in a subcutaneous catheter infection model in vivo. Mixed species biofilms were enhanced compared to single species biofilms of either S. epidermidis or C. albicans. A mixed species environment increased catheter infection and increased dissemination of S. epidermidis in mice. Microarrays were used to explore differential gene expression of S. epidermidis in the mixed species biofilms. In mixed species biofilms, compared to single species S. epidermidis biofilms, 2.7% of S. epidermidis genes were upregulated and 6% were down regulated. Staphylococcal autolysis repressors lrgA and lrgB were down regulated 36-fold and 27-fold respectively. The role of biofilm extracellular DNA was investigated by quantitation and by evaluating the effects of DNAse in a concentration and time dependent manner. S. epidermidis specific eDNA was increased in mixed species biofilms and further confirmed by degradation with DNAse. Conclusions Mixed-species biofilms are enhanced and associated with increased S. epidermidis-specific eDNA in vitro and greater systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis in vivo. Down regulation of the lrg operon, a repressor of autolysis, associated with increased eDNA suggests a possible role for bacterial autolysis in mixed species biofilms. Enhancement and systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis may explain adverse outcomes after clinical polymicrobial infections of S

  6. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Luis Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La +3 (HBL a+3 ) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100μM and 1mM; HBLa +3 only one of 10μM. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at λ = 630nm ± 20nm and the other one blue emission at λ = 460nm ± 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa +3 and 6 min for the MB at 100μM). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100μM did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa +3 biofilm group showed a lower reduction in the concentration of 10μM in

  7. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles

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    Ravikumar Bapurao Shinde

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p < 0.05 in presence of 250 µg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole.

  8. Candida albicans spondylodiscitis following an abdominal stab wound: forensic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans spondylodiscitis is a fungal infection of the spine which is still unusual in spite of the increasing frequency of predisposing factors. A 22-year-old man received an abdominal stab wound during a physical assault. Initial medical care included surgery, prolonged use of indwelling vascular catheters with administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and hospitalization in intensive care. Two months after the event, the victim experienced back pain in the right lumbar region and septic spondylodiscitis secondary to C. albicans was diagnosed three weeks later. This case is noteworthy because of its clinical forensic context. In France, the public prosecutor orders a medico-legal assessment after an assault for all living victims in order to establish a causal relationship between the assault and its complications. In our case, the patient presented numerous risk factors for candidemia and the forensic specialist reasonably accepted that the causal relationship was certain but indirect. We have only found one published case of spondylodiscitis after an abdominal penetrating injury and the pathogenic agent was not mentioned. We have found no case reported in a forensic context. This unusual observation shows that it may be genuinely difficult to prove the causal relationship between an abdominal penetrating injury and an unusual infectious complication such as fungal spondylodiscitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular methods for strain typing of Candida albicans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghrouni, F; Ben Abdeljelil, J; Boukadida, J; Ben Said, M

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most medically important fungi because of its high frequency as a commensal and pathogenic microorganism causing superficial as well as invasive infections. Strain typing and delineation of the species are essential for understanding its biology, epidemiology and population structure. A wide range of molecular techniques have been used for this purpose including non-DNA-based methods (multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis), conventional DNA-based methods (electrophoretic karyotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism, restriction enzyme analysis with and without hybridization, rep-PCR) and DNA-based methods called exact typing methods because they generate unambiguous and highly reproducible typing data (including microsatellite length polymorphism and multi-locus sequence typing). In this review, the main molecular methods used for C. albicans strain typing are summarized, and their advantages and limitations are discussed with regard to their discriminatory power, reproducibility, cost and ease of performance. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Simple and Rapid Detection of Candida albicans DNA in Serum by PCR for Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; Freisleben, Hans-Joachim; Sonntag, Hans-Günther; Schnitzler, Paul

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive PCR assay for the detection of Candida albicans DNA in serum was established. DNA from human serum samples was purified using the QIAamp blood kit, which proved to be a fast and simple method for isolating minute amounts of Candida DNA from clinical specimens for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. Universal primer sequences used in the PCR assay are derived from the internal transcribed spacer rRNA gene of fungi, whereas the biotinylated hybridization probe used in a DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) binds specifically to C. albicans DNA. The sensitivity of this PCR-DEIA method is very high; the detection limit for genomic Candida DNA is one C. albicans genome per assay. Blood from uninfected and infected persons, ranging from healthy volunteers, patients with mucocutaneous infections, and patients at risk to develop a systemic Candida infection to patients with an established systemic candidiasis, was analyzed for the presence of C. albicans to diagnose fungal infection. Candida DNA could not be detected in sera of 16 culture-negative controls and from 11 nonsystemic candidal infections by PCR or DEIA. Blood cultures from patients at risk were all negative for Candida, whereas all blood cultures from systemic candidiasis patients were positive. However, Candida DNA could be detected by PCR and DEIA in the serum from three out of nine patients who were at risk for a systemic infection and in the serum of all seven patients who had already developed an invasive Candida infection. PCR is more sensitive than blood culture, since some of the patients at risk for invasive yeast infection, whose blood cultures were all negative for Candida, tested positive in the PCR amplification. These results indicate the potential value of PCR for detecting C. albicans in serum samples and for identifying patients at risk for invasive candidiasis. PMID:10921970

  11. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Hallie S; Bernardo, Stella M; Howell, Amy B; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is responsible for increased morbidity and healthcare costs. Moreover, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs. Thus, development of specific approaches for the prevention of Candida urinary infections is needed. Cranberry juice-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) have efficacy in the prevention of bacterial UTIs, partially due to anti-adherence properties, but there are limited data on their use for the prevention and/or treatment of Candida UTIs. Therefore, we sought to systematically assess the in vitro effect of cranberry-derived PACs on C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. C. albicans biofilms in artificial urine were coincubated with cranberry PACs at serially increasing concentrations and biofilm metabolic activity was assessed using the XTT assay in static microplate and silicone disc models. Cranberry PAC concentrations of ≥16 mg/L significantly reduced biofilm formation in all C. albicans strains tested, with a paradoxical effect observed at high concentrations in two clinical isolates. Further, cranberry PACs were additive in combination with traditional antifungals. Cranberry PACs reduced C. albicans adherence to both polystyrene and silicone. Supplementation of the medium with iron reduced the efficacy of cranberry PACs against biofilms. These findings indicate that cranberry PACs have excellent in vitro activity against C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. We present preliminary evidence that cranberry PAC activity against C. albicans biofilm formation is due to anti-adherence properties and/or iron chelation.

  12. Comparative antifungal susceptibility analysis of Candida albicans versus non-albicans Candida corneal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, Oriel; Dugar, Jyoti; Miller, Darlene; OʼBrien, Terrence P

    2015-05-01

    To compare the in vitro activity of topical amphotericin B (AMB), natamycin, voriconazole, and fluconazole against human corneal isolates of Candida sp. for guidance in the treatment of Candida keratitis. Sixty-eight Candida isolates (37 albicans and 31 non-albicans isolates) recovered from corneal scrapings submitted to rule out microbial keratitis, during the years 2005 to 2011, at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, were examined in this study. Corneal isolates were cultured on fungal agars for 48 hours. Each yeast isolate was dispensed into 4 microtiter wells, each containing 100 mL of commercial (natamycin 5%) or compounded (AMB 0.15%, voriconazole 1%, and fluconazole 0.2%) antifungal medications. A comparison of growth patterns was conducted. One hundred percent of the samples showed growth inhibition after treatment exposure with AMB or natamycin. The isolates treated with voriconazole demonstrated an 85% inhibition rate overall, with the Candida albicans samples showing a 77% inhibition rate and the non-albicans sp. a 93% inhibition rate. In the fluconazole group, there was only a 19.6% inhibition rate noted, with a 7.7% inhibition rate observed in the C. albicans group versus a 30% inhibition rate in the non-albicans group. AMB 0.2% and natamycin 5% have equal effectiveness and full inhibition against Candida keratitis isolates. Fluconazole 0.2% is not the drug of choice in both C. albicans and non-albicans keratitis. Voriconazole 1% may need a stronger concentration for higher effectiveness, but potentially may be helpful as a second agent in the treatment of Candida keratitis.

  13. Antibiotic resistance in Candida albicans and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, vaginal candidiasis and bacterial vaginosis are frequently encountered in medical practice and antibiotic resistance in implicated pathogens has not been reported in Dschang. This study sought to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 198 isolates of Candida albicans and 300 strains of ...

  14. Effects of low-level laser irradiation on the pathogenicity of Candida albicans: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Rezaie, Sasan; Fateh, Mohsen; Djavid, Gholamreza Esmaeeli; Zibafar, Ensieh; Morsali, Farhad; Zand, Nasrin; Alinaghizadeh, Mohammadreza; Ataie-Fashtami, Leila

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the in vitro growth characteristics and in vivo pathogenicity of Candida albicans in a murine model in the absence of a photosensitizer. C. albicans is an opportunistic commensal organism that causes a wide variety of diseases in human beings, ranging from superficial infections to life-threatening invasive candidiasis. The incidence of C. albicans infection is increasing, because of the greater frequency of acquired immunodeficiency conditions. A high recurrence rate has been reported for vulvovaginal and oral candidiasis, despite the best available treatments. Therefore, the search for new treatment modalities seems quite rational. Candida culture plates were exposed to common clinical energies of LLLI: 3, 5, 10, and 20 J at 685 nm (BTL Laser 5000, Medicinos Projektai, Czech Republic, Prague, max power output 50 mW) and 3, 5, 10, 30, and 50 J at 830 nm (BTL Laser 5000, Medicinos Projektai, Czech Republic, Prague, max power output 400 mW). Following LLLI with energies >10 J at both 685 and 830 nm wavelengths, statistically significant effects were observed in vitro on the turbidimetric growth kinetics of C. albicans and in vivo on the survival rate of infected mice (p value ≤ 0.05). Therefore, this energy could be considered a threshold for clinical investigation. Translating our data into the clinical setting, it can be proposed that a direct laser-based approach without using a photosensitizing dye can significantly reduce the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. It can also be concluded that laser light at specific wavelengths could be a possible promising novel treatment for superficial and mucocutaneous C. albicans infections.

  15. Quercetin sensitizes fluconazole-resistant candida albicans to induce apoptotic cell death by modulating quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Upreti, D K; Singh, B R; Pandey, G; Verma, S; Roy, S; Naqvi, A H; Rawat, A K S

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC), a dietary flavonoid isolated from an edible lichen (Usnea longissima), can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for FCZ-resistant C. albicans NBC099, enhancing the efficacy of FCZ. QC enhanced FCZ-mediated cell killing of NBC099 and also induced cell death. These experiments indicated that the combined application of both drugs was FCZ dose dependent rather than QC dose dependent. In addition, we found that QC strongly suppressed the production of virulence weapons-biofilm formation, hyphal development, phospholipase, proteinase, esterase, and hemolytic activity. Treatment with QC also increased FCZ-mediated cell death in NBC099 biofilms. Interestingly, we also found that QC enhances the anticandidal activity of FCZ by inducing apoptotic cell death. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the farnesol response generated by QC. Molecular docking studies also support this conclusion and suggest that QC can form hydrogen bonds with Gln969, Thr1105, Ser1108, Arg1109, Asn1110, and Gly1061 in the ATP binding pocket of adenylate cyclase. Thus, this QS-mediated combined sensitizer (QC)-anticandidal agent (FCZ) strategy may be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of FCZ-based therapy of C. albicans infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Retigeric acid B attenuates the virulence of Candida albicans via inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity targeted by enhanced farnesol production.

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    Wenqiang Chang

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen, undergoes yeast-to-hyphal switch which has long been identified as a key fungal virulence factor. We showed here that the lichen-derived small molecule retigeric acid B (RAB acted as an inhibitor that significantly inhibited the filamentation of C. albicans, leading to the prolonged survival of nematodes infected by C. albicans. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis and intracellular cAMP measurement revealed RAB regulated the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway by reducing cAMP level to inhibit the hyphae formation. Confocal microscopic observation showed RAB induced the expression of Dpp3, synthesizing more farnesol, which was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy detection. An adenylyl cyclase activity assay demonstrated RAB could repress the activity of Cdc35 through stimulating farnesol synthesis, thus causing a decrease in cAMP synthesis, leading to retarded yeast-to-hyphal transition. Moreover, reduced levels of intracellular cAMP resulted in the inhibition of downstream adhesins. Together, these findings indicate that RAB stimulates farnesol production that directly inhibits the Cdc35 activity, reducing the synthesis of cAMP and thereby causing the disruption of the morphologic transition and attenuating the virulence of C. albicans. Our work illustrates the underlying mechanism of RAB-dependent inhibition of the yeast-to-hyphal switch and provides a potential application in treating the infection of C. albicans.

  17. Intrathecal spinal abscesses due to Candida albicans in an immunocompetent man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, John K

    2018-03-27

    Infections of the central nervous system due to Candida albicans are uncommon and are usually only observed in special circumstances, such as following neurosurgery or penetrating head trauma, in immunosuppressed patients, premature infants or in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts. The author reports a case of an immunocompetent man who presented with a thoracic intraspinal abscess due to C. albicans Despite surgical drainage and 6 weeks of high-dose fluconazole therapy, the abscess extended and recurred in the cervical spine, requiring a second operation to arrest the infection. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2016-02-01

    In this study, surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) was developed for the detection of Candida albicans which is a causal agent of oral infection. The detection was based on the sandwich assay. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on the mixed self assemble monolayers (SAMs). The ratio of mixed SAMs between 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 3-mercaptopropanol was varied to find the optimal ratio for use as a sensor surface. The results showed that the suitable surface for C. albicans detection was SAM of carboxylic (mixed SAMs 1:0), even though mixed SAMs 1:40 had a high detection signal in comparison to mixed SAMs 1:0, but the non-specific signal was higher. The detection limit was 107 cells/ml for direct detection, and was increased to 106 cells/ml with sandwich antibody. The use of polyclonal C. albicans antibody as capture and sandwich antibody showed good selectivity against the relevant oral bacteria including Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutan, Staphylococcus aureus, β-streptococci, and Lactobacillus casei. SPR platform in this study could detect C. albicans from the mixed microbial suspension without requirement of skillful technician. This SPR imaging biosensor could be applied for Candida identification after cultivation.

  19. Control of Candida albicans morphology and pathogenicity by post-transcriptional mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen responsible for both systemic and mucosal infections in a wide variety of immunocompromised individuals. Because the ability of C. albicans to undergo a reversible morphological transition from yeast to filaments is important for virulence, significant research efforts have focused on mechanisms that control this transition. While transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms have been well-studied, considerably less is known about the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, in recent years several discoveries have begun to shed light on this important, but understudied, area. Here, I will review a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms that have recently been shown to control C. albicans morphology, virulence and/or virulence-related processes, including those involving alternative transcript localization, mRNA stability and translation. I will also discuss the role that these mechanisms play in other pathogens as well as the potential they may hold to serve as targets for new antifungal strategies. Ultimately, gaining a better understanding of C. albicans post-transcriptional mechanisms will significantly improve our knowledge of how morphogenesis and virulence are controlled in fungal pathogens and open new avenues for the development of novel and more effective antifungals. PMID:27312239

  20. The Role of AIRE in the Immunity Against Candida Albicans in a Model of Human Macrophages

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    Jose Antonio Tavares de Albuquerque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE. Patients with AIRE mutations are susceptible to Candida albicans infection and present with autoimmune disorders. We previously demonstrated that cytoplasmic AIRE regulates the Syk-dependent Dectin-1 pathway. In this study, we further evaluated direct contact with fungal elements, synapse formation, and the response of macrophage-like THP-1 cells to C. albicans hyphae to determine the role of AIRE upon Dectin receptors function and signaling. We examined the fungal synapse (FS formation in wild-type and AIRE-knockdown THP-1 cells differentiated to macrophages, as well as monocyte-derived macrophages from APECED patients. We evaluated Dectin-2 receptor signaling, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion upon hyphal stimulation. AIRE co-localized with Dectin-2 and Syk at the FS upon hyphal stimulation of macrophage-like THP-1 cells. AIRE-knockdown macrophage-like THP-1 cells exhibited less Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 receptors accumulation, decreased signaling pathway activity at the FS, lower C. albicans phagocytosis, and less lysosome formation. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α secretion by AIRE-knockdown macrophage-like THP-1 cells and AIRE-deficient patient macrophages was decreased compared to control cells. Our results suggest that AIRE modulates the FS formation and hyphal recognition and help to orchestrate an effective immune response against C. albicans.

  1. Increased expression of virulence attributes in oral Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Arati; Gaikwad, Shraddha; Bembalkar, Shilpa; Risbud, Arun

    2012-02-01

    Oral candidiasis caused by Candida albicans is recognized as one of the most frequent opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. The overall severity and chronicity of oral candidiasis has been attributed exclusively to the HIV-induced immune deficiency of the affected individuals but not to the virulence factors of the pathogen, i.e. C. albicans. However, genotypic and phenotypic studies have suggested that HIV infection might be associated with preferential selection of C. albicans strains with altered virulence determinants, leading to colonization with Candida populations that are better able to cause disease in these immunologically compromised hosts. If this process of selection is indeed related to pathogenicity, it may be possible to measure alterations in different virulence factors produced by C. albicans in HIV-infected patients. To evaluate this hypothesis, the present work was undertaken to determine simultaneously the expression of five virulence factors in oral C. albicans isolates colonizing and infecting HIV-positive and -negative individuals. The significance of genotypes in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis was also elucidated. Oral swabs were collected from 335 consecutive individuals (210 HIV-positive and 125 HIV-negative). Virulence factors and genotypes were determined for all the C. albicans strains isolated. The results showed significantly increased expression of proteinase, phospholipase and haemolytic activities, as well as a greater ability to adhere, in isolates from HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative individuals (P<0.05). However, no significant differences in virulence factor expression in isolates colonizing or infecting HIV-positive individuals were seen. Genotype A was the predominant type (71.3 %); however, a relationship could not be established between the genotypes and the virulence factors, or with clinical infection. These data support the concept of preferential C. albicans

  2. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Candida albicans pancreatitis in a child with cystic fibrosis post lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Mark M.; Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway Blvd., Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Zhang, Lingxin [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Stoll, Janis M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We present a case of Candida albicans infection of a previously intact pancreas in a child with cystic fibrosis status post lung transplantation. Although Candida superinfection in necrotizing pancreatitis is not uncommon, this is a unique case of Candida infection of non-necrotic pancreatic parenchyma. This case presented a diagnostic dilemma for radiologists because it appeared virtually identical to acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis on imaging. Ultimately, endoscopic US-based biopsy was pursued for diagnosis. Although difficult to treat and compounded by the immunocompromised status of the child, the pancreatic infection improved with antifungal therapy. (orig.)

  4. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis.

  5. Drug Susceptibility of Matrix-Encapsulated Candida albicans Nano-Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Lee K, Vande Berg J , Hu J , Messer S, Herwaldt L, Pfaller M, Diekema D. 2003. Attributable mortality of nosocomial candidemia, revisited. Clin Infect...Srinivasan A, Uppuluri P , Lopez-Ribot J , Ramasubramanian AK. 2011. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip. PLoS ONE 6(4):e19036...Srinivasan, Celia Macias Gupta, C. Mauli Agrawal, Kai P . Leung, Jose L. Lopez-Ribot, Anand K. Ramasubramanian 206022 c. THIS PAGE The public reporting

  6. Effect of the Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Eugenia uniflora on Proteins Global Expression during Morphogenesis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison P; de Azevedo, Matheus F; Ferreira, Magda R A; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Milan, Eveline P; Soares, Luiz A L; Rocha, Keyla B F; Uchôa, Adriana F; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J S; Fusco Almeida, Ana M; Chaves, Guilherme M

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is able to switch from yeast to hyphal growth and this is an essential step for tissue invasion and establishment of infection. Due to the limited drug arsenal used to treat fungal infections and the constant emergence of resistant strains, it is important to search for new therapeutic candidates. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate by proteomic analysis the role of a natural product ( Eugenia uniflora ) in impairing hypha formation in C. albicans . We also tested the potential action of E. uniflora to prevent and treat oral candidiasis induced in a murine model of oral infection and the ability of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to phagocytize C. albicans cells treated with the ethyl acetate fraction of the extract. We found that this fraction greatly reduced hypha formation after morphogenesis induction in the presence of serum. Besides, several proteins were differentially expressed in cells treated with the fraction. Surprisingly, the ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced phagocytosis in C. albicans (Mean 120.36 ± 36.71 yeasts/100 PMNs vs. 44.68 ± 19.84 yeasts/100 PMNs). Oral candidiasis was attenuated when C. albicans cells were either pre-incubated in the presence of E. uniflora or when the fraction was applied to the surface of the oral cavity after infection. These results were consistent with the reduction in CFU counts (2.36 vs. 1.85 Log10 CFU/ml) and attenuation of tissue damage observed with histopathological analysis of animals belonging to treated group. We also observed shorter true hyphae by direct examination and histopathological analysis, when cells were treated with the referred natural product. The E. uniflora ethyl acetate fraction was non-toxic to human cells. E. uniflora may act on essential proteins mainly related to cellular structure, reducing the capacity of filamentation and attenuating infection in a murine model, without causing any toxic effect on human cells, suggesting that it may be a future

  7. Candida albicans - Biology, molecular characterization, pathogenicity, and advances in diagnosis and control - An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadar, Maryam; Tiwari, Ruchi; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Chakraborty, Sandip; Shahali, Youcef; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2018-04-01

    Candida albicans is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungal pathogen representing an important source of invasive disease in humans and generating high healthcare costs worldwide. This fungus is frequently found in different anatomical sites of healthy persons and could induce systemic and superficial infections under optimal environmental conditions. Invasive candidiasis (IC) is an important nosocomial infection with high morbidity and mortality rates in hospitalized children. It represents a major source of prolonged infections in intensive care unit (ICU), particularly in immunosuppressed or elderly patients. Clinical diagnosis of candidiasis could be difficult because of the lack of specific symptoms and clinical signs. Although C. albicans is the most frequently isolated Candida species in IC, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species are also commonly detected. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), electrophoretic karyotyping (EK), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are known as an efficient technique used for molecular typing of Candida species. The efficacy of antifungal treatment against candidiasis has been evaluated and discussed in the context of large epidemiological studies. The present review highlights the etiology, epidemiology, molecular typing, commensalism and virulence factors, along with the appropriate prevention and control strategies regarding this widespread pathogen. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Disruption of the Candida albicans TPS1 Gene Encoding Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase Impairs Formation of Hyphae and Decreases Infectivity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Blazquez, Miguel A.; Gancedo, Carlos

    1998-01-01

    The TPS1 gene from Candida albicans, which encodes trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, has been cloned by functional complementation of a tps1 mutant from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast with the wild-type strain, the double tps1/tps1 disruptant did not accumulate trehalose at stationary phase or after heat shock. Growth of the tps1/tps1 disruptant at 30°C was indistinguishable from that of the wild type. However, at 42°C it did not grow on glucose or fructose but grew normally on galactose or glycerol. At 37°C, the yeast-hypha transition in the mutant in glucose-calf serum medium did not occur. During growth at 42°C, the mutant did not form hyphae in galactose or in glycerol. Some of the growth defects observed may be traced to an unbalanced sugar metabolism that reduces the cellular content of ATP. Mice inoculated with 106 CFU of the tps1/tps1 mutant did not show visible symptoms of infection 16 days after inoculation, while those similarly inoculated with wild-type cells were dead 12 days after inoculation. PMID:9683476

  9. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study on Decolonization Procedures for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among HIV-Infected Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrob, Amy; Bebu, Ionut; Agan, Brian; Diem, Alona; Johnson, Erica; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Wang, Xun; Bavaro, Mary; Ellis, Michael; Mende, Katrin; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected persons have increased risk of MRSA colonization and skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI). However, no large clinical trial has examined the utility of decolonization procedures in reducing MRSA colonization or infection among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons. 550 HIV-infected adults at four geographically diverse US military HIV clinics were prospectively screened for MRSA colonization at five body locations every 6 months during a 2-year period. Those colonized were randomized in a double-blind fashion to nasal mupirocin (Bactroban) twice daily and hexachlorophene (pHisoHex) soaps daily for 7 days compared to placeboes similar in appearance but without specific antibacterial activity. The primary endpoint was MRSA colonization at 6-months post-randomization; secondary endpoints were time to MRSA clearance, subsequent MRSA infections/SSTI, and predictors for MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point. Forty-nine (9%) HIV-infected persons were MRSA colonized and randomized. Among those with 6-month colonization data (80% of those randomized), 67% were negative for MRSA colonization in both groups (p = 1.0). Analyses accounting for missing 6-month data showed no significant differences could have been achieved. In the multivariate adjusted models, randomization group was not associated with 6-month MRSA clearance. The median time to MRSA clearance was similar in the treatment vs. placebo groups (1.4 vs. 1.8 months, p = 0.35). There was no difference on subsequent development of MRSA infections/SSTI (p = 0.89). In a multivariable model, treatment group, demographics, and HIV-specific factors were not predictive of MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point. A one-week decolonization procedure had no effect on MRSA colonization at the 6-month time point or subsequent infection rates among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons. More aggressive or novel interventions may be needed to reduce the burden of MRSA in this population. Clinical

  10. Stage specific assessment of Candida albicans phagocytosis by macrophages identifies cell wall composition and morphogenesis as key determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne E Lewis

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major life-threatening human fungal pathogen. Host defence against systemic Candida infection relies mainly on phagocytosis of fungal cells by cells of the innate immune system. In this study, we have employed video microscopy, coupled with sophisticated image analysis tools, to assess the contribution of distinct C. albicans cell wall components and yeast-hypha morphogenesis to specific stages of phagocytosis by macrophages. We show that macrophage migration towards C. albicans was dependent on the glycosylation status of the fungal cell wall, but not cell viability or morphogenic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. This was not a consequence of differences in maximal macrophage track velocity, but stems from a greater percentage of macrophages pursuing glycosylation deficient C. albicans during the first hour of the phagocytosis assay. The rate of engulfment of C. albicans attached to the macrophage surface was significantly delayed for glycosylation and yeast-locked morphogenetic mutant strains, but enhanced for non-viable cells. Hyphal cells were engulfed at a slower rate than yeast cells, especially those with hyphae in excess of 20 µm, but there was no correlation between hyphal length and the rate of engulfment below this threshold. We show that spatial orientation of the hypha and whether hyphal C. albicans attached to the macrophage via the yeast or hyphal end were also important determinants of the rate of engulfment. Breaking down the overall phagocytic process into its individual components revealed novel insights into what determines the speed and effectiveness of C. albicans phagocytosis by macrophages.

  11. Stage specific assessment of Candida albicans phagocytosis by macrophages identifies cell wall composition and morphogenesis as key determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Leanne E; Bain, Judith M; Lowes, Christina; Gillespie, Collette; Rudkin, Fiona M; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major life-threatening human fungal pathogen. Host defence against systemic Candida infection relies mainly on phagocytosis of fungal cells by cells of the innate immune system. In this study, we have employed video microscopy, coupled with sophisticated image analysis tools, to assess the contribution of distinct C. albicans cell wall components and yeast-hypha morphogenesis to specific stages of phagocytosis by macrophages. We show that macrophage migration towards C. albicans was dependent on the glycosylation status of the fungal cell wall, but not cell viability or morphogenic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. This was not a consequence of differences in maximal macrophage track velocity, but stems from a greater percentage of macrophages pursuing glycosylation deficient C. albicans during the first hour of the phagocytosis assay. The rate of engulfment of C. albicans attached to the macrophage surface was significantly delayed for glycosylation and yeast-locked morphogenetic mutant strains, but enhanced for non-viable cells. Hyphal cells were engulfed at a slower rate than yeast cells, especially those with hyphae in excess of 20 µm, but there was no correlation between hyphal length and the rate of engulfment below this threshold. We show that spatial orientation of the hypha and whether hyphal C. albicans attached to the macrophage via the yeast or hyphal end were also important determinants of the rate of engulfment. Breaking down the overall phagocytic process into its individual components revealed novel insights into what determines the speed and effectiveness of C. albicans phagocytosis by macrophages.

  12. Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis Decrease Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by Suppressing Morphological Transition to Its Hyphal Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Su Jung; Choi, Sun Ju; Park, Joo Young

    2017-11-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Proteus species are causative agents in a variety of opportunistic nosocomial infections, and their ability to form biofilms is known to be a virulence factor. In this study, the influence of co-cultivation with Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) and Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) on C. albicans biofilm formation and its underlying mechanisms were examined. XTT reduction assays were adopted to measure biofilm formation, and viable colony counts were performed to quantify yeast growth. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the expression of yeast-specific genes (rhd1 and rbe1), filament formation inhibiting genes (tup1 and nrg1), and hyphae-related genes (als3, ece1, hwp1, and sap5). Candida biofilm formation was markedly inhibited by treatment with either living or heat-killed P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis. Proteus-cultured supernatant also inhibited Candida biofilm formation. Likewise, treatment with live P. vulgaris or P. mirabilis or with Proteus-cultured supernatant decreased expression of hyphae-related C. albicans genes, while the expression of yeast-specific genes and the filament formation inhibiting genes of C. albicans were increased. Heat-killed P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis treatment, however, did not affect the expression of C. albicans morphology-related genes. These results suggest that secretory products from P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis regulate the expression of genes related to morphologic changes in C. albicans such that transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form can be inhibited. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  13. Therapeutic potential of thiazolidinedione-8 as an antibiofilm agent against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Feldman

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is known as a commensal microorganism but it is also the most common fungal pathogen in humans, causing both mucosal and systemic infections. Biofilm-associated C. albicans infections present clinically important features due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. Quorum sensing is closely associated with biofilm formation and increasing fungal pathogenicity. We investigated the ability of the novel bacterial quorum sensing quencher thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8 to inhibit the formation of, and eradication of mature C. albicans biofilms. In addition, the capability of S-8 to alter fungal adhesion to mammalian cells was checked. S-8 exhibited specific antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities against C. albicans, at four- to eightfold lower concentrations than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that S-8 dose-dependently reduces C. albicans-GFP binding to RAW macrophages. S-8 at sub-MICs also interfered with fungal morphogenesis by inhibiting the yeast-to-hyphal form transition. In addition, the tested agent strongly affected fungal cell wall characteristics by modulating its hydrophobicity. We evaluated the molecular mode of S-8 antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities using real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of genes associated with biofilm formation, adhesion and filamentation, HWP1, ALS3 and EAP1, respectively, were dose-dependently downregulated by S-8. Transcript levels of UME6, responsible for long-term hyphal maintenance, were also significantly decreased by the tested agent. Both signaling pathways of hyphal formation-cAMP-PKA and MAPK-were interrupted by S-8. Their upstream general regulator RAS1 was markedly suppressed by S-8. In addition, the expression levels of MAPK cascade components CST20, HST7 and CPH1 were downregulated by S-8. Finally, transcriptional repressors of filament formation, TUP1 and NRG1, were dramatically upregulated by our

  14. Combining the sterile insect technique with the incompatible insect technique: I-impact of wolbachia infection on the fitness of triple- and double-infected strains of Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjing Zhang

    Full Text Available The mosquito species Aedes albopictus is a major vector of the human diseases dengue and chikungunya. Due to the lack of efficient and sustainable methods to control this mosquito species, there is an increasing interest in developing and applying the sterile insect technique (SIT and the incompatible insect technique (IIT, separately or in combination, as population suppression approaches. Ae. albopictus is naturally double-infected with two Wolbachia strains, wAlbA and wAlbB. A new triple Wolbachia-infected strain (i.e., a strain infected with wAlbA, wAlbB, and wPip, known as HC and expressing strong cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI in appropriate matings, was recently developed. In the present study, we compared several fitness traits of three Ae. albopictus strains (triple-infected, double-infected and uninfected, all of which were of the same genetic background ("Guangzhou City, China" and were reared under the same conditions. Investigation of egg-hatching rate, survival of pupae and adults, sex ratio, duration of larval stages (development time from L1 to pupation, time to emergence (development time from L1 to adult emergence, wing length, female fecundity and adult longevity indicated that the presence of Wolbachia had only a minimal effect on host fitness. Based on this evidence, the HC strain is currently under consideration for mass rearing and application in a combined SIT-IIT strategy to control natural populations of Ae. albopictus in mainland China.

  15. A novel antifungal is active against Candida albicans biofilms and inhibits mutagenic acetaldehyde production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Wilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (pMutagenic levels (>40 μM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (pagent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm infections.

  16. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  17. Candida albicans Chitin Increases Arginase-1 Activity in Human Macrophages, with an Impact on Macrophage Antimicrobial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Wagener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause a variety of diseases, ranging from superficial mucosal infections to life-threatening systemic infections. Phagocytic cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophages, are important first-line responders to an infection and generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as part of their protective antimicrobial response. During an infection, host cells generate nitric oxide through the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS to kill the invading pathogen. Inside the phagocyte, iNOS competes with the enzyme arginase-1 for a common substrate, the amino acid l-arginine. Several pathogenic species, including bacteria and parasitic protozoans, actively modulate the production of nitric oxide by inducing their own arginases or the host’s arginase activity to prevent the conversion of l-arginine to nitric oxide. We report here that C. albicans blocks nitric oxide production in human-monocyte-derived macrophages by induction of host arginase activity. We further determined that purified chitin (a fungal cell wall polysaccharide and increased chitin exposure at the fungal cell wall surface induces this host arginase activity. Blocking the C. albicans-induced arginase activity with the arginase-specific substrate inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA or the chitinase inhibitor bisdionin F restored nitric oxide production and increased the efficiency of fungal killing. Moreover, we determined that C. albicans influences macrophage polarization from a classically activated phenotype toward an alternatively activated phenotype, thereby reducing antimicrobial functions and mediating fungal survival. Therefore, C. albicans modulates l-arginine metabolism in macrophages during an infection, potentiating its own survival.

  18. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Monroy-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC. The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4% and 37 (94.9% were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8% isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%, ALS3 in 14 (35.8%, and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%. In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3% and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%. In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles.

  19. Triclosan antagonizes fluconazole activity against Candida albicans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, J

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg\\/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg\\/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes.

  20. Triclosan Antagonizes Fluconazole Activity against Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J.; Pinjon, E.; Oltean, H.N.; White, T.C.; Kelly, S.L.; Martel, C.M.; Sullivan, D.J.; Coleman, D.C.; Moran, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes. PMID:21972257

  1. The Absence of N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine Causes Attenuation of Virulence of Candida albicans upon Interaction with Vaginal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máté Manczinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the molecular events underlying vulvovaginal candidiasis, we established an in vitro system. Immortalized vaginal epithelial cells were infected with live, yeast form C. albicans and C. albicans cultured in the same medium without vaginal epithelial cells were used as control. In both cases a yeast to hyphae transition was robustly induced. Whole transcriptome sequencing was used to identify specific gene expression changes in C. albicans. Numerous genes leading to a yeast to hyphae transition and hyphae specific genes were upregulated in the control hyphae and the hyphae in response to vaginal epithelial cells. Strikingly, the GlcNAc pathway was exclusively triggered by vaginal epithelial cells. Functional analysis in our in vitro system revealed that the GlcNAc biosynthesis is involved in the adherence to, and the ability to kill, vaginal epithelial cells in vitro, thus indicating the key role for this pathway in the virulence of C. albicans upon vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  2. A transmission electron microscopy study of the diversity of Candida albicans cells induced by Euphorbia hirta L. leaf extract in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basma, Abu Arra; Zuraini, Zakaria; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    To determine the major changes in the microstructure of Candida albicans (C. albicans) after treatment with Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) L. leaf extract. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructural changes caused by E. hirta extract on C. albicans cells at various exposure time. It was found that the main abnormalities were the alterations in morphology, lysis and complete collapse of the yeast cells after 36 h of exposure to the extract. Whereas the control cultures showed a typical morphology of Candida with a uniform central density, typically structured nucleus, and a cytoplasm with several elements of endomembrane system and enveloped by a regular, intact cell wall. The significant antifungal activity shown by this methanol extract of E. hirta L. suggests its potential against infections caused by C. albicans. The extract may be developed as an anticandidal agent.

  3. [Efficacy of sodium hydroxide at 2.5 %, chlorhexidine gluconate at 0.5 % and calcium hydroxide against Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, D; Diongue, K; Bane, K; Seck, A; Niang, S O; Lèye Benoist, F; Ndiaye, D; Touré, B

    2016-12-01

    Endodontic flora is dominated in the apical part of the channels by strict anaerobic and some facultative anaerobic bacteria but also by Candida yeasts, especially Candida albicans species that are involved in the maintenance and persistence of endodontic infections. Their elimination of the canal system in practice by chemo-mechanical methods of disinfection is not always guaranteed. Thus, this in vitro study was performed to determine the sensitivity of C. albicans with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) dosed at 2.5 %, the chlorhexidine digluconate 0.5 % and calcium hydroxide used in inter-session medication. The diffusion method was used initially to test the sensitivity of C. albicans strains with the above products. Then a dilution technique has allowed us to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of these active products on C. albicans. Strains from infected pulp teeth of patients showed a sensitivity of C. albicans to sodium hypochlorite to a minimum inhibitory concentration less than 70μg/mL and 30μg/mL for chlorhexidine. This study demonstrated a sensitivity of C. albicans to sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 is effective for preventing Candida albicans-induced mucosal inflammation and proliferation in the forestomach of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Yui; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Uchida, Masayuki; Narama, Isao; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Oral and esophageal candidiasis sometimes leads to mucosal hyperplasia, and progresses to carcinoma. We have produced an animal model for hyperplastic mucosal candidiasis in the forestomach that has a proliferative lesion of the squamous epithelium with chronic inflammation and C. albicans infection, some of which advanced to squamous cell carcinoma. There are many reports of the antibacterial effects of probiotics, but consensus about their antifungal effect has not been reached. In the present study, we investigate whether probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 (LG21 yogurt) can prevent proliferative and inflammatory changes caused by C. albicans in this mucosal candidiasis animal model. Diabetes was induced in 8-week-old WBN/Kob rats by intravenous administration of alloxan. One group of diabetic rats received a saline containing C. albicans and LG21 yogurt orally (DC+LG21 group) for 30 weeks, and another group received only C. albicans (DC group) for 30 weeks. They were sacrificed at 40 weeks of age, and analyzed histopathologically. In the DC+LG21 group, squamous hyperplasia at the greater curvature was significantly milder, and the Ki-67 positive index was significantly lower compared with the DC group. Suppurative inflammation with C. albicans also tended to be suppressed at the greater curvature. These findings suggest that probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 can suppress squamous hyperplastic change and inflammation associated with C. albicans infection in the forestomach.

  5. Posaconazole exhibits in vitro and in vivo synergistic antifungal activity with caspofungin or FK506 against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lien Chen

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to test whether posaconazole, a broad-spectrum antifungal agent inhibiting ergosterol biosynthesis, exhibits synergy with the β-1,3 glucan synthase inhibitor caspofungin or the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Although current drug treatments for Candida infection are often efficacious, the available antifungal armamentarium may not be keeping pace with the increasing incidence of drug resistant strains. The development of drug combinations or novel antifungal drugs to address emerging drug resistance is therefore of general importance. Combination drug therapies are employed to treat patients with HIV, cancer, or tuberculosis, and has considerable promise in the treatment of fungal infections like cryptococcal meningitis and C. albicans infections. Our studies reported here demonstrate that posaconazole exhibits in vitro synergy with caspofungin or FK506 against drug susceptible or resistant C. albicans strains. Furthermore, these combinations also show in vivo synergy against C. albicans strain SC5314 and its derived echinocandin-resistant mutants, which harbor an S645Y mutation in the CaFks1 β-1,3 glucan synthase drug target, suggesting potential therapeutic applicability for these combinations in the future.

  6. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investiga...

  7. Germ tube growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, N A

    1997-12-01

    The clinical pathogen Candida albicans is a budding yeast that is capable of forming a range of polarized and expanded cell shapes from pseudohyphae to true nonconstricted hyphae. Filamentous forms consist of contiguous uninucleated compartments that are partitioned by septa. It has long been held that the so-called "dimorphic transition" from a budding to a filamentous form may aid the fungus to penetrate epithelia and may therefore be a virulence factor. This review summarized new information regarding the physiology and ecology of hyphal growth in C. albicans. New evidence has demonstrated that hyphae of C. albicans have a sense of touch so that they grow along grooves and through pores (thigmotropism). This may aid infiltration of epithelial surfaces during tissue invasion. Hyphae are also aerotropic and can form helices when contacting solid surfaces. Growing evidence supports the view that hyphal growth is a response to nutrient deprivation, especially low nitrogen and that filamentous growth enables the fungus to forage for nutrients more effectively. Further insights into the growth of C. albicans have come from the analysis of genes and mutations of Saccharomyces which have begun to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the mechanisms of bud site selection, cell polarity and signal transduction pathways that lead to pseudohyphal development in this and other organisms. For example, it is now clear that a MAP-kinase cascade, homologous to the mating pathway in Saccharomyces, regulates filamentous growth in both fungi. However, this must be only one of several overlapping or separate signal transduction pathways for hyphal development because filamentous growth still occurs in mutants of Candida and Saccharomyces which are blocked in this pathway. Cell cycle analyses have shown that hyphal phase cell cycle of Candida is distinct from that in budding and pseudohyphal formation and so pseudohyphal growth of Saccharomyces is not a true model of germ tube

  8. Candida albicans response to spaceflight (NASA STS-115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans...

  9. Synergic effect of combination of glycyrol and fluconazole against experimental cutaneous candidiasis due to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Zheong-Imm; Han, Yongmoon

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-fungal activity of glycyrol, a coumarine isolated from licorice (Glycyrrhizae Radix), in a murine model of cutaneous candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. Compared to the infected sites, located on the mice's back, of the untreated control mice, the infected sites treated with glycyrol had reduced CFU (colony forming unit) values up to 60 and 85.5 % at 20 and 40 μg/mouse of glycyrol, respectively (P < 0.01). The antifungal activity of glycyrol was synergistically increased when glycyrol (10 μg/mouse) was combined with fluconazole (10 μg/mouse), demonstrating that the combination therapy is approximately 4 times more effective than fluconazole alone at 20 μg/mouse (P < 0.01). Additionally, the combination activity was 1.65 times greater than the antifungal activity of fluconazole alone at 40 μg/mouse (P < 0.05). In seeking glycyrol's antifungal mechanism, we determined that glycyrol inhibited hyphal induction and cell wall adherence of C. albicans. Thus, it is very likely that, by damaging the cell wall, glycyrol helps fluconazole invade C. albicans more readily and attack fluconazole's target in the fungus membrane. In summary, our data indicate that glycyrol may contribute to the development of a novel agent that possesses antifungal activity against cutaneous candidiasis.

  10. Combination of CuO nanoparticles and fluconazole: preparation, characterization, and antifungal activity against Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Iris S.; Maoz, Michal; Panitz, Daniel; Eichler, Sigal; Segal, Ester

    2015-08-01

    Combination therapy becomes an important strategy in the management of invasive fungal infections and emergence of resistant fungi mutants. In this work, we examine the combination of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) with fluconazole as potential treatment against the pathogenic fungi, Candida albicans. CuO NPs ( 7 nm in size) were synthesized with acetate ligands assembled on their surface, as shown by both thermal gravimetric analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Unlike the commercial CuO (both bulk and 50 nm particles), that are poorly dispersed in water, the interaction with water allows the fine dispersion of the coated CuO NPs and their excellent colloidal stability. The addition of fluconazole to the aqueous CuO dispersion induced spontaneous self-assembly of the NPs into linear pearl-like chains network, shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The antifungal activity of the CuO NPs and their combination with fluconazole (fluconazole-CuO NPs) was studied against C. albicans. The best MIC values were obtained at concentrations as low as 0.2 and 0.3 mg/mL, respectively. The results suggest that fluconazole-CuO NPs can provide a potential alternative treatment for C. albicans infections.

  11. An internal polarity landmark is important for externally induced hyphal behaviors in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra; Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Bendel, Catherine; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula; Henry-Stanley, Michelle; Wells, Carol; Ross, Karen; Gow, Neil A R; Gale, Cheryl A

    2008-04-01

    Directional growth is a function of polarized cells such as neurites, pollen tubes, and fungal hyphae. Correct orientation of the extending cell tip depends on signaling pathways and effectors that mediate asymmetric responses to specific environmental cues. In the hyphal form of the eukaryotic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, these responses include thigmotropism and galvanotropism (hyphal turning in response to changes in substrate topography and imposed electrical fields, respectively) and penetration into semisolid substrates. During vegetative growth in C. albicans, as in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ras-like GTPase Rsr1 mediates internal cellular cues to position new buds in a prespecified pattern on the mother cell cortex. Here, we demonstrate that Rsr1 is also important for hyphal tip orientation in response to the external environmental cues that induce thigmotropic and galvanotropic growth. In addition, Rsr1 is involved in hyphal interactions with epithelial cells in vitro and its deletion diminishes the hyphal invasion of kidney tissue during systemic infection. Thus, Rsr1, an internal polarity landmark in yeast, is also involved in polarized growth responses to asymmetric environmental signals, a paradigm that is different from that described for the homologous protein in S. cerevisiae. Rsr1 may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections by influencing hyphal tip responses triggered by interaction with host tissues.

  12. Detection of Candida albicans DNA from blood samples using a novel electrochemical assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Alastair; Forrest, Gordon; Clarkson, John; Wheals, Alan

    2011-04-01

    The genus Candida contains a number of yeast species which are opportunistic pathogens and are associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Provision of appropriate therapy relies on the rapid identification of the infecting species, and existing methods of identifying Candida species in clinical samples are time and resource intensive and are not always specific enough to differentiate between drug-susceptible and drug-resistant species. We have previously developed a system for the rapid detection of yeast pathogens in clinical samples using PCR followed by hybridization with a suite of five species-specific, electrochemically labelled DNA probes. The limit of detection of the assay was shown to be 37 fg (∼1 genome) per reaction using extracted genomic DNA. We carried out a study to test the limit of detection of one of the probes, CA PR3, using blood samples from a healthy donor that were spiked with genomic DNA or with C. albicans cells. Our results demonstrated a limit of detection of 37 fg (ml blood)(-1) (∼1 genome ml(-1)) using extracted DNA or 10 c.f.u. (ml blood)(-1) using C. albicans cells, indicating that the assay is capable of detecting C. albicans nucleic acid at levels that are encountered in clinical samples.

  13. Diferenciação de cepas de Candida albicans pelo sistema killer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Celia Cândido

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudado o efeito killer de 9 cepas padrão de leveduras sobre 146 amostras de Candida albicans isoladas dos seguintes espécimes clínicos: mucosa bucal, fezes, lavado brônquico, escarro, secreção vaginal, urina, lesão de pele, lesão de unha e sangue. Usando este sistema foi possível diferenciar 23 biotipos de C. albicans. Os biotipos 211, 111 e 811 foram os mais freqüentemente isolados. A maioria das amostras de C. albicans (98,6% foi sensível a pelo menos uma ou mais das 9 cepas killer. Empregando- se este sistema foi possível demonstrar que 2 pacientes albergavam mesmo biotipo killer, respectivamente, 111 e 211, em diferentes espécimes clínicos, e em outro paciente, o mesmo biotipo (211 foi isolado de hemoculturas realizadas em ocasiões distintas. O uso do sistema killer para diferenciar os tipos entre as espécies de leveduras patogênicas, pode ser um método útil para estabelecer a eventual fonte de infecção, constituindo uma ajuda valiosa para o controle e vigilância de infecções nosocomiais causadas por leveduras.The authors studied the killer effect of nine standard strains of yeasts on 146 samples of Candida albicans isolated from the following clinical specimens: oral mucosa, feces, bronchial wash, sputum, vaginal secretion, urine, skin lesion, nail lesion and blood. Using this system it was possible to differentiate 23 biotypes of Candida albicans. The biotypes 211, 111 and 811 were most frequently isolated. Most of the samples of C. albicans (98.6% were sensitive to at least one or more of the nine killer strains. Using the killer system it was possible to show that two patients harbored the same killer biotypes, 111 and 211, respectively, in different clinical specimens and another patient harbored the same biotype (211 in blood cultures effected in different ocasions. The utilization of the killer system to differentiate types among species of pathogenic yeasts can be a useful method to stablish the eventual

  14. IL-1 Coordinates the Neutrophil Response to C. albicans in the Oral Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Altmeier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal infections with Candida albicans belong to the most frequent forms of fungal diseases. Host protection is conferred by cellular immunity; however, the induction of antifungal immunity is not well understood. Using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we show that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R signaling is critical for fungal control at the onset of infection through its impact on neutrophils at two levels. We demonstrate that both the recruitment of circulating neutrophils to the site of infection and the mobilization of newly generated neutrophils from the bone marrow depended on IL-1R. Consistently, IL-1R-deficient mice displayed impaired chemokine production at the site of infection and defective secretion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF in the circulation in response to C. albicans. Strikingly, endothelial cells were identified as the primary cellular source of G-CSF during OPC, which responded to IL-1α that was released from keratinocytes in the infected tissue. The IL-1-dependent crosstalk between two different cellular subsets of the nonhematopoietic compartment was confirmed in vitro using a novel murine tongue-derived keratinocyte cell line and an established endothelial cell line. These data establish a new link between IL-1 and granulopoiesis in the context of fungal infection. Together, we identified two complementary mechanisms coordinating the neutrophil response in the oral mucosa, which is critical for preventing fungal growth and dissemination, and thus protects the host from disease.

  15. UV-induced mitotic co-segregation of genetic markers in Candida albicans: Evidence for linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, M.

    1983-01-01

    Parasexual genetic studies of the medically important yeast Candida albicans were performed using the method of UV-induced mitotic segregation. UV-irradiation of the Hoffmann-La Roche type culture of C. albicans yielded a limited spectrum of mutants at a relatively high fequency. This observation suggested natural heterozygosity. Canavanine-sensitive (CanS) segregants were induced at a frequency of 7.6 . 10 -3 . Double mutants that were both CanS and methionine (Met - ) auxotrophs were induced at a frequency of 7.4 . 10 -3 . The single Met - segregant class was missing indicating linkage. UV-induced CanS or Met - CanS segregants occurred occasionally in twin-sectored colonies. Analyses of the sectors as well as the observed and missing classes of segregants indicated that genes met and can are linked in the cis configuration. The proposed gene order is: centromere - met - can. Thus, it is concluded that the Hoffmann-La Roche strain of C. albicans is naturally heterozygous at two linked loci. These findings are consistent with diploidy. (orig.)

  16. Plasma membrane organization promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lois M.; Konopka, James. B.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human fungal pathogen capable of causing lethal systemic infections. The plasma membrane plays key roles in virulence because it not only functions as a protective barrier, it also mediates dynamic functions including secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, endocytosis, and nutrient uptake. Consistent with this functional complexity, the plasma membrane is composed of a wide array of lipids and proteins. These components are organized into distinct domains that will be the topic of this review. Some of the plasma membrane domains that will be described are known to act as scaffolds or barriers to diffusion, such as MCC/eisosomes, septins, and sites of contact with the endoplasmic reticulum. Other zones mediate dynamic processes, including secretion, endocytosis, and a special region at hyphal tips that facilitates rapid growth. The highly organized architecture of the plasma membrane facilitates the coordination of diverse functions and promotes the pathogenesis of C. albicans. PMID:26920878

  17. IL-17-mediated immunity to the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    IL-17 (IL-17A) has emerged as a key mediator of protection against extracellular microbes, but this cytokine also drives pathology in various autoimmune diseases. Overwhelming data in both humans and mice reveal a clear and surprisingly specific role for IL-17 in protection against the fungus Candida albicans, a commensal of the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract and reproductive mucosa. The IL-17 pathway regulates antifungal immunity through upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, neutrophil-recruiting chemokines such as CXCL1 and CXCL5 and antimicrobial peptides such as the defensins, which act in concert to limit fungal overgrowth. This review will focus on diseases caused by C. albicans, the role of IL-17-mediated immunity in candidiasis, and the implications for clinical therapies for both autoimmune conditions and fungal infections. PMID:26188072

  18. Inhibition of Candida albicans by Fluvastatin Is Dependent on pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cholesterol-lowering drug fluvastatin (FS has an inhibitory effect on the growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans that is dependent on the pH of the medium. At the low pH value of the vagina, FS is growth inhibitory at low and at high concentrations, while at intermediate concentrations (1–10 mM, it has no inhibitory effect. Examination of the effect of the common antifungal drug fluconazole in combination with FS demonstrates drug interactions in the low concentration range. Determination of intracellular stress and the activity of the FS target enzyme HMG-CoA reductase confirm our hypothesis that in the intermediate dose range adjustments to the sterol biosynthesis pathway can compensate for the action of FS. We conclude that the pH dependent uptake of FS across yeast membranes might make FS combination therapy an attractive possibility for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infections.

  19. Recent advances on Candida albicans biology and virulence [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Sellam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an important human fungal pathogen, in terms of both its clinical significance and its use as an experimental model for scientific investigation. Although this opportunistic pathogen is a natural component of the human flora, it can cause life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. There are currently a limited number of antifungal molecules and drug targets, and increasing resistance to the front-line therapeutics, demonstrating a clear need for new antifungal drugs. Understanding the biology of this pathogen is an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets for antifungal therapeutics. In this review, we highlight some recent developments that help us to understand how virulence traits are regulated at the molecular level, in addition to technical advances that improve the ability of genome editing in C. albicans.

  20. Defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent mucosal host response to Candida albicans determines susceptibility to oral candidiasis in mice expressing the HIV-1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Mathieu; Cousineau-Côté, Vincent; Aumont, Francine; Sénéchal, Serge; Gaboury, Louis; Hanna, Zaher; Jolicoeur, Paul; de Repentigny, Louis

    2014-10-26

    The tissue-signaling cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 are critical to host defense against oral Candida albicans infection, by their induction of oral antimicrobial peptide expression and recruitment of neutrophils. Mucosal Th17 cells which produce these cytokines are preferentially depleted in HIV-infected patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent host responses to C. albicans determine the phenotype of susceptibility to oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in transgenic (Tg) mice expressing HIV-1. Naïve CD4+ T-cells and the differentiated Th1, Th2, Th17, Th1Th17 and Treg lineages were all profoundly depleted in cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) of these Tg mice. However, naive CD4+ cells from Tg mice maintained the capacity to differentiate into these lineages in response to polarizing cytokines in vitro. Expression of Il17, Il22, S100a8 and Ccl20 was enhanced in oral mucosal tissue of non-Tg, but not of Tg mice, after oral infection with C. albicans. Treatment of infected Tg mice with the combination of IL-17 and IL-22, but not IL-17 or Il-22 alone, significantly reduced oral burdens of C. albicans and abundance of Candida hyphae in the epithelium of tongues of infected Tg mice, and restored the ability of the Tg mice to up-regulate expression of S100a8 and Ccl20 in response to C. albicans infection. These findings demonstrate that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent induction of innate mucosal immunity to C. albicans is central to the phenotype of susceptibility to OPC in these HIV transgenic mice.

  1. Sexually transmitted infections in Obafemi Awolowo University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A decade of clinic experience. ... The breakdown of infections revealed that Candida albicans was the most common venereal pathogen accounting for 24% while Neisseria gonorrhoeae accounted for about 18.0%. Sarcoptes ...

  2. Effects of oral moisturising gel containing egg yolk antibodies against Candida albicans in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Motohashi, Jun; Kimori, Hisato; Nakagawa, Yoichi; Tsurumoto, Akihisa

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of oral moisturising gel containing egg yolk antibody against Candida albicans (anti-CA IgY) in older people. Therefore, we measured the number of Candia CFU present on oral swabs at baseline and after using the gel. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among volunteers living in a nursing home in Japan. The participants were divided into two groups. The group 1 participants received oral care using an experimental oral moisturising gel with anti-CA IgY, and those in group 2 received oral care using a placebo oral moisturising gel without anti-CA IgY. The oral care was performed by care workers three times a day for 4 weeks. The participants' tongues were sampled using a swab method at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks of using the oral gel, and the number of C. albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei colonies was counted. The baseline oral condition of the participants in the two groups did not differ significantly. The experimental gel significantly reduced the number of C. albicans colonies from baseline to after 4 weeks of using the oral gel; however, no significant reductions were observed in the number of C. tropicalis or C. krusei colonies. The use of oral moisturising gel containing anti-CA IgY for 1 month significantly reduces the number of C. albicans CFU present on swabs in older people. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Efek Antijamur Minyak Atsiri Jahe Putih Kecil (Zingiber officinale var. Amarum terhadap Candida Albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanny Satriyani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of many antifungal drugs make it necessary to find an herbal alternative with reduced side effects. Many herbals are knwon to have an antifungal effect, including ginger with its volatile oil composition. However, the specific antifungal effect and optimal concentration of the volatile oil from Zingiber officinale var. amarum against C. albicans is not yet known. This research was done to verify the antifungal effect of Zingiber officinale var. amarum volatile oil on C. albicans, to determine its optimal concentration, and to determine the relation between the volatile oil was provided by water and steam distillation of BALITTRO, Bogor. The colonies were double counted in two steps. First, the volatile oil at concentrations of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25%, 3.125%, 1.56% and 0.78% were applied for treatment, wheras in the second step concentrations of 100%, 90%, 80%, 70%, 60%, and 50% were used. In the disk diffusion method, the volatile oil concentrations of 100%, 70%, 60%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25% and 3.125% were applied in triplicate in Petri dishes containing C. albicans by using 6 mm blank disks. Result: Mann-Whitney test showed the significant decrease of the colonies between 6.25% and 3.125% of the volatile oil concentration (α = 0.021, and also between the volatile oil concentration 6.25% and the control group (α = 0.014. The Spearman test showed a positive and strong correlation between the volatile oil of Zingiber officinale var. amarum and its inhibition zone (r = 0.91. Conclusion: The volatile oil of Zingiber officinale var. amarum has an antifungal effect against C. albicans with an optimal concentration of 6.25%, and increasing volatile oil concentration is followed by increasing inhibition zone.

  4. Oxidative and nitrosative stress responses during macrophage-Candida albicans biofilm interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce Miranda, Julio E; Baronetti, José L; Sotomayor, Claudia E; Paraje, M Gabriela

    2017-12-27

    Candida albicans is an important source of device-associated infection because of its capacity for biofilm formation. This yeast has the ability to form biofilms which favors the persistence of the infection. Furthermore, the innate immune response has a critical role in the control of these infections and macrophages (Mø) are vital to this process. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by Mø involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The interaction between biofilms and these immune cells, and the contribution of oxidative and nitrosative stress, that is determinant to the course of the infection, remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate this interaction. To this purpose, two models of Mø-biofilms contact, early (model 1) and mature (model 2) biofilms, were used; and the production of ROS, RNI and the oxidative stress response (OSR) were evaluated. We found that the presence of Mø decreased the biofilm formation at an early stage and increased the production of ROS and RNI, with activation of ORS (enzymatic and nonenzymatic). On the other hand, the interaction between mature biofilms and Mø resulted in an increasing biofilm formation, with low levels of RNI and ROS production and decrease of OSR. Dynamic interactions between Mø and fungal biofilms were also clearly evident from images obtained by confocal scanning laser microscopy. The prooxidant-antioxidant balance was different depending of C. albicans biofilms stages and likely acts as a signal over their formation in presence of Mø. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the immune-pathogenesis of C. albicans biofilm infections. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Ribosomal RNA processing in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrak, Michael L; Roberts, David D

    2011-12-01

    Ribosome assembly begins with conversion of a polycistronic precursor into 18S, 5.8S, and 25S rRNAs. In the ascomycete fungus Candida albicans, rRNA transcription starts 604 nt upstream of the 18S rRNA junction (site A1). One major internal processing site in the 5' external transcribed spacer (A0) occurs 108 nt from site A1. The A0-A1 fragment persists as a stable species during log phase growth and can be used to assess proliferation rates. Separation of the small and large subunit pre-rRNAs occurs at sites A2 and A3 in internal transcribed spacer-1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-rRNA. However, the 5' end of the 5.8S rRNA is represented by only a 5.8S (S) form, and a 7S rRNA precursor of the 5.8S rRNA extends into internal transcribed spacer 1 to site A2, which differs from S. cerevisiae. External transcribed spacer 1 and internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 show remarkable structural similarity with S. cerevisiae despite low sequence identity. Maturation of C. albicans rRNA resembles other eukaryotes in that processing can occur cotranscriptionally or post-transcriptionally. During rapid proliferation, U3 snoRNA-dependent processing occurs before large and small subunit rRNA separation, consistent with cotranscriptional processing. As cells pass the diauxic transition, the 18S pre-rRNA accumulates into stationary phase as a 23S species, possessing an intact 5' external transcribed spacer extending to site A3. Nutrient addition to starved cells results in the disappearance of the 23S rRNA, indicating a potential role in normal physiology. Therefore, C. albicans reveals new mechanisms that regulate post- versus cotranscriptional rRNA processing.

  6. Candida albicans induces Metabolic Reprogramming in human NK cells and responds to Perforin with a Zinc Depletion Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eHellwig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK cells are directly involved in the response to fungal infections. Perforin has been identified as the major effector molecule acting against many fungal pathogens. While several studies have shown that perforin mediated fungicidal effects can contribute to fungal clearance, neither the activation of NK cells by fungal pathogens nor the effects of perforin on fungal cells are well understood. In a dual approach, we have studied the global gene expression pattern of primary and cytokine activated NK cells after co-incubation with C. albicans and the transcriptomic adaptation of C. albicans to perforin exposure. NK cells responded to the fungal pathogen with an up-regulation of genes involved in immune signaling and release of cytokines. Furthermore, we observed a pronounced increase of genes involved in glycolysis and glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose impaired C. albicans induced NK cell activation. This strongly indicates that metabolic adaptation is a major part of the NK cell response to C. albicans infections. In the fungal pathogen, perforin induced a strong up-regulation of several fungal genes involved in the zinc depletion response, such as PRA1 and ZRT1. These data suggest that fungal zinc homeostasis is linked to the reaction to perforin secreted by NK cells. However, deletion mutants in PRA1 and ZRT1 did not show altered susceptibility to perforin.

  7. Detection of inhibitors of Candida albicans Cdr transporters using a diS-C3(3 fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eSzczepaniak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major cause of opportunistic and life-threatening, systemic fungal infections. Hence new antifungal agents, as well as new methods to treat fungal infections, are still needed. The application of inhibitors of drug-efflux pumps may increase the susceptibility of C. albicans to drugs. We developed a new fluorescence method that allows the in vivo activity evaluation of compounds inhibiting of C. albicans transporters. We show that the potentiometric dye 3,3′-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide diS-C3(3 is pumped out by both Cdr1 and Cdr2 transporters. The fluorescence labeling with diS-C3(3 enables a real-time observation of the activity of C. albicans Cdr1 and Cdr2 transporters. We demonstrate that enniatin A and beauvericin show different specificities toward these transporters. Enniatin A inhibits diS-C3(3 efflux by Cdr1 while beauvericin inhibits both Cdr1p and Cdr2p.

  8. The Use of Chitosan to Enhance Photodynamic Inactivation against Candida albicans and Its Drug-Resistant Clinical Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuimin Tsai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant Candida infection is a major health concern among immunocompromised patients. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI was introduced as an alternative treatment for local infections. Although Candida (C. has demonstrated susceptibility to PDI, high doses of photosensitizer (PS and light energy are required, which may be harmful to eukaryotic human cells. This study explores the capacity of chitosan, a polycationic biopolymer, to increase the efficacy of PDI against C. albicans, as well as fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates in planktonic or biofilm states. Chitosan was shown to effectively augment the effect of PDI mediated by toluidine blue O (TBO against C. albicans that were incubated with chitosan for 30 min following PDI. Chitosan at concentrations as low as 0.25% eradicated C. albicans; however, without PDI treatment, chitosan alone did not demonstrate significant antimicrobial activity within the 30 min of incubation. These results suggest that chitosan only augmented the fungicidal effect after the cells had been damaged by PDI. Increasing the dosage of chitosan or prolonging the incubation time allowed a reduction in the PDI condition required to completely eradicate C. albicans. These results clearly indicate that combining chitosan with PDI is a promising antimicrobial approach to treat infectious diseases.

  9. Double-Stranded RNA Is Detected by Immunofluorescence Analysis in RNA and DNA Virus Infections, Including Those by Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyung-No; Liang, Zhiguo; Lipton, Howard L

    2015-09-01

    Early biochemical studies of viral replication suggested that most viruses produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is essential for the induction of the host immune response. However, it was reported in 2006 that dsRNA could be detected by immunofluorescence antibody staining in double-stranded DNA and positive-strand RNA virus infections but not in negative-strand RNA virus infections. Other reports in the literature seemed to support these observations. This suggested that negative-strand RNA viruses produce little, if any, dsRNA or that more efficient viral countermeasures to mask dsRNA are mounted. Because of our interest in the use of dsRNA antibodies for virus discovery, particularly in pathological specimens, we wanted to determine how universal immunostaining for dsRNA might be in animal virus infections. We have detected the in situ formation of dsRNA in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, and Nyamanini virus, which represent viruses from different negative-strand RNA virus families. dsRNA was also detected in cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, an ambisense RNA virus, and minute virus of mice (MVM), a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvovirus, but not hepatitis B virus. Although dsRNA staining was primarily observed in the cytoplasm, it was also seen in the nucleus of cells infected with influenza A virus, Nyamanini virus, and MVM. Thus, it is likely that most animal virus infections produce dsRNA species that can be detected by immunofluorescence staining. The apoptosis induced in several uninfected cell lines failed to upregulate dsRNA formation. An effective antiviral host immune response depends on recognition of viral invasion and an intact innate immune system as a first line of defense. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a viral product essential for the induction of innate immunity, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and the activation of hundreds of IFN

  10. Mass spectrometric analysis of the secretome of Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgo, A.G.; Heilmann, C.J.; Dekker, H.L.; Brul, S.; de Koster, C.G.; Klis, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of hydrolases and other proteins. In-depth studies of the C. albicans secretome could thus provide new candidates for diagnostic markers and vaccine development. We compared various growth conditions differing in pH, temperature

  11. Sensitivity pattern of clinical isolates of Candida albicans from hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the sensitivity pattern of clinical isolates of C. albicans from HIV/AIDS patients to combined P. grisea extract and tioconazole. Twenty isolates of C. albicans were obtained from high vaginal swab (HVS) from HIV/AIDS patients in Bishop Shanahan Hospital, Nsukka after their ...

  12. Antifungal drug susceptibility of Candida albicans | Bii | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to establish the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to commonly used antifungal drugs. Design: Laboratory based experiment. Setting: Mbagathi District Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Candida albicans isolated between 1998 ...

  13. Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative dental material

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    Shirin Lawaf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. Materials and methods. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with different incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Student's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. Results. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes. However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. Conclusion. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer restorative material.

  14. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the coloni-zation and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable infor-mation about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little infor-mation available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with differ-ent incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Stu-dent's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ion-omer restorative material.

  15. Evaluation of Candida Albicans Biofilm Formation on Various Parts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Candida Albicans Biofilm Formation on Various Parts of Implant Material Surfaces. ... In general, yeast cells have remarkable potential to adhere to host surfaces, such as teeth or mucosa, and to artificial, non-biological surfaces, such as dental materials. C. albicans adhesion to denture materials is widely ...

  16. Evaluation of Candida albicans biofilm formation on various dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study compared the susceptibility of six dental restorative materials to Candida albicans adhesion. Materials and methods: Cylindrical samples of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. The antifungal effect of the samples on C. albicans was determined with the disc-diffusion method.

  17. Comparison of the adhesion ability of Candida albicans strains to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the ability of oral Candida albicans strains to adhere to Caco-2 and Hep-2 epithelial cells, to produce slime using Congo red and Safranin methods and to form a biofilm on polymethylmethacrylate. A total of 20 C. albicans strains were tested in the present work. The biofilm ...

  18. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and Lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinke, T.; Kneist, S.; de Soet, J.J.; Kuhlisch, E.; Mauersberger, S.; Forster, A.; Klimm, W.

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed,

  19. The Antifungal Inhibitory Concentration Effectiveness Test From Ethanol Seed Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica) Extract Against The Growth Of Candida albicans Patient Isolate With In Vitro Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satria Rakatama, Adam; Pramono, Andri; Yulianti, Retno

    2018-03-01

    Candida albicans are the most frequent cause of Vulvovaginalis Candidiasis infection. Its treatment using antifungal drugs, are oftenly caused side effects. The reduction of C.albicans growth and the reduction of antifungal drugs side effect, were our main purposed. Our study objective is determine the effectiveness of inhibitory power of arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. The type of this research is experimental research. Kirby-bauer method with the Saboraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) media was used in this experiment. Inhibitory zone was observed around the disc, to determine the inhibitory power. The results showed that the inhibitory zone was formed on arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on 10%, 20%, 40%, and 80% concentration. Kruskal-Wallis test results (palbicans patient isolates were smaller compared with C.albicans ATCC 90028 as gold standard. This showed that the virulence of C.albicans from patients isolates were higher. We concluded that arabica coffee seed ethanol extract could inhibiting the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. Optimization of coffee seed ethanol extract to obtain maximum active ingredients still needs to be done. This knowledge is expected to be used for the beginning manufacturer antifungal drug from natural product.

  20. Candida albicans Ethanol Stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-Controlled Biofilm Formation as Part of a Cyclic Relationship Involving Phenazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okegbe, Chinweike; Harty, Colleen E.; Golub, Yuriy; Thao, Sandy; Ha, Dae Gon; Willger, Sven D.; O'Toole, George A.; Harwood, Caroline S.; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25340349

  1. Candida albicans ethanol stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-controlled biofilm formation as part of a cyclic relationship involving phenazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie I Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP, and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  2. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study on Decolonization Procedures for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA among HIV-Infected Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Weintrob

    Full Text Available HIV-infected persons have increased risk of MRSA colonization and skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI. However, no large clinical trial has examined the utility of decolonization procedures in reducing MRSA colonization or infection among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons.550 HIV-infected adults at four geographically diverse US military HIV clinics were prospectively screened for MRSA colonization at five body locations every 6 months during a 2-year period. Those colonized were randomized in a double-blind fashion to nasal mupirocin (Bactroban twice daily and hexachlorophene (pHisoHex soaps daily for 7 days compared to placeboes similar in appearance but without specific antibacterial activity. The primary endpoint was MRSA colonization at 6-months post-randomization; secondary endpoints were time to MRSA clearance, subsequent MRSA infections/SSTI, and predictors for MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point.Forty-nine (9% HIV-infected persons were MRSA colonized and randomized. Among those with 6-month colonization data (80% of those randomized, 67% were negative for MRSA colonization in both groups (p = 1.0. Analyses accounting for missing 6-month data showed no significant differences could have been achieved. In the multivariate adjusted models, randomization group was not associated with 6-month MRSA clearance. The median time to MRSA clearance was similar in the treatment vs. placebo groups (1.4 vs. 1.8 months, p = 0.35. There was no difference on subsequent development of MRSA infections/SSTI (p = 0.89. In a multivariable model, treatment group, demographics, and HIV-specific factors were not predictive of MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point.A one-week decolonization procedure had no effect on MRSA colonization at the 6-month time point or subsequent infection rates among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons. More aggressive or novel interventions may be needed to reduce the burden of MRSA in this population

  3. The effect of submersion denture base acrylic resin in a betel leaf ekstract solution against growth Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Izham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Denture base is a protesa which replace some or all of the lost original teeth and surrounding tissues. The Pupose of making protesa is for restore the function, appearance, comfort and impaired health result lost teeth. One part of the denture base is base plate. Microorganisms are often found in the oral cavity is Candida albicans (C.albicans approximately 40% in the oral cavity.C.albicans can penetrate the acrylic resin that can infect the soft tissue and is the cause of denture stomatitis therefore the disinfection of denture base is a important factor that must be done. In general betel leaves contant up to 4.2% essential oil compounds and phenyl propanoid and tannin. These compounds is a antimicroba and antifungal which can inhibit the growth of several type of bacteria among others Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp, Staphylococcus aurens, Klebstella, Pasteurella and can turn off the C.albicans. The purpose of the research is to determine how the effect of submersion denture base acrylic resin in a betel leaf ekstract solution against growth C.albicans.Type of research is an experimental laboratory with a longitudinal design (follow-up study. The sampling method used is total sampling. The results showed that the number of C.albicans colonies n denture base acrylic resin which soaked betel leaf extract solution that the dilution 10-1  with consentration 2.5% total colony count is 2 and the results 2.0 x 101 CFU/ml, on a control solution that the dilution 10-2 total colony 355 and the result 3.55 x 104 CFU/ml, that the dilution  10-3 total colony 62 and the result 6.2 x 104 CFU/ml.

  4. Performance comparison of phenotypic and molecular methods for detection and differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Khan, Ziauddin; Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Theyyathel, Ajmal; Chandy, Rachel

    2012-09-25

    Candida albicans is the most pathogenic Candida species but shares many phenotypic features with Candida dubliniensis and may, therefore, be misidentified in clinical microbiology laboratories. Candidemia cases due to C. dubliniensis are increasingly being reported in recent years. Accurate identification is warranted since mortality rates are highest for C. albicans infections, however, C. dubliniensis has the propensity to develop resistance against azoles more easily. We developed a duplex PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of C. albicans from C. dubliniensis for resource-poor settings equipped with basic PCR technology and compared its performance with three phenotypic methods. Duplex PCR was performed on 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species previously identified by assimilation profiles on Vitek 2 ID-YST system. Typical morphologic characteristics on simplified sunflower seed agar (SSA), and reaction with a commercial (Bichro-Dubli) latex agglutination test were also performed. The assay was further applied on 239 clinical yeast and yeast-like fungi and results were confirmed by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA. The results of duplex PCR assay for 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species were comparable to their identification by Vitek 2 ID-YST system, colony characteristics on SSA and latex agglutination test. Application of duplex PCR also correctly identified all 148 C. albicans and 50 C. dubliniensis strains among 239 yeast-like fungi. The data show that both, duplex PCR and Bichro-Dubli are reliable tests for rapid (within few hours) identification of clinical yeast isolates as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans. However, duplex PCR may be applied directly on clinical yeast isolates for their identification as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans as it does not require prior testing for germ tube formation or latex Candida agglutination.

  5. Assessment of antimicrobial potential of 10% ginger extract against Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Enterococcus faecalis: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriraju, Anjan; Yunus, G Y

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Enterococcus faecalis are the three oral microorganisms most commonly implicated in the causation of oral infections. All these oral microorganisms have shown resistant to routinely used antimicrobials. There is a need for an antimicrobial agent which is effective, safe, and economical. Zingiber officinale, commonly known as ginger is one such plant product which has been used from ancient time. It has been shown to possess promising inhibitory effect on many of the oral microorganisms. On review of dental literature, there was scarcity of studies which had tried to assess antimicrobial potential of ginger extract against S. mutans, E. faecalis, and C. albicans; hence, the present study was designed. To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 10% ginger extract against S. mutans, E. faecalis, and C. albicans. Laboratory setting and experimental design. In the first part of the study, 10% ethanolic ginger extract was prepared in the laboratory of Pharmacy College. It was then subjected to microbiological assay to determine its zone of inhibition using Agar disk diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using serial broth dilution method against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis. 10% ethanolic ginger extract showed: (a) Maximum zone of inhibition of 8 mm, 14 mm, and 11 mm against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis respectively. (b) MIC of 1.25%, 2.5%, and 2.5% against S. mutans, C. albicans, and E. faecalis respectively. 10% ethanolic ginger extract was found to possess antimicrobial potential against all the three pathogens used in the study.

  6. Performance comparison of phenotypic and molecular methods for detection and differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Suhail

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans is the most pathogenic Candida species but shares many phenotypic features with Candida dubliniensis and may, therefore, be misidentified in clinical microbiology laboratories. Candidemia cases due to C. dubliniensis are increasingly being reported in recent years. Accurate identification is warranted since mortality rates are highest for C. albicans infections, however, C. dubliniensis has the propensity to develop resistance against azoles more easily. We developed a duplex PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of C. albicans from C. dubliniensis for resource-poor settings equipped with basic PCR technology and compared its performance with three phenotypic methods. Methods Duplex PCR was performed on 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species previously identified by assimilation profiles on Vitek 2 ID-YST system. Typical morphologic characteristics on simplified sunflower seed agar (SSA, and reaction with a commercial (Bichro-Dubli latex agglutination test were also performed. The assay was further applied on 239 clinical yeast and yeast-like fungi and results were confirmed by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of rDNA. Results The results of duplex PCR assay for 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species were comparable to their identification by Vitek 2 ID-YST system, colony characteristics on SSA and latex agglutination test. Application of duplex PCR also correctly identified all 148 C. albicans and 50 C. dubliniensis strains among 239 yeast-like fungi. Conclusions The data show that both, duplex PCR and Bichro-Dubli are reliable tests for rapid (within few hours identification of clinical yeast isolates as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans. However, duplex PCR may be applied directly on clinical yeast isolates for their identification as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans as it does not require prior

  7. In Vitro Analyses of the Effects of Heparin and Parabens on Candida albicans Biofilms and Planktonic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Marisa H.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Ku, T. S. Neil; Walraven, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Infections and thromboses are the most common complications associated with central venous catheters. Suggested strategies for prevention and management of these complications include the use of heparin-coated catheters, heparin locks, and antimicrobial lock therapy. However, the effects of heparin on Candida albicans biofilms and planktonic cells have not been previously studied. Therefore, we sought to determine the in vitro effect of a heparin sodium preparation (HP) on biofilms and planktonic cells of C. albicans. Because HP contains two preservatives, methyl paraben (MP) and propyl paraben (PP), these compounds and heparin sodium without preservatives (Pure-H) were also tested individually. The metabolic activity of the mature biofilm after treatment was assessed using XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction and microscopy. Pure-H, MP, and PP caused up to 75, 85, and 60% reductions of metabolic activity of the mature preformed C. albicans biofilms, respectively. Maximal efficacy against the mature biofilm was observed with HP (up to 90%) compared to the individual compounds (P < 0.0001). Pure-H, MP, and PP each inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation up to 90%. A complete inhibition of biofilm formation was observed with HP at 5,000 U/ml and higher. When tested against planktonic cells, each compound inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicated that HP, MP, PP, and Pure-H have in vitro antifungal activity against C. albicans mature biofilms, formation of biofilms, and planktonic cells. Investigation of high-dose heparin-based strategies (e.g., heparin locks) in combination with traditional antifungal agents for the treatment and/or prevention of C. albicans biofilms is warranted. PMID:21986822

  8. A double labeling technique for performing immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization in virus infected cell cultures and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendelman, H.E.; Moench, T.R.; Narayan, O.; Griffin, D.E.; Clements, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a combined immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization procedure which allows visualization of cellular or viral antigens and viral RNA in the same cell. Cultures infected with visna or measles virus were fixed in periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde, stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique using antibodies to viral or cellular proteins and then incubated with radiolabeled specific DNA probes (in situ hybridization). This technique provides a new approach to the study of viral pathogenesis by: (1) identifying the types of cells which are infected in the host and (2) identifying points of blockade in the virus life cycle during persistent infections. (Auth.)

  9. Candida albicans mannans mediate Streptococcus mutans exoenzyme GtfB binding to modulate cross-kingdom biofilm development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Kim, Dongyeop; Li, Yong; Krysan, Damian J; Koo, Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Candida albicans is frequently detected with heavy infection by Streptococcus mutans in plaque-biofilms from children with early-childhood caries (ECC). This cross-kingdom biofilm contains an extensive matrix of extracellular α-glucans that is produced by an exoenzyme (GtfB) secreted by S. mutans. Here, we report that mannans located on the outer surface of C. albicans cell-wall mediates GtfB binding, enhancing glucan-matrix production and modulating bacterial-fungal association within biofilms formed in vivo. Using single-molecule atomic force microscopy, we determined that GtfB binds with remarkable affinity to mannans and to the C. albicans surface, forming a highly stable and strong bond (1-2 nN). However, GtfB binding properties to C. albicans was compromised in strains defective in O-mannan (pmt4ΔΔ) or N-mannan outer chain (och1ΔΔ). In particular, the binding strength of GtfB on och1ΔΔ strain was severely disrupted (>3-fold reduction vs. parental strain). In turn, the GtfB amount on the fungal surface was significantly reduced, and the ability of C. albicans mutant strains to develop mixed-species biofilms with S. mutans was impaired. This phenotype was independent of hyphae or established fungal-biofilm regulators (EFG1, BCR1). Notably, the mechanical stability of the defective biofilms was weakened, resulting in near complete biomass removal by shear forces. In addition, these in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo using a rodent biofilm model. Specifically, we observed that C. albicans och1ΔΔ was unable to form cross-kingdom biofilms on the tooth surface of rats co-infected with S. mutans. Likewise, co-infection with S. mutans defective in GtfB was also incapable of forming mixed-species biofilms. Taken together, the data support a mechanism whereby S. mutans-secreted GtfB binds to the mannan layer of C. albicans to promote extracellular matrix formation and their co-existence within biofilms. Enhanced understanding of GtfB-Candida interactions

  10. Candida albicans mannans mediate Streptococcus mutans exoenzyme GtfB binding to modulate cross-kingdom biofilm development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Kim, Dongyeop; Li, Yong; Krysan, Damian J.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is frequently detected with heavy infection by Streptococcus mutans in plaque-biofilms from children with early-childhood caries (ECC). This cross-kingdom biofilm contains an extensive matrix of extracellular α-glucans that is produced by an exoenzyme (GtfB) secreted by S. mutans. Here, we report that mannans located on the outer surface of C. albicans cell-wall mediates GtfB binding, enhancing glucan-matrix production and modulating bacterial-fungal association within biofilms formed in vivo. Using single-molecule atomic force microscopy, we determined that GtfB binds with remarkable affinity to mannans and to the C. albicans surface, forming a highly stable and strong bond (1–2 nN). However, GtfB binding properties to C. albicans was compromised in strains defective in O-mannan (pmt4ΔΔ) or N-mannan outer chain (och1ΔΔ). In particular, the binding strength of GtfB on och1ΔΔ strain was severely disrupted (>3-fold reduction vs. parental strain). In turn, the GtfB amount on the fungal surface was significantly reduced, and the ability of C. albicans mutant strains to develop mixed-species biofilms with S. mutans was impaired. This phenotype was independent of hyphae or established fungal-biofilm regulators (EFG1, BCR1). Notably, the mechanical stability of the defective biofilms was weakened, resulting in near complete biomass removal by shear forces. In addition, these in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo using a rodent biofilm model. Specifically, we observed that C. albicans och1ΔΔ was unable to form cross-kingdom biofilms on the tooth surface of rats co-infected with S. mutans. Likewise, co-infection with S. mutans defective in GtfB was also incapable of forming mixed-species biofilms. Taken together, the data support a mechanism whereby S. mutans-secreted GtfB binds to the mannan layer of C. albicans to promote extracellular matrix formation and their co-existence within biofilms. Enhanced understanding of Gtf

  11. Prevention of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infections: Single Operator Technique with Use of Povidone-Iodine, Double Gloving, Meticulous Aseptic/Antiseptic Measures and Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Antonis S; Melita, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation is complicated by infection still at a worrisome rate of 2-5%. Since early on during device implantation procedures, we have adopted an infection-preventive technique which has hitherto resulted in effective prevention of infections. Herein we present our results of applying this technique by a single operator in a prospective series of 762 consecutive patients undergoing device implantation. A meticulous search for and treatment of active, occult, or smoldering infection was undertaken preoperatively. An aseptic/antiseptic technique was used for implantation of each device. Skin preparation is thorough with initial cleansing performed with alcohol followed by povidone-iodine 10% solution, which is also used in the wound and inside the pocket. In addition, we routinely use double gloving, and IV antibiotic prophylaxis 1 hour before and for 48 hours afterwards followed by oral antibiotic for 2-3 days after discharge. The skin is closed with absorbable sutures. The study includes 382 patients having a new pacemaker (n = 333) or battery change, system upgrade or lead revision (n = 49), and 380 patients having a new implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) (n = 296) or device replacement/upgrade/lead revision (n = 84). The pacemaker group, aged 70.2 ± 16.5 years, includes 18% VVI, 49% DDD, 29% VDD, and 4% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The ICD group, aged 61.3 ± 13.0 years, with a mean ejection fraction of 36 ± 13%, includes 325 ICD and 55 CRT implants. Over 26.6 ± 33.4 months for the pacemaker group and 36.6 ± 38.3 months for the ICD group, infection occurred in one patient in each group (0.26%) having a device replacement. A consistent and strict approach of aseptic/antiseptic technique with the use of double gloving and povidone-iodine solution within the pocket plus a 4-day regimen of antibiotic prophylaxis minimizes infections in CIED implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of long-term weekly iron and folic acid supplementation on lower genital tract infection - a double blind, randomised controlled trial in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabin, Loretta; Roberts, Stephen A; Gies, Sabine; Nelson, Andrew; Diallo, Salou; Stewart, Christopher J; Kazienga, Adama; Birtles, Julia; Ouedraogo, Sayouba; Claeys, Yves; Tinto, Halidou; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Faragher, E Brian; Brabin, Bernard

    2017-11-23

    Provision of routine iron supplements to prevent anaemia could increase the risk for lower genital tract infections as virulence of some pathogens depends on iron availability. This trial in Burkina Faso assessed whether weekly periconceptional iron supplementation increased the risk of lower genital tract infection in young non-pregnant and pregnant women. Genital tract infections were assessed within a double blind, controlled, non-inferiority trial of malaria risk among nulliparous women, randomised to receive either iron and folic acid or folic acid alone, weekly, under direct observation for 18 months. Women conceiving during this period entered the pregnancy cohort. End assessment (FIN) for women remaining non-pregnant was at 18 months. For the pregnancy cohort, end assessment was at the first scheduled antenatal visit (ANC1). Infection markers included Nugent scores for abnormal flora and bacterial vaginosis (BV), T. vaginalis PCR, vaginal microbiota, reported signs and symptoms, and antibiotic and anti-fungal prescriptions. Iron biomarkers were assessed at baseline, FIN and ANC1. Analysis compared outcomes by intention to treat and in iron replete/deficient categories. A total of 1954 women (mean 16.8 years) were followed and 478 (24.5%) became pregnant. Median supplement adherence was 79% (IQR 59-90%). Baseline BV prevalence was 12.3%. At FIN and ANC1 prevalence was 12.8% and 7.0%, respectively (P Iron-supplemented non-pregnant women received more antibiotic treatments for non-genital infections (P = 0.014; mainly gastrointestinal infections (P = 0.005), anti-fungal treatments for genital infections (P = 0.014) and analgesics (P = 0.008). Weekly iron did not significantly reduce iron deficiency prevalence. At baseline, iron-deficient women were more likely to have normal vaginal flora (P = 0.016). Periconceptional weekly iron supplementation of young women did not increase the risk of lower genital tract infections but did increase

  13. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

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    Shirasawa Bungo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group; whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group. We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2. Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039. Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly.

  14. Ethno botany and antimicrobial perspective of Spices and Honey against Candida albicans

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    Kothai Nil Seshathri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In spite of obsessive use of spices in every Ethiopian meal, little has been investigated on the utilization of Ethiopian spices as a cure for oral opportunistic infections. Therefore the aim was to identify spices used in Ethiopian food through ethno botanical survey and study their antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Method: Ethno botanical survey of the selected Kebeles of Jimma, Ethiopia was conducted using a semi structured questionnaire from October 2006 to November 2007. Antifungal nature of the spices and combination of spices and honey were evaluated by agar well diffusion assay from September 2008 to July 2010. Result: Ethno botanical survey indicated fourteen species of spices and honey play a major role in Ethiopian food and beverages. Single plant extract of Trachyspermum copticum showed highest activity against C. albicans. The same plant showed antagonistic effect when combined with brown and white honey. Cinamomum zeylanicum showed highest synergistic effect with both brown and white honey when compared to Allium ursenum, Cuminum cyminum, Nigella sativa, Rosemarinus officinalis and Occimum hodiense. Conclusion: Thus spices used in Ethiopian food could be a preventive as well as a cure for oral candidiasis caused by C.albicans. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 73-80

  15. In vitro antifungal and antibiofilm activities of halogenated quinoline analogues against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ran; Garrison, Aaron T; Basak, Akash; Zhang, Peilan; Huigens, Robert W; Ding, Yousong

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing prevalence of fungal infections coupled with emerging drug resistance, there is an urgent need for new and effective antifungal agents. Here we report the antifungal activities of 19 diverse halogenated quinoline (HQ) small molecules against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Four HQ analogues inhibited C. albicans growth with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 100 nM, whilst 16 analogues effectively inhibited C. neoformans at MICs of 50-780 nM. Remarkably, two HQ analogues eradicated mature C. albicans and C. neoformans biofilms [minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) = 6.25-62.5 µM]. Several active HQs were found to penetrate into fungal cells, whilst one inactive analogue was unable to, suggesting that HQs elicit their antifungal activities through an intracellular mode of action. HQs are a promising class of small molecules that may be useful in future antifungal treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Candida albicans Hap43 Domains Are Required under Iron Starvation but Not Excess

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    Volha Skrahina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron availability is a central factor in infections, since iron is a critical micronutrient for all living organisms. The host employs both iron limitation and toxicity strategies to control microbial growth, and successful pathogens are able to tightly coordinate iron homeostasis in response to changing iron levels. As a commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans copes with both iron deficiency and excess via the precise regulation of iron acquisition, consumption and storage. The C. albicans transcription factor Hap43 is known to be required for the iron starvation response, while specific domains of its ortholog, HapX, in Aspergillus fumigatus, were recently shown to regulate iron uptake and consumptions genes under both low and high iron levels. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of C. albicans Hap43 domains in response to changing iron levels. We found the C-terminus of Hap43 to be essential for the activation of iron uptake genes during iron starvation, whereas, in contrast to A. fumigatus, Hap43 was not required in mediating adaptation to iron resistance. These data indicate that the generally conserved metal acquisition systems in fungal pathogens can show individual adaptations to the host environment.

  17. Effect of Schinus terebinthifolius on Candida albicans growth kinetics, cell wall formation and micromorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Lívia Araújo; Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Pereira, Tricia Murielly; de Souza, Andrade; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the anti-fungal activity of a tincture from Schinus terebinthifolius (Brazilian pepper tree) on Candida albicans (ATCC 289065), a micro-organism associated with fungal infections of the oral cavity. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration (MFC) were determined through microdilution technique, as well as the microbial growth curve of C. albicans promoted by S. terebinthifolius. In addition, this study investigated a possible activity of the product on the fungal cell wall and its biological activity on fungal morphology. Nystatin was used as control and all tests were performed in triplicate. S. terebinthifolius showed MIC of 312.5 µg/mL and MFC of 2500 µg/mL upon the strain tested, while Nystatin showed MIC and MFC of 6.25 µg/mL. As regards the microbial growth curve, S. terebinthifolius was able to significantly reduce the number of CFU/mL when compared to growth control until the time of 60 min. In the times 120 and 180 min there was no statistically significant difference between the growth control and the experimental product. S. terebinthifolius possibly acts on the fungal cell wall, once the sorbitol test indicated a MIC of 1250 µg/mL. In the fungal morphology, a reduction was observed of pseudo-hyphae, chlamydoconidia and blastoconidia in the presence of the experimental product. S. terebinthifolius showed anti-fungal activity against C. albicans, inhibiting, probably, the fungal cell wall formation.

  18. Viable quantitative PCR for assessing the response of Candida albicans to antifungal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí, Gemma; Fittipaldi, Mariana; Morató, Jordi; Codony, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    Propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium bromide monoazide (EMA) treatment has been used before nucleic acid detection methods, such as PCR, to distinguish between live and dead cells using membrane integrity as viability criterion. The performance of these DNA intercalating dyes was compared in many studies utilizing different microorganisms. These studies demonstrated that EMA and PMA differ in their abilities to identify nonviable cells from mixed cell populations, depending on the microorganism and the nature of the sample. Due to this heterogeneity, both dyes were used in the present study to specifically distinguish dead from live Candida albicans cells using viable quantitative PCR (qPCR). The viable qPCR was optimized, and the best results were obtained when pre-treating the cells for 10 min in the dark with 25 μM EMA followed by continuous photoactivation for 15 min. The suitability of this technique to distinguish clotrimazole- and fluconazole-treated C. albicans cells from untreated cells was then assessed. Furthermore, the antifungal properties of two commercial essential oils (Thymus vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla) were evaluated. The viable qPCR method was determined to be a feasible technique for assessing the viability of C. albicans after drug treatment and may help to provide a rapid diagnostic and susceptibility testing method for fungal infections, especially for patients treated with antifungal therapies.

  19. Biosurfactants prevent in vitro Candida albicans biofilm formation on resins and silicon materials for prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochis, Andrea; Fracchia, Letizia; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Rimondini, Lia

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against Candida albicans biofilm. Disks of silicon and acrylic resin for denture prostheses were precoated with increasing concentrations of biosurfactants obtained from endophyte biofilms selected from Robinia pseudoacacia and from Nerium oleander, and afterward infected with C. albicans cells. The number of biofilm cells were detected by colony-forming unit (CFU) counting, cell viability was established by the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assay, and biosurfactant cytotoxicity was evaluated by the [3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (MTT) assay. Chlorhexidine was used as control. Precoating with biosurfactants caused a greater reduction (P biosurfactants was observed at low concentrations (78.12 μg/mL and 156.12 μg/mL) which were noncytotoxic. This study demonstrated the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against C. albicans biofilm. These agents are amphiphilic, interfere with microbial adhesion, and demonstrate cycompatibility with epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Regulatory Mechanisms of Pathogenicity and Virulence to Combat MDR in Candida albicans

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    Saif Hameed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous deployment of antifungals in treating infections caused by dimorphic opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has led to the emergence of drug resistance resulting in cross-resistance to many unrelated drugs, a phenomenon termed multidrug resistance (MDR. Despite the current understanding of major factors which contribute to MDR mechanisms, there are many lines of evidence suggesting that it is a complex interplay of multiple factors which may be contributed by still unknown mechanisms. Coincidentally with the increased usage of antifungal drugs, the number of reports for antifungal drug resistance has also increased which further highlights the need for understanding novel molecular mechanisms which can be explored to combat MDR, namely, ROS, iron, hypoxia, lipids, morphogenesis, and transcriptional and signaling networks. Considering the worrying evolution of MDR and significance of C. albicans being the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, this review summarizes these new regulatory mechanisms which could be exploited to prevent MDR development in C. albicans as established from recent studies.

  1. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  2. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans

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    Wylly Araújo de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. It was tested fifteen strains of C. albicans. The MIC was determined by the microdilution method and the MFC was determined when an aliquot of the broth microdilution was cultivated in SDA medium. The phytochemical analysis of EO showed presence of citronellal (23,59%, geraniol (18,81% and citronellol (11,74%. The EO showed antifungal activity, and the concentrations 625 µg/mL and 1250 µg/mL inhibited the growth of all strains tested and it was fungicidal, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of various concentrations of EO was analyzed over time, it was found concentration-dependent antifungal activity, whose behavior was similar to amphotericin B and nystatin.

  3. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Wylly Araújo; de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; de Luna, Giliara Carol Diniz Gomes; Lima, Igara Oliveira; Wanderley, Paulo Alves; de Lima, Rita Baltazar; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-04-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO) was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. It was tested fifteen strains of C. albicans. The MIC was determined by the microdilution method and the MFC was determined when an aliquot of the broth microdilution was cultivated in SDA medium. The phytochemical analysis of EO showed presence of citronellal (23,59%), geraniol (18,81%) and citronellol (11,74%). The EO showed antifungal activity, and the concentrations 625 µg/mL and 1250 µg/mL inhibited the growth of all strains tested and it was fungicidal, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of various concentrations of EO was analyzed over time, it was found concentration-dependent antifungal activity, whose behavior was similar to amphotericin B and nystatin.

  4. CO(2 acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Hall

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO(2 acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO(2-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p, a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate fungal responses to serum and bacterial peptidoglycan. We further identify Lys 1373 as essential for CO(2/bicarbonate regulation of Cyr1p. Disruption of the CO(2/bicarbonate receptor-site interferes selectively with C. albicans filamentation within fungal biomasses. Comparisons between the Drosophila melanogaster infection model and the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, suggest that metabolic CO(2 sensing may be important for initial colonisation and epithelial invasion. Our results reveal the existence of a gaseous Candida signalling pathway and its molecular mechanism and provide insights into an evolutionary conserved CO(2-signalling system.

  5. Candida albicans PROTEIN PROFILE CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO THE BUTANOLIC EXTRACT OF Sapindus saponariaL.

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    Adriana FIORINI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that is capable of causing superficial and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Extracts of Sapindus saponaria have been used as antimicrobial agents against various organisms. In the present study, we used a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS to identify the changes in protein abundance of C. albicans after exposure to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of the butanolic extract (BUTE of S. saponaria and also to fluconazole. A total of six different proteins with greater than 1.5 fold induction or repression relative to the untreated control cells were identified among the three treatments. In general, proteins/enzymes involved with the glycolysis (GPM1, ENO1, FBA1, amino acid metabolism (ILV5, PDC11 and protein synthesis (ASC1 pathways were detected. In conclusion, our findings reveal antifungal-induced changes in protein abundance of C. albicans. By using the previously identified components of the BUTE of S. saponaria(e.g., saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides, it will be possible to compare the behavior of compounds with unknown mechanisms of action, and this knowledge will help to focus the subsequent biochemical work aimed at defining the effects of these compounds.

  6. Productive HIV-1 infection is enriched in CD4(-)CD8(-) double negative (DN) T cells at pleural sites of dual infection with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Canaday, David H; McDonald, David J; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Baseke, Joy; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    A higher human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) viral load at pleural sites infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) than in peripheral blood has been documented. However, the cellular source of productive HIV infection in HIV-1/MTB-coinfected pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs) remains unclear. In this study, we observed significant quantities of HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes in PFMCs, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes were mostly enriched in DN T cells. Intracellular CD4 expression was detectable in HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells. HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells showed lower surface expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC and tetherin than did HIV-1 p24(+) CD4 T cells. Upon in vitro infection of PFMC CD4 T cells from TB mono-infected subjects, Nef- and/or Vpu-deleted HIV mutants showed lower generation of HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells than the wild-type virus. These data indicate that productively HIV-1-infected DN T cells, generated through down-modulation of surface CD4, likely by HIV-1 Nef and Vpu, are the predominant source of HIV-1 at pleural sites of HIV/MTB coinfection.

  7. A Novel Antifungal Is Active against Candida albicans Biofilms and Inhibits Mutagenic Acetaldehyde Production In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mikko T.; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Vilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (pbiofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 µM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (pbiofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm infections. PMID:24867320

  8. Abolishing Cell Wall Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins in Candida albicans Enhances Recognition by Host Dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Chen, Si Min; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Fang; He, Li Juan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhang, Shi Qun; Yan, Lan; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2015-07-01

    Fungi can shield surface pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for evading host immune attack. The most common and opportunistic human pathogen, Candida albicans, can shield β-(1 3)-glucan on the cell wall, one of the major PAMPs, to avoid host phagocyte Dectin-1 recognition. The way to interfere in the shielding process for more effective antifungal defense is not well established. In this study, we found that deletion of the C. albicans GPI7 gene, which was responsible for adding ethanolaminephosphate to the second mannose in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis, could block the attachment of most GPI-anchored cell wall proteins (GPI-CWPs) to the cell wall and subsequently unmask the concealed β-(1,3)-glucan. Neutrophils could kill the uncloaked gpi7 mutant more efficiently with an augmented respiratory burst. The gpi7 mutant also stimulated Dectin-1-dependent immune responses of macrophages, including activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and secretion of specific cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-12p40. Furthermore, the gpi7 null mutant could induce an enhanced inflammatory response through promoting significant recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and could stimulate stronger Th1 and Th17 cell responses to fungal infections in vivo. These in vivo phenotypes also were Dectin-1 dependent. Thus, we assume that GPI-CWPs are involved in the immune mechanism of C. albicans escaping from host recognition by Dectin-1. Our studies also indicate that the blockage of GPI anchor synthesis is a strategy to inhibit C. albicans evading host recognition. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Synergistic activity of antifungal drugs and lipopeptide AC7 against Candida albicans biofilm on silicone

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    Chiara Ceresa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Candida albicans device-associated infections is tightly correlated to the ability of this fungus to form biofilms. The presence of this three-dimensional structure protects cells from host defenses, and significantly increases their resistance to antifungal agents. Lipopeptide biosurfactants are microbial products with interesting antibacterial, antifungal and anti-adhesive properties. Aim of the present study was to investigate a possible synergistic effect of lipopeptide AC7BS in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole against C. albicans planktonic cells, biofilm formation and 24 h-old biofilms on medical-grade silicone elastomer disks, in simulated physiological conditions. In co-incubation experiments, AC7BS alone was not effective. However, the combination of AC7BS with the antifungal compounds resulted in a synergistic increase in the efficacy of the drugs against planktonic cells and biofilm, leading to a reduction of MICs and SMICs50. In pre-coating conditions, amphotericin B alone and AC7BS alone significantly inhibited C. albicans biofilms. When the two molecules were tested in association, a synergistic effect was observed on different phases of biofilm formation and a lower SMIC50 was detected. The observed synergism could be related to the combination of the AC7BS anti-adhesive activity and the AMB antifungal effect, but also to the ability of the biosurfactant to affect membranes, thus facilitating AMB entry in the cells. These results suggest that AC7BS can be considered a potential inhibitor of C. albicans biofilm on medical insertional materials and its use as coating agent may potentiate the effect of antifungal compounds such as AMB, when applied in combination.

  10. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Ho, Evi X.; Lamont, Iain L.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa’s ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa’s cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  11. Differential filamentation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis Is governed by nutrient regulation of UME6 expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Leanne

    2010-09-01

    Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans; however, it is responsible for fewer infections in humans and is less virulent in animal models of infection. C. dubliniensis forms fewer hyphae in vivo, and this may contribute to its reduced virulence. In this study we show that, unlike C. albicans, C. dubliniensis fails to form hyphae in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) medium supplemented with 10% (vol\\/vol) fetal calf serum (YPDS medium). However, C. dubliniensis filaments in water plus 10% (vol\\/vol) fetal calf serum (WS), and this filamentation is inhibited by the addition of peptone and glucose. Repression of filamentation in YPDS medium could be partly overcome by preculture in synthetic Lee\\'s medium. Unlike C. albicans, inoculation of C. dubliniensis in YPDS medium did not result in increased UME6 transcription. However, >100-fold induction of UME6 was observed when C. dubliniensis was inoculated in nutrient-poor WS medium. The addition of increasing concentrations of peptone to WS medium had a dose-dependent effect on reducing UME6 expression. Transcript profiling of C. dubliniensis hyphae in WS medium identified a starvation response involving expression of genes in the glyoxylate cycle and fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a core, shared transcriptional response with C. albicans could be identified, including expression of virulence-associated genes including SAP456, SAP7, HWP1, and SOD5. Preculture in nutrient-limiting medium enhanced adherence of C. dubliniensis, epithelial invasion, and survival following coculture with murine macrophages. In conclusion, C. albicans, unlike C. dubliniensis, appears to form hyphae in liquid medium regardless of nutrient availability, which may account for its increased capacity to cause disease in humans.

  12. Differential filamentation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis Is governed by nutrient regulation of UME6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Leanne; Caplice, Nicole; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J; Moran, Gary P

    2010-09-01

    Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans; however, it is responsible for fewer infections in humans and is less virulent in animal models of infection. C. dubliniensis forms fewer hyphae in vivo, and this may contribute to its reduced virulence. In this study we show that, unlike C. albicans, C. dubliniensis fails to form hyphae in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) medium supplemented with 10% (vol/vol) fetal calf serum (YPDS medium). However, C. dubliniensis filaments in water plus 10% (vol/vol) fetal calf serum (WS), and this filamentation is inhibited by the addition of peptone and glucose. Repression of filamentation in YPDS medium could be partly overcome by preculture in synthetic Lee's medium. Unlike C. albicans, inoculation of C. dubliniensis in YPDS medium did not result in increased UME6 transcription. However, >100-fold induction of UME6 was observed when C. dubliniensis was inoculated in nutrient-poor WS medium. The addition of increasing concentrations of peptone to WS medium had a dose-dependent effect on reducing UME6 expression. Transcript profiling of C. dubliniensis hyphae in WS medium identified a starvation response involving expression of genes in the glyoxylate cycle and fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a core, shared transcriptional response with C. albicans could be identified, including expression of virulence-associated genes including SAP456, SAP7, HWP1, and SOD5. Preculture in nutrient-limiting medium enhanced adherence of C. dubliniensis, epithelial invasion, and survival following coculture with murine macrophages. In conclusion, C. albicans, unlike C. dubliniensis, appears to form hyphae in liquid medium regardless of nutrient availability, which may account for its increased capacity to cause disease in humans.

  13. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT), using Toluidine blue O inhibits the viability of biofilm produced by Candida albicans at different stages of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Paula; Rosseti, Isabela Bueno; Carvalho, Moisés Lopes; da Silva, Bruna Graziele Marques; Alberto-Silva, Carlos; Costa, Maricilia Silva

    2018-03-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungus producing both superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised individuals. It has been demonstrated that C. albicans ability to form biofilms is a crucial process for colonization and virulence. Furthermore, a correlation between the development of drug resistance and biofilm maturation at Candida biofilms has been shown. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) is a potential antimicrobial therapy that combines visible light and a non-toxic dye, known as a photosensitizer, producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can kill the treated cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of PACT, using Toluidine Blue O (TBO) on the viability of biofilms produced by C. albicans at different stages of development. In this study, the effects of PACT on both biofilm formation and viability of the biofilm produced by C. albicans were studied. Biofilm formation and viability were determined by a metabolic assay based on the reduction of XTT assay. In addition, the morphology of the biofilm was observed using light microscopy. PACT inhibited both biofilm formation and viability of the biofilm produced by C. albicans. Furthermore, PACT was able to decrease the number of both cells and filamentous form present in the biofilm structure. This inhibitory effect was observed in both early and mature biofilms. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the potential of PACT (using TBO) as an effective antifungal therapy, including against infections associated with biofilms at different stages of development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of yeast other than Candida albicans in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Inês; Proença, Luis; Félix, Sérgio; Salema-Oom, Madalena

    2013-07-01

    The isolation of yeast species other than Candida albicans from the oral mucosa has been increasing in frequency, suggesting that those may constitute emerging potential oral colonizers. The purpose of this work was to determine whether yeast species other than C. albicans are associated with factors related to wearing of dental prostheses. tRNA-PCR fingerprinting and sequencing of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain were used to identify all yeasts isolated from CHROMagar™ Candida cultures of oral swabs collected from 178 patients. Besides C. albicans, 13 other species were identified, corresponding to 34% of the yeast isolates. The majority of the non-C. albicans species were not detected as single colonizers but rather in co-colonization with one or two other yeasts, often with C. albicans. No significant associations were found with non-C. albicans species. On the contrary, the best-fitted logistic regression model predicts that either wearing a denture (adjusted odds = 4.6) or insufficient oral hygiene (adjusted odds = 2.3) are risks for colonization by yeast, in general. The colonization with non-C. albicans species and co-colonization were not independently associated with any of the analyzed host-related factors. In particular, neither wearing a removable denture nor being elderly were significant predictors. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inhibits Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2, synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  16. Effect of the serotonin receptor agonist, buspirone, on immune function in HIV-infected individuals: a six-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Benfield, T; Axen, T E

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous studies have shown that agents modulating the cAMP/PKA pathway have a beneficial effect on immune reconstitution in HIV-infected individuals. Here we evaluate the effect of buspirone on immune function as measured by CD4 and CD8 T-cell counts, CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio, HIV viral load......, and response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) in antiretroviral naive HIV-1-infected individuals. METHOD: Twenty-three HIV-infected patients with CD4 T-cell counts above 300 per microL were enrolled in a 6-month double-blinded placebo controlled trial. No patients received antiretroviral therapy during the study...... to placebo-treated patients was observed. There were no significant differences in CD4 T-cell counts, HIV viral load, or proliferative response to PWM between those receiving placebo and those receiving buspirone. CONCLUSION: Buspirone treatment leads to significant changes in CD8 T-cell count and in CD4/CD8...

  17. Comparison of the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of Cervarix and Gardasil human papillomavirus vaccines in HIV-infected adults: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Lars; Storgaard, Merete; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Tolstrup, Martin; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-04-15

    We compared the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of Cervarix or Gardasil human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in adults infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This was a double-blind, controlled trial randomizing HIV-positive adults to receive 3 doses of Cervarix or Gardasil at 0, 1.5, and 6 months. Immunogenicity was evaluated for up to 12 months. Neutralizing anti-HPV-16/18 antibodies were measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay. Laboratory tests and diary cards were used for safety assessment. The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined before and after immunization. Ninety-two participants were included in the study. Anti-HPV-18 antibody titers were higher in the Cervarix group compared with the Gardasil group at 7 and 12 months. No significant differences in anti-HPV-16 antibody titers were found among vaccine groups. Among Cervarix vaccinees, women had higher anti-HPV-16/18 antibody titers compared to men. No sex-specific differences in antibody titers were found in the Gardasil group. Mild injection site reactions were more common in the Cervarix group than in the Gardasil group (91.1% vs 69.6%; P = .02). No serious adverse events occurred. Both vaccines were immunogenic and well tolerated. Compared with Gardasil, Cervarix induced superior vaccine responses among HIV-infected women, whereas in HIV-infected men the difference in immunogenicity was less pronounced.

  18. [Intrauterine infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2006-09-10

    A broad variety of microorganisms are capable of causing fetal infections. Among viral agents prominent are the human cytomegaly virus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), human immundeficiency virus (HIV), varicella, herpes zooster, rubella, parvovirus B19, measles and the hepatitis B and C viruses. Protozoa such as toxoplasma and spirocheta pallida, causing congenital syphilis are equally important. Bacterial infections are responsible for in uterus aquired listeriosis, tuberculosis, and group B streptococcus infections. Fungi including candida albicans complete the circle of infections pathogens. Infectious microrganisms may reach the fetus through the placenta are may ascend through the birth canal. The quoted pathological agents threaten the health and life of the fetus directly by the biological derangements they cause and also by inducing abortion or premature birth. The clinical manifestations include retarded growth, central nervous system damage and skin lesions. The invariable therapeutic measures vary but in general, are limited value in cases of in utero acquired infections.

  19. Symbiotic Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Synergizes Virulence of Plaque Biofilms In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetta, Megan L.; Klein, Marlise I.; Colonne, Punsiri M.; Scott-Anne, Kathleen; Gregoire, Stacy; Pai, Chia-Hua; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Watson, Gene; Krysan, Damian J.; Bowen, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is often cited as the main bacterial pathogen in dental caries, particularly in early-childhood caries (ECC). S. mutans may not act alone; Candida albicans cells are frequently detected along with heavy infection by S. mutans in plaque biofilms from ECC-affected children. It remains to be elucidated whether this association is involved in the enhancement of biofilm virulence. We showed that the ability of these organisms together to form biofilms is enhanced in vitro and in vivo. The presence of C. albicans augments the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS), such that cospecies biofilms accrue more biomass and harbor more viable S. mutans cells than single-species biofilms. The resulting 3-dimensional biofilm architecture displays sizeable S. mutans microcolonies surrounded by fungal cells, which are enmeshed in a dense EPS-rich matrix. Using a rodent model, we explored the implications of this cross-kingdom interaction for the pathogenesis of dental caries. Coinfected animals displayed higher levels of infection and microbial carriage within plaque biofilms than animals infected with either species alone. Furthermore, coinfection synergistically enhanced biofilm virulence, leading to aggressive onset of the disease with rampant carious lesions. Our in vitro data also revealed that glucosyltransferase-derived EPS is a key mediator of cospecies biofilm development and that coexistence with C. albicans induces the expression of virulence genes in S. mutans (e.g., gtfB, fabM). We also found that Candida-derived β1,3-glucans contribute to the EPS matrix structure, while fungal mannan and β-glucan provide sites for GtfB binding and activity. Altogether, we demonstrate a novel mutualistic bacterium-fungus relationship that occurs at a clinically relevant site to amplify the severity of a ubiquitous infectious disease. PMID:24566629

  20. Frequency of Candidiasis and Colonization of Candida albicans in Relation to Oral Contraceptive Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Atousa; Sabeti Sanat, Ali; Nik Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Candidiasis, the infection caused by Candida albicans , is one of the most common infections of the oral cavity in humans. Candidiasis causes irritation and is known for its carcinogenic effects. Thus, it is important to recognize the predisposing factors for this opportunistic infection. Several previous studies have demonstrated an increased frequency of vaginal candidiasis in relation to oral contraceptive consumption. Only a few studies on the relation between oral contraceptives and oral candidiasis have been previously conducted. This study aims to evaluate the possible relation between oral contraceptive pills and oral candidiasis. This analytic, case-control study included 40 non-pregnant women divided into two groups: 20 who used oral contraceptive pills and 20 who did not. The groups were matched according to age, oral health, and past and present medical history. Samples were collected from the tongue's dorsum using a cotton swab and inoculated on CHROMagar culture plates. The frequency of positive cultures and the number of Candida colonies were compared between the two groups using independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney statistical tests with SPSS18 software. The frequency of positive cultures of Candida albicans was higher (P value = 0.03) for the case group. Also, the number of C. albicans and C. krusei was significantly higher for the case group compared to the control group (P value = 0.04, P value = 0.03). The results of the present study demonstrate that oral contraceptives containing estradiol can lead to Candida colonization in the oral cavity. It is recommended that further studies comparing the influence of oral contraceptives on Candida's adherence to the epithelium is highly recommended.

  1. Effect of oral antiseptic agents on phospholipase and proteinase enzymes of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun-Can, Banu; Kadir, Tanju; Gumru, Birsay

    2016-02-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most prevalent form of oral candida infections among the denture wearers. Generally, antiseptic oral rinses used in the treatment of these infections are considered as an adjunct or alternative antifungal treatment. Studies have suggested that the intraoral concentrations of antiseptics decrease substantially to the sub-therapeutic levels on account of the dynamics of the oral cavity. This condition yields the question about the minimum antiseptic concentration that effect the character or pathogenesis of Candida during treatment. The extracellular phospholipase and proteinase enzymes of Candida albicans are regarded to have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human fungal infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different sub-therapeutic concentrations of chlorhexidine gluconate, hexetidine and triclosan on the production of these enzymes by C. albicans strains isolated from 20 patients with denture stomatitis. Phospholipase test was done by using Sabouraud dextrose agar with egg yolk, proteinase test was done by using bovine serum albumin agar. Phospholipase test was done by using Sabouraud dextrose agar with egg yolk, proteinase test was done by using bovine serum albumin agar. Exoenzyme production of 20 strains which were brief exposured to sub-therapeutic concentrations of three antiseptic agents decreased significantly compared with the strains that were not exposured with antiseptic values (pantiseptics (pantiseptic was compared, there were no significant differences between enzymatic activities (p>0.05). The results of this study show that sub-therapeutic levels of each antiseptic may modulate candidal exoenzyme production, consequently suppressing pathogenicity of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective photoinactivation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis with hypericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, C.; Rodrigues, J. A. O.; Guimarães, A. P. P.; Ribeiro, A. O.; de Oliveira, K. T.; Imasato, H.; Perussi, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Candida includes different species that have the potential to invade and colonize the human body and C. albicans is the most common cause of skin, nail and mucous infections. The increasing resistance against antifungal drugs has renewed the search for new treatment procedures and antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a propitious candidate. Hypericin (HY) has several wanted properties to be used as a photosensitizer in this technique including a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation, a high extinction coefficient near 600 nm, and a relatively low dark toxicity. Although the phototoxicity of HY on several tumor cells has been reported, the data concerning its photoactivity on microorganisms are scarce. The aim of this study was to obtain the experimental parameters to achieve an acceptable selective hypericinphotoinactivation of two species of Candida comparing with fibroblasts and epithelial cells which are the constituents of some potential host tissues, such mucosas, skin and cavities. Microorganisms and cells were incubated with the same HY concentrations and short incubation time followed by irradiation with equal dose of light. The best conditions to kill just Candida were very low HY concentration (0.1-0.4 μg ml-1) incubated by 10 min and irradiated with LED 590 nm with 6 J cm-2.

  3. Integrating Candida albicans metabolism with biofilm heterogeneity by transcriptome mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Ranjith; May, Ali; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Williams, Craig; Jones, Brian L.; Burgess, Karl V.; Heringa, Jaap; Abeln, Sanne; Brandt, Bernd W.; Munro, Carol A.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of disease, a characteristic which has been shown to be heterogeneous in clinical isolates. Using an unbiased computational approach we investigated the central metabolic pathways driving biofilm heterogeneity. Transcripts from high (HBF) and low (LBF) biofilm forming isolates were analysed by RNA sequencing, with 6312 genes identified to be expressed in these two phenotypes. With a dedicated computational approach we identified and validated a significantly differentially expressed subnetwork of genes associated with these biofilm phenotypes. Our analysis revealed amino acid metabolism, such as arginine, proline, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were predominantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. On the contrary, purine, starch and sucrose metabolism was generally upregulated in the LBF phenotype. The aspartate aminotransferase gene AAT1 was found to be a common member of these amino acid pathways and significantly upregulated in the HBF phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of AAT1 enzyme activity significantly reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that biofilm phenotype is associated with differential regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding and targeting such pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, is potentially useful for developing diagnostics and new antifungals to treat biofilm-based infections.

  4. Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Kah Yean; Tay, Sun Tee; Le, Cheng Foh; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Sabri, Nadia Hanim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Hassan, Hamimah; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-05-12

    Candida spp. are the most common causes of fungal infections worldwide. Among the Candida species, Candida albicans remains the predominant species that causes invasive candidiasis in most countries. In this study, we used two peptides, KABT-AMP and uperin 3.6 as templates to develop novel antifungal peptides. Their anticandidal activity was assessed using a combination of MIC, time-killing assay and biofilm reduction assay. Hybrid peptides, KU2 and KU3 containing a mixed backbone of KABT-AMP and Uperin 3.6 demonstrated the most potent anticandidal activity with MIC values ranging from 8-16 mg/L. The number of Trp residues and the amphipathic structure of peptides probably enhanced the anticandidal activity of peptides. Increasing the cationicity of the uperin 3.6 analogues resulted in reduced MIC from the range of 64-128 mg/L to 16-64 mg/L and this was also correlated with the antibiofilm activity and killing kinetics of the peptides. Peptides showed synergistic effects when used in combination with conventional antifungals. Peptides demonstrated low haemolytic activity but significant toxicity on two normal human epithelial cell lines. This study provides us with a better understanding on the structure-activity relationship and the balance between cationicity and hydrophobicity of the peptides although the therapeutic application of the peptides is limited.

  5. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaile, Esther; Müller, Mario M; Schäfer, Miriam R; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E; Zipfel, Peter F; Singer, Bernhard B; Slevogt, Hortense

    2017-03-14

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans ) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans -induced CXCL8 secretion. IMPORTANCE The present study demonstrates for the first time that fungal pathogens can be recognized by at least four members of the immunomodulatory CEACAM receptor family: CEACAM1, -3, -5, and -6. Three of the four receptors (i.e., CEACAM1, -5, and -6) are expressed in mucosal cells of the intestinal tract, where they are implicated in immunomodulation and control of tissue homeostasis. Importantly, the interaction of the major fungal pathogen in humans Candida albicans with CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 resulted in an altered epithelial immune response. With respect to the broad impact of CEACAM receptors on various aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune responses, in particular epithelial, neutrophil, and T cell behavior, understanding the role of CEACAMs in the host response to fungal pathogens might help to improve management of

  6. Alginate oligosaccharides modify hyphal infiltration of Candida albicans in an in vitro model of invasive human candidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M F; Jack, A A; Powell, L C; Sadh, H; Rye, P D; Hill, K E; Thomas, D W

    2017-09-01

    A novel alginate oligomer (OligoG CF-5/20) has been shown to potentiate antifungal therapy against a range of fungal pathogens. The current study assessed the effect of this oligomer on in vitro virulence factor expression and epithelial invasion by Candida species. Plate substrate assays and epithelial models were used to assess Candida albicans (CCUG 39343 and ATCC 90028) invasion, in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy and histochemistry. Expression of candidal virulence factors was determined biochemically and by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Changes in surface charge of C. albicans following OligoG treatment were analysed using electrophoretic light scattering. OligoG induced marked alterations in hyphal formation in the substrate assays and reduced invasion in the epithelial model (P albicans was evident following OligoG treatment (P  0·05), qPCR demonstrated a reduction in phospholipase B (PLB2) and SAPs (SAP4 and SAP6) expression. OligoG CF-5/20 reduced in vitro virulence factor expression and invasion by C. albicans. These results, and the previously described potentiation of antifungal activity, define a potential therapeutic opportunity in the treatment of invasive candidal infections. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Effects of extracellular DNA from Candida albicans and pneumonia-related pathogens on Candida biofilm formation and hyphal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapaar, B; Nur, A; Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Murakami, K; Amoh, T; Matsuo, T; Ichikawa, T; Miyake, Y

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of genomic DNA purified from Candida albicans and pneumonia-related pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, on in vitro biofilm formation and morphological change of 3 Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis). Biofilm formation was evaluated by the crystal violet assay and colony-forming unit counts. Morphological characteristics of biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of DNA at a low concentration (Candida species. In contrast, the addition of DNA at a high concentration (10 μg ml(-1)) decreased the biofilm mass. Interestingly, the formation of hyphae in a dense network of yeast cells was observed in C. albicans biofilms exposed to a low concentration of DNA (Candida biofilm formation and suggested that eDNA may induce the morphological transition from yeast to hyphal growth form during C. albicans biofilm development. A novel therapy targeting eDNA may be applicable for Candida infection to decrease biofilm formation and hyphal formation. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Genetic-relatedness of peri-implants and buccal Candida albicans isolates determined by RAPD-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Adriana M; Rosa, Alcira C; Nastri, Natalia; Santillán, Hector D; Ariza, Yamila; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia M

    2016-12-01

    Molecular techniques have been used in recent studies to identify a wide range of potential bacterial pathogens in periimplant pockets of the oral cavity. However, the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of yeasts and species distribution related to periimplantitis are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of yeasts in periimplant biofilm and to study genetic relatedness of Candida albicans. Yeasts recovered from periimplant biofilm samples (n=89) and buccal samples (n=120) were studied in 40 immunocompetent nonsmoking patients who visited the dental clinic of the Asociación Implantodontológica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and had received oral rehabilitation with implants for more than five years. Yeasts recovered from samples were studied by typing assays using RAPDPCR. The prevalence of yeasts in the periimplant sulcus was 73% (n=29). C. albicans was the most prevalent species identified in this study population. The RAPD analysis showed identical genotypes in most C. albicans spp. from the two different sampling sites: buccal and periimplant. These findings suggest that periimplant biofilm is an ecological niche that favors the growth of yeast species. Most C. albicans found in periimplant biofilm originate from the endogenous infection caused by commensal strains. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  9. Genotypes of Candida albicans involved in development of candidiasis and their distribution in oral cavity of non-candidiasis individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yuki; Hattori, Hisao; Adachi, Hidesada; Takakura, Shunji; Horii, Toshinobu; Chindamporn, Ariya; Kitai, Hiroki; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Fukano, Hideo; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Shimozato, Kazuo; Kanbe, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Genotype characteristics and distribution of commensal Candida albicans should be studied to predict the development of candidiasis, however, extensive genotype analysis of commensal C. albicans has not been made. In this study, 508 C. albicans isolates were collected from patients with/without candidiasis and divided into 4 isolate groups (SG-1, oral cavity of non-candidiasis patients; SG-2, patients with cutaneous candidiasis; SG-3, patients with vaginal candidiasis; SG-4, patients with candidemia). These isolates were characterized to study the relationship between genotypes and pathogenicity using microsatellite analysis. Using CDC3 and CAI, 5 genotypes (I, 111: 115/33: 41; II, 115: 119/23: 23; III, 115: 123/18: 27; IV, 115: 123/33: 40; and V, 123: 127/32: 41) were found in 4.2%, 8.9%, 7.1%, 2.2% and 3.1% of the isolates, respectively. Genotypes II and III were commonly found in all isolate groups. These genotypes were further divided into 28 types by additional HIS3 and CAIII microsatellite markers. In this analysis, C. albicans with type 6 and type 23 was widely distributed as a commensal species in the oral cavity of non-candidiasis patients and found to be related with candidiasis development. Additionally, genotypes I and IV were found in SG-2 and/or SG-4, suggesting that the fungus with those genotypes is also involved in this development. In contrast, genotype V was not identified in any infective isolates.

  10. Comparing FTIR and RAPD techniques in the typing of C. albicans in a clinical set-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandt, Christophe L.; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Toubas, Dominique; Aubert, Dominique; Lepan, Herve; Lepouse, Claire; Jaussaud, Maryse; Leon, Alain; Pinon, Jean-Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2002-03-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, generally though to be of endogenous origin, with however reported outbreaks. Epidemilogy of C. albicans has been studied so far by genotypic methods mainly, including the classical RAPD analysis. Albeit powerful, genotypic techniques are expensive, time consuming and complex to implement. FTIR spectroscopy is simple, rapid, inexpensive and an increasingly used technique for the identification of microorganisms. As a phenotypic method, it provides rapid whole cells 'fingerprinting' using few consumables and can detect very subtle differences between strains of the same species. In this study, C. albicans strains isolated from 50 patients from six hospital units were collected and studied by FTIR spectroscopy and RAPD-PCR. Discrimination of strains was computed using classification algorithms on selected features of the spectral data. Results from 10 patients, for whom iterative sampling was possible, are presented and discussed. Emphasis was laid on the reproducibility of dat for strain-level identification. FTIR analysis shows that (a) the C. albicans spectra were different from one patient to another, (b) seven patients exhibit each a homogeneous group while three patients display each two groups of strains. RAPD-PCR and FTIR analyses correlate quite well showing that FTIR spectroscopy could be a potential epidemiological tool in the control of nosocomial fungal infections.

  11. The effect of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to heat-polymerized acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncul, Burcin; Karakis, Duygu; Dogruman Al, Funda

    2015-04-01

    Xerostomia can diminish the quality of life, leads to changes in normal chemical composition of saliva and oral microbiata, and increases the risk for opportunistic infections, such as Candida albicans. Various artificial salivas have been considered for patients with xerostomia. However, the knowledge on the antifungal and antiadhesive activity of artificial saliva substitutes is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate influence of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens. Two commercial artificial salivas (Saliva Orthana and Biotene Oral Balance Gel) were selected. 45 polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens were prepared and randomly allocated into 3 groups; Saliva Orthana, Biotene-Oral Balance gel and distilled water. Specimens were stored in the artificial saliva or in the sterile distilled water for 60 minutes at 37℃. Then they were exposed to yeast suspensions including Candida albicans. Yeast cells were counted using ×40 magnification under a light microscope and data were analysed. Analysis of data indicated statistically significant difference in adhesion of Candida albicans among all experimental groups (P=.000). Findings indicated that Saliva Orthana had higher adhesion scores than the Biotene Oral Balance gel and distilled water (Pxerostomia.

  12. Supramolecular Chitosan Micro-Platelets Synergistically Enhance Anti-Candida albicans Activity of Amphotericin B Using an Immunocompetent Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisin, Tiphany; Bories, Christian; Bombardi, Martina; Loiseau, Philippe M; Rouffiac, Valérie; Solgadi, Audrey; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Ponchel, Gilles; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design new chitosan conjugates able to self-organize in aqueous solution in the form of micrometer-size platelets. When mixed with amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB-DOC), micro-platelets act as a drug booster allowing further improvement in AmB-DOC anti-Candida albicans activity. Micro-platelets were obtained by mixing oleoyl chitosan and α-cyclodextrin in water. The formulation is specifically-engineered for mucosal application by dispersing chitosan micro-platelets into thermosensitive pluronic ® F127 20 wt% hydrogel. The formulation completely cured C. albicans vaginal infection in mice and had a superior activity in comparison with AmB-DOC without addition of chitosan micro-platelets. In vitro studies showed that the platelets significantly enhance AmB-DOC antifungal activity since the IC 50 and the MIC 90 decrease 4.5 and 4.8-times. Calculation of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI = 0.198) showed that chitosan micro-platelets act in a synergistic way with AmB-DOC against C. albicans. No synergy is found between spherical nanoparticles composed poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate)/chitosan and AmB-DOC. These results demonstrate for the first time the ability of flattened chitosan micro-platelets to have synergistic activity with AmB-DOC against C. albicans candidiasis and highlight the importance of rheological and mucoadhesive behaviors of hydrogels in the efficacy of the treatment.

  13. High-Throughput Screening of a Collection of Known Pharmacologically Active Small Compounds for Identification of Candida albicans Biofilm Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, Samuel A.; Srinivasan, Anand; Pierce, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common etiologic agent of systemic fungal infections with unacceptably high mortality rates. The existing arsenal of antifungal drugs is very limited and is particularly ineffective against C. albicans biofilms. To address the unmet need for novel antifungals, particularly those active against biofilms, we have screened a small molecule library consisting of 1,200 off-patent drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Prestwick Chemical Library, to identify inhibitors of C. albicans biofilm formation. According to their pharmacological applications that are currently known, we classified these bioactive compounds as antifungal drugs, as antimicrobials/antiseptics, or as miscellaneous drugs, which we considered to be drugs with no previously characterized antifungal activity. Using a 96-well microtiter plate-based high-content screening assay, we identified 38 pharmacologically active agents that inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. These drugs were subsequently tested for their potency and efficacy against preformed biofilms, and we identified three drugs with novel antifungal activity. Thus, repurposing FDA-approved drugs opens up a valuable new avenue for identification and potentially rapid development of antifungal agents, which are urgently needed. PMID:23689719

  14. Perioperative synbiotics administration decreases postoperative infections in patients with colorectal cancer: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINE TABORDA FLESCH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of perioperative administration of symbiotics on the incidence of surgical wound infection in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a randomized clinical trial with colorectal cancer patients undergoing elective surgery, randomly assigned to receive symbiotics or placebo for five days prior to the surgical procedure and for 14 days after surgery. We studied 91 patients, 49 in the symbiotics group (Lactobacillus acidophilus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus casei 108 to 109 CFU, Bifi dobacterium 108 to 109 CFU and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS 6g and 42 in the placebo group. Results: surgical site infection occurred in one (2% patient in the symbiotics group and in nine (21.4% patients in the control group (p=0.002. There were three cases of intraabdominal abscess and four cases of pneumonia in the control group, whereas we observed no infections in patients receiving symbiotics (p=0.001. Conclusion: the perioperative administration of symbiotics significantly reduced postoperative infection rates in patients with colorectal cancer. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of symbiotics in the surgical treatment of colorectal cancer.

  15. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type b) How to Take Your Child's Temperature Impetigo Infant Botulism Infections That Pets Carry Influenza (Flu) ... Herpes Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Hives (Urticaria) Impetigo Infections That Pets Carry Lyme Disease Measles Molluscum ...

  16. Investigation of touch-sensitive responses by hyphae of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, N A; Perera, T H; Sherwood-Higham, J; Gooday, G W; Gregory, D W; Marshall, D

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus that commonly infects the mucosal surface of humans. The hyphal growth form of this fungus may initiate the primary invasion of the host. Here we show that hyphae respond thigmotropically and morphologically to cues such as the presence of a surface, pores, grooves and ridges. Growth on some firm surfaces elicits a helical growth response. Hyphae follow grooves and ridges of inert substrates and penetrate pores of filtration membranes. Our in vitro experiments suggest that thigmotropism may enhance the ability of a hypha to invade epithelia of a host at sites of weakened integrity.

  17. Penicillenols from a deep-sea fungus Aspergillus restrictus inhibit Candida albicans biofilm formation and hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Yao, Qi-Feng; Amin, Muhammad; Nong, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Penicillenols (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 and C2) were isolated from Aspergillus restrictus DFFSCS006, and could differentially inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate pre-developed biofilms of Candida albicans. Their structure-bioactivity relationships suggested that the saturation of hydrocarbon chain at C-8, R-configuration of C-5 and trans-configuration of the double bond between C-5 and C-6 of pyrrolidine-2,4-dione unit were important for their anti-biofilm activities. Penicillenols A2 and B1 slowed the hyphal growth and suppressed the transcripts of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4. Moreover, penicillenols A2 and B1 were found to act synergistically with amphotericin B against C. albicans biofilm formation.

  18. The effect of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to heat-polymerized acrylic resin

    OpenAIRE

    Oncul, Burcin; Karakis, Duygu; Dogruman Al, Funda

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Xerostomia can diminish the quality of life, leads to changes in normal chemical composition of saliva and oral microbiata, and increases the risk for opportunistic infections, such as Candida albicans. Various artificial salivas have been considered for patients with xerostomia. However, the knowledge on the antifungal and antiadhesive activity of artificial saliva substitutes is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate influence of two artificial salivas on the adhesion...

  19. Comparative evaluation of three antifungal susceptibility test methods for Candida albicans isolates and correlation with response to fluconazole therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhnke, M; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Engelmann, E; Trautmann, M

    1996-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities were determined for 56 Candida albicans isolates obtained from the oral cavities of 41 patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. The agents tested included fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, flucytosine, and amphotericin B. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution technique following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards document M27-P (M27-P micro), a broth microdilution technique using high-resolution medium (HR micro), and t...

  20. Role of Non Albicans Candida Spp. and Biofilm in Neonatal ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Shagun; Mittal, Seema; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. remains the fungal species most commonly associated with biofilm formation. Increase in Candida infections in last decades has almost paralleled the increase and wide spread use of a broad range of medical implant devices mainly in population with impaired host defences. One of the most important characteristics of biofilms is their high level of resistance to antimicrobial drugs. This study was conducted to know the prevalence of different Candida spp. causing blood stream infections and ability to form biofilm and to evaluate the co relation of biofilm with antifungal drug resistance. The present study was conducted on 12464 blood samples for the identification and speciation of various Candida spp. causing blood stream infection over a period of one year. Antifungal susceptibility was performed as per clinical laboratory standard institute guidelines and biofilm formation was detected by method described by Christensen's et al. Out of total 12464 blood culture received, 1378 (11.05%) were culture positive rest and among culture positive 100 (7.25%) Candida isolates were recovered. C. tropicalis was the commonest (43%) species followed by C. albicans (41%), C. krusei (9%) and C. parapsilosis (7%). A total of 41 Candida isolates were biofilm producers and rest 59 isolates were non-biofilm producers. A changing trend of increased prevalence of non albicans Candida spp. was observed which were resistant to commonly used antifungal fluconazole. Multi drug resistance was more common in biofilm forming Candida isolates.

  1. Effects on muscle performance of NSAID treatment with piroxicam versus placebo in geriatric patients with acute infection-induced inflammation. A double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ingo; Bautmans, Ivan; Njemini, Rose; Demanet, Christian; Bergmann, Pierre; Mets, Tony

    2011-12-30

    Inflammation is the main cause of disease-associated muscle wasting. In a previous single blind study we have demonstrated improved recovery of muscle endurance following celecoxib treatment in hospitalized geriatric patients with acute infection. Here we further evaluate NSAID treatment with piroxicam in a double blind RCT and investigate the role of cytokines and heat shock proteins (Hsp) with respect to muscle performance. We hypothesized that NSAID treatment would preserve muscle performance better than antibiotic treatment alone, by reducing infection-associated inflammation and by increasing expression of cytoprotective Hsp. Consecutive admissions to the geriatric ward were screened. 30 Caucasian patients, median age 84.5 years, with acute infection-induced inflammation and serum levels of CRP > 10 mg/L were included and randomized to active treatment with 10 mg piroxicam daily or placebo. Assessment comprised general clinical and biochemical parameters, 25 cytokines in serum, intra-and extracellular Hsp27 and Hsp70, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS) scores, grip strength (GS), fatigue resistance (FR) and lean body mass (LBM). Patients were evaluated until discharge with a maximum of 3 weeks after treatment allocation. EMS scores, FR and grip work (GW), a measure taking into account GS and FR, significantly improved with piroxicam, but not with placebo. Early decreases in IL-6 serum levels with piroxicam correlated with better muscle performance at week 2. Basal expression of Hsp27 in monocytes without heat challenge (WHC) was positively correlated with FR at baseline and significantly increased by treatment with piroxicam compared to placebo. Profound modifications in the relationships between cytokines or Hsp and changes in muscle parameters were observed in the piroxicam group. Piroxicam improves clinically relevant measures of muscle performance and mobility in geriatric patients hospitalized with acute infection-induced inflammation. Underlying mechanisms may

  2. Searching for new strategies against biofilm infections: Colistin-AMP combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus single- and double-species biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jorge

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial research is being pressured to look for more effective therapeutics for the ever-growing antibiotic-resistant infections, and antimicrobial peptides (AMP and antimicrobial combinations are promising solutions. This work evaluates colistin-AMP combinations against two major pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, encompassing non- and resistant strains. Colistin (CST combined with the AMP temporin A (TEMP-A, citropin 1.1 (CIT-1.1 and tachyplesin I linear analogue (TP-I-L was tested against planktonic, single- and double-species biofilm cultures. Overall synergy for planktonic P. aeruginosa and synergy/additiveness for planktonic S. aureus were observed. Biofilm growth prevention was achieved with synergy and additiveness. Pre-established 24 h-old biofilms were harder to eradicate, especially for S. aureus and double-species biofilms; still, some synergy and addictiveness was observed for higher concentrations, including for the biofilms of resistant strains. Different treatment times and growth media did not greatly influence AMP activity. CST revealed low toxicity compared with the other AMP but its combinations were toxic for high concentrations. Overall, combinations reduced effective AMP concentrations, mainly in prevention scenarios. Improvement of effectiveness and toxicity of therapeutic strategies will be further investigated.

  3. Effect of different wavelengths and dyes on Candida albicans: In vivo study using Galleria mellonella as an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Conti, Stefania; Ciociola, Tecla; Fornaini, Carlo; Polonelli, Luciano; Lagori, Giuseppe; Manfredi, Maddalena; Vescovi, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Studies on photodynamic inactivation against microorganisms had a great development in recent years. The aim of this work was to test the application of different laser wavelengths with or without different photosensitizing dyes on Candida albicans cells in vitro and in photodynamic therapy protocols in vivo in larvae of Galleria mellonella. Laser application was realized on C. albicans cells suspended in saline solution or cultured on solid medium for the in vitro study, and in a model of G. mellonella candidal infection for the in vivo study. Three wavelengths (650, 405, and 532nm) were used in continuous mode with different values of applied fluences: 10, 20 and 30J/cm 2 for the in vitro study and 10J/cm 2 for the in vivo study, without and with photosensitizing dyes. No growth inhibition was obtained on yeast cells in saline solution without photosensitizers. The maximum inhibition of growth (100%) was obtained with 405nm diode laser and curcumin at any used fluence. No growth inhibition was observed for yeast cells cultured on solid medium after laser application without dyes. An inhibition was observed after laser application when curcumin and erythrosine were added to the medium. The survival curves of G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans with or without the different dyes and after laser application showed a statistically significant difference (palbicans and the potential of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of candidal infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Candida albicans and napkin dermatitis: relationship and lesion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candida albicans and napkin dermatitis: relationship and lesion severity correlation. Amani Hussein Ahmed Karsani, Abdullateef Azolaibani, Yasser Farouq, Khalid Zedan, Mohammed Mohsen Alotaibi, Ghada Bin Saif, Ibrahim H. Babikir ...

  5. Pathogenesis of Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odds, F C

    1994-09-01

    Candida infections of the skin and superficial mucosal sites are the result of an interplay between fungal virulence and host defenses. Epidermal proliferation and T-lymphocyte immune responses are expressed by the host to combat fungal invasion, but inflammatory responses and nonspecific inhibitors also probably play a role. Candida albicans can express at least three types of surface adhesion molecules to colonize epithelial surfaces, plus an aspartyl proteinase enzyme able to facilitate initial penetration of keratinized cells. Deeper penetration of keratinized epithelia is assisted by hypha formation, and C. albicans hyphae may use contact sensing (thigmotropism) as a guiding mechanism. Pathogenesis requires differential expression of virulence factors at each new stage of the process: a propensity for rapid alteration of the expressed phenotype in C. albicans may therefore be a significant factor in establishing the comparatively high pathogenic potential of this species.

  6. SAVVY (C31G gel for prevention of HIV infection in women: a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Peterson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of 1.0% C31G (SAVVY in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV infection among women at high risk.This was a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants made up to 12 monthly visits for HIV testing, adverse event reporting, and study product supply. The study was conducted between March 2004 and February 2006 in Accra and Kumasi, Ghana. We enrolled 2142 HIV-negative women at high risk of HIV infection, and randomized them to SAVVY or placebo gel. Main outcome measures were the incidence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection as determined by detection of HIV antibodies from oral mucosal transudate specimens and adverse events. We accrued 790 person-years of follow-up in the SAVVY group and 772 person-years in the placebo group. No clinically significant differences in the overall frequency of adverse events, abnormal pelvic examination findings, or abnormal laboratory results were seen between treatment groups. However, more participants in the SAVVY group reported reproductive tract adverse events than in the placebo group (13.0% versus 9.4%. Seventeen HIV seroconversions occurred; eight in participants randomized to SAVVY and nine in participants receiving placebo. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative probability of HIV infection through 12 months were 0.010 in the SAVVY group and 0.011 in the placebo group (p = 0.731, with a hazard ratio (SAVVY versus placebo of 0.88 (95% confidence interval 0.33, 2.27. Because of a lower-than-expected HIV incidence, we were unable to achieve the required number of HIV infections (66 to obtain the desired study power.SAVVY was not associated with increased adverse events overall, but was associated with higher reporting of reproductive adverse events. Our data are insufficient to conclude whether SAVVY is effective at preventing HIV infection relative to placebo.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00129532.

  7. The roles of CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1 in kaempferol-induced suppression with fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jing; Zhang, MengXiang; Wang, TianMing; Li, Yue; Wang, ChangZhong

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections caused by fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans are an intractable clinical problem, calling for new efficient antifungal drugs. Kaempferol, an active flavonoid, has been considered a potential candidate against Candida species. This work investigates the resistance reversion of kaempferol in fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and the underlying mechanism. The antifungal activities of fluconazole and/or kaempferol were assessed by a series of standard procedures including broth microdilution method, checkerboard assay and time-kill (T-K) test in nine clinical strains as well as a standard reference isolate of C. albicans. Subsequently, the morphological changes, the efflux of rhodamine 6G, and the expressions of CDR 1, CDR 2, and MDR 1 were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), inverted fluorescence microscope and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in C. albicans z2003. For all the tested C. albicans strains, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluconazole and kaempferol ranged 0.25-32 and 128-256 μg/mL with a range of fractional inhibitory concentration index of 0.257-0.531. In C. albicans z2003, the expression of both CDR 1 and CDR 2 were decreased after exposure to kaempferol alone with negligible rhodamine 6G accumulation, while the expression of CDR 1, CDR 2 and MDR 1 were all decreased when fluconazole and kaempferol were used concomitantly with notable fluorescence of rhodamine 6G observed. Kaempferol-induced reversion in fluconazole-resistant C. albicans might be likely due to the suppression of the expression of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1.

  8. Purpurin suppresses Candida albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wai-Kei Tsang

    Full Text Available A striking and clinically relevant virulence trait of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is its ability to grow and switch reversibly among different morphological forms. Inhibition of yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans represents a new paradigm for antifungal intervention. We have previously demonstrated the novel antifungal activity of purpurin against Candida fungi. In this study, we extended our investigation by examining the in vitro effect of purpurin on C. albicans morphogenesis and biofilms. The susceptibility of C. albicans biofilms to purpurin was examined quantitatively by 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide reduction assay. Hyphal formation and biofilm ultrastructure were examined qualitatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of hypha-specific genes and hyphal regulator in purpurin-treated fungal cells. The results showed that, at sub-lethal concentration (3 µg/ml, purpurin blocked the yeast-to-hypha transition under hypha-inducing conditions. Purpurin also inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation and reduced the metabolic activity of mature biofilms in a concentration-dependent manner. SEM images showed that purpurin-treated C. albicans biofilms were scanty and exclusively consisted of aggregates of blastospores. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that purpurin downregulated the expression of hypha-specific genes (ALS3, ECE1, HWP1, HYR1 and the hyphal regulator RAS1. The data strongly suggested that purpurin suppressed C. albicans morphogenesis and caused distorted biofilm formation. By virtue of the ability to block these two virulence traits in C. albicans, purpurin may represent a potential candidate that deserves further investigations in the development of antifungal strategies against this notorious human fungal pathogen in vivo.

  9. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions ...

  10. Frequency and enzymatic activity of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-positive patients at Fortaleza, Ceará Freqüência e atividade enzimática de Candida albicans isolado da cavidade oral de pacientes HIV-positivos em Fortaleza, Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Albuquerque Menezes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans and other species are usually involved in opportunistic infections in patients with acquired immunological deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The virulence mechanisms by which this yeast expresses its pathogenicity include adherence patterns, ability to form pseudomycelia and production of extracellular enzymes, among others. The objective of this research was to verify the frequency of Candida and the production of proteinase and phospholipase in 52 strains of Candida albicans from the oral cavity of patients infected by HIV treated at Hospital São José, AIDS reference and training center in Fortaleza, Ceará. Samples were collected of patients, with or without oral lesions characteristic of candidosis. From 100 patients, 80% presented positivity for Candida: 65% (52 were identified as C. albicans, 27.5% (22 as C. tropicalis, 2.5% (2 as C. glabrata, 2.5% (2 as C. krusei and 2.5% (2 as C. guilliermondii. Among the strains of C. albicans isolated from the oral cavity, proteinase and phospholipase were detected in 69.2% and 73%, respectively. The results suggested that C. albicans was the most frequent species observed, with intermediate expression of proteinase and phospholipase.Candida albicans e outras espécies são usualmente envolvidas em infecções de pacientes com a síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (AIDS. Os mecanismos de virulência pelos quais a levedura expressa sua patogenicidade incluem padrões de aderência, habilidade por formar pseudomicélio, produção de enzimas extracelulares e outros. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a freqüência de Candida e a produção de proteinase e fosfolipase em 52 cepas de Candida albicans da cavidade oral de pacientes infectados pelo HIV atendidos no Hospital São José, hospital de referência e centro de treinamento em AIDS em Fortaleza, Ceará. Neste trabalho foram coletadas amostras de pacientes com ou sem lesões características de candidose. Dos cem pacientes 80

  11. Candida albicans endophthalmitis in a patient with a non-functioning pituitary adenoma evolving into Cushing׳s disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyoung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old woman presented with complaints of blurred vision in the left eye. She had been treated for recurrent non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA. A vitreous biopsy followed by histopathologic examination showed the presence of Candida albicans. Meanwhile, Cushing׳s disease was diagnosed and gamma knife surgery was performed. Vitrectomy and antifungal treatment improved ocular infection and inflammation. Herein, we describe the first case of C. albicans endophthalmitis in a patient with NFPA evolving into Cushing׳s disease.

  12. Stress alters rates and types of loss of heterozygosity in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forche, A; Abbey, D; Pisithkul, T; Weinzierl, M A; Ringstrom, T; Bruck, D; Petersen, K; Berman, J

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity is often generated during adaptation to stress, and in eukaryotes some of this diversity is thought to arise via recombination and reassortment of alleles during meiosis. Candida albicans, the most prevalent pathogen of humans, has no known meiotic cycle, and yet it is a heterozygous diploid that undergoes mitotic recombination during somatic growth. It has been shown that clinical isolates as well as strains passaged once through a mammalian host undergo increased levels of recombination. Here, we tested the hypothesis that stress conditions increase rates of mitotic recombination in C. albicans, which is measured as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at specific loci. We show that LOH rates are elevated during in vitro exposure to oxidative stress, heat stress, and antifungal drugs. In addition, an increase in stress severity correlated well with increased LOH rates. LOH events can arise through local recombination, through homozygosis of longer tracts of chromosome arms, or by whole-chromosome homozygosis. Chromosome arm homozygosis was most prevalent in cultures grown under conventional lab conditions. Importantly, exposure to different stress conditions affected the levels of different types of LOH events, with oxidative stress causing increased recombination, while fluconazole and high temperature caused increases in events involving whole chromosomes. Thus, C. albicans generates increased amounts and different types of genetic diversity in response to a range of stress conditions, a process that we term "stress-induced LOH" that arises either by elevating rates of recombination and/or by increasing rates of chromosome missegregation. Stress-induced mutagenesis fuels the evolution of bacterial pathogens and is mainly driven by genetic changes via mitotic recombination. Little is known about this process in other organisms. Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, causes infections that require adaptation to different host environmental

  13. Anti-Candida albicans natural products, sources of new antifungal drugs: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zida, A; Bamba, S; Yacouba, A; Ouedraogo-Traore, R; Guiguemdé, R T

    2017-03-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen in humans. Due to the development of drug resistance, there is today a need for new antifungal agents for the efficient management of C. albicans infections. Therefore, we reviewed antifungal activity, mechanisms of action, possible synergism with antifungal drugs of all natural substances experimented to be efficient against C. albicans for future. An extensive and systematic review of the literature was undertaken and all relevant abstracts and full-text articles analyzed and included in the review. A total of 111 documents were published and highlighted 142 anti-C. albicans natural products. These products are mostly are reported in Asia (44.37%) and America (28.17%). According to in vitro model criteria, from the 142 natural substances, antifungal activity can be considered as important for 40 (28.20%) and moderate for 24 (16.90%). Sixteen products have their antifungal activity confirmed by in vivo gold standard experimentation. Microbial natural products, source of antifungals, have their antifungal mechanism well described in the literature: interaction with ergosterol (polyenes), inhibition 1,3-β-d-glucan synthase (Echinocandins), inhibition of the synthesis of cell wall components (chitin and mannoproteins), inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis (serine palmitoyltransferase, ceramide synthase, inositol phosphoceramide synthase) and inhibition of protein synthesis (sordarins). Natural products from plants mostly exert their antifungal effects by membrane-active mechanism. Some substances from arthropods are also explored to act on the fungal membrane. Interestingly, synergistic effects were found between different classes of natural products as well as between natural products and azoles. Search for anti-C. albicans new drugs is promising since the list of natural substances, which disclose activity against this yeast is today long. Investigations must be pursued not only to found more new anti

  14. Quantitative Investigation of Efficiency of Ultraviolet and Visible Light in Eradication of Candida albicans In Vitro

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    Maver-Bišćanin, Mirela; Mravak-Stipetić, Marinka; Bukovski, Suzana; Bišćanin, Alen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the efficiency of the ultraviolet (UV) and visible light in eradication of Candida albicans in vitro; in particular, to determine, for selected wavelengths, the specific eradication coefficients and thresholds in terms of energy density levels required to effect 3.0log10 and 4.0log10 reduction. Background data: Oral candidosis is the most common infection of the oral cavity and is caused by Candida species. The widespread use of topical and systemic antifungal agents as conventional treatment for oral candidosis has resulted in the development of resistance in C. albicans. Therefore, it has become necessary to develop alternative therapies for the treatment of oral candidosis. Methods: C. albicans ATCC® 90028™ was irradiated with 254 nm, 365 nm, 406 nm, 420 nm, and broadband Xe spectrum. For each wavelength, a fit of experimental data (survival fraction vs. applied energy density) with an exponential decay function enabled estimation of the specific eradication coefficients and thresholds. Results: Based on estimated specific efficiencies (Δ) and eradication thresholds (ET) of the investigated wavelengths, the ranking in eradication efficiency of C. albicans (most to least effective) is: 254 nm (Δ=6.1 mJ/cm−2, ET99.99=56 mJ/cm−2), broadband Xe spectrum (Δ=27.7 mJ/cm−2, ET99.99=255 mJ/cm−2), 365 nm (Δ=4.3 J/cm−2, ET99.99=39 J/cm−2), 420 nm (Δ=0.65 J/cm−2, ET99.99=6 J/cm−2), and 406 nm (Δ=11.4 J/cm−2, ET99.99=104 J/cm−2). Conclusions: The results provide insight into the wavelength-dependent dynamics of eradication of C. albicans. For each investigated wavelength, the eradication coefficient and corresponding eradication threshold were estimated. The observed different eradication efficiencies are consequence of different spectrally dependent inactivation mechanisms. The established methodology enables unambiguous quantitative

  15. Effect of the Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Eugenia uniflora on Proteins Global Expression during Morphogenesis in Candida albicans

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    Walicyranison P. Silva-Rocha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is able to switch from yeast to hyphal growth and this is an essential step for tissue invasion and establishment of infection. Due to the limited drug arsenal used to treat fungal infections and the constant emergence of resistant strains, it is important to search for new therapeutic candidates. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate by proteomic analysis the role of a natural product (Eugenia uniflora in impairing hypha formation in C. albicans. We also tested the potential action of E. uniflora to prevent and treat oral candidiasis induced in a murine model of oral infection and the ability of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to phagocytize C. albicans cells treated with the ethyl acetate fraction of the extract. We found that this fraction greatly reduced hypha formation after morphogenesis induction in the presence of serum. Besides, several proteins were differentially expressed in cells treated with the fraction. Surprisingly, the ethyl acetate fraction significantly reduced phagocytosis in C. albicans (Mean 120.36 ± 36.71 yeasts/100 PMNs vs. 44.68 ± 19.84 yeasts/100 PMNs. Oral candidiasis was attenuated when C. albicans cells were either pre-incubated in the presence of E. uniflora or when the fraction was applied to the surface of the oral cavity after infection. These results were consistent with the reduction in CFU counts (2.36 vs. 1.85 Log10 CFU/ml and attenuation of tissue damage observed with histopathological analysis of animals belonging to treated group. We also observed shorter true hyphae by direct examination and histopathological analysis, when cells were treated with the referred natural product. The E. uniflora ethyl acetate fraction was non-toxic to human cells. E. uniflora may act on essential proteins mainly related to cellular structure, reducing the capacity of filamentation and attenuating infection in a murine model, without causing any toxic effect on human cells, suggesting that it may be a

  16. Candida albicans survival and biofilm formation under starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Y; Hu, X; Ling, J; Du, Y; Liu, J; Liu, H; Peng, Z

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the survival and biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans in starvation and under anaerobic conditions. Candida albicans growth and survival were monitored in vitro for up to 8 months. Fungal suspensions from late exponential, stationary and starvation phases were incubated on human dentine, polystyrene and glass slides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the process of biofilm formation. 2,3-bis(2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) reduction assay was performed to quantify the biofilm formation capability, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study and make semi-quantitative comparisons of the ultrastructure of biofilms formed on human dentine. 'XTT bioactivity' and 'COMSTAT results' were analysed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and one-way ANOVA, respectively. Candida albicans survived for over six months. SEM demonstrated that starving C. albicans produced mature biofilms on different substrata. C. albicans of the same growth phase incubated on human dentine displayed significantly higher biofilm formation capability than on polystyrene or glass slides (P roughness coefficient and surface/volume ratio (P < 0.05). Candida albicans cells can survive and form biofilms in anaerobic and nutrient-limited conditions and may pose a treatment challenge. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  17. Prevention of nosocomial infection in critically ill patients by selective decontamination of the digestive tract. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L A; Martín, M J; Pita, S; Paz, J; Seco, C; Margusino, L; Villanueva, R; Durán, M T

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a method of Selective Decontamination of the Digestive Tract (SDD) on colonization, nosocomial infection (NI), bacterial resistance, mortality and economic costs. Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study. Polyvalent intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital with 27 beds. 101 patients with > 3 days of mechanical ventilation and > 5 days of stay, without infection at the start of the study. 47 belonged to the Treated Group (TG) and 54 to the Placebo Group (PG). The TG was given Cefotaxime i.v. (6 g/day) for the first four days and an association of Polymyxin E, Tobramycin and Amphotericin B at the oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal level throughout the whole stay. In the TG, colonization by gram-negative agents at oropharyngeal, tracheal and gastrointestinal level fell significantly. There was a significant drop in the overall, respiratory and urinary NI (26% vs 63%, p < 0.001; 15% vs 46%, p < 0.001; 9% vs 31%, p < 0.01). The overall mortality and NI related mortality was less in the TG (21% vs 44%, p < 0.05; 2% vs 20%, p < 0.01). The economic costs, mechanical ventilation time and length of stay were similar. The percentage of bacterial isolations resistant to Cefotaxime and Tobramycin was greater in the TG (38% vs 15% and 38% vs 9%, p < 0.001). colonization by gram-negative bacilli, NI and the mortality related to it can be modified by SDD. Continuous bacteriological surveillance is necessary.

  18. A double-blind study of the efficacy and safety of the ICP10deltaPK vaccine against recurrent genital HSV-2 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Gerardo; Cancela, Rosalia; Alonzo, Lourdes; Benuto, Rosa; Magana, Maria del Carmen; Hurley, Dennis R; Fishbein, Eugenia; Lara, Claudia; Gonzalez, Teresa; Ponce, Rebeca; Burnett, Joseph W; Calton, Gary J

    2002-10-01

    A randomized double-blind trial to evaluate the safety of a novel recombinant virus, ICP10deltaPK, for reduction or prevention of recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection was carried out in public hospitals in Mexico City. Persons having a minimum of 5 documented herpetic recurrences in the previous year were randomized for vaccination. Patients were examined within 72 hours of lesion occurrence. If accepted into the study, the patient was inoculated subcutaneously in the upper deltoid muscle area at days 7, 17, and 28 after initiation of lesion occurrence. Recurrences were recorded by patient diary and physician examination. During the observation period (extending from 10 to 180 days after the last booster dose), recurrences in the vaccine (V) group were prevented completely in 37.5% of the patients, whereas in the placebo (P) group, 100% of the patients had at least one recurrence (P = .068). Vaccinated patients had fewer recurrences (V, 1.58; P, 3.13 [P = .028]). The mean number of illness days was 10 for the vaccine group and 18 for the placebo group (P = .028). Further studies to evaluate this vaccine and its dosimetry for the treatment of genital herpes infections appear warranted.

  19. The Effect of Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts of Teucrium polium on Candida Albicans and Two Species of Malassezia

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    Maryam Nadimi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teucrium polium L. is a medicinal plant, which due to its antimicrobial, antispasmodic and anti-tumor properties has been used in traditional medicine for over 2000 years. The aim of this research was to study the effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Teucrium polium L. against three strains of Candida albicans (ATCC 62061, ATCC 1677, and NCPF 3153, Malassezia furfur and Malassezia globosa using pour plate method. Materials and Methods: Teucrium polium L. was collected from Broojen area during the spring. The plant was dried and powdered. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts were prepared from the fine powder. Different concentrations of extracts (1, 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml were made in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA and modified Leeming-Notman Agar (MLNA medium for Candida albicans, Malassezia furfur and Malassezia globosa. 1.5×106 cfu/ml of yeasts, were cultured on media and incubated at 37ºC and 32ºC respectively. Pour plate method was used to assess the antifungal activity of these extracts.Results: The inhibitory effect of ethanolic extract of Teucrium polium L. on the three strains of Candida albicans was depended on concentration level of extracts in media. Aqueous extract had inhibitory effect on Candida albicans (NCPF 3153 only, and with increasing of the extract concentration, the number of colonies was decreased, so that in concentration of 8 mg/ml, no growth was seen. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts had no inhibitory effect on Malassezia species. Conclusion: Teucrium polium L. extracts have considerable inhibitory effect on different strains of Candida albicans. Further investigations are needed to detect the effectiveness of this plant in treatment of Candida infections.

  20. Management of destructive Candida albicans spondylodiscitis of the cervical spine: a systematic analysis of literature illustrated by an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg-Stolberg, Josef; Horn, Dagmar; Roßlenbroich, Steffen; Riesenbeck, Oliver; Kampmeier, Stefanie; Mohr, Michael; Raschke, Michael J; Hartensuer, René

    2017-04-01

    Candida induced spondylodiscitis of the cervical spine in immunocompetent patients is an extremely rare infectious complication. Since clinical symptoms might be nonspecific, therapeutic latency can lead to permanent spinal cord damage, sepsis and fatal complications. Surgical debridement is strongly recommended but there is no standard antimycotic regime for postsurgical treatment. This paper summarizes available data and demonstrates another successfully treated case. The systematic analysis was performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. PubMed and Web of Science were scanned to identify English language articles. Additionally, the authors describe the case of a 60-year-old male patient who presented with a Candida albicans induced cervical spondylodiscitis after an edematous pancreatitis and C. albicans sepsis. Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion of C4-C6, additional anterior plating, as well as posterior stabilization C3-Th1 was followed by a 6-month antimycotic therapy. There was neither funding nor conflict of interests. A systematic literature analysis was conducted and 4599 articles on spondylodiscitis were scanned. Only four cases were found reporting about a C. albicans spondylodiscitis in a non-immunocompromised patient. So far, our patient was followed up for 2 years. Until now, he shows free of symptoms and infection parameters. Standard testing for immunodeficiency showed no positive results. Candida albicans spondylodiscitis of the cervical spine presents a potentially life-threatening disease. To our knowledge, this is the fifth case in literature that describes the treatment of C. albicans spondylodiscitis in an immunocompetent patient. Surgical debridement has to be considered, following antimycotic regime recommendations vary in pharmaceutical agents and treatment duration.

  1. Contribution of Fdh3 and Glr1 to Glutathione Redox State, Stress Adaptation and Virulence in Candida albicans.

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    Anna T Tillmann

    Full Text Available The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species following phagocytosis by host immune cells. In response to these toxins, this fungus activates potent anti-stress responses that include scavenging of reactive nitrosative and oxidative species via the glutathione system. Here we examine the differential roles of two glutathione recycling enzymes in redox homeostasis, stress adaptation and virulence in C. albicans: glutathione reductase (Glr1 and the S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR, Fdh3. We show that the NADPH-dependent Glr1 recycles GSSG to GSH, is induced in response to oxidative stress and is required for resistance to macrophage killing. GLR1 deletion increases the sensitivity of C. albicans cells to H2O2, but not to formaldehyde or NO. In contrast, Fdh3 detoxifies GSNO to GSSG and NH3, and FDH3 inactivation delays NO adaptation and increases NO sensitivity. C. albicans fdh3⎔ cells are also sensitive to formaldehyde, suggesting that Fdh3 also contributes to formaldehyde detoxification. FDH3 is induced in response to nitrosative, oxidative and formaldehyde stress, and fdh3Δ cells are more sensitive to killing by macrophages. Both Glr1 and Fdh3 contribute to virulence in the Galleria mellonella and mouse models of systemic infection. We conclude that Glr1 and Fdh3 play differential roles during the adaptation of C. albicans cells to oxidative, nitrosative and formaldehyde stress, and hence during the colonisation of the host. Our findings emphasise the importance of the glutathione system and the maintenance of intracellular redox homeostasis in this major pathogen.

  2. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study; Desenvolvimento de biofilme formado por Candida albicans in vitro para estudo da terapia fotodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Luis Claudio

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La{sup +3} (HBL{sup a+3}) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100{mu}M and 1mM; HBLa{sup +3} only one of 10{mu}M. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at {lambda} = 630nm {+-} 20nm and the other one blue emission at {lambda} = 460nm {+-} 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa{sup +3} and 6 min for the MB at 100{mu}M). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100{mu}M did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa{sup +3} biofilm group showed a

  3. Development of Anti-Virulence Approaches for Candidiasis via a Novel Series of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Candida albicans Filamentation

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    Jesus A. Romo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans remains the main etiologic agent of candidiasis, the most common fungal infection and now the third most frequent infection in U.S. hospitals. The scarcity of antifungal agents and their limited efficacy contribute to the unacceptably high morbidity and mortality rates associated with these infections. The yeast-to-hypha transition represents the main virulence factor associated with the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections. In addition, filamentation is pivotal for robust biofilm development, which represents another major virulence factor for candidiasis and further complicates treatment. Targeting pathogenic mechanisms rather than growth represents an attractive yet clinically unexploited approach in the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we performed large-scale phenotypic screening assays with 30,000 drug-like small-molecule compounds within ChemBridge’s DIVERSet chemical library in order to identify small-molecule inhibitors of C. albicans filamentation, and our efforts led to the identification of a novel series of bioactive compounds with a common biaryl amide core structure. The leading compound of this series, N-[3-(allyloxy-phenyl]-4-methoxybenzamide, was able to prevent filamentation under all liquid and solid medium conditions tested, suggesting that it impacts a common core component of the cellular machinery that mediates hypha formation under different environmental conditions. In addition to filamentation, this compound also inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation. This leading compound also demonstrated in vivo activity in clinically relevant murine models of invasive and oral candidiasis. Overall, our results indicate that compounds within this series represent promising candidates for the development of novel anti-virulence approaches to combat C. albicans infections.

  4. Members of the Candida parapsilosis complex and Candida albicans are differentially recognized by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

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    Eine eEstrada-Mata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high mobility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNF and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune

  5. Effects of 60 Cobalt ionizing radiation in morphology and metabolism of yeasts and Chlamydospore of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Michel R.F.; Demicheli, Marina C.; Andrade Junior, Heitor F.; Galiesteo Junior, Andres A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus responsible for 80-90% of fungal infections, as the symptoms are similar to those of systemic bacterial infections there is a difficulty for immediate diagnosis. These difficulties can lead to delays of antifungal therapy, which contributes to the high mortality rates associated with this infection. Resistance structures referred to as chlamydospores are very common in the pathogen, representing different cell types that form in response to certain genetic or environmental conditions. Recently, various antifungal agents and new therapeutic strategies have come into use, allowing the fungus to acquire a resistance to the drugs. The use of ionizing radiation has been widely employed for the production of immunogens against various parasites. In this work, we evaluate the effects of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) in yeast and chlamydospore of C. albicans with doses ranging from 320 to 10.240 Gy with Cobalt 60. Subsequently the samples were plated and after seven days, the colony forming units (CFU) told. The viability of irradiated cells were evaluated using the Janus green dye. A dose of 6000 Gy was considered ideal for the mitigation of chlamydospore and yeast. The dimorphic change mechanisms of both fungal structures were not harmed. The viability of chlamydospores remained above 70% while the yeast viability remained above 85%. By transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy may be noted cytoplasmic changes, defects in the cell wall, mitochondria, and the presence of partially preserved vesicles of both morphological forms of C. albicans. Irradiation both chlamydospore as C. albicans yeast allows the suppression of their reproduction, opening the possibility of their use in future candidate immunogens. (author)

  6. Effects of 60 Cobalt ionizing radiation in morphology and metabolism of yeasts and Chlamydospore of Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Michel R.F.; Demicheli, Marina C.; Andrade Junior, Heitor F.; Galiesteo Junior, Andres A.J., E-mail: galisteo@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IMTSP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical. Lab. de Protozoologia; Takakura, Cleusa F.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Patologia de Molestias Transmissiveis. Lab. de Patologia; Negro, Gilda M.B. del [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFM/USP/IMTSP/LIM-53), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Lab. de Micologia; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus responsible for 80-90% of fungal infections, as the symptoms are similar to those of systemic bacterial infections there is a difficulty for immediate diagnosis. These difficulties can lead to delays of antifungal therapy, which contributes to the high mortality rates associated with this infection. Resistance structures referred to as chlamydospores are very common in the pathogen, representing different cell types that form in response to certain genetic or environmental conditions. Recently, various antifungal agents and new therapeutic strategies have come into use, allowing the fungus to acquire a resistance to the drugs. The use of ionizing radiation has been widely employed for the production of immunogens against various parasites. In this work, we evaluate the effects of gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) in yeast and chlamydospore of C. albicans with doses ranging from 320 to 10.240 Gy with Cobalt 60. Subsequently the samples were plated and after seven days, the colony forming units (CFU) told. The viability of irradiated cells were evaluated using the Janus green dye. A dose of 6000 Gy was considered ideal for the mitigation of chlamydospore and yeast. The dimorphic change mechanisms of both fungal structures were not harmed. The viability of chlamydospores remained above 70% while the yeast viability remained above 85%. By transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy may be noted cytoplasmic changes, defects in the cell wall, mitochondria, and the presence of partially preserved vesicles of both morphological forms of C. albicans. Irradiation both chlamydospore as C. albicans yeast allows the suppression of their reproduction, opening the possibility of their use in future candidate immunogens. (author)

  7. A Designed Tryptophan- and Lysine/Arginine-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide with Therapeutic Potential for Clinical Antibiotic-Resistant Candida albicans Vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Bai, Xuewei; Luan, Ning; Yao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiye; Liu, Weihui; Chen, Yan; Yan, Xiuwen; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiumin

    2016-03-10

    New therapeutic agents for Candida albicans vaginitis are urgently awaiting to be developed because of the increasing antibiotic resistance of C. albicans. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the most promising choices for next-generation antibiotics. In this study, novel peptides were designed based on snake venom antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin-BF to promote anti-C. albicans activity and decrease side-effects. The designing strategies include substitutions of charged or hydrophobic amino acid residues for noncharged polar residues to promote antimicrobial activity and insertion of a hydrophobic residue in the hydrophilic side of the helix structure to reduce hemolysis. A designed tryptophan and lysine/arginine-rich cationic peptide 4 (ZY13) (VKRWKKWRWKWKKWV-NH2) exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against either common strain or clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant C. albicans with little hemolysis. Peptide 4 showed significant therapeutic effects on vaginitis in mice induced by the infection of clinical antibiotic-resistant C. albicans. The approaches herein might be useful for designing of AMPs.

  8. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the in vitro growth of Candida albicans and its protective effect in an oral candidiasis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis.

  9. Decreased susceptibility of Candida albicans to azole antifungals: a complication of long-term treatment in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautemaa, Riina; Richardson, Malcolm; Pfaller, Michael; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Saxén, Harri

    2007-10-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, APS1) is an autosomal recessive disease exceptionally common in Finland. Most patients have chronic oral candidiasis from early childhood and this infection has been shown to be carcinogenic. Hence, patients receive repeated treatment and prophylactic courses of antifungals throughout life. In Finland, 92 patients have been diagnosed with APECED and 66 of them are currently alive. Our aim was to study the effect of long-term azole treatment on the candidal colonization of APECED patients and the influence on antifungal susceptibilities. We evaluated the culture reports from 1994 to 2004 of 56 APECED patients followed in Helsinki University Central Hospital. Candida albicans strains of all 11 patients initially reported resistant (n = 27) and 12 patients reported susceptible (n = 16) to fluconazole were re-analysed for their susceptibility to fluconazole. Antifungal usage was analysed up to 30 years back. A total of 162 fungal cultures had been performed. Of these, 75% had been reported positive for Candida and 63% for C. albicans. Eleven patients (31.4%) had been reported to harbour at least once a C. albicans strain resistant to fluconazole. Re-analysis of the stored C. albicans strains originally reported to be resistant to fluconazole revealed a mean MIC of 19.5 mg/L. Multiple courses (>6) of fluconazole annually and low dose prophylaxis are major risk factors for persistent colonization with C. albicans with decreased susceptibility in APECED patients.

  10. Immunomodulation of antiretroviral drug-suppressed chronic HIV-1 infection in an oral probiotic double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Otto O; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Cordova, Robert; Khanlou, Homayoon

    2014-10-01

    A putative source of inappropriate immune activation that drives human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 immunopathogenesis is the gastrointestinal tract. Even with effective antiretroviral treatment, residual activation persists. We hypothesized that an oral probiotic could improve the residual immune activation in chronic treated HIV-1 infection, and tested a Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 capsule probiotic in HIV-1-infected persons with suppressed viremia on stable antiretroviral therapy in a 3-month double-blind placebo-controlled trial (10 probiotic, 7 placebo). The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was administered monthly. Blood was tested at the start and end of placebo/probiotic administration for viremia, CD4(+) T cell percentage/concentration, soluble (s)CD14, soluble intestinal fatty acid binding protein, sCD163, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. All participants maintained viremia probiotic was safe and well tolerated, and appeared to improve chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Its administration was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of blood CD4(+) T cells compared to placebo (+2.8% versus -1.8%, p=0.018) although CD4(+) T cell concentrations were generally unchanged in both groups. None of the biomarkers showed significant changes on probiotic treatment or between-group differences in change (although significance was borderline for a greater sCD163 drop in the probiotic versus placebo group, p=0.05). Some biomarkers showed significant correlations to each other, particularly D-dimer with CRP and sCD14 with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. These data demonstrate the safety and possible benefit of this probiotic for residual inflammation in treated HIV-1 infection, although further study will be required to determine the immune pathways involved.

  11. Effect of gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination on nosocomial infections acquired in the intensive care unit: a double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrier, François; Dubois, Didier; Pronnier, Philippe; Herbecq, Patrick; Leroy, Olivier; Desmettre, Thibaut; Pottier-Cau, Elodie; Boutigny, Hervé; Di Pompéo, Christophe; Durocher, Alain; Roussel-Delvallez, Micheline

    2005-08-01

    To document the effect of gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination on the rate of nosocomial bacteremias and respiratory infections acquired in the intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy study. Six ICUs: three in university hospitals and three in general hospitals. A total of 228 nonedentulous patients requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, with an anticipated length of stay > or =5 days. Antiseptic decontamination of gingival and dental plaque with a 0.2% chlorhexidine gel or a placebo gel, three times a day, during the entire ICU stay. Demographic and clinical characteristics, organ function data (Logistic Organ Dysfunction score), severity of condition (Simplified Acute Physiologic Score), and dental plaque status were assessed at baseline and until 28 days. Bacteriologic sampling of dental plaque and saliva was done every 5 days, and blood, tracheal aspirate, and bronchoalveolar lavage cultures were performed when appropriate. The primary efficacy end point was the incidence of bacteremia, bronchitis, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, expressed as a percentage and per 1000 ICU days. All baseline characteristics were similar between the treated and the placebo groups. The incidence of nosocomial infections was 17.5% (13.2 per 1000 ICU days) in the placebo group and 18.4% (13.3 per 1000 ICU days) in the plaque antiseptic decontamination group (not significant). No difference was observed in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia per ventilator or intubation days, mortality, length of stay, and care loads (secondary end points). On day 10, the number of positive dental plaque cultures was significantly lower in the treated group (29% vs. 66%; p dental plaque were not eradicated by the antiseptic decontamination. No side effect was reported. Gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination significantly decreased the oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic

  12. Reduction of health care-associated infection indicators by copper oxide-impregnated textiles: Crossover, double-blind controlled study in chronic ventilator-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Esther-Lee; Yosef, Hana; Borkow, Gadi; Caine, Yehezkel; Sasson, Ady; Moses, Allon E

    2017-04-01

    Copper oxide has potent wide-spectrum biocidal properties. The purpose of this study is to determine if replacing hospital textiles with copper oxide-impregnated textiles reduces the following health care-associated infection (HAI) indicators: antibiotic treatment initiation events (ATIEs), fever days, and antibiotic usage in hospitalized chronic ventilator-dependent patients. A 7-month, crossover, double-blind controlled trial including all patients in 2 ventilator-dependent wards in a long-term care hospital. For 3 months (period 1), one ward received copper oxide-impregnated textiles and the other received untreated textiles. After a 1-month washout period of using regular textiles, for 3 months (period 2) the ward that received the treated textiles received the control textiles and vice versa. The personnel were blinded to which were treated or control textiles. There were no differences in infection control measures during the study. There were reductions of 29.3% (P = .002), 55.5% (P 37.6°C), days of antibiotic treatment, and antibiotic defined daily dose per 1,000 hospitalization days, respectively, when using the copper oxide-impregnated textiles. Use of copper oxide-impregnated biocidal textiles in a long-term care ward of ventilator-dependent patients was associated with a significant reduction of HAI indicators and antibiotic utilization. Using copper oxide-impregnated biocidal textiles may be an important measure aimed at reducing HAIs in long-term care medical settings. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is ineffective at preventing otitis media in children with presumed viral upper respiratory infection: a randomized, double-blind equivalence, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Giraudeau, Bruno; Ployet, Marie Joseph; Jonville-Béra, Annie-Pierre

    2002-12-01

    To assess the equivalence of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and placebo in the prevention of acute otitis media in children at high risk of acute otitis media who develop upper respiratory tract infection. This was a multicentre, equivalence, randomized, double-blind trial of two parallel groups comparing 5 days of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 75 mg kg-1 day-1 (i.e. 25 mg kg-1 every 8 h) and placebo. The main outcome measure was acute otitis media occurring within 8-12 days of initiating treatment. Two hundred and three infants, aged 3 months-3 years with upper respiratory tract infection over 36 h and a history of recurrent acute otitis media were included over 8.5 months. Two children were lost to follow-up. Patient characteristics were similar in both groups. In the intention to treat analysis the frequency of acute otitis media was 16.2% (16/99) in the placebo group and 9.6% (10/104) in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid group (P = 0.288). The difference between acute otitis media rates was 6.6% (one-sided 95% confidence interval of 14.3%). The occurrence of side-effects was similar in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and placebo groups. The difference in effectiveness between antibiotic and placebo was not greater than 14.3%, and we calculated that 94 children would need to be exposed to antibiotics to avoid six cases of acute otitis media. In view of the risk of development of resistance due to frequent exposure to antibiotics, our study supports the need for reduction in the administration of antibiotics in upper respiratory tract infection even in children at high risk of acute otitis media.

  14. Triclosan Enhances the Clearing of Pathogenic Intracellular Salmonella or Candida albicans but Disturbs the Intestinal Microbiota through mTOR-Independent Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Triclosan (TCS is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, whose well-known antibacterial mechanism is inhibiting lipid synthesis. Autophagy, an innate immune response, is an intracellular process that delivers the cargo including pathogens to lysosomes for degradation. In this study, we first demonstrated that TCS induced autophagy in a dose-dependent manner in non-phagocytic cells (HeLa and in macrophages (Raw264.7 and in vivo. The western blot results also revealed that TCS induced autophagy via the AMPK/ULK1 and JNK/ERK/p38 pathways independent of mTOR. The immunofluorescence results indicated that TCS up-regulated the expression of the ubiquitin receptors NDP52 and p62 and strengthened the co-localization of these receptors with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (S. typhimurium or Candida albicans (C. albicans in infected MΦ cells. In addition, sub-lethal concentrations of TCS enhanced the clearing of the pathogens S. typhimurium or C. albicans in infected MΦ and in corresponding mouse infection models in vivo. Specifically, we found that a sub-inhibitory concentration of TCS induced autophagy, leading to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora in mice through the analysis of 16s rRNA Sequencing. Together, these results demonstrated that TCS induced autophagy, which enhanced the killing against pathogenic S. typhimurium or C. albicans within mammal cells but broke the balance of the intestinal microflora.

  15. IL-33 priming regulates multiple steps of the neutrophil-mediated anti-Candida albicans response by modulating TLR and dectin-1 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hongnga T; Tran, Vuvi G; Kim, Wonyoung; Kim, Juyang; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2012-07-01

    IL-33 is known to play an important role in Th2 immunity. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-33 pretreatment on anti-fungal response using an acute Candida albicans peritoneal infection model. IL-33 pretreatment induced a rapid fungal clearance and markedly reduced the C. albicans infection-associated mortality. The priming effect of IL-33 occurred during multiple steps of the neutrophil-mediated anti-fungal response. First, the anti-fungal effect occurred due to the rapid and massive recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection as a result of the release of CXCR2 chemokines by peritoneal macrophages and by reversal of the TLR-induced reduction of CXCR2 expression in neutrophils during IL-33 priming. Second, conditioning of neutrophils by IL-33 activated the TLR and dectin-1 signaling pathways, leading to the upregulation of complement receptor 3 expression induced by C. albicans. Upregulated CR3 in turn increased the phagocytosis of opsonized C. albicans and resulted in the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species and the subsequent enhanced killing activity of neutrophils. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-33 can regulate the anti-fungal activity of neutrophils by collaborative modulation of the signaling pathways