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Sample records for alberta university slowpoke reactor

  1. SLOWPOKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Charles.

    1979-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE (Safe Low Power Critical Experiment) reactor was developed by AECL at Whiteshell and Chalk River between 1968 and 1970. It is a neutron-producing reactor of low power with minimal fuel, shielding, and cooling requirements and intrinsic safety. Four Canadian universities and one German one have acquired SLOWPOKE reactors for neutron activation analyses and for student research in nuclear engineering and reactor physics. (LL)

  2. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactors for replacing SLOWPOKE-2 research reactors and the production of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.; Hilborn, J.W.; Carlin, G.E.; Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was conceived with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors when they reach end-of-core life to continue their missions of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography at universities, and to produce radioisotopes such as 99 Mo for medical applications. A homogeneous reactor core allows a much simpler extraction of radioisotopes (such as 99 Mo) for applications in industry and nuclear medicine. The 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both the deterministic WIMS-AECL and the probabilistic MCNP 5 reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture was a dilute aqueous solution of Uranyl Sulfate (UO 2 SO 4 ) with 994.2 g of 235 U (enrichment at 20%) providing an excess reactivity at operating temperature (40 o C) of 3.8 mk for a molality determined as 1.46 mol kg -1 for a Zircaloy-2 reactor vessel. Because this reactor is intended to replace the core of SLOWPOKE-2 reactors, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor core had a height about twice its diameter. The reactor could be controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector, chemical control in the core, or a combination of both. The safety of the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was analysed for both normal operation and transient conditions. Thermal-hydraulics calculations used COMSOL Multiphysics and the results showed that natural convection was sufficient to ensure adequate reactor cooling in all situations. The most severe transient simulated resulted from a 5.87 mk step positive reactivity insertion to the reactor in operation at critical and at steady state at 20 o C. Peak temperature and power were determined as 83 o C and 546 kW, respectively, reached 5.1 s after the reactivity insertion. However, the power fell rapidly to values below 20 kW some 35 s after the peak and remained below that value thereafter. Both the temperature and void coefficients are

  3. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactors for replacing SLOWPOKE-2 research reactors and the production of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hilborn, J.W. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Carlin, G.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P. [Canadian Forces (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Inspired from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was conceived with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors when they reach end-of-core life to continue their missions of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography at universities, and to produce radioisotopes such as {sup 99}Mo for medical applications. A homogeneous reactor core allows a much simpler extraction of radioisotopes (such as {sup 99}Mo) for applications in industry and nuclear medicine. The 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both the deterministic WIMS-AECL and the probabilistic MCNP 5 reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture was a dilute aqueous solution of Uranyl Sulfate (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) with 994.2 g of {sup 235}U (enrichment at 20%) providing an excess reactivity at operating temperature (40 {sup o}C) of 3.8 mk for a molality determined as 1.46 mol kg{sup -1} for a Zircaloy-2 reactor vessel. Because this reactor is intended to replace the core of SLOWPOKE-2 reactors, the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor core had a height about twice its diameter. The reactor could be controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector, chemical control in the core, or a combination of both. The safety of the Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was analysed for both normal operation and transient conditions. Thermal-hydraulics calculations used COMSOL Multiphysics and the results showed that natural convection was sufficient to ensure adequate reactor cooling in all situations. The most severe transient simulated resulted from a 5.87 mk step positive reactivity insertion to the reactor in operation at critical and at steady state at 20 {sup o}C. Peak temperature and power were determined as 83 {sup o}C and 546 kW, respectively, reached 5.1 s after the reactivity insertion. However, the power fell rapidly to values below 20 kW some 35 s after the peak and remained below that value thereafter. Both the

  4. Utilization of the SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalor, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    SLOWPOKEs are typically low power research reactors that have a limited number of applications. However, a significant range of NAA can be performed with such reactors. This paper describes a SLOWPOKE-based NAA program that is performing a valuable series of studies in Jamaica, including geological mapping and pollution assessment. (author)

  5. Performance of small reactors at universities for teaching, research, training and service (TRTS): thirty five years' experience with the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatt, A., E-mail: a.chatt@dal.ca [Dalhousie Univ., Trace Analysis Research Centre, Dept. of Chemistry, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) facility, operated during 1976-2011, was the only research reactor in Atlantic Canada as well as the only one associated with a chemistry department in a Canadian university. The most outstanding features of the facility included: a rapid (100 ms) cyclic pneumatic sample transfer system, a permanently installed Cd-site, and a Compton-suppression gamma-ray spectrometer. The usage encompassed fundamental as well as applied studies in various fields using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The facility was used for training undergraduate/graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, technicians, and visiting scientists, and for cooperative projects with other universities, research organizations and industries. (author)

  6. Fission product release from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnden-Gillis, A M.C. [Queen` s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Increasing radiation fields at several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with highly enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel have begun to interfere with the daily operation of these reactors. To investigate this phenomenon, samples of reactor container water and gas from the headspace were obtained at four SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facilities and examined by gamma ray spectroscopy methods. These radiation fields are due to the circulation of fission products within the reactor container vessel. The most likely source of the fission product release is an area of uranium-bearing material exposed to the coolant at the end weld line which originated at the time of fuel fabrication. The results of this study are compared with observations from an underwater visual examination of one core and the metallographic examination of archived fuel elements. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  7. Dalhousie SLOWPOKE-2 reactor: A nuclear analytical chemistry facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatt, A.; Holzbecher, J.

    1990-01-01

    SLOWPOKE is an acronym for Safe Low POwer Kritical Experiment. The SOWPOKE-2 is a compact, inherently safe, swimming-pool-type reactor designed by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for neutron activation analysis (NAA) and isotope production. The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (DUSR) has been operating since 1976; a large beryllium reflector was added in 1986 to extend its lifetime by another 8 to 10 yr. The DUSR is generally operated at half-power with a maximum thermal flux of 1.1 x 10 12 n/cm 2 ·s in the inner pneumatic sites and that of 5.4 x 10 11 n/cm 2 ·s in the outer sites. Despite this comparatively low flux, SLOWPOKE-2 reactors have many beneficial features that are continuously being exploited at the DUSR facility for developing nuclear analytical methods for fundamental as well as applied studies. Although NAA is a well-established analytical technique, much of the activation analysis being performed in most facilities has been limited to methods using fairly long-lived nuclides. The approach at the DUSR facility has been to utilize the highly homogeneous, stable, and reproducible neutron flux to develop NAA methods based on short-lived nuclides. SLOWPOKE reactors have a fairly high epithermal neutron flux, which is being advantageously used for determining several trace elements in complex matrices. Radiochemical NAA (RNAA) methods using coprecipitation, distillation, and ion-exchange separations have been used for the determination of very low levels of several elements in biological materials

  8. Iodine behaviour in the SLOWPOKE nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekeris, P A; Evans, G J [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to measure and attempt to explain the presence and volatility of iodine isotopes present as fission products in the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor. Liquid sampling and extraction procedures developed indicated that approximately 40% of the reactor iodine is in the form of iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}), and 60% is in the form of iodide (I{sup -}). No appreciable amount in non-polar forms such as molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) or organic iodides (RI) were detected. This goes contrary to past expectations that all of the iodine in the liquid phase would be in the form of I{sup -}. In addition partition coefficients for I-131 were determined as 2-6x10{sup 6} at a neutral pH. Kr-88 is suspected as a possible interfering isotope in the measurement of I-131 in the liquid and gas phases. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. SLOWPOKE: heating reactors in the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, J.W.; Lynch, G.F.

    1988-06-01

    Since global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years, nuclear heating could become as important as nuclear electricity generation. To fill that need, AECL has designed a 10 MW nuclear heating plant for large buildings. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on the successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba, and the design of a 10 MW commercial unit is well advanced. With capital costs in the range $5 million to $7 million, unit energy costs could be as low as $0.02 per kWh, for a unit operating at 50% load factor over a 25-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees Celsius, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe, nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  10. Development Directions For CANDU and Slowpoke Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a broader-based discussion of overall development directions foreseen for CANDU reactors, particularly those which have further evolved sine the earlier paper. The paper then discusses development directions for the Slowpokes Energy System which is a small nuclear heat source intended to meet local heating needs for building complexes and municipal heating systems. In evolving a sound development direction, it is necessary, firstly, to address the question of requirements, viz., what are the requirements which future nuclear power plants must satisfy if they are to be successful? Today, some in the nuclear industry believe that the most important of such requirements relates to the need for 'safer' reactors. Indeed, some proponents of this view would seem to suggest that if only we could develop such 'safer' reactors, suddenly all of our problem s with public acceptance would disappear and utilities would form long lines waiting to purchase such marvellous machines. I do not share such a simplistic view nor, indeed, do many of my colleagues in the international nuclear power industry

  11. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, B.M.; Hilborn, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  12. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors - Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnden, A.M.C.

    1995-09-01

    The results of an investigation into the release of fission products from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium alloy core are detailed in Volume 1. This data report (Volume 2) contains plots of the activity concentrations of the fission products observed in the reactor container at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and the Kanata Isotope Production Facility. Release rates from the reactor container water to the gas headspace are also included. (author)

  13. Diffusion calculation's for the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor using DONJON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noceir, S.; El Hajjaji, O.; Varin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE reactor at Ecole Polytechnique will be refueled with a Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel in place of a High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel used until now. The purpose of this study is to provide various models, using the reactor physics chain of codes DRAGON/DONJON, in order to predict the behavior of the new LEU Slowpoke. In particle, we will present some numerical results concerning the separate temperature effects of the main components of the core, the effect of a partial void appearing near the fuel pins and the axial and radial flux distributions. Finally the difference between the present HEU and the future LEU fuel power will be given. (author)

  14. Operation of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C.N.; Lalor, G.C.; Vuchkov, M.K. [University of the West Indies, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2001-07-01

    Over the past sixteen years lCENS has operated a SLOWPOKE 2 nuclear reactor almost exclusively for the purpose of neutron activation analysis. During this period we have adopted a strategy of minimum irradiation times while optimizing our output in an effort to increase the lifetime of the reactor core and to maintaining fuel integrity. An inter-comparison study with results obtained with a much larger reactor at IPEN has validated this approach. The parameters routinely monitored at ICENS are also discussed and the method used to predict the next shim adjustment. (author)

  15. Keeping research reactors relevant: A pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosby, L.R.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Nielsen, K.; Weir, R.

    2010-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE is a small, inherently safe, pool-type research reactor that was engineered and marketed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in the 1970s and 80s. The original reactor, SLOWPOKE-1, was moved from Chalk River to the University of Toronto in 1970 and was operated until upgraded to the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in 1973. In all, eight reactors in the two versions were produced and five are still in operation today, three having been decommissioned. All of the remaining reactors are designated as SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. These research reactors are prone to two major issues: aging components and lack of relevance to a younger audience. In order to combat these problems, one SLOWPOKE -2 facility has embraced a strategy that involves modernizing their reactor in order to keep the reactor up to date and relevant. In 2001, this facility replaced its aging analogue reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. The digital control system provides a better interface and allows flexibility in data storage and retrieval that was never possible with the analogue control system. This facility has started work on another upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system that will be installed in 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a web-based simulation and training system that will allow licensed operators, students and researchers to use an online simulation tool for training, education and research. The tool consists of: 1) A dynamic simulation for reactor kinetics (e.g., core flux, power, core temperatures, etc). This tool is useful for operator training and student education; 2) Dynamic mapping of the reactor and pool container gamma and neutron fluxes as well as the vertical neutron beam tube flux. This research planning tool is used for various researchers who wish to do irradiations (e.g., neutron

  16. Neutronics comparative analysis between MNSR and slowpoke-II reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; Khattab, K.

    1999-01-01

    Neutronics analysis of both MNSR and Slowpoke reactors were made. Calculations including flux distribution, power estimation, excess and shutdown reactivity margins, flooding effects of irradiation sites, and initial investigation of fuel conversion from high to low enriched uranium were discussed. A neutronic 3-D model, dedicated mainly for the MNSR, has been developed to perform such neutronic calculations for both reactors. Well-known cell and core calculation codes such as WIMSD4 and CITATIONS have been used. It was found out that it is possible to lower the fuel enrichment of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) to 20% using U O 2 as fuel instead of U Al 4 . The number of fuel elements required for the new core is 199. The use of double thickness of the bottom reflector in Slowpoke reactor made it possible to load the reactor with lower enriched fuel compared to MNSR. Values of reactivity flooding effects for single or combination of inner irradiation sites were obtained accurately. Results show good agreement with reported data for MNSR. (author)

  17. Dynamic simulation of the 2 MWt slowpoke heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, C.M.; Lepp, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    A 2 MWt SLOWPOKE reactor, intended for commercial space heating, is being developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. A small-signal dynamic simulation of this reactor, without closed-loop control, was developed. Basic equations were used to describe the physical phenomena in each kf the eight reactor subsystems. These equations were then linearized about the normal operation conditions and rearranged in a dimensionless form for implementation. The overall simulation is non-linear. Slow transient responses (minutes to days) of the simulation to both reactivity and temperature perturbations were measured at full power. In all cases the system reached a new steady state in times varying from 12 h to 250 h. These results illustrate the benefits of the inherent negative reactivity feedback of this reactor concept. The addition of closed-loop control using core outlet temperature as the controlled variable to move a beryllium reflector is also examined

  18. Use of a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for nuclear forensics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.T.; Beames-Canivet, T.L.; Elliott, R.S.; Kelly, D.G.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Emily.Corcoran@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A low enriched uranium SLOWPOKE-2 reactor is used as a neutron interrogation source in support of the identification and characterization of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). Small amounts of fissile uranium and plutonium are sent into a SLOWPOKE-2 irradiation site before their transport to RMCC’s delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system. The counting arrangement of the DNGC consists of an array of six {sup 3}He and a high purity germanium detector. These detectors record the delayed neutron and photon emissions as a function of count time, to verify MCNP6 simulations of delayed particle emissions, and to detect and quantify trace amounts of fissile content. This paper discusses MCNP analyses done in preparation for an upcoming nuclear forensics exercise in the fall of 2014. MCNP6 simulations of the DNGC system focussed on the identification of characteristic gamma lines from prominent fission products. The relative intensities of these gamma lines are dependent on the SNM content in the sample. Gamma line pairs useful for SNM identification in RMCC's DNGC system are presented. (author)

  19. Mathematical models in Slowpoke reactor internal irradiation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, J.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective is to build representative mathematical models of neutron activation analysis in a Slowpoke internal irradiation site. Another significant objective is to correct various elements neutron activation analysis measured mass using these models. The neutron flux perturbation is responsible for the measured under-estimation of real masses. We supposed that neutron flux perturbation measurements taken during the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal Slowpoke reactor first fuel loading were still valid after the second fuelling. .We also supposed that the thermal neutrons spatial and kinetic energies distributions as well as the absorption microscopic cross section dependence on the neutrons kinetic energies were important factors to satisfactorily represent neutron activation analysis results. In addition, we assumed that the neutron flux is isotropic in the laboratory system. We used experimental results from the Slowpoke reactor internal irradiation sites, in order to validate our mathematical models. Our models results are in close agreement with these experimental results..We established an accurate global mathematical correlation of the neutron flux perturbation in function of samples volumes and macroscopic neutron absorption cross sections. It is applicable to sample volumes ranging from 0,1 to 1,3 ml and macroscopic neutron absorption cross section up to 5 moles-b for seven (7) elements with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 5 to 79. We first came up with a heuristic neutron transport mathematical semi-analytical model, in order to better understand neutrons behaviour in presence of one of several different nuclei samples volumes and mass. In order to well represent the neutron flux perturbation, we combined a neutron transport solution obtained from the spherical harmonics method of a finite cylinder and a mathematical expression combining two cylindrical harmonic functions..With the help of this model and the least squares method, we made extensive

  20. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I., E-mail: paul.hungler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  1. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    2014-01-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  2. A novel approach to the production of medical radioisotopes: the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.; Hilborn, J.W.; Carlin, G.E.; Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the unexpected 15-month outage of the Canadian NRU nuclear reactor resulted in a sudden 30% world shortage, with higher shortages experienced in North America than in Europe. Commercial radioisotope production is from just eight nuclear reactors, most being aging systems near the end of their service life. This paper proposes a more efficient production and distribution model. Tc-99m unit doses would be distributed to regional hospitals from ten integrated 'industrial radiopharmacies', located at existing licensed nuclear reactor sites in North America. At each site, one or more 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE nuclear reactors would deliver 15 litres of irradiated aqueous uranyl sulfate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells, for extraction of Mo-99; and the low-enriched uranium would be recycled. Purified Mo-99 would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily for road delivery to all of the nuclear medicine hospitals within a 3-hour range. At the current price of $20 per unit dose, the annual gross income from 10 sites would be approximately $360 million. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor evolved from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors at the end-of-core life, enabling them to continue their primary missions of research and education, together with full time commercial radioisotope production. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both deterministic and probabilistic reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture is a dilute aqueous solution of low-enriched uranyl sulfate containing approximately 1 kg of U-235. The reactor is controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector. Safety analysis was carried out for both normal operation and transient conditions. The most severe

  3. A novel approach to the production of medical radioisotopes: the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hilborn, J.W. [retired, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Carlin, G.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P. [Royal Canadian Navy, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    In 2009, the unexpected 15-month outage of the Canadian NRU nuclear reactor resulted in a sudden 30% world shortage, with higher shortages experienced in North America than in Europe. Commercial radioisotope production is from just eight nuclear reactors, most being aging systems near the end of their service life. This paper proposes a more efficient production and distribution model. Tc-99m unit doses would be distributed to regional hospitals from ten integrated 'industrial radiopharmacies', located at existing licensed nuclear reactor sites in North America. At each site, one or more 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE nuclear reactors would deliver 15 litres of irradiated aqueous uranyl sulfate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells, for extraction of Mo-99; and the low-enriched uranium would be recycled. Purified Mo-99 would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily for road delivery to all of the nuclear medicine hospitals within a 3-hour range. At the current price of $20 per unit dose, the annual gross income from 10 sites would be approximately $360 million. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor evolved from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors at the end-of-core life, enabling them to continue their primary missions of research and education, together with full time commercial radioisotope production. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both deterministic and probabilistic reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture is a dilute aqueous solution of low-enriched uranyl sulfate containing approximately 1 kg of U-235. The reactor is controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector. Safety analysis was carried out for both normal operation and transient conditions. The most severe

  4. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnden, A.M.C.

    1995-09-01

    Increasing radiation fields due to a release of fission products in the reactor container of several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy core have been observed. It is believed that these increases are associated with the fuel fabrication where a small amount of uranium-bearing material is exposed to the coolant at the end-welds of the fuel element. To investigate this phenomenon samples of reactor water and gas from the headspace above the water have been obtained and examined by gamma spectrometry methods for reactors of various burnups at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and Kanata Isotope Production Facility. An underwater visual examination of the fuel core at Ecole Polytechnique has also provided information on the condition of the core. This report (Volume 1) summarizes the equipment, analysis techniques and results of tests conducted at the various reactor sites. The data report is published as Volume 2. (author). 30 refs., 9 tabs., 20 figs

  5. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor for the production of radio-isotope. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busatta, P.; Bonin, H.W. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: paul.busatta@rmc.ca; bonin-h@rmc.ca

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of replacing the actual heterogeneous fuel core of the present SLOWPOKE-2 by a reservoir containing a homogeneous fuel for the production of Mo-99. The study looked at three items: by using the MCNP Monte Carlo reactor calculation code, develop a series of parameters required for an homogeneous fuel and evaluate the uranyl sulfate concentration of the aqueous solution fuel in order to keep a similar excess reactivity; verify if the homogeneous reactor will retain its inherent safety attributes; and with the new dimensions and geometry of the fuel core, observe whether natural convection can still effectively cool the reactor using the modeling software FEMLAB. It was found that it is indeed feasible to modify the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for a homogeneous reactor using a solution of uranyl sulfate and water. (author)

  6. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor for the production of radio-isotope. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busatta, P.; Bonin, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of replacing the actual heterogeneous fuel core of the present SLOWPOKE-2 by a reservoir containing a homogeneous fuel for the production of Mo-99. The study looked at three items: by using the MCNP Monte Carlo reactor calculation code, develop a series of parameters required for an homogeneous fuel and evaluate the uranyl sulfate concentration of the aqueous solution fuel in order to keep a similar excess reactivity; verify if the homogeneous reactor will retain its inherent safety attributes; and with the new dimensions and geometry of the fuel core, observe whether natural convection can still effectively cool the reactor using the modeling software FEMLAB. It was found that it is indeed feasible to modify the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for a homogeneous reactor using a solution of uranyl sulfate and water. (author)

  7. Homogeneous slowpoke reactor for the production of radio-isotope. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busatta, P.; Bonin, H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of replacing the actual heterogeneous fuel core of the present SLOWPOKE-2 by a reservoir containing a homogeneous fuel for the production of Mo-99. The study looked at three items: by using the MCNP 5 simulation code, develop a series of parameters required for an homogeneous fuel and evaluate the uranyl sulfate concentration of the aqueous solution fuel in order to keep a similar excess reactivity; verify if the homogeneous reactor will retain its inherent safety attributes; and with the new dimensions and geometry of the fuel core, observe whether the natural convection will still effectively cool the reactor using the modeling software FEMLAB. The MCNP 5 simulation code was validated by using a simulation with WIMS-AECL code. It was found that it is indeed feasible to modify the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for a homogeneous reactor using a solution of uranyl sulfate and water. (author)

  8. Homogeneous Slowpoke reactor for the production of radio-isotope: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busetta, P.; Bonin, H.W. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of replacing the actual heterogeneous fuel core of the present SLOWPOKE-2 by a reservoir containing a homogeneous fuel for the production of Mo-99. The study looked at three items: by using the MCNP Monte Carlo reactor calculation code, develop a series of parameters required for an homogeneous fuel and evaluate the uranyl sulfate concentration of the aqueous solution fuel in order to keep a similar excess reactivity; verify if the homogeneous react will retain its inherent safety attributes; and with the new dimensions and geometry of the fuel core, observe whether natural convection can still effectively cool the reactor using the modeling software FEMLAB(r). It was found that it is needed feasible to modify the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for a homogeneous reactor using a solution of uranyl sulfate and water. (author)

  9. Homogeneous slowpoke reactor for the production of radio-isotope. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busatta, P.; Bonin, H. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: paul.busatta@rmc.ca; bonin-h@rmc.ca

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the feasibility of replacing the actual heterogeneous fuel core of the present SLOWPOKE-2 by a reservoir containing a homogeneous fuel for the production of Mo-99. The study looked at three items: by using the MCNP 5 simulation code, develop a series of parameters required for an homogeneous fuel and evaluate the uranyl sulfate concentration of the aqueous solution fuel in order to keep a similar excess reactivity; verify if the homogeneous reactor will retain its inherent safety attributes; and with the new dimensions and geometry of the fuel core, observe whether the natural convection will still effectively cool the reactor using the modeling software FEMLAB. The MCNP 5 simulation code was validated by using a simulation with WIMS-AECL code. It was found that it is indeed feasible to modify the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor for a homogeneous reactor using a solution of uranyl sulfate and water. (author)

  10. Large-signal, dynamic simulation of the slowpoke-3 nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, C.M.; Lepp, R.M.

    1983-07-01

    A 2 MWt nuclear reactor, called SLOWPOKE-3, is being developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). This reactor, which is cooled by natural circulation, is designed to produce hot water for commercial space heating and perhaps generate some electricity in remote locations where the costs of alternate forms of energy are high. A large-signal, dynamic simulation of this reactor, without closed-loop control, was developed and implemented on a hybrid computer, using the basic equations of conservation of mass, energy and momentum. The natural circulation of downcomer flow in the pool was simulated using a special filter, capable of modelling various flow conditions. The simulation was then used to study the intermediate and long-term transient response of SLOWPOKE-3 to large disturbances, such as loss of heat sink, loss of regulation, daily load following, and overcooling of the reactor coolant. Results of the simulation show that none of these disturbances produce hazardous transients

  11. DRAGON and SERPENT 2-D modelling of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at Ecole Polytechnique Montreal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouafi, H.; Marleau, G.

    2012-01-01

    DRAGON is a deterministic code that can be used to perform lattice cell calculations based on numerical solutions of neutron transport equation. DRAGON can also be used for full core 2-D and 3-D simulations in transport. One alternative to the use of such a deterministic code consist in following the history of neutrons in the core based on statistical Monte Carlo simulation with codes like MCNP and SERPENT. This second calculation approach has been used successfully for SLOWPOKE-2 simulation in the past. Here we present a comparison between DRAGON and SERPENT calculations for the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor. We also compare the flux distribution obtained using both codes for a copper sample placed inside a small irradiation site. (author)

  12. Biomedical and health studies with the new Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Isles, K.; Hill, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on clinical patients who had malnutrition, cystic fibrosis and other related electrolyte disorders. A stable activable tracer technique has been developed to determine the extracellular fluid volume (ECV) of infants. A regulated dose of sodium bromide is injected into the patient and, following short-term equilibration and dilution of this sample, a small blood sample is taken, yielding 50 μl of plasma. The plasma bromide concentration is determined by 80 Br (T=18 m) activation. Some samples were cross-checked by a microdiffusion method. The technique has been applied to 230 patients and controls, and has proved to be simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive for determining ECV to +-6%. Patients with cystic fibrosis (C.F.) were studied with respect to their growth and their sodium and electrolyte balance. In related clinical studies, hair and nail clippings from 50 C.F. patients and control children of the same age groups were activated at SLOWPOKE and Cu, Ca, Br, Cl, K, Na and I determined for use in differentiating C.F., along with a number of other elements including Zn, Mn, Al, Ti and Ni which showed little difference. A fairly good correlation of hair and nail concentrations was found for a number of the elements determined, suggesting that either tissue may be used in future studies. (T.G.)

  13. Keeping research reactors relevant: a pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosby, L.; Nielsen, K.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the Royal Military College of Canada replaced its aging analogue SLOWPOKE-2 reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. An upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system has been completed and will be installed in October 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a simulation and training system that will enhance training, education and research by licensed operators, students and researchers.

  14. An overview of thermalhydraulics R and D for SLOWPOKE heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmick, G.R.

    1988-09-01

    AECL is currently demonstrating the use of pool-type reactors of up to 10 MW output to produce hot water at about 90 degrees Celsius. The initial focus for the development is the provision of a source of hot water for institutional and municipal heating networks. Ongoing developments are designed to broaden the applications to electricity generation and industrial processes such as desalination and agricultural needs. The reactor concept is based on the Slowpoke-2 research reactor, eight of which are successfully operating in Canada and abroad. The primary-circuit flow is driven by natural convection, with the heated water, produced by the reactor core near the bottom of the pool, being ducted to low-pressure-drop heat exchangers in the upper part of the pool. As the pool volume is relatively large, the fluid transit time around the circuit is long, ensuring that the reactor response to all normal transients is extremely slow. To investigate thermalhydraulics aspects of the reactor design, including its behaviour underextreme conditions, an electrically heated, natural-convection loop was designed and constructed. The core of the loop consists of a rod bundle that is a precise reproduction of one quarter of the core of the 2-MW SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor presently being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. With this loop, measurements of the distribution of pressure, temperature, velocity and subcooled void have been made in the simulated core, via a variety of intrusive and non-intrusive techniques. In addition, both the single- and two-phase behaviour of the system have been studied. This paper gives examples of the various in-core measurements made and also makes comparisons between the measured system behaviour and that predicted by the various steady-state and transient computer codes

  15. An Integrated Management System (IMS) for JM-1 SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor in Jamaica: experiences in documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first criticality in March 1984, the Jamaica SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the University of the West Indies, Mona located in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) has operated for approximately 52% of the lifetime of the existing core configuration. The 20kW pool type research reactor has been primarily used for neutron activation analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration in Jamaica. The involvement of the JM-1 reactor for research and teaching activities has segued into commercial applications which, coupled with the current core conversion programme from HEU to LEU, has demanded the implementation of management systems to satisfy regulatory requirements and assure compliance with internationally defined quality standards. At ICENS, documentation related to the Quality Management System aspect of an Integrated Management System (IMS) is well underway. The quality system will incorporate operational and nuclear safety, training, maintenance, design, utilization, occupational health and safety, quality service, and environmental management for its Nuclear Analytical Laboratory, NAL. The IMS is being designed to meet the requirements of the IAEA GS-R-3 with additional controls from international standards including: ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007. This paper reports on the experiences of the documentation process in a low power reactor facility characterized by limited human resource, where innovative mechanisms of system automation and modeling are included to increase productivity and efficiency. (author)

  16. An Integrated Management System (IMS) for JM-1 SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor in Jamaica: experiences in documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, T., E-mail: traceyann.warner02@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of West Indies, Mona (Jamaica)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first criticality in March 1984, the Jamaica SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the University of the West Indies, Mona located in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) has operated for approximately 52% of the lifetime of the existing core configuration. The 20kW pool type research reactor has been primarily used for neutron activation analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration in Jamaica. The involvement of the JM-1 reactor for research and teaching activities has segued into commercial applications which, coupled with the current core conversion programme from HEU to LEU, has demanded the implementation of management systems to satisfy regulatory requirements and assure compliance with internationally defined quality standards. At ICENS, documentation related to the Quality Management System aspect of an Integrated Management System (IMS) is well underway. The quality system will incorporate operational and nuclear safety, training, maintenance, design, utilization, occupational health and safety, quality service, and environmental management for its Nuclear Analytical Laboratory, NAL. The IMS is being designed to meet the requirements of the IAEA GS-R-3 with additional controls from international standards including: ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007. This paper reports on the experiences of the documentation process in a low power reactor facility characterized by limited human resource, where innovative mechanisms of system automation and modeling are included to increase productivity and efficiency. (author)

  17. A program for the a priori evaluation of detection limits in instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galinier, J.L.; Zikovsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    A program that permits the a priori calculation of detection limits in monoelemental matrices, adapted to instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor, is described. A simplified model of the gamma spectra is proposed. Products of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions induced by the fast components of the neutron flux that accompanies the thermal flux at the level of internal irradiation sites in the reactor have been included in the list of interfering radionuclides. The program calculates in a systematic way the detection limits of 66 elements in an equal number of matrices using 153 intermediary radionuclides. Experimental checks carried out with silicon (for short lifetimes) and aluminum and magnesium (for intermediate lifetimes) show satisfactory agreement with the calculations. These results show in particular the importance of the contribution of the (n,p) and (n,α) reactions in the a priori evaluation of detection limits with a SLOWPOKE type reactor [fr

  18. Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactors for Mo-99/Tc-99m production in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilborn, J.W., E-mail: hilbovanw@sympatico.ca [Deep River, Ontario (Canada); Bonin, H.W. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU in 2009 - 2010 caused an overall isotope shortage of approximately 30%; and in North America, the annual Tc-99m demand decreased from an estimated 20 million unit doses to about 15 million unit doses. Mo-99/Tc-99m is produced from HEU targets, irradiated in NRU for 11 days, and after chemical removal of uranium it is shipped to Nordion in Kanata, Ontario. Nordion further purifies the material and sends it to Lantheus Medical Imaging in the USA for manufacture of Mo-99 generators, which are then distributed to hundreds of hospital radiopharmacies throughout North America. One other American company, Covidien, manufactures and distributes Mo-99 generators like Lantheus, but they import bulk Mo-99 from Europe or South Africa. At the hospitals, Tc-99m is chemically extracted daily from the Mo-99 generators and loaded into syringes for immediate clinical use. Fortuitously, the 66 hour half-life of Mo-99 allows the replenishment of Tc-99m in the generator over a growth period of about 20 hours; and a generator can be 'milked' daily for up to two weeks. A more efficient model is the direct production and distribution of Tc-99m unit doses to regional hospitals from 10 'industrial' radiopharmacies located at existing licensed reactor sites in North America. A 20 kW homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor at each site would deliver 15 litres of irradiated uranyl sulphate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells for extraction of Mo-99, which would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) would be recycled. Each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily, for courier delivery to all of the Nuclear Medicine hospitals within a 3 hour average range by road transport. Typically, the delivered doses would be in the range 10 to 30 mCi. Assuming an average unit dose of 25 mCi at the hospital and 5 x 52

  19. R and D of proton conducting SOFC reactors to co-generate electricity and ethylene at University of Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, X.Z.; Zhou, G.H.; Luo, J.L.; Chuang, K.T.; Sanger, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Ethane exists in many natural gas deposits and is also a by-product of petroleum refining. Ethane's primary use is as a petrochemical feedstock to produce ethylene, a major intermediate in the manufacture of polymers and petrochemicals. Steam cracking is the principal method for conversion of ethane to ethylene. However, in this process, over 10 per cent of ethane is oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), generating a nitrogen oxide pollutant. A large amount of ethane is deeply oxidized to CO 2 using common oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene, and the chemical energy is not easily recovered as high grade energy. In addition, oxidative methods also produce acetylene, which is very detrimental to the manufacture of polymers because it poisons the catalysts and must therefore be removed to form high purity ethylene feed, which is a costly process. Ethane has the potential to be used as a fuel for hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to generate electrical energy with high efficiency and low impact on the environment, in which it is completely oxidized to CO 2 and water. However, consumption of ethane generates greenhouse gas (CO 2 ) emissions in conventional SOFCs using oxygen ion electrolyte, and consumption of these non-renewable resources is less desirable than their use for manufacture of petrochemicals. This paper discussed the development of ethane proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell reactors and related materials in order to more efficiently use ethane resources in an environmentally friendly process. The advantages of these fuel cell reactors were presented. 5 refs.

  20. Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU)-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor simulation with the Monte-Carlo based MCNP 4A code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fuelled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the Royal Military College-College Militaire Royal (RMC-CMR), excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. The results showed a maximum excess reactivity of 3.37 mk at 33 o C. Several deterministic models using computer codes like WIMS-CRNL, CITATION, TRIVAC and DRAGON have been used to try to reproduce the excess reactivity and temperature trend of both the LEU and HEU SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. The best simulations had been obtained at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. They were able to reproduce the temperature trend of their HEU-fuelled reactor using TRIVAC calculations, but this model over-estimated the absolute value of the excess reactivity by 119 mk. Although calculations using DRAGON did not reproduce the temperature trend as well as TRIVAC, these calculations represented a significant improvement on the absolute value at 20 o C reducing the discrepancy to 13 mk. Given the advance in computer technology, a probabilistic approach was tried in this work, using the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A, to model the RMC-CMR SLOWPOKE-2 reactor.

  1. Use of the Slowpoke-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada for book conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, K.; Welland, M.; Allen, F.; Corcoran, E.; Deschenes, M.; Bonin, H. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The present project investigated the use of the mixed radiation field produced by the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to prolong the life of biodeteriorated books. Research into past studies of radiation treatment indicated that the primary biodeteriorating agents, insects and moulds, can be reduced enough to return books to the 'natural' level of infestation with a dose of 2-3kGy where they will age in a manner consistent with a 'normal' book. Based on research of the potential negative effects of irradiation on paper, including depolymerization, loss of paper strength and durability, discoloration, and harm to ink, it was found that at doses below 8kGy, at a dose rate of 2.4kGy, there is no serious harm to the paper. Based on a desired dose range of 2 to 8kGy, and the dimensions and flux mapping of the radiation field in the reactor pool, a 60cm x 58cm x 43.5cm vacuum-sealed box, with a Cadmium foil neutron shield, is proposed. A preliminary feasibility study suggests that the capital and operating costs of this irradiation procedure would be approximately C$15000 and C$600, respectively. (author)

  2. The SLOWPOKE licensing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, V. G.; Takats, F.; Szivos, K.

    1989-08-15

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System (SES-10) is a 10 MW heating reactor that has been developed in Canada. It will be capable of running without a licensed operator in continuous attendance, and will be sited in urban areas. It has forgiving safety characteristics, including transient time-scales of the order of hours. A process called `up-front` licensing has been evolved in Canada to identify, and resolve, regulatory concerns early in the process. Because of the potential market in Hungary for nuclear district heating, a licensing plan has been developed that incorporates Canadian licensing experience, identifies specific Hungarian requirements, and reduces the risk of licensing delays by seeking agreement of all parties at an early stage in the program.

  3. Slowpoke: the first decade and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, J.W.; Burbidge, G.A.

    1983-10-01

    Since the startup of the first SLOWPOKE reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in 1970, six SLOWPOKE-2 research reactors have been installed at other locations in Canada and a seventh is nearing completion in Jamaica. Designed mainly for neutron activation analysis, the 20 KW SLOWPOKE produces a thermal neutron flux of 10 12 n.cm -2 s -1 at five sample sites in a beryllium reflector surrounding the core. There are an additional five sites in the water reflector outside the beryllium. It has a high degree of inherent safety, arising from the negative temperature and void coefficients of the core, limited maximum excess reactivity, and restricted access to the core by users. As a result the reactor does not require an automatic shutdown system, neutron ionization chambers or low power startup instruments. Automatic control is exercised by a single motor-driven absorber rod responding to a self-powered neutron detector. Once operating, the reactor is licensed to be left unattended, but remotely monitored, for periods up to 24 hours. Because the reactor is so simple and safe, users of the facility can be licensed as operators without formal training in reactor technology. They must, of course, be fully qualified in radiation protection procedures. Reactor users do not have access to the core and are not permitted to store enriched uranium fuel at the reactor site. Present work at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is directed toward the conversion of future SLOWPOKE reactors to low-enriched fuel, in support of an international effort to prevent the possible diversion and misuse of highly-enriched uranium. The feasibility of uprating SLOWPOKE to 2 MWt for heating buildings is also being studied

  4. Production of 165 Dy for radiation synovectomy, in a low-power (slowpoke) nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, C.; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A.; Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Severe, debilitating pain accompanies inflammation of the synovial membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. Under certain conditions, radiation synovectomy is an effective alternative to surgery for relief of these symptoms. Radionuclides which decay by the emission of beta particles, or beta plus low yields of gamma/x-rays are indicated for this medical application. Of the radionuclides with appropriate decay emissions, half-life and physical/chemical properties, 165 Dy is a suitable candidate for production in a low-power reactor. Literature methods for production of this radiopharmaceutical usually involve irradiating solid Dy(OH) 3 , which is dissolved in HCl to form DyCl 3 and then re-precipitated under controlled conditions using NaOH, to produce the desired particle size for medical use. A procedure in which most or all of this post-irradiation processing can be eliminated is particularly important when using low neutron flux reactors, in order to avoid reductions in the amount of deliverable radiopharmaceutical. Radiological safety considerations may also necessitate avoiding post-irradiation processing, since low-power reactor facilities usually have no appropriate hot cells for extensive manipulation of highly active samples. Appropriately-sized, pre-formed Dy(OH) 3 particles were produced under a variety of conditions in attempts to produce a stable, sodium-free product that would be suitable for irradiation and use without further processing. Sodium content could be reduced to about 165 Dy production yields and particle characteristics will be presented in support of this concept

  5. Quality Assurance of University Education in Alberta and Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the introduction of degree granting institutions, Alberta and Kenya have persistently made efforts to manage and improve the quality of university education. While contexts, stakeholders, and quality assurance regimes have changed over time, debate on academic quality in both jurisdictions has continued bringing to ...

  6. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  7. IDRC and the University of Alberta

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC support enables University ... Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is one of the world's leading institutions in ... then PhD student in Educational Policy Studies, docu- ... nesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Taiwan.

  8. Various applications using the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.G.I.; Nielsen, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    History will record that the reactor pool at the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC was one of the first SLOWPOKE pools to be constructed (mid 1970s), even though the reactor itself was the last SLOWPOKE reactor to be installed and commissioned (1985). The unique and very useful feature of the reactor pool is that it is uncovered, allowing for applications in addition to the NAA and radioisotope production applications initially advertised. Because the installation of a tangential neutron beam tube (NBT) had been planned from the beginning, an outer irradiation site inside the reactor container was replaced by a thermal column. Next, a positioning system was added to accept large objects such as flight control surfaces from DND's CF-18 fighter aircraft. Imaging of these surfaces using film is being phased out with the introduction of digital imaging. Very recently a tomography stage was designed and built and is now integrated into the neutron imaging system. Also in the open pool are three pulley and rope 'elevators', two of which allow for large samples to be exposed to various kinds of radiation directly outside of the reactor container. The third elevator is located against the west pool wall, which allows for sample exposure to radiation without any neutron contribution. At the time of negotiating the purchase of the reactor, a teaching package consisting of an in-pool borated ion chamber and an outlet thermocouple was ordered. Automatic irradiation and counting systems in the form of cyclic, pseudo-cyclic, and long counting options were added to the original manual irradiation option. This past summer (2010), a delayed neutron counting system (DNCS) was built and installed in the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC. Examples will be given for the above-mentioned applications.

  9. Various applications using the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at RMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, L.G.I.; Nielsen, K.S. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    History will record that the reactor pool at the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC was one of the first SLOWPOKE pools to be constructed (mid 1970s), even though the reactor itself was the last SLOWPOKE reactor to be installed and commissioned (1985). The unique and very useful feature of the reactor pool is that it is uncovered, allowing for applications in addition to the NAA and radioisotope production applications initially advertised. Because the installation of a tangential neutron beam tube (NBT) had been planned from the beginning, an outer irradiation site inside the reactor container was replaced by a thermal column. Next, a positioning system was added to accept large objects such as flight control surfaces from DND's CF-18 fighter aircraft. Imaging of these surfaces using film is being phased out with the introduction of digital imaging. Very recently a tomography stage was designed and built and is now integrated into the neutron imaging system. Also in the open pool are three pulley and rope 'elevators', two of which allow for large samples to be exposed to various kinds of radiation directly outside of the reactor container. The third elevator is located against the west pool wall, which allows for sample exposure to radiation without any neutron contribution. At the time of negotiating the purchase of the reactor, a teaching package consisting of an in-pool borated ion chamber and an outlet thermocouple was ordered. Automatic irradiation and counting systems in the form of cyclic, pseudo-cyclic, and long counting options were added to the original manual irradiation option. This past summer (2010), a delayed neutron counting system (DNCS) was built and installed in the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC. Examples will be given for the above-mentioned applications.

  10. COURSE : a new industry led consortium to focus and accelerate energy resources research at Alberta University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, R.J. [Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bailey, R. [Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kirk, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Luhning, R.W. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, AB (Canada); Kratochvil, R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    This paper described a new initiative entitled COURSE (Coordination of University Research for Synergy and Effectiveness) which has been created through the collaboration of the energy industry, universities and the Alberta government to promote research in the field of energy resources. Calls for research proposals went out in June 1999 and January 2000. The selected projects will be funded by the Alberta Ministry of Innovation and Science through the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority (AOSTRA). The major objectives of COURSE are to increase and align fundamental breakthrough university research with the industry needs, and to provide results that exceed what would be achieved by one university alone. An agreement has been reached whereby the universities own the technology and are the exclusive license agents of the research.

  11. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented

  12. The status of HEU to LEU core conversion activities at the Jamaica SLOWPOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, J.; Grant, C., E-mail: john.preston@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of the West Indies, Mona Campus, International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, Mona (Jamaica)

    2012-12-15

    The SLOWPOKE reactor in Jamaica has been operated by the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, University of the West Indies since 1984, mainly for the purpose of Neutron Activation Analysis. The HEU core with current utilization has another 14 years of operation, before the addition of a large beryllium annulus would be required to further extend the life-time by 15 years. However, in keeping with the spirit of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, the decision was taken in 2003 to convert the core from HEU to LEU, in line with those at the Ecole Polytechnic and RMC SLOWPOKE facilities. This paper reports on the current status of the conversion activities, including key fuel manufacture and regulatory issues, which have seen substantial progress during the last year. A timetable for the complete process is given, and provided that the fuel fabrication can be completed in the estimated 18 months, the core conversion should be accomplished by the end of 2014. (author)

  13. The status of HEU and LEU core conversion activities at the Jamaica SLOWPOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, J.; Grant, C., E-mail: john.preston@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of the West Indies, Mona Campus, International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2013-07-01

    The SLOWPOKE reactor in Jamaica has been operated by the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, University of the West Indies since 1984, mainly for the purpose of Neutron Activation Analysis. The HEU core with current utilization has another 14 years of operation, before the addition of a large beryllium annulus would be required to further extend the life-time by 15 years. However, in keeping with the spirit of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, the decision was taken in 2003 to convert the core from HEU to LEU, inline with those at the Ecole Polytechnic and RMC SLOWPOKE facilities. This paper reports on the current status of the conversion activities, including key fuel manufacture and regulatory issues, which have seen substantial progress during the last year. A timetable for the complete process is given, and provided that the fuel fabrication can be completed in the estimated 18 months, the core conversion should be accomplished by the end of 2014. (author)

  14. The multi-role nature of the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.G.I.; Beeley, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    After up to a decade of successful operation of seven SLOWPOKE-2 reactors within Canada and in Jamaica, an eighth SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada in 1985. Its open pool was one factor that allowed the authors to develop a variety of research capabilities beyond those being established for NAA. A description of the research projects to date will serve to indicate the diversity of this facility. (author) 14 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Computing Services Planning, Downsizing, and Organization at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrametti, Monica

    1993-01-01

    In a six-month period, the University of Alberta (Canada) campus computing services department formulated a strategic plan, and downsized and reorganized to meet financial constraints and respond to changing technology, especially distributed computing. The new department is organized to react more effectively to trends in technology and user…

  16. LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 modelling with MCNP4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.R.M.; Bonin, H.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fueled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at Royal Military College,excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. Given the advance in computer technology, the use of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A appeared possible for the simulation of the LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core, and this work demonstrates that this is indeed the case. MCNP 4A is a full three dimensional program allowing the user to enter a large amount of complexity. The limit on the geometry complexity is the computing time required to achieve a reasonable standard deviation. To this point several models of the SLOWPOKE-2 have been developed giving some insight on the sensitivity of the code. MCNP4A can use various cross section libraries. The aim of this work is to calculate accurately the reactivity of the core and reproduce The temperature trend of the reactivity. The model preserved as much as possible the details of the core and facility in order to allow further study in the flux mapping

  17. University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  18. Royal Military College of Canada SLOWPOKE-2 facility. Integrated regulating and instrumentation system (SIRCIS) upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.P.; Nielsen, K.S.; Kelly, D.G.; Weir, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at the Royal Military College of Canada has operated the only digitally controlled SLOWPOKE reactor since 2001 (Version 1.0). The present work describes ongoing project development to provide a robust digital reactor control system that is consistent with Aging Management as summarized in the Facility's Life Cycle Management and Maintenance Plan. The project has transitioned from a post-graduate research activity to a comprehensively managed project supported by a team of RMCC professional and technical staff who have delivered an update of the V1.1 system software and hardware implementation that is consistent with best Canadian nuclear industry practice. The challenges associated with the implementation of Version 2.0 in February 2012, the lessons learned from this implementation, and the applications of these lessons to a redesign and rewrite of the RMCC SLOWPOKE-2 digital instrumentation and regulating system (Version 3) are discussed. (author)

  19. Status of Japanese university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Status of Japanese university reactors, their role and value in research and education, and the spent fuel problem are presented. Some of the reactors are now faced by severe difficulties in continuing their operation services. The point of measures to solve the difficulties is suggested. (author)

  20. DOE/university reactor sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy's program of reactor sharing is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering instruction and nuclear research opportunities in non-reactor-owning colleges and universities. The benefits of the program and need for the continuation of the program in the future are discussed

  1. District heating with SLOWPOKE energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, G.F.

    1988-03-01

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System, a benign nuclear heat source designed to supply 10 thermal megawatts in the form of hot water for local heating systems in buildings and institutions, is at the forefront of these developments. A demonstration unit has been constructed in Canada and is currently undergoing an extensive test program. Because the nuclear heat source is small, operates at atmospheric pressure, and produces hot water below 100 degrees Celcius, intrinsic safety features will permit minimum operator attention and allow the heat source to be located close to the load and hence to people. In this way, a SLOWPOKE Energy System can be considered much like the oil- or coal-fired furnace it is designed to replace. The low capital investment requirements, coupled with a high degree of localization, even for the first unit, are seen as attractive features for the implementation of SLOWPOKE Energy Systems in many countries

  2. Slowpoke - a new Canadian heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.; Lynch, G.F.; Ohta, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited now has a new product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, that provides low temperature heat suitable for building and process heating. The SLOWPOKE Energy System is sized to deliver up to 10 megawatts of hot water at up to 90 degrees C, appropriate for large buildings and industrial processes. It is designed for operation without the full-time attendance of dedicated staff and, because of its inherent safety, for siting close to users. At less than 2 cents/kWh, the heat is competitive with oil, gas and electricity in most regions of Canada and the world

  3. Measurements in support of a neutron radiography facility for the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Andrews, W.S.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Beeley, P.A.; Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using the small (20 kWh) SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor for neutron radiography has been investigated. Although designed primarily for neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC was installed with a thermal column of heavy water in a sector of the water gap between the beryllium reflector and the reactor container. The thermal-neutron flux in the reactor pool, just beyond the reactor container, has been measured to be a factor of 2.7 higher than in similar locations remote from the thermal column. Placed in this location was a prototype neutron radiography facility, consisting of a beam tube (or collimator), vertically tangential to the reactor core, and a beam stop. Once the feasibility of using a SLOWPOKE-2 for neutron radiography was demonstrated, subsequent investigations were carried out to optimize the quality of the obtainable radiographs. Both neutron radiographic and thermal-neutron flux measurements were undertaken to determine the optimum placement and arrangement of the beam tube. A Category III (as defined by the ASTM Standard E545-86) neutron radiography facility was obtained, although Category I or II were indicated as feasible. Based on this prototype design and experimentation, a permanent neutron radiography facility will be installed. The design calculations have been finalized, construction blueprints have been prepared, and work is proceeding with the construction, installation and commissioning of the facility. (orig.)

  4. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : interim report November 1996-Jun 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.; Johnson, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report focused on the emissions and efficiency of flares under operating conditions typical of solution gas flares. While most solution gas produced in Alberta is conserved, it is estimated that 6 per cent of these gases are flared with significant changes in the volumes flared from site to site. The median volume of flared or vented gas was approximately 60,300 m 3 /year and 95 per cent of battery sites flare and vent less than 1,000,000 m 3 /year. The goal of this project is to experimentally study the scaled-down generic pipe flares under well-controlled conditions to better understand the performance of flares. Research was conducted in a closed-loop wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on flaring. Other objectives of the research are to develop methods for measuring the overall combustion efficiency of flares with either gaseous flare streams or those containing liquid droplets. Models for the scaling of plumes that disperse the products of combustion from flares as a function of wind speed, exit velocity and flare stack diameter were also examined. And finally, this research project measured the emissions of selected toxic compounds in both their vapor and soot phases. 38 refs., 10 tabs., 56 figs

  5. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-08-31

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included.

  6. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included

  7. Arkansas Tech University TRIGA nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoorikal, J.; Culp, R.; Hamm, J.; Elliott, D.; Hodgson, L.; Apple, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the TRIGA nuclear reactor (ATUTR) proposed for construction on the campus of Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, Arkansas. The reactor will be part of the Center for Energy Studies located at Arkansas Tech University. The reactor has a steady state power level of 250 kW and can be pulsed with a maximum reactivity insertion of $2.0. Experience gained in dismantling and transporting some of the components from Michigan State University, and the storage of these components will be presented. The reactor will be used for education, training, and research. (author)

  8. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    At low power research reactor is being set up in Andhra University to cater to the needs of researchers and isotope users by the Department of Atomic Energy in collaboration with Andhra University. This reactor is expected to be commissioned by 2001-02. Departments like Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics, Life Sciences, Pharmacy, Medicine and Engineering would be the beneficiaries of the availability of this reactor. In this paper, details of the envisaged research programme and training activities are discussed. (author)

  9. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilborn, J. [Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  10. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, J.

    2013-01-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  11. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given

  12. A case study in Gantt charts as historiophoty: A century of psychology at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael R W

    2013-05-01

    History is typically presented as historiography, where historians communicate via the written word. However, some historians have suggested alternative formats for communicating and thinking about historical information. One such format is known as historiophoty, which involves using a variety of visual images to represent history. The current article proposes that a particular type of graph, known as a Gantt chart, is well suited for conducting historiophoty. When used to represent history, Gantt charts provide a tremendous amount of information. Furthermore, the spatial nature of Gantt charts permits other kinds of spatial operations to be performed on them. This is illustrated with a case study of the history of a particular psychology department. The academic year 2009-2010 marked the centennial of psychology at the University of Alberta. This centennial was marked by compiling a list of its full-time faculty members for each year of its history. This historiography was converted into historiophoty by using it as the source for the creation of a Gantt chart. The current article shows how the history of psychology at the University of Alberta is revealed by examining this Gantt chart in a variety of different ways. This includes computing simple descriptive statistics from the chart, creating smaller versions of the Gantt to explore departmental demographics, and using image processing methods to provide measures of departmental stability throughout its history. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  14. The first university research reactor in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, G.S. [Co-ordinator, Low Power Research Reactor, Andhra Univ., Visakapatnam (India)

    1999-08-01

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  15. Operational safety and reactor life improvements of Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.; Nishihara, H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent important experience in improving the operational safety and life of a reactor are described. The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is a 25-year-old 5 MW light water reactor provided with two thermal columns of graphite and heavy water as well as other kinds of experimental facilities. In the graphite thermal column, noticeable amounts of neutron irradiation effects had accumulated in the graphite blocks near the core. Before the possible release of the stored energy, all the graphite blocks in the column were successfully replaced with new blocks using the opportunity provided by the installation of a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in the column. At the same time, special seal mechanisms were provided for essential improvements to the problem of radioactive argon production in the column. In the heavy-water thermal column we have accomplished the successful repair of a slow leak of heavy water through a thin instrumentation tube failure. The repair work included the removal and reconstructions of the lead and graphite shielding layers and welding of the instrumentation tube under radiation fields. Several mechanical components in the reactor cooling system were also exchanged for new components with improved designs and materials. On-line data logging of almost all instrumentation signals is continuously performed with a high speed data analysis system to diagnose operational conditions of the reactor. Furthermore, through detailed investigations on critical components, operational safety during further extended reactor life will be supported by well scheduled maintenance programs

  16. Is Universal Screening Necessary? Incidence of Tuberculosis among Tibetan Refugees Arriving in Calgary, Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Rachel; Jarand, Julie; Field, Stephen K; Fisher, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Background . Canadian policy requires refugees with a history of tuberculosis (TB) or abnormal chest radiograph to be screened after arrival for TB. However, Tibetan refugees are indiscriminately screened, regardless of preimmigration assessment. We sought to determine the incidence of latent (LTBI) and active TB, as well as treatment-related outcomes and associations between preimmigration factors and TB infection among Tibetan refugees arriving in Calgary, Alberta. Design . Retrospective cohort study including Tibetan refugees arriving between 2014 and 2016. Associations between preimmigration factors and incidence of latent and active TB were determined using Chi-square tests. Results . Out of 180 subjects, 49 percent had LTBI. LTBI was more common in migrants 30 years of age or older ( P = 0.009). Treatment initiation and completion rates were high at 90 percent and 76 percent, respectively. No associations between preimmigration factors and treatment completion were found. A case of active TB was detected and treated. Conclusion . Within this cohort, the case of active TB would have been detected through the usual postsurveillance process due to a history of TB and abnormal chest radiograph. Forty-nine percent had LTBI, compared to previously quoted rates of 97 percent. Tibetan refugees should be screened for TB in a similar manner to other refugees resettling in Canada.

  17. New training reactor at Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.; Knorr, J.; Wolf, T.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 14 low-power (up to 10 W) training reactors have been operated at German universities, 9 of them officially classified as being operational in 2004, though for very different uses. This number is expected to drop sharply. The only comprehensive upgrading of a training reactor took place at Dresden Technical University: AKR-2, the most modern facility in Germany, started routine operation in April 2005, under a newly granted license pursuant to Sec. 7, Subsec. 1 of the German Atomic Energy Act, for training students in nuclear technology, for suitable research projects, and a a center of information about reactor technology and nuclear technology for the interested public. One special aspect of this refurbishment was the installation of digital safety I and C systems of the TELEPERM XS line, which are used also in other modern plants. This fact, plus the easy possibility to use the plant for many basic experiments in reactor physics and radiation protection, make the AKR-2 attractive also to other users (e.g. for training reactor personnel or other persons working in nuclear technology). (orig.)

  18. Radiation protection in a university TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M. . Author

    2004-01-01

    Radiation protection in a university institute operating a research reactor and other installations has different constraints as a larger facility. This is because the legal requirements apply in full, but the potential of exposure is low, and accesses has to be made available for students, but also for temporary workers. Some of the problems in practical radiation protection are addressed and solutions are discussed. In addition, experience with national radiation protection legislation recently to be issued is addressed and discussed. (author)

  19. Measuring the productivity of university research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    University Research Reactors (URRs) on 33 campuses in the United States provide valuable contributions to academic instruction and research programs. In most cases, there are no alternative diagnostic techniques to supplant the need for a reactor and associated facilities. Since URRs constitute a major financial commitment, it is important that they be operated in a productive manner. Productivity may be defined as the sum of new knowledge generated, existing knowledge transferred to others, and analytical services provided to assist in the generation of new knowledge; another definition of productivity is this sum expressed as a function of the cost incurred. In either case, a consistent measurement is difficult and more qualitative than quantitative. A uniform reporting system has been proposed that defines simplified categories through which meaningful comparisons can be performed

  20. A university contribution to reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    The total UK university effort available for research specifically directed towards reactor safety is certainly small in comparison with that in industry. To be worth while, the work should complement that in the industry, and ways in which this can, and in some cases does, happen, will be discussed. There is, however, another reason for university involvement: the need for an informed body of opinion on matters of reactor safety outside the industry. Without this it is difficult for the public and its representatives to assure themselves that the depth and scope of safety analysis is commensurate with the seriousness of the problem, and that the best available data and techniques are being used. An independent inspectorate is an essential element in this philosophy, but in addition there is much to be said for exposing the arguments to scrutiny by the widest possible range of informed critics. Such people will be much more effective if they are themselves involved in real problems in the field. In a university, this involvement is probably best achieved through research; as mentioned above, the type of research should preferably complement that being carried out in the industry. The current situation, and the future, are discussed. (author)

  1. Post-secondary stress : Alberta's colleges and universities race to get seats open to help fill a coming energy industry labour crunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentein, J.

    2010-09-15

    The oil sands industry is finding it difficult to recruit younger people due to its negative image as a major polluter. A recent survey has suggested that Canada's petroleum industry will struggle to find employees by the end of the decade. Younger people are more conscious of environmental issues than previous generations. The energy industry is also facing a recruiting problem because the boom and bust nature of the industry has meant that earlier generations were not provided with the training or skill sets required to work in the industry. Post-secondary institutions are not equipped to train people for resource-related careers. The University of Alberta has started to increase the size of its engineering department and is expected to train increasing numbers of professionals for the oil and gas industry. The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) has created a new facility for training oil and gas industry workers. The University of Calgary is also expanding its engineering and science-related facilities. The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) has established new apprenticeship programs. Keyano College has doubled its number of trades and heavy industrial apprentices over the last year. 1 fig.

  2. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  3. Developing an integrated evidence-based medicine curriculum for family medicine residency at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Tan, Amy; Hindle, Hugh; Kung, Lina; Manca, Donna

    2008-06-01

    There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop new strategies as needed. Input from stakeholders including faculty and residents was sought, and evidence regarding the teaching and practical application of EBM was gathered. The committee drafted goals and objectives, the primary of which were to assist residents to (1) become competent self-directed, lifelong learners with skills to effectively and efficiently keep up to date, and 2) develop EBM skills to solve problems encountered in daily practice. New curriculum components, each evidence based, were introduced in 2005 and include a family medicine EBM workshop to establish basic EBM knowledge; a Web-based Family Medicine Desktop promoting easier access to evidence-based Internet resources; a brief evidence-based assessment of the research project enhancing integration of EBM into daily practice; and a journal club to support peer learning and growth of rapid appraisal skills. Issues including time use, costs, and change management are discussed. Ongoing evaluation of the curriculum and its components is a principal factor of the design, allowing critical review and adaptation of the curriculum. The first two years of the curriculum have yielded positive feedback from faculty and statistically significant improvement in multiple areas of residents' opinions of the curriculum and comfort with evidence-based practice.

  4. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Renewal for 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2x4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments

  5. Slowpoke: a role for nuclear technology in district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, G.F.

    1987-08-01

    The successful application of the SLOWPOKE concept to satisfy the heating needs of institutions and building complexes is described. Although the load factor for heating in Japan may not be as high as those experienced in other countries of the northern hemipshere, this particular application clearly demonstrates that small, special purpose, ultra-safe nuclear energy sources are technically and economically viable. They can be designed for easy operation and maintenance, to be located in urban areas and remote communities, thereby satsifying a broad spectrum of energy needs that cannot be served by central nuclear electrical generators

  6. Reactor console replacement at Washington State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Thomas A.

    1978-01-01

    A replacement reactor console was installed in 1977 at the W.S.U. 1 MW TRIGA-fueled reactor as the final step in an instrumentation upgrade program. The program was begun circa 1972 with the design, construction and installation of various systems and equipment. Major instruments were installed in the existing console and tested in the course of reactor operation. The culmination of the program was the installation of a cubicle designed and constructed to house the updated instrumentation. (author)

  7. RELAP/SCDAPSIM Reactor System Simulator Development and Training for University and Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behaviour of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology development program called SDTP (SCDAP Development and Training Program). SDTP involves more than 60 organizations in 28 countries. One of the important applications of the code is for simulator training of university faculty and students, reactor analysts, and reactor operations and technical support staff. Examples of RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based system thermal hydraulic and severe accident simulator packages include the SAFSIM simulator developed by NECSA for the SAFARI research reactor in South Africa, university-developed simulators at the University of Mexico and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and commercial VISA and RELSIM packages used for analyst and reactor operations staff training. This paper will briefly describe the different packages/facilities. (authors)

  8. RELAP/SCDAPSIM Reactor System Simulator Development and Training for University and Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M. [Innovative Systems Software, 1242 South Woodruff Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83404 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behaviour of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology development program called SDTP (SCDAP Development and Training Program). SDTP involves more than 60 organizations in 28 countries. One of the important applications of the code is for simulator training of university faculty and students, reactor analysts, and reactor operations and technical support staff. Examples of RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based system thermal hydraulic and severe accident simulator packages include the SAFSIM simulator developed by NECSA for the SAFARI research reactor in South Africa, university-developed simulators at the University of Mexico and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and commercial VISA and RELSIM packages used for analyst and reactor operations staff training. This paper will briefly describe the different packages/facilities. (authors)

  9. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of an on-site irradiation facility in nuclear science and engineering education is examined. Using the example of a university research reactor, the use of such devices in laboratory instruction, public outreach programs, special instructional programs, research, etc. is discussed. Examples from the Oregon State University curriculum in nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering and radiation health are given. (author) 1 tab

  10. Future plans on the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Seiichi

    2000-01-01

    The Research Reactor Institute (RRI), Kyoto University, for aiming at performing the 'Experiments using a reactor and its related research', was established in Showa 38 (1963) as a cooperative research institute for universities and so on in allover Japan. Operation using KUR of one of main facilities in RRI was started by 1 MW of its rated output in 1964, and converted to 5 MW in 1968, after which through development , addition and modification of various research apparatus it has been proposed to the cooperative application researches with universities and so on in allover Japan, hitherto. Among these periods, its research organization is improved to six departments containing twenty divisions and two attached research facilities to progress some investigations on future plans at RRI for response to new researching trends. Here were described on present state of research on use of low concentrated uranium fuels at research reactor, and future plans on neutron factory and hybrid reactor. The former aims at establishment of a new research facility capable of alternating to KUR for future academic research on research reactor containing high quality and high degree application of neutron field and safety management and feature upgrading of nuclear energy. And, the latter aims at development on an accelerator drive uncritical reactor combined an accelerator neutron source and an uncritical reactor. (G.K.)

  11. The keys to success in marketing small heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, D.S.; Lynch, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The success of the SLOWPOKE Energy System requires acceptance of the SLOWPOKE reactor within the community where the reactor's energy is to be used. Public acceptance will be obtained once the public is convinced that this nuclear heat source is needed, safe and of economic benefit to the community. The need for a new application of nuclear energy is described and the ability of small reactors used for district heating to play that role is shown. The safety of the reactor is being demonstrated with the establishment of the SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and with open, candid discussion with the involved community. Economic arguments are reviewed and include discussion of quantitative and qualitative issues. (orig.)

  12. Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.W.; Swansen, J.E.; Goris, P.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-08-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies. This assay system can accommodate the full range of geometries and masses found in fast breeder subassemblies under IAEA safeguards. The system's high-performance capability accommodates high plutonium loadings of up to 16 kg. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications

  13. Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.W.; Swansen, J.E.; Goris, P.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-08-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies. This assay system can accommodate the full range of geometries and masses found in fast breeder subassemblies under IAEA safeguards. The system's high-performance capability accommodates high plutonium loadings of up to 16 kg. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications.

  14. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1990-01-01

    The research and teaching operations of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Dept. of Chemistry and the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering are housed at the Oregon State University Radiation Center. This facility which includes a 1.1 MW TRIGA reactor was used for 53 classes from a number of different academic departments last year. About one-half of these classes used the reactor and ∼25% of the reactor's 45 hour week was devoted to teaching. Descriptions will be given of reactor-oriented instructional programs in nuclear engineering, radiation health and nuclear chemistry. In nuclear chemistry, classes in (a) nuclear chemistry for nuclear engineers, (b) radiotracer methods, (c) elementary and advanced activation analysis, and (d) advanced nuclear instrumentation will be described in detail. The use of the facility to promote general nuclear literacy among college students, high school and grade school students and the general population will also be covered

  15. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  16. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Thomas, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Flaring is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multiyear study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency. 1 tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  17. Utilization of research reactors in universities and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji.

    1983-01-01

    In Japan, five research reactors and a critical assembly are operated by the universities. They are opened to all university researchers, the system of which is financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Japanese government. Usually KUR is operated eight cycles per year. One cycle consists of the following four week operation: 1. Mainly for researchers from other universities; 2. Mainly for researchers in the institute; 3. Mainly for beam experiment; 4. Sort time experiment. In the weeks of 1 ∼ 3 the KUR is operated continously from Tuesday morning to Friday evening. The experiment include studies on physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering etc. Recently the medical application of research reactors has become popular in Japan. The new technique of the boron neutron capture thereby has been successfully applied to brain tumors and will be to melanoma (skin cancer) in near future. (author)

  18. Use of university research reactors to teach control engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    University research reactors (URRs) have provided generations of students with the opportunity to receive instruction and do hands-on work in reactor dynamics, neutron scattering, health physics, and neutron activation analysis. Given that many URRs are currently converting to programmable control systems, the opportunity now exists to provide a similar learning experience to those studying systems control engineering. That possibility is examined here with emphasis on the need for the inclusion of experiment in control engineering curricula, the type of activities that could be performed, and safety considerations

  19. Wind integration in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, W.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation described the role of the Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) for Alberta's interconnected electric system with particular reference to wind integration in Alberta. The challenges of wind integration were discussed along with the requirements for implementing the market and operational framework. The AESO is an independent system operator that directs the reliable operation of Alberta's power grid; develops and operates Alberta's real-time wholesale energy market to promote open competition; plans and develops the province's transmission system to ensure reliability; and provides transmission system access for both generation and load customers. Alberta has over 280 power generating station, with a total generating capacity of 11,742 MW, of which 443 is wind generated. Since 2004, the AESO has been working with industry on wind integration issues, such as operating limits, need for mitigation measures and market rules. In April 2006, the AESO implemented a temporary 900 MW reliability threshold to ensure reliability. In 2006, a Wind Forecasting Working Group was created in collaboration with industry and the Canadian Wind Energy Association in an effort to integrate as much wind as is feasible without compromising the system reliability or the competitive operation of the market. The challenges facing wind integration include reliability issues; predictability of wind power; the need for dispatchable generation; transmission upgrades; and, defining a market and operational framework for the large wind potential in Alberta. It was noted that 1400 MW of installed wind energy capacity can be accommodated in Alberta with approved transmission upgrades. figs

  20. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  1. The value and cost of university research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a brief overview of the value and costs of U.S. university research reactors (URRs). More than three dozen URRs are currently operating in an approximately equal number of states. These URRs are an important part of the U.S. capabilities in nuclear science and technology. These multipurpose research facilities are located on the campuses of universities and colleges and therefore are easily accessible to university staff and students as well as to the high-technology industries, which often are located near universities. The close proximity, i.e., convenient location, to a diverse user base is a major reason for the multifaceted applications of URRs, including basic and applied science, technology, education, and industrial applications. The URRs have an extraordinarily broad range of applicability, including medicine and the life sciences, materials science, environmental sciences, earth and planetary sciences, and nuclear energy

  2. Major Refurbishment of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joradn, Kelly; Berglund, Matthew; Shea, Brian [Univ., of Florida, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The research reactor fleet is aging with few replacements being built. At the same time the technology for refurbishment of the older reactors has advanced well beyond that of currently installed equipment. The disparity between new and old technology results in an inability to find simple replacements for the older, highly integrated components. The lack of comprehensive guidance for digital equipment adds to the technical problems of installing individual replacement parts. Up to this point, no U. S. facilities have attempted a complete modernization effort because of the time commitment, financial burden, and licensing required for a total upgrade. The University of Florida Training Reactor is tackling this problem with a replacement of nearly all of the major facility sub-systems, including electrical distribution, reactor controls, nuclear instrumentation, security, building management, and environmental controls. This approach offers increased flexibility over the piece-by-piece replacement method by leveraging modern control systems based on global standards and capable of good data interchange with higher levels of redundancy. The UFTR reviewed numerous technologies to arrive at the final system architecture and this 'clean-slate' installation methodology. It is this concept of total system replacement and strict use of modular, open-standards technology that has allowed for a facility design that will be easy to install, maintain, and build upon over time.

  3. Major Refurbishment of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joradn, Kelly; Berglund, Matthew; Shea, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The research reactor fleet is aging with few replacements being built. At the same time the technology for refurbishment of the older reactors has advanced well beyond that of currently installed equipment. The disparity between new and old technology results in an inability to find simple replacements for the older, highly integrated components. The lack of comprehensive guidance for digital equipment adds to the technical problems of installing individual replacement parts. Up to this point, no U. S. facilities have attempted a complete modernization effort because of the time commitment, financial burden, and licensing required for a total upgrade. The University of Florida Training Reactor is tackling this problem with a replacement of nearly all of the major facility sub-systems, including electrical distribution, reactor controls, nuclear instrumentation, security, building management, and environmental controls. This approach offers increased flexibility over the piece-by-piece replacement method by leveraging modern control systems based on global standards and capable of good data interchange with higher levels of redundancy. The UFTR reviewed numerous technologies to arrive at the final system architecture and this 'clean-slate' installation methodology. It is this concept of total system replacement and strict use of modular, open-standards technology that has allowed for a facility design that will be easy to install, maintain, and build upon over time

  4. UCN-VCN facility and experiments in Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Okumura, Kiyoshi; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1993-01-01

    An ultracold and very cold neutron facility was installed in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The facility consists of a very cold neutron (VCN) guide tube, a VCN bender, a supermirror neutron turbine and experimental equipments with ultracold neutrons (UCN). The properties of each equipments are presented. UCN is generated by a supermirror neutron turbine combined with the cold neutron source operated with liquid deuterium, and the UCN output spectrum was measured by the time-of-flight method. A gravity analyzer for high resolution spectroscopy and a neutron bottle for decay experiments are now developing as the UCN research in KUR. (author)

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Day, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, 153 Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet trademark) and 90 Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere trademark). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes

  6. Alberta Chamber of Resources: 1998 in review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.

    1999-01-01

    Several key initiatives taken by the Alberta Chamber of Resources during 1998 are described. Among these initiatives special mention is made of strengthening the relations between the Chamber and the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta through regular contributions to business plan reviews, scholarships, and advisory committees. Working with the Department of Energy on a range of issues involving the environment, taxation, and mineral rights tenure is an area the ACR is involved. Hosting a workshop on the economic and social values and trade-offs in the green areas of Alberta and working with the University Alberta regarding the development of an advisory committee on forest resource valuation is another area. Strategizing the Oil Sands Task Force to strengthen it in the areas of industrial coordination, by-product utilization, the creation niche markets and product quality and investigating, through the Black Oil Pipeline Steering Committee, transportation, technological and marketing issues related to the oil sands are other interests. In the Mineral Sector, the Chamber facilitated discussions towards a Non-Energy Minerals and Mines Act, which among other long-range beneficial effects, prompted the provincial government to provide an additional $ 1.5 million to the Alberta Geological Survey. In the Utilities Sector, the Chamber continued to bring together various parties to work on common challenges and opportunities. Much interest has been generated also on upgraders and research facilitated by the Chamber either with members of the Alberta Research Council, or the National Centre for Upgrading Technology or similar organizations. This kind of facilitation helps the Chamber's member companies to realize cost reductions in development and application of new technologies

  7. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Reactor Research and Education Center

    2015-06-15

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  8. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  9. Congestion management in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, R.

    2002-01-01

    The challenges facing Alberta regarding electricity market design and congestion management were described. The electricity market in the province consists of a central power pool, an open access transmission network, and a single pool price, unlike many other jurisdictions in North America which have adopted a location margin price (LMP) design with significant price differences between various locations within the power network. Alberta's transmission network is regulated and provides carrier functions. Power moves freely throughout Alberta's power pool network with no congestion, therefore the common pool price signals market participants throughout the entire network with no segregation into zones. Alberta is currently at a cross road in choosing between a single pool price model or a nodal price model. In the first instance, the province would have to strengthen the transmission network to maintain the market at a reasonable size. The alternative would permit Alberta to use market-based techniques to deal with the evolution of many smaller markets in the province, but these would be very small by North American standards and their ability to compete would be questionable

  10. Transmission issues in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levson, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlined the major issues and concerns facing users of the transmission system in Alberta. They include congestion management issues that make investors uncertain about power generation. It is necessary to know the difference between which transmission price signals will be faced by low cost cogeneration at Fort McMurray and Cold Lake coal-fired generation near Edmonton compared to combined cycle gas generation near Calgary. Import and export policy tariffs are another concern. Most new generation opportunities in Alberta require access to export markets, but transmission facilities for export need policy support and appropriate tariffs. It was noted that the past actions of Alberta's Transmission Administrator and balancing pool may be distorting market signals for ancillary service markets, and that loss studies and calculations need upgrading

  11. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta 'crossfire' and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet TM , a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere TM , an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  12. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Colombia (United States). Departments of Radiology, Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta `crossfire` and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet{sup TM}, a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere{sup TM}, an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  13. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors

  14. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Schlapper, G.A.; Alger, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U.S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MuRR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR, if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  15. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Robert M.; Schlapper, Gerald A.; Alger, Don M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U. S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MURR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  16. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  17. Science and Service at a University Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Experiences of the Laboratory for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) of the Reactor Institute Delft at the Delft University of Technology are presented on basis of more than 30 years experience with INAA services to others. Recommendations are given to neutron activation analysis groups starting as a service provider, but also pitfalls are identified. The importance of fitness for intended purpose is emphasized, so that analysis protocols should be optimized to answer the customer’s basic question, rather than to yield the highest number of elements and best level of precision. The absence of automation and no return of revenues are identified as highest threats of becoming a successful and reliable partner for providing services. (author)

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Day, D.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, {sup 153}Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet{trademark}) and {sup 90}Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere{trademark}). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes.

  19. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.; Kadiroghlu, O.K.; Soekmen, C.N.; Schmitt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  20. Southern Alberta system reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, A. [Alberta Electric System Operator, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    System planning for the Alberta Electric System Operator's (AESO) southern system was discussed in view of the growing interest in developing wind energy resources in the province. While Alberta currently has a total of 11,500 MW of installed wind power, southern Alberta has a very small capability for interconnecting additional wind resources. There are 3 main agencies involved in system planning for the southern region: (1) the Alberta Utilities Commission (AUC), (2) the AESO, and (3) the transmission facility owners. Transmission needs are studied by the AESO, who then applies to the AUC for approval. Transmission facility owners also apply to the AUC for approval to construct facilities. The AESO's roles are to operate the wholesale electricity market; plan the transmission system; arrange access for loads and generation; and oversee transmission system operation. The AESO is an independent agency with a public interest mandate. The AESO's queue management process has been designed to facilitate non-discriminatory system access. Development options currently being considered by the AESO include a 240 kV AC transmission line; a 500 kV AC transmission line; a 765 kV AC transmission line; a high voltage direct current (HVDC) system; and a voltage source converter (VSC) HVDC system. Radial and looped configurations are also being considered. The AESO is currently conducting a participant involvement program that involves open houses with the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) and other provincial stakeholders. tabs., figs.

  1. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant. Final report 08/06/1998 - 08/13/1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajorek, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license

  2. Systems for aiding operators at university-owned research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Kimura, Y.; Shibata, T.

    1984-01-01

    University-owned research reactors are operated for various purposes, and small disturbances may arise from various experimental facilities. Also not uniform are the technical levels of operators who range from supervised-students to reactor physicists. Considerable efforts are therefore devoted to the preventive maintainance. With these boundary conditions imposed, systems for aiding operators are designed at these research reactor facilities. (author)

  3. Service to the Electric Utility Industry by the Ford Nuclear Reactor, University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.; Simpson, P.A.; Cook, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1977, the staff of the University of Michigan's Ford Nuclear Reactor has been providing irradiation, testing, analytical, and training services to electric utilities and to suppliers of the nuclear electric utility industry. This paper discusses the reactor's irradiation facilities; reactor programs and utilization; materials testing programs; neutron activation analysis activities; and training programs conducted

  4. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Final technical report for 1996--1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor and radiation facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2 x 4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments. The Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR) and the associated laboratories are made available to any interested institution six days a week on a scheduled basis. Most institutions are scheduled at the time of their first request--a reflection of their commitment to the Reactor Sharing Program. The success of the past years by no means guarantees future success. Therefore, the reactor staff is more aggressively pursuing its outreach program, especially with junior colleges and universities without reactor or radiation facilities; more aggressively developing demonstration and training programs for students interested in careers in nuclear power and radiation technology; and more aggressively up-grading the reactor facilities--not only to provide a better training facility but to prepare for relicensing in the year 2000

  5. Unique educational opportunities at the Missouri University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ross, F.K.; Spate, V.

    1997-01-01

    Since the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) went critical in 1966, it has been a center where students from many departments conduct their graduate research. In the past three decades, hundreds of graduate students from the MU departments of chemistry, physics, anthropology, nuclear engineering, etc., have received masters and doctoral degrees based on research using neutrons produced at MURR. More recently, the educational opportunities at MURR have been expanded to include undergraduate students and local high school students. Since 1989 MURR has participated in the National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. As part of this program, undergraduate students from universities and colleges throughout the United States come to MURR and get hands-on research experience during the summer. Another program, started in 1994 by the Nuclear Analysis Program at MURR, allows students from a local high school to conduct a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment. We also conduct tours of the center, where we describe the research and educational programs at MURR to groups of elementary school children, high school science teachers, state legislators, professional organizations, and many other groups

  6. University of Michigan workscope for 1991 DOE University program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehe, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Michigan (UM) is a member of a team of researchers, including the universities of Florida, Texas, and Tennessee, along with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developing robotic for hazardous environments. The goal of this research is to develop the intelligent and capable robots which can perform useful functions in the new generation of nuclear reactors currently under development. By augmenting human capabilities through remote robotics, increased safety, functionality, and reliability can be achieved. In accordance with the established lines of research responsibilities, our primary efforts during 1991 will continue to focus on the following areas: radiation imaging; mobile robot navigation; three-dimensional vision capabilities for navigation; and machine-intelligence. This report discuss work that has been and will be done in these areas

  7. Requalification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] pins for use in university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Dates, L.R.

    1986-12-01

    A series of nondestructive and destructive examinations have been performed on a representative sample of stainless steel-clad UO 2 fuel pins procured in the early-to-mid 1960s for the SPERT program. These examinations were undertaken in order to requalify the SPERT pins for use in converting university research reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. The requalification program included visual and dimensional inspections of fuel pins and fuel pellets, radiographic inspections of welds, fill gas analyses, and chemical and spectrographic analyses of fuel and cladding materials. In general all attributes tested were within or very close to specified values, although some weld defects not covered by the original specifications were found. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  8. Power deregulation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMurchy, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    The impacts of deregulation of the electric power industry in Alberta from the perspective of the natural gas industry was presented with special focus on how the power market can be brought back into balance. The issue of what impacts the deregulated power market will have on natural gas consumption or prices was also reviewed. It was noted that deregulation of the electric power industry will have a definite impact on natural gas consumption but no significant impact on prices. It is estimated that in 1999/2000 gas demand will be 90 million cf/day for incremental electricity generation. However, as long as pipe capacity out of the province exits, this increase in natural gas demand in Alberta is not expected to affect gas prices

  9. Whither Alberta's oil production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, R.A.; Dick, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated how a combination of old theory (decline methods and statistics) and new technology (computer graphics) can enhance decline-curve forecasts for multi-well groupings. Production and well-count forecasts are presented for four different sized groups of aggregate production. The four examples are: the small Manville pool; the Pembina Cardium, Alberta's largest oil pool; an aggregate of all reef pools of Keg River age; and an aggregate of all wells reporting conventional oil production in the province of Alberta. In each case graphical results show the historical and forecast trends for the statistical distribution of well rates, the median well rate, the aggregated rate, and the number of producing wells. It is concluded that well rate distributions for groups ranging from 15 wells in a single pool to thousands of wells in hundreds of pools are all approximately lognormal. Lognormal well rate distributions and Lorenz graphs provide qualitative and quantitative assessments of a resource base. Decline curves for the median well rate can reveal trends masked in the aggregated rate by changing well count, operating practice and degradation of the resource base. The number of producing wells in Alberta has grown from ca 9000 in 1970 to ca 24,000 in 1988, has remained constant from 1988-1990, and will start to decline as the number of suspended or abandoned wells exceeds the number of new completions. 3 refs., 13 figs., 4 figs

  10. Alberta propylene upgrading prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    A very significant byproduct recovery and purification scheme is at present being prepared by TransCanada Midstream (TCMS). Alberta Economic Development commissioned an independent study to identify propylene supply options while proceeding with the evaluation of various propylene derivatives with regard to their fit with the Alberta context. Identification of chemical companies with derivative interests was also accomplished. By 2005, it is estimated that 280 kilo-tonnes of propylene will be available on an annual basis from byproduct sources. Those sources are oil sands upgraders, ethylene plants and refineries. The ranges of impurities and supply costs vary between the different sources. An option being considered involves pipeline and rail receipt with a major central treating and distillation facility for the production of polymer grade (PG) propylene with propane and other smaller byproducts. Special consideration was given to three chemicals in this study, namely: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and acrylic acid (AA). Above average growth rates were identified for these chemicals: demand is growing at 6 to 7 per cent a year for both PP and ACN, while demand for AA grows at 8 per cent annually. Two other possibilities were identified, propylene oxide (PO) and phenol. The study led to the conclusion that low capital and operating costs and shipping costs to the Pacific Rim represent advantages to the development of propylene derivatives in the future in Alberta. 4 refs., 87 tabs., 7 figs

  11. The University of Missouri Research Reactor facility can melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; Olson, O.L.; Stevens, R.; Brugger, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a waste compacting system for reducing the volume of radioactive aluminum cans has been designed, built and put into operation. In MURR's programs of producing radioisotopes and transmutation doping of silicon, a large volume of radioactive aluminum cans is generated. The Can Melter System (CMS) consists of a sorting station, a can masher, an electric furnace and a gas fired furnace. This system reduces the cans and other radioactive metal into barrels of solid metal close to theoretical density. The CMS has been in operation at the MURR now for over two years. Twelve hundred cu ft of cans and other metals have been reduced into 150 cu ft of shipable waste. The construction cost of the CMS was $4950.84 plus 1680 man hours of labor, and the operating cost of the CMS is $18/lb. The radiation exposure to the operator is 8.6 mR/cu ft. The yearly operating savings is $30,000. 20 figs., 10 tabs

  12. Alberta oil sands crudes : upgrading and marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashar, M.

    2008-01-01

    Open pit mining and in situ techniques, such as steam stimulation, are used to recover Alberta's bitumen and heavy oil resources, which have higher viscosities than conventional hydrocarbons. The bitumen is typically upgraded to synthetic crude oil (SCO). In the simplest processing scheme, the bitumen is blended with diluent for ease in pipeline transport and then processed at refineries with upgrading facilities. The bitumen is also upgraded to light SCO at world-scale upgraders in Alberta. The SCO is then processed at refineries in downstream markets. The 2 categories of upgrading, notably primary and secondary upgrading, were described in this article along with technology options for both categories. Slurry hydrocracking is regarded as the most interesting emerging residual fuel upgrading technology. It combines special catalyst mixes with the latest slurry reactor designs as well as innovative catalyst capture and recycle schemes to produce very high conversions and potentially superior upgrading economics. The increase in volume and rate of SCO from Alberta provides refiners in the oil sands marketing sector an unprecedented choice of opportunities to improve profitability. Key trends indicate that production will increase substantially from 2008 to 2030. 5 figs

  13. Alberta oil sands crudes : upgrading and marketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashar, M. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Open pit mining and in situ techniques, such as steam stimulation, are used to recover Alberta's bitumen and heavy oil resources, which have higher viscosities than conventional hydrocarbons. The bitumen is typically upgraded to synthetic crude oil (SCO). In the simplest processing scheme, the bitumen is blended with diluent for ease in pipeline transport and then processed at refineries with upgrading facilities. The bitumen is also upgraded to light SCO at world-scale upgraders in Alberta. The SCO is then processed at refineries in downstream markets. The 2 categories of upgrading, notably primary and secondary upgrading, were described in this article along with technology options for both categories. Slurry hydrocracking is regarded as the most interesting emerging residual fuel upgrading technology. It combines special catalyst mixes with the latest slurry reactor designs as well as innovative catalyst capture and recycle schemes to produce very high conversions and potentially superior upgrading economics. The increase in volume and rate of SCO from Alberta provides refiners in the oil sands marketing sector an unprecedented choice of opportunities to improve profitability. Key trends indicate that production will increase substantially from 2008 to 2030. 5 figs.

  14. Alberta`s petroleum industry and the Conservation Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, D.H.

    1993-12-31

    The history of Alberta`s petroleum industry and Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) was told. The conservation movement in Alberta was tracked from 1908 to the founding of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board in 1938. Failure of Alberta`s first proration, and the Turner Valley `waste` gas conservation movement occurred during this period. The Leduc discovery and effects of the new regulatory environment on its development were discussed. The natural gas export debate, and the expansion of Alberta`s crude oil market were recounted in detail. The organization and regulation of field development which occurred during the period from 1948 to 1959 was presented. Past actions of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Board reviewed from today`s perspective. The petroleum industry and the ERCB were said to have been jointly responsible for the creation of a prosperous and confident new Alberta, moving it further and further away from the Canadian economic and political mainstream,, and reinforcing the sense of alienation that began to develop during the preceding agrarian decades. 53 figs., 48 tabs.

  15. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Chihiro; Fujine, Shigenori; Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1986-01-01

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Alberta's electricity forwards market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlined how the province of Alberta is starting over with a wholesale electricity market. Wholesalers have retreated back to the real-time market. The Watt-Ex standard market design position paper, issued in October 2002, examines wholesale market issues. The author notes that the biggest constraint to competitive electricity market is the reliance on real-time markets to price a good portion of transactions. Doing so, creates extreme price volatility and ineffective price signals because demand and supply have only a limited ability to respond to prices

  17. University of Wisconsin, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Annual report, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  18. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  19. Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Thirtieth annual progress report, July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is the thirtieth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor and covers such topics as: personnel; reactor facility; cobalt-60 facility; education and training; Radionuclear Application Laboratory; Low Level Radiation Monitoring Laboratory; and facility research utilization

  20. Educational utilization of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, D.W.; Bolon, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary mission of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) research reactor (UMRR) is to provide exceptional educational opportunities for UMR students and for students at regional college and precollege institutions. Our vision is to become the premier educational reactor in the nation. In order to realize this vision, the principles of self-assessment and continuous improvement are being implemented

  1. Reactor laboratory course for students majoring in nuclear engineering with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Shiroya, S.; Kanda, K.

    1996-01-01

    With the use of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities (Hokkaido University, Tohoku University, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokai University, Nagoya University, Osaka University, Kobe University of Mercantile Marine and Kyushu University) in addition to a reactor laboratory course of undergraduate level for Kyoto University. These courses are opened for three weeks (two weeks for the joint course and one week for the undergraduate course) to students majoring in nuclear engineering and a total of 1,360 students have taken the course in the last 21 years. The joint course has been institutionalized with the background that it is extremely difficult for a single university in Japan to have her own research or training reactor. By their effort, the united faculty team of the joint course have succeeded in giving an effective, unique one-week course, taking advantage of their collaboration. Last year, an enquete (questionnaire survey) was conducted to survey the needs for the educational experiments of graduate level and precious data have been obtained for promoting reactor laboratory courses. (author)

  2. Management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Tenson; Shimoura, K.; Koyama, A.

    1977-11-01

    In this report, the management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University during past 6 years, from April in 1971 to March in 1977 are reviewed. (auth.)

  3. Researches at the University of Tokyo fast neutron sources reactor, YAYOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Saito, I.

    1992-01-01

    The Fast neutron source reactor YAYOI was critical in 1971 at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo (UTNL). The core is fueled with the enriched uranium surrounded by the depleted uranium. YAYOI is the first fast reactor in Japan. Many types of studies have been carried out by the researchers of the University of Tokyo in these 20 years. It also contributed to the Japan's national project of developing fast breeder reactors. The reactor is opened to the visiting researchers from universities and research institutes. YAYOI has also been utilized for education of undergraduate and graduate students of the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Tokyo. The present paper briefly summerizes past and present researchers. (author)

  4. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such a broad

  5. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would

  6. Use of research reactors in multidisciplinary education at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Multidisciplinary aspects of nuclear science and technology form a large part of the research and teaching activities of the Nuclear Science and Engineering (NS and E) Program at Cornell, and the two reactors housed in Ward Laboratory - a 500-kW TRIGA and a 100-W critical facility [zero-power reactor (ZPR)]- play a central role in those activities. Several primarily educational and multidisciplinary features of the NS and E program are described in this paper

  7. Co-operation between Canada and Hungary on the application of the SLOWPOKE energy system to district heating in eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, R. E.; Halzl, J.; Sigmond, G.; Takats, F.; Bakacs, I.

    1989-06-15

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System is a nuclear energy source designed to provide up to 10 MWt of heat energy in the form of hot water to medium- and large- size district heating systems. An appropriate grouping of Canadian and Hungarian companies with the support of the Hungarian Ministry of Industry is studying the technical, economic, commercial, and nuclear licensability aspects of the application of the SLOWPOKE Energy System to district heating in Hungary. Results of these studies indicate that there is a significant potential market for SLOWPOKE Energy Systems in existing district heating systems, that the SLOWPOKE Energy System can be readily integrated into such systems, that high capacity factors can be achieved, and that it will be relatively easy to localize the supply of most components and systems.

  8. Co-operation between Canada and Hungary on the application of the SLOWPOKE energy system to district heating in eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, R.E.; Halzl, J.; Sigmond, G.; Takats, F.; Bakacs, I.

    1989-06-01

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System is a nuclear energy source designed to provide up to 10 MWt of heat energy in the form of hot water to medium- and large- size district heating systems. An appropriate grouping of Canadian and Hungarian companies with the support of the Hungarian Ministry of Industry is studying the technical, economic, commercial, and nuclear licensability aspects of the application of the SLOWPOKE Energy System to district heating in Hungary. Results of these studies indicate that there is a significant potential market for SLOWPOKE Energy Systems in existing district heating systems, that the SLOWPOKE Energy System can be readily integrated into such systems, that high capacity factors can be achieved, and that it will be relatively easy to localize the supply of most components and systems

  9. Educational use of research reactor (KUR) and critical assembly (KUCA) at Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji

    2005-01-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, a research reactor of 5MW (KUR) and a critical assembly (KUCA) have been used for educational purpose to train undergraduate or graduate students. Using KUR, basic experiments for neutron applications have been carried out, and KUCA has been used for the education of nuclear engineering and technology. Especially, using KUCA, a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities, and more than 2200 students attended this course

  10. Use of the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor for education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) for education and training. In particular, data covering the last 5 yr are presented, which cover education through formal university classes, theses, public information, and school programs. Training is covered by presenting data on domestic and foreign reactor operator training, health physics training, and neutron activation analysis training. While education and training only occupy ∼16% of the OSTR's total use time, nevertheless, this is an important mission of all nonpower reactors that cannot be performed effectively in any other way

  11. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigliole, A. Borio Di; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Provasi, M.C.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G. [University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (L.E.N.A), Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  12. Expanding the grid in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M. [AltaLink Management Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed some of the changes and strategies that are currently being adopted by AltaLink to expand Alberta's electricity grid in relation to wind power development. The company is Alberta's largest transmission facility operator. Wind power currently accounts for approximately 5 percent of the province's generation mix. Applications for new wind farms will increase Alberta's 629 MW of wind power generation capacity to 5530 MW. Alberta's transmission regulation requires that 100 percent of in-merit generation can occur when transmission facilities are in service, and that 95 percent of in-merit generation can occur under abnormal operating conditions. A new transmission line is being constructed in the Pincher Creek and Lethbridge region as part of a southern Alberta transmission reinforcement project. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) and Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) are working together to ensure that adequate resources are available while system reliability is maintained. The Ardenville wind farm is the first wind power project to be energized under the new connection model launched by the AESO. The connection model was developed to identify, connect, and construct new energy projects. The project will also identify connection routes with the lowest overall impact on the province. Alberta will also continue to implement technologies that ensure the development of a smart grid. tabs., figs.

  13. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  14. Science Hall of Atomic Energy in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takeo

    1979-01-01

    The Science Hall of Atomic Energy was built as a subsidiary facility of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The purpose of this facility is to accept outside demands concerning the application of the research reactor. The building is a two story building, and has the floor area of 901.47 m 2 . There are an exhibition room, a library, and a big lecture room. In the exhibition room, models of the Kyoto University Research Reactor and the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are placed. Various pictures concerning the application of the reactor are on the wall. In the library, people from outside of the Institute can use various books on science. Books for boys and girls are also stocked and used for public use. At the lecture room, various kinds of meeting can be held. (Kato, T.)

  15. Sulphur demand growing. [Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-20

    Sulfur markets look better going into 1975 than they have for several years, as North American demand growth is being filled largely by elemental sulfur producers and overseas. Demand is rising as fast as the capacity of Canadian transportation and handling facilities. It will take a long time to make much of a dent in the total Alberta stockpile of 14 million long tons at the end of 1974, with involuntary production from sour gas plants exceeding sales volume since 1972. However, there is some encouragement in the approaching peakout of production combined with a substantial increase in price since the low point of the cycle at the beginning of 1973, and a predicted rise of at least 20% in domestic (North American) sales this year over 1974.

  16. Cold neutron PGAA facility developments at university research reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, K.; Rios-Martinez, C.

    2005-01-01

    The PGAA applications can be enhanced by using subthermal neutrons, cold neutrons at university research reactors. Only two cold neutron beam facilities were developed at the U.S. university research reactors, namely at Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin. Both facilities used mesitylene moderator. The mesitylene moderator in the Cornell Cold Neutron Beam Facility (CNBF) was cooled by a helium cryorefrigerator via copper cold fingers to maintain the moderator below 30 K at full power reactor operation. Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) also uses mesitylene moderator that is cooled by a cryorefrigerator via a neon thermosiphon. The operation of the TCNS is based on a helium cryorefrigerator, which liquefies neon gas in a 3-m long thermosiphon. The thermosiphon cools and maintains mesitylene moderator at about 30 K in a chamber. Neutrons streaming through the mesitylene chamber are moderated and thus reduce their energy to produce a cold neutron distribution. (author)

  17. Small reactor operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    There is a potential need for small reactors in the future for applications such as district heating, electricity production at remote sites, and desalination. Nuclear power can provide these at low cost and with insignificant pollution. The economies required by the small scale application, and/or the remote location, require a review of the size and location of the operating staff. Current concepts range all the way from reactors which are fully automatic, and need no local attention for days or weeks, to those with reduced local staff. In general the less dependent a reactor is on local human intervention, the greater its dependence on intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low-stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. A case study of the design and licensing of the SLOWPOKE Energy System heating reactor is presented. (author)

  18. Low temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Okada, Moritami; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kodaka, Hisao; Miyata, Kiyomi.

    1977-01-01

    A new refrigeration system has been substituted to the low temperature irradiation facility at KUR instead of the previous one, since April in 1975. The model 1204 CTi He liquifier was designed to be modified for the refrigerator with the capacity of 30 watts at 10 K. The refrigeration capacity of 38 watts at 10 K was defined using a special cryostat and transfer-tubes, and the lowest temperature of about 18 K was measured using the irradiation loop without reactor operation. The reconstructed facility enables us to hold the many specimens simultaneously in the sample chamber of the irradiation loop at about 25 K during reactor operation of 5 MW. The irradiation dose has been reached about 6.6 x 10 16 n sub(f)/cm 2 and 6.1 x 10 17 n sub(th)/cm 2 with the normal reactor operation cycle of up to 77 hours. The stable operation condition of the machine and the special safety system for the refrigeration system enable us to maintain easily the facility with a constant operation condition for such a long time irradiation. Many kinds of low temperature neutron irradiation experiments are carried out using the facility, which techniques are partially reported. (auth.)

  19. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A fuel evolution model for a TRIGA Mark II reactor has been developed. • Reproduction of nearly 50 years of reactor operation. • The model was used to predict the best reactor reconfiguration. • Reactor life was extended without adding fresh fuel elements. - Abstract: A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyze neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate low power experimental reactors from those used for power production, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the core and to obtain a substantial increase in the Core Excess reactivity value. The evaluation of fuel burnup and the reconfiguration results are presented in this paper.

  20. Study of a new automatic reactor power control for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Magrotti, G. [Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata (L.E.N.A.), University of Pavia, Via Aselli 41, 27100 (Italy); Cammi, A.; Memoli, V. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division (CeSNEF), Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gadan, M. A. [Instrumentation and Control Department, National Atomic Energy Comission of Argentina, University of Pavia (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The installation of a new Instrumentation and Control (IC) system for the TRIGA Mark-II reactor at University of Pavia has recently been completed in order to assure a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future. The intervention involved nearly the whole IC system and required a channel-by-channel component substitution. One of the most sensitive part of the intervention concerned the Automatic Reactor Power Controller (ARPC) which permits to keep the reactor at an operator-selected power level acting on the control rod devoted to the fine regulation of system reactivity. This controller installed can be set up using different control logics: currently the system is working in relay mode. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to set up a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) configuration of the new controller installed on the TRIGA reactor of Pavia so as to optimize the response to system perturbations. The analysis have shown that a continuous PID offers generally better results than the relay mode which causes power oscillations with an amplitude of 3% of the nominal power

  1. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Accelerator-Driven System at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan, a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft–Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium–tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of the accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Kyeong; Lee, Deok Jung [Nuclear Engineering Division, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Chul [VHTR Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Nuclear Engineering Science Division, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Shin, Ho Cheol [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan), a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium-tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  3. University Reactor Instrumentation Program. Final report, September 30, 1993--March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has received a total of $115,723.00 from the Department of Energy (DOE) Instrumentation Program (DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-91ID13083) and $40,000 in matching funds from the University of Massachusetts Lowell administration. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has been serving the University and surrounding communities since it first achieved criticality in May 1974. The principle purpose of the facility is to provide a multidisciplinary research and training center for the University of Massachusetts Lowell and other New England academic institutions. The facility promotes student and industrial research, in addition to providing education and training for nuclear scientists, technicians, and engineers. The 1 MW thermal reactor contains a variety of experimental facilities which, along with a 0.4 megacurie cobalt source, effectively supports the research and educational programs of many university departments including Biology, Chemistry, Nuclear and Plastics Engineering, Radiological Sciences, Physics, and other campuses of the University of Massachusetts system. Although the main focus of the facility is on intra-university research, use by those outside the university is fully welcomed and highly encouraged

  4. Update on the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, J C; Rhyne, J J [University of Missouri-Columbia (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) is in the process of upgrading the research and operational capabilities of the MU Research Reactor (MURR) and associated facilities. The plans include an expanded research building that will double the laboratory space, the addition of new research programs, instrumentation and equipment, a cold neutron source, and improved reactor systems. These enhancements, which are in various stages of completion, will greatly expand the present active multidisciplinary research programs at MURR.

  5. University of Arizona TRIGA reactor. Annual utilization report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    This is the annual report for the University of Arizona TRIGA Reactor under Contract No. DE-AC02-76ER02096 covering the period July 1, 1984 through June 30, 1985, including the 1984-85 Academic Year. The purpose of this report is to document the facility usage which is possible because of DOE support under the contract. The reactor is operated under License R-52 with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  6. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumburgh, G.P.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  7. New control and safety rod unit for the training reactor of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Schab, J.; Knorr, J.

    1983-01-01

    The extension of the experimental training of students at the training reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University requires the reconstruction of the reactor with a new control and safety rod unit. The specific conditions at the AKR led to a new variant. Results of preliminary experiments, design and mode of operation of the first unit as well as hitherto gained operation experiences are presented. (author)

  8. A history of effluent releases from the Texas A and M University reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, E F; Neff, R D; Sandel, P S; Schoenbucher, B [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Since 1966 records of radioactive effluents releases from the Texas A and M University Research Reactor have been compiled. These data include particulate activity, noble gases, and liquid effluent releases. Particulate activity releases with half-lives greater than eight days were negligible and are not included in this presentation. Conversion from an MTR plate reactor to a TRIGA fueled reactor was completed in August 1968. Records of effluent releases of Argon-4l and liquids for the past, five years are summarized, in this presentation. These release data are compared to the current limits specified: in 10 CPR 20 and the limits appearing in proposed Appendix.

  9. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - Options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Energy. (author)

  10. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab

  11. University of Missouri research reactor exhaust ventilation/laboratory fume hood upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; McCracken, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) facility is located in Research Park, 1 mile south of the Columbia campus. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-and-graphite-reflected core, serviced by six radial beam tubes for research, and has sample irradiation facilities in both a flux trap and in the graphite region. The reactor operates at full power 150 h/week, 52 week/yr, making it one of the best operating schedules and the most extensively used of any university research reactor. This extensive utilization includes many programs, such as radioisotope applications, neutron activation analysis, etc., that depend heavily on fume hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells that put a tremendous demand on the exhaust system. The exhaust system is required to be operable whenever the reactor is operating and must have the capability of being operated from an emergency electrical generator on loss of site electrical power. The originally installed exhaust ventilation system was below needed capacity and, with increased program requirements and system age, the necessity to upgrade the system was paramount. The challenge was to complete the upgrade construction while continuing to operate the reactor and maintain all the other ongoing programs, rather than take the easy way of an extended shutdown. This paper discusses how MURR met this challenge and solved these problems, problems that are similarly experienced by almost all research reactors to some degree when major work is required on critical systems

  12. Education and training activities at North Carolina State University's PULSTAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Research reactor utilization has been an integral part of the North Carolina State University's (NCSU's) nuclear engineering program since its inception. The undergraduate curriculum has a strong teaching laboratory component. Graduate classes use the reactor for selected demonstrations, experiments, and projects. The reactor is also used for commercial power reactor operator training programs, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and sample and tracer activation for industrial short courses and services as part of the university's land grant mission. The PULSTAR reactor is a 1-MW pool-type reactor that uses 4% enriched UO 2 pellet fuel in Zircaloy II cladding. Standard irradiation facilities include wet exposure ports, a graphite thermal column, and a pneumatic transfer system. In the near term, general facility upgrades include the installation of signal isolation and computer data acquisition and display functions to improve the teaching and research interface with the reactor. In the longer term, the authors foresee studies of new core designs and the development of beam experiment design tools. These would be used to study modifications that may be desired at the end of the current core life and to undertake the development of new research instruments

  13. Reactors set for mini market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, Richard.

    1988-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power generation on a large-scale has an uncertain future. However, it is hoped that a small nuclear reactor could form the basis for providing heating, cooling or electricity in large buildings. Based on the Slowpoke research reactor, the Slowpoke energy system concept is simple. The concept and the way in which the small-scale reactor would work are discussed. The system consists of a stainless steel tank surrounded by reinforced concrete and let into the ground. The tank is full of light water which is heated to about 90 deg C by a central core of 2.4 percent enriched uranium fuel. The resulting natural circulation causes the water to pass through a heat exchanger. The water from the heat exchanger can be used for building or district heating, to operate air-conditioners or to generate small quantities of electricity. It is hoped to automate the operation of the reactor so that continuous supervision by a team of engineers would be unnecessary. A single operator on call in the building would be able to take control actions if the reactor's safety system failed. (UK)

  14. Programs with societal benefits at the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.; Aderhold, H.C.; Hossain, T.Z.

    1993-01-01

    In its 30 yr of operation, the Cornell TRIGA reactor has been used for many educational and research programs that provide general benefits to society. In addition to supporting graduate-level education of nuclear scientists and engineers, it has been extensively used in undergraduate and graduate courses and research by nonspecialists and, through the medium of tours, in education of the general public. Some educational functions have been described previously. In this paper, examples are presented of research of societal interest in nonnuclear fields. The first two rely mainly on radiography, and the remaining five on neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  15. Improving the beam quality of the neutron radiography facility using the SLOWPOKE-2 at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Teshima, P.

    1996-01-01

    At the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at the Royal Military College of Canada, a neutron radiography facility has been designed and installed, and the beam quality has been improved by performing a series of radiographs using American standard for testing and materials (ASTM) E 545 indicators. Other means of determining the progress such as bubble detectors and activation foils were used. Modifications to the nosepiece of the beam tube including shielding and linings for fast neutron and gamma radiation were made. (orig.)

  16. Water in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This report contains background information, including historical aspects, roles of government agencies, and relevant technical information, for use as a resource document at a conference on water resources in northern Alberta. An overview is presented of the three river basins which are the geographic focus of this report (Peace River, Athabasca, and Beaver River), describing their characteristics, the types of human activity occurring in them, and the relevant issues pertaining to water. The roles and responsibilities of government departments and agencies in water management are then introduced. A section on water resource issues defines ten topic areas, and for each issue, a summary of the issue, background of the issue, and key concerns and suggested actions are given. These issue areas concern groundwater management (including protection from contamination by oil field produced water), community water supply, farmland drainage and erosion, protection of surface water quality, watershed and wetlands management, farm and rural water supply, tourism/recreation and fisheries, industrial water use (particularly by the oil sand, forestry, and hydroelectric power industries), native peoples' concerns, and water diversion. The final section discusses a number of common themes which arose from the public consultation process, including integrated planning and program coordination, monitoring and enforcement, public information, and research requirements. 22 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Alberta Learning: Early Development Instrument Pilot Project Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Wanda; Harris-Lorenze, Elayne

    The Early Development Instrument (EDI) was designed by McMaster University to measure the outcomes of childrens early years as they influence their readiness to learn at school. The EDI was piloted in several Canadian cities in recent years through two national initiatives. Building on these initiatives, Alberta Learning piloted the EDI as a…

  18. University Reactor Sharing Program. Period covered: September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Myser, R.D.; Miller, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    During the period from September 1, 1981 to August 31, 1982, the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory participated in the Reactor Sharing Program by providing services to eight colleges and universities. A laboratory on Neutron Activation Analysis was developed for students in the program. A summary of services provided and a copy of the laboratory procedure are attached. Services provided in the last funded period were in three major areas. These were neutron activation analysis, nuclear engineering labs, and introductions to nuclear research. One group also performed radiation surveys and produced isotopes for calibration of their own analytical equipment

  19. Broad scope educational role of a midsize university reactor NAA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Broad scope educational activities at the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory (NAAL) associated with the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) have been implemented to serve a deserve and multidisciplinary academic clientele to meet a wide spectrum of educational needs for students at all academic levels. Educational usage of the complementary laboratory facilities is described and the importance of such academic experimental experience is emphasized for developing and maintaining a cadre of professionals in the analytical applications of nuclear energy. The synergistic operation of the NAAL and the reactor at the University of Florida to serve as a model worthy of emulation for other similar facilities is emphasized. (author)

  20. U.S. university reactors: What they are and what they do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most underappreciated facts in the academic and industrial communities today is that there are 35 licensed university nuclear research and training reactors in operation on 33 campuses (two universities have two reactors each) in 25 states. These facilities, in conjunction with their respective nuclear engineering and science departments, provide the professional expertise and the backbone of our nation's human resources for exploiting the nuclear sciences and technology on which so much of society depends today. Areas of contribution and service include biomedical applications (therapy and diagnosis), radioisotope tracer applications, neutron activation analysis and detection, materials testing and enhancement, neutron radiography applications, and radioisotope production, to name just a few

  1. Alberta Chamber of Resources : 1997 resources guide and directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources (ACR) is composed of 140 member companies from the oil and gas industry, forestry, pulp and paper, mining, oil sands, utilities, contractors, suppliers, consultants, banking and other service groups, as well as representatives from universities and governments. ACR's activities during 1996 were reviewed. These included supporting or sponsoring a careers forum, and various other networking and information sharing opportunities, a study of the potential for Alberta's minerals industry, and exploring opportunities for research in the forestry sector and the further development of Alberta's oil sands. Studies of the transportation and infrastructures strategies for Alberta's resources, royalty regimes, tenure and compensation issues associated with oil sands reservoirs that are 'capped' by natural gas reservoirs, taxation issues related to oil sands development, mineral rights tenure, and toll design and royalty issues affecting Alberta's natural gas sector rounded out the Chamber's activities. The annual review also profiled a number of ACR member companies, among them Koch Oil Company Ltd., Pardee Equipment Ltd., Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Clearwater Welding and Fabricating Ltd., and Weldwood of Canada. A listing of all ACR members was also provided

  2. University research reactors in the United States: Their role and value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to the people who make decisions affecting the levels of future university reactor programs URR: university administrators, department heads, federal policy makers, state and local policy makers, those in industry and government who depend upon a supply of nuclear-trained personnel, and those who are concerned with the future of the many sciences that benefit from the unique capabilities of nuclear-based techniques as well as from the nuclear sciences themselves. The major thrust of this report is to illustrate the scientific and social benefits and contributions associated with well-managed and well-funded university reactor programs. The intent is to help a decision maker gain a perspective and appreciation of the scientific, academic, social, and technical values of URR programs. The report also examines the role of university-like reactors in Europe, where a productive community of researchers is apparently served in an exemplary manner. The committee, assesses the security and safeguard needs at small reactors in a university setting in order to help gain a perspective on the potential hazards and relative risks involved. The last chapter discusses the kind of commitment and support needed if a significant population of URRs is to remain productive. 83 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Research on neutron radiography in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University and activities related to it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    The research on neutron radiography in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University was begun in 1974 using the E-2 experimental hole which was designed for neutron irradiation. It was reconstructed for the excellent performance as neutron radiography facility by fixing aluminum plugs, a collimator and so on. The research activities thereafter are briefly described. In 1989, the cold neutron facility was installed in the graphite thermal neutron facility, and the experiment on cold neutron radiography became feasible. The reactor in Kyoto University is of the thermal output of 5 MW, and is put to the joint utilization by universities and research institutes in whole Japan. The experimental items carried out so far are enumerated. At present, the main subjects of research are the development of the standard for establishing image evaluation method, the analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow, the construction of the data base for the literatures and images of neutron radiography, the application of cold neutron radiography, the development of the imaging method using fast neutrons and so on. The thermal neutron radiography and the cold neutron radiography facilities of Kyoto University research reactor are described. The research and activities at Kyoto University research reactor and the investigation of problems are reported. (K.I.) 56 refs

  4. Alberta's new oil boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforuk, A.

    1997-01-01

    A massive expansion of Canada's oil sands and the oil-mining business is underway. The prediction is that within five years there will be at least three, possibly six, huge new open pit mines north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. It was suggested that within 20 years, possibly half of Canada's oil supply will come from the oil sands industry which has already attracted $10 billion worth of developments. Unlike conventional crude, the oil sands contain bitumen, water, clay, minerals and lots of sands. Shallow deposits are mined like coal. Deeper formations make use of in-situ thermal recovery techniques. Extraction costs are presently at $15 per barrel, aiming for $12 by 1999. Return on investment is in double digits. Estimates of reserves in the Athabasca, Cold Lake, Peace River and Wabasca deposits go as high as 1.7 trillion barrels, or about twice as much as Saudi Arabia's conventional crude reserves. Syncrude has built a $5 billion production facility and two pipelines have already been proposed to transport the oil sands crude to midwestern US refineries. US refineries prize synthetic crude as excellent mixing stock. The major problem with oil sands is that unlike conventional oil, these reserves require an enormous amount of energy to exploit, which in turn means lots of foul air and greenhouse gases. There are many environmental unknowns, and without a clear management framework in sight the addition of two or three Syncrude-size operations has the potential to create a real and significant acid rain problem in the Western Canada Basin

  5. New research facilities at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia is investing its resources for a significant expansion of the research capabilities and utilization of MURR to provide it the opportunity to deliver on its obligation to become the nation's premier educational institution in nuclear-related fields and so that it can provide scientific personnel and a state-of-the-art research test bed to support the national need for highly trained graduates in nuclear science and engineering

  6. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Gonzalez, R.C.; Trivedi, M.M.; Wehe, D.K.

    1990-05-01

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of advanced robotic systems capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of economically performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. The approach to achieving the program objective is a transition from teleoperation to the capability of autonomous operation within three successive generations of robotic systems. The strategy adopted in order to achieve the program goals in an efficient and timely manner consists in utilizing, and advancing where required, state-of-the-art robotics technology through close interaction between the universities and the manufacturers and operators of nuclear power plants. There is a potentially broad range of applications for the robotic systems developed in the course of this project. Therefore, it is expected that efforts to obtain additional support from other agencies, e.g., DOD and NASA, will be successful. Areas of cooperation with other nations (e.g., Japan, France, Germany) are being explored. This Program features a unique teaming arrangement among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Odetics, Gulf State Utilities, Florida Power and Light Company, Remotec, and Telerobotics International

  7. Insight conference proceedings : Alberta power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This conference addressed issues dealing with Alberta's restructured electric power industry and new policies from the perspective of Alberta's independent power industry. It covered lessons learned from electric industry restructuring, transmission strategies, transmission frameworks, competitive markets, power costs, energy prices, and power outages. Interconnected power systems between Alberta and British Columbia were also reviewed along with grid reinforcement requirements. Markets and restructuring efforts in other jurisdictions such as Quebec and Maritime Canada were briefly reviewed. The move to deregulate the industry has played an important role in restructuring a vertically integrated industry into power generation, transmission and distribution. High electricity prices eventually resulted in re regulation of the industry and a synergy between wholesale and retail markets. Five of the 17 papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs

  8. China joins Alberta oilsands research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that China's state oil company has bought a stake in an in situ oilsands research project in northern Alberta. China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC) will invest $6.5 million in the Underground Test Facility (UTF) operated by Alberta Oilsands Technology and Research Authority (Aostra) near Fort McMurray. It is the first foreign research investment for CNPC. The UTF is a joint venture by provincial agency Aostria, the Canadian federal government, and commercial partners in underground mining techniques to extract crude oil from bitumen. Alberta opened a trade office in Beijing in 1991 and now sells several hundred million dollars a year in petroleum equipment and services to China. A horizontal well in situ steam injection process is approaching the production stage at the UTF. It is to begin producing at a rate of 2,000 b/d this fall. The current project is a followup to a pilot project

  9. Minority and female training programs at the Ford Nuclear Reactor, University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power industry operations staffs are composed predominantly of white males because most of the personnel come from the nuclear submarine and surface branches of the U.S. Navy. The purpose of the minority and female training programs sponsored by the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is to provide a path for minorities and women to enter the nuclear industry as operators, technicians, and, in the long term, as graduate engineers. The training programs are aimed at high school students, preferably juniors. While the training is directed toward operation of a nuclear reactor, it is equally applicable to careers in most other technical fields. It is hoped that some of the participants will remain at the Ford Nuclear Reactor as reactor operators, enter college, and obtain college degrees, after which they will enter the nuclear industry as graduate engineers

  10. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bernard H. IV; Ebert, David

    1988-01-01

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  11. Planning and implementation of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA research reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, N.; Yavuz, H.; Bayulken, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Istanbul Technical University TRIGA Research Reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Energy, which went critical on March 11, 1979 is basically a pulsing type TRIGA Mark - II reactor. Completion of the ITU-TRR contributed to broaden the role of the Institute for Nuclear Energy of the Technical University in Istanbul in the nuclear field by providing for the first time adequate on-campus experimental facilities for nuclear engineering studies to ITU students. The research program which is currently under planning at ITU-NEE encompasses: a) Neutron activation analysis studies by techniques and applications to chemistry, mining, materials research, archaeological and biomedical studies; b) applications of Radioisotopes; c) Radiography with reactor neutron beams; d) Radiation Pulsing

  12. University Reactor Instrumentation grant program. Final report, September 7, 1990--August 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSU NRL) participated in the Department of Energy (DOE) grant program commonly denoted as the University Reactor Instrumentation (URI) program from the period September 1990 through August 1995, after which funding was terminated on a programmatic basis by DOE. This program provided funding support for acquisition of capital equipment targeted for facility upgrades and improvements, including modernizing reactor systems and instrumentation, improvements in research and instructional capabilities, and infrastructure enhancements. The staff of the OSU NRL submitted five grant applications during this period, all of which were funded either partially or in their entirety. This report will provide an overview of the activities carried out under these grants and assess their impact on the OSU NRL facilities

  13. Investigations of the reactivity temperature coefficient of the Dresden Technical University training and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Knorr, J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate formulas are derived for determining the temperature coefficient of reactivity of the training and research reactor (AKR) of the Dresden Technical University. Values calculated on the basis of these approximations show good agreement with experimentally obtained results, thus confirming the applicability of the formulas to simple systems

  14. The reconstruction of the training reactor of the Budapest Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, E.

    1981-01-01

    The reconstruction of the training reactor between 1978 and 1981 did not hinder the education and training activities of the University. Dosimetric measurements during the test run revealed no additional hazard from the elevation of power from 10 to 100 kW. (author)

  15. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  16. Alberta oil sands royalty regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgarpour, S.

    2004-01-01

    The long term objective of the Oil Sands Business Unit of Alberta Energy is to pave the way for Alberta's bitumen production to reach 3 million barrels per day by 2020. This presentation described the national government's role in resource development. It was emphasized that since the Crown is the owner of the oil sands resource, it would benefit by providing strategic leadership and by generating a larger royalty base. The oil sands fiscal regime was described with reference to generic royalty, risk sharing, investment, and project economics. Business rule principles were also outlined along with criteria for project expansions. Both upstream and downstream challenges and opportunities were listed. 4 figs

  17. Alberta outlook: cash and energy team wins business for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, H

    1975-12-01

    The increase in Alberta's gross provincial product over the past decade from $3.9-billion in 1964 to $12-billion last year is largely due to its energy industries. Coal, oil, and gas make up almost all of the 48 percent of the net value of production that comes under the heading of mining. The financial success of the province stems from a happy combination of far-sighted government leadership; the strong tradition of local entrepreneurship; and the interest shown by world financiers in Alberta's energy opportunies. Energy-generated Albertan capital is moving out to seek energy-related opportunities in surrounding areas of the U.S. and Canada. An analysis of the $1.5-billion ethylene complex centered in the Red Deer Area shows that some benefits include ethane extraction, ethylene production, and pipeline products produced for export to improve balance of payments, create new jobs, and produce large revenues for the corporate partners. A tabulation of 57 energy-related projects under construction in Alberta, mid-1975, is given with some financial data. There exists a need for foreign capital, but the Energy Minister of Canada has stated that it is Alberta that will decide what oil, gas, and other energy investments from foreign sources will be acceptable in that province, and what export arrangements can be made. Some specific joint energy developments are discussed, but it is understood that any joint venture will be assessed on a project-by-project basis. (MCW)

  18. The Design of Universal Soft Control for Advanced Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Song Hae; Shin, Yeong Cheol; Kang, Sung Kon; Lyou, Joon

    2011-01-01

    Highly-Integrated Control Room (HICR) has been adopted for APR+. APR+ is being developed as the evolutionary improvement of APR1400. In HICR, the traditional control panels, with their assorted gauges, indicating lights, control switches, annunciators, etc., are replaced by computer-driven consolidated operator workstations. Soft control plays a key role in consolidating control in the workstation. Universal Soft Control (USC) has the ability to control plant functions and components in multiple divisions of safety systems and non-safety systems from a single operator workstation. The USC further contribute to the level of consolidation in the workstation and provide better human machine interface with reduced operational burden. However, the implementation of USC poses challenges to the independence among safety divisions and between safety system and non-safety system. This paper presents design features and approach to prevent adverse affects of the safety systems and to minimize the potential for spurious actuations by USC

  19. The Design of Universal Soft Control for Advanced Power Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Song Hae; Shin, Yeong Cheol; Kang, Sung Kon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lyou, Joon [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Highly-Integrated Control Room (HICR) has been adopted for APR+. APR+ is being developed as the evolutionary improvement of APR1400. In HICR, the traditional control panels, with their assorted gauges, indicating lights, control switches, annunciators, etc., are replaced by computer-driven consolidated operator workstations. Soft control plays a key role in consolidating control in the workstation. Universal Soft Control (USC) has the ability to control plant functions and components in multiple divisions of safety systems and non-safety systems from a single operator workstation. The USC further contribute to the level of consolidation in the workstation and provide better human machine interface with reduced operational burden. However, the implementation of USC poses challenges to the independence among safety divisions and between safety system and non-safety system. This paper presents design features and approach to prevent adverse affects of the safety systems and to minimize the potential for spurious actuations by USC.

  20. 75 FR 54657 - University of Florida; University of Florida Training Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... operation of the UFTR to routinely provide teaching, research, and services to numerous institutions for a... confinement. The Nuclear Reactor Building and its annex, the Nuclear Sciences Center, are located in an area... primary system consisting of a 200-gallon coolant storage tank, a heat removal system, and a processing...

  1. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... dormitory is approximately 400 meters (1,300 feet) away. There are no nearby industrial, transportation, or... housed in the Reactor Laboratory, a 13 meter (43 feet) by 22 meter (70 feet) room of conventional... height is approximately 11 meters (36 feet) with a portion of the ceiling above the console area a height...

  2. Applied research and service activities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The University Of Missouri operates MURR to provide an intense source of neutron and gamma radiation for research and applications by experimenters from its four campuses and by experimenters from other universities, government and industry. The 10 MW reactor, which has been operating an average of 155 hours per week for the past eight years, produces thermal neutron fluxes up to 6-7x10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the central flux trap and beamport source fluxes of up to 1.2x10 14 n/cm 2 -s. The mission of the reactor facility, to promote research, education and service, is the same as the overall mission of the university and therefore, applied research and service supported by industrial firms have been welcomed. The university recognized after a few years of reactor operation that in order to build utilization, it would be necessary to develop in-house research programs including people, equipment and activity so that potential users could more easily and quickly obtain the results needed. Nine research areas have been developed to create a broadly based program to support the level of activity needed to justify the cost of operating the facility. Applied research and service generate financial support for about one-half of the annual budget. The applied and service programs provide strong motivation for university/industry association in addition to the income generated. (author)

  3. Research Reactor Utilization at the University of Utah for Nuclear Education, Training and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, T.; Choe, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    In the years of nuclear renaissance we all recognize a need for modernizing the approaches in fostering nuclear engineering and science knowledge, in strengthening disciplinary depth in students’ education for their preparation for workforce, and in helping them learn how to extend range of skills, develop habits of mind and subject matter knowledge. The education infrastructure at the University of Utah has been recently revised to incorporate the experiential learning using our research reactor as integral part of curriculum, helping therefore that all of our students build sufficient level of nuclear engineering literacy in order to be able to contribute productively to nuclear engineering work force or continue their education toward doctoral degrees. The University of Utah TRIGA Reactor built 35 years ago represents a university wide facility to promote research, education and training, as well as is used for various applications of nuclear engineering, radiation science and health physics. Our curriculum includes two consecutive classes for preparation of our students for research reactor operating license. Every year the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s representatives hold the final exam for our students. Our activities serve the academic community of the University of Utah, commercial and government entities, other universities and national laboratories as well. (author)

  4. Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Ja, Wei; Ma, D.; Zinn, K.; Lanigan, J.

    1995-12-31

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced beta-particle emitters for experimental use in nuclear medicine therapy of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. MURR has played a major role in the development of bone cancer pain palliation with the agents {sup 153}Sm EDTMP and {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re HEDP, as well as in the use of {sup 186}Re, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 105}Rh for radioimmunotherapy and receptor-agent-guided radiotherapy. MURR is also responsible for the development of therapeutic, {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres for the treatment of liver tumors, a product ({sup 90}Y Therasphere{trademark}) which is currently an approved drug in Canada. MURR has also pioneered the development of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re and {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc gel generators, which make the use of low specific activity {sup 188}W and {sup 99}Mo practical for such isotope generators.

  5. An ultracold neutron source at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobkina, E.; Wehring, B. W.; Hawari, A. I.; Young, A. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Golub, R.; Xu, Y.; Palmquist, G.

    2007-08-01

    Research and development is being completed for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source to be installed at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University (NCSU). The objective is to establish a university-based UCN facility with sufficient UCN intensity to allow world-class fundamental and applied research with UCN. To maximize the UCN yield, a solid ortho-D 2 converter will be implemented coupled to two moderators, D 2O at room temperature, to thermalize reactor neutrons, and solid CH 4, to moderate the thermal neutrons to cold-neutron energies. The source assembly will be located in a tank of D 2O in the space previously occupied by the thermal column of the PULSTAR reactor. Neutrons leaving a bare face of the reactor core enter the D 2O tank through a 45×45 cm cross-sectional area void between the reactor core and the D 2O tank. Liquid He will cool the disk-shaped UCN converter to below 5 K. Independently, He gas will cool the cup-shaped CH 4 cold-neutron moderator to an optimum temperature between 20 and 40 K. The UCN will be transported from the converter to experiments by a guide with an inside diameter of 16 cm. Research areas being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source include time-reversal violation in neutron beta decay, neutron lifetime determination, support measurements for a neutron electric-dipole-moment search, and nanoscience applications.

  6. Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Ja, Wei; Ma, D.; Zinn, K.; Lanigan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced beta-particle emitters for experimental use in nuclear medicine therapy of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. MURR has played a major role in the development of bone cancer pain palliation with the agents 153 Sm EDTMP and 186 Re/ 188 Re HEDP, as well as in the use of 186 Re, 177 Lu, 166 Ho, and 105 Rh for radioimmunotherapy and receptor-agent-guided radiotherapy. MURR is also responsible for the development of therapeutic, 90 Y-labeled glass microspheres for the treatment of liver tumors, a product ( 90 Y Therasphere trademark) which is currently an approved drug in Canada. MURR has also pioneered the development of 188 W/ 188 Re and 99 Mo/ 99m Tc gel generators, which make the use of low specific activity 188 W and 99 Mo practical for such isotope generators

  7. Operational experience with the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio di Tigliole, A.; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2008-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia is in operation since 1965. The annual operational time at nominal power (250 kW) is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities and BNCT research. Few tens of hours per year are dedicated also to electronic devices irradiation and student training courses. Few homemade upgrading of the reactor were realized in the past two years: components of the secondary/tertiary cooling circuit were substituted and a new radiation area monitoring system was installed. Also the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system was almost completely refurbished. The presentation describes the major extraordinary maintenance activities implemented and the status of main reactor systems: - The I and C System: complete substitution, channel-by-channel without changing the operating and safety logics; - Tertiary and secondary water-cooling circuits: complete substitution of the tertiary water-cooling circuit and partial substitution of the components of the secondary water-cooling circuit; - Reactor Building Air Filtering and Ventilation System: installation of a computerized air filtering and ventilation system; - Radiation Area Monitoring System: new system based on a commercial micro-computer and an home-made software developed on Lab-View platform. The system is made of a network of different instruments coupled, trough a serial bus line RS232, with a data acquisition station; - Fuel Elements: at the moment, the core is made of 48 Aluminium clad and 34 SST clad TRIGA fuel elements controlled periodically for their elongation and/or bowing. All components and systems undergo ordinary maintenance according to the Technical Prescriptions and to the 'Good Practice Procedures'. In summary, the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia shows a very good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or

  8. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.A.; Springfels, D.; Schubring, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed

  9. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kjordan@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Springfels, D., E-mail: dspringfels@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Schubring, D., E-mail: dlschubring@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, PO Box 118300, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed.

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Pennsylvania State University for a renewal of Operating License R-2 to continue to operate the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor (PSBR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  11. Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, J C; Edwards, Jr, C B; Meyer, Jr, W A [MU Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Kim, S S [Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1990-05-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research Reactor Facility staff is in the process of upgrading the operational and research capabilities of the reactor and associated facilities. The upgrades include an extended life aluminide fuel element, a power increase, improved instrumentation and control equipment, a cold neutron source, a building addition, and improved research instrumentation and equipment. These upgrades will greatly enhance the capabilities of the facility and the research programs. This paper discusses the parts of the upgrade and current status of implementation. (author)

  12. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenizer, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  13. Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Edwards, C.B. Jr.; Meyer, W.A. Jr.; Kim, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research Reactor Facility staff is in the process of upgrading the operational and research capabilities of the reactor and associated facilities. The upgrades include an extended life aluminide fuel element, a power increase, improved instrumentation and control equipment, a cold neutron source, a building addition, and improved research instrumentation and equipment. These upgrades will greatly enhance the capabilities of the facility and the research programs. This paper discusses the parts of the upgrade and current status of implementation. (author)

  14. Self-sustainability of a research reactor facility with neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilian, C.; Kennedy, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term self-sustainability of a small reactor facility is possible because there is a large demand for non-destructive chemical analysis of bulk materials that can only be achieved with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The Ecole Polytechnique Montreal SLOWPOKE Reactor Facility has achieved self-sustainability for over twenty years, benefiting from the extreme reliability, ease of use and stable neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE reactor. The industrial clientele developed slowly over the years, mainly because of research users of the facility. A reliable NAA service with flexibility, high accuracy and fast turn-around time was achieved by developing an efficient NAA system, using a combination of the relative and k0 standardisation methods. The techniques were optimized to meet the specific needs of the client, such as low detection limit or high accuracy at high concentration. New marketing strategies are presented, which aim at a more rapid expansion. (author)

  15. Alberta wind integration. Status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehler, John; Aksomitis, Kris; Duchesne, Jacques [Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO), Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Alberta has excellent wind resources with over 600 MW of wind generation currently operating on the Alberta Interconnected Electric System (AIES) and there continues to be strong interest in wind development. Integration of large-scale wind power, however, is still relatively new and presents new operational opportunities and challenges. The AESO currently has over 7,700 MW in potential wind power development in Alberta in our interconnection queue. The Alberta system peak load is 10, 236 MW with 12,763 MW installed generation capacity and limited interconnection capability to neighboring jurisdictions. The AESO recognizes that it is important, both to system reliability and to the successful development of renewable resources in Alberta, that the impact on power system operations and the obligations of market participants are understood as Alberta reaches higher levels of wind penetration. The paper discusses the current status and future outlook on wind integration in Alberta. (orig.)

  16. The Alberta oil sands story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    This report serves as a detailed introduction to the Alberta oil sands and their development. It includes a description of the oil sands deposits, an outline of crude bitumen recovery and upgrading processes, the role of Alberta Energy Company in oil sands development, environmental aspects, manpower requirements for oil sands development, research needs, and further oil sands projects. Presently proven recoverable reserves in the oil sands amount to 26.5 billion bbl of synthetic crude. Production from the Syncrude plant (125,000 bbl/d capacity) is expected to begin in 1977, followed by a Shell Canada operation around 1980. The provincial government will participate in the oil sand industry through its joint venture participation in Syncrude and its 50% share in Alberta Energy Company; the latter company participates in related aspects of the Syncrude project, such as pipelines. The result of Alberta's participation in the industry will mean that, directly or indirectly, the province will realize 60% of the total profits. The job creation potential of oil sands projects is estimated to be extensive, with a direct and indirect work force supported by oil sands activities possibly reaching 180,000 persons by the year 2000. Research needs have been identified, particularly in the area of in-situ thermal recovery technology, and the creation of the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority has been authorized in order to meet these needs. Although current reserves are sufficient to support 20-30 synthetic crude plants, a number of factors will limit expansion of the industry. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altic, Nick A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  18. Manipulator and materials handling systems for reactor decommissioning -Cooperation between the university and the plant operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, G.; Bach, F. W.; Haferkamp, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear reactor dismantling requires suitable handling systems for tools and disassembled components, as well as qualified and reliable disassembly and cutting techniques. From the angle of radiation protection, remote-controlled handling techniques and underwater techniques are the methods of choice, the latter particularly in continuation of plant operating conditions, and this all the more the more disassembly work proceeds towards the reactor core. With the experience accumulated for 20 years now by the Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde (materials science) of Hannover University by basic research and application-oriented development work in the field of thermal cutting technology, especially plasma arc cutting techniques, as well as development work in the field of remote-controlled materials handling systems, the institute is the cut-out partner for disassembly tasks in reactor decommissioning. (Orig./DG) [de

  19. A smart electricity policy for Alberta : enhancing the Alberta advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pape-Salmon, A.; Hornung, R.; Macintosh, R.; Marr-Laing, T.

    2001-03-01

    The promotion of sustainable energy technologies under a competitive electricity market in Alberta was discussed. The electric power industry in Alberta is currently in a crisis with rising electricity prices. The government has tried to mitigate the impacts by providing large rebates to help ease the financial burden on consumers. The author argued that unless the fundamental causes of the problem are dealt with, Albertans will soon face even larger problems. This paper described a new approach to electricity sector planning in Alberta. In particular, the approach focused on conserving energy and improving energy efficiency as well as on increasing the use of low-impact renewable energy such as small hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, biomass and waste fuel generators and cogenerators. New policies would protect consumers from price and resource instability as well as from human health and environmental degradation. Additional policies would promote diversity in electricity supply and competition. Competition encourages electricity suppliers to work through market based mechanisms instead of government regulation or intervention. Competition in the electricity markets may also lead to increased customer choice, a larger number players in the electricity generation sector, and greater opportunities for trade. Increased competition may force producers to develop cost effective technologies that promote sustainable development to mitigate some environmental impacts. 3 tabs

  20. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR

  1. Safety considerations of new critical assembly for the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Iwao; Matsuoka, Naomi; Harada, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Keiji; Kanazawa, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The new critical assembly type of nuclear reactor having three cores for the first time in the world was completed successfully at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in autumn of 1974. It is called KUCA (Kyoto University Critical Assembly). Safety of the critical assembly was considered sufficiently in consequence of discussions between the researchers of the institute and the design group of our company, and then many bright ideas were created through the discussions. This paper is described the new safety design of main equipments - oil pressure type center core drive mechanism, removable water overflow mechanism, core division mechanism, control rod drive mechansim, protection instrumentation system and interlock key system - for the critical assembly. (author)

  2. Analysis of kyoto university reactor physics critical experiments using NCNSRC calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, E.; Hathout, A.M.; Shouman, S.

    1997-01-01

    The kyoto university reactor physics experiments on the university critical assembly is used to benchmark validate the NCNSRC calculations methodology. This methodology has two lines, diffusion and Monte Carlo. The diffusion line includes the codes WIMSD4 for cell calculations and the two dimensional diffusion code DIXY2 for core calculations. The transport line uses the MULTIKENO-Code vax Version. Analysis is performed for the criticality, and the temperature coefficients of reactivity (TCR) for the light water moderated and reflected cores, of the different cores utilized in the experiments. The results of both Eigen value and TCR approximately reproduced the experimental and theoretical Kyoto results. However, some conclusions are drawn about the adequacy of the standard wimsd4 library. This paper is an extension of the NCNSRC efforts to assess and validate computer tools and methods for both Et-R R-1 and Et-MMpr-2 research reactors. 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. University of Virginia open-quotes virtualclose quotes reactor facility tours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, D.R.; Mulder, R.U.

    1995-01-01

    An electronic information and tour book has been constructed for the University of Virginia reactor (UVAR) facility. Utilizing the global Internet, the document resides on the University of Virginia World Wide Web (WWW or W) server within the UVAR Homepage at http://www.virginia. edu/∼reactor/. It is quickly accessible wherever an Internet connection exists. The UVAR Homepage files are accessed with the hypertext transfer protocol (http) prefix. The files are written in hypertext markup language (HTML), a very simple method of preparing ASCII text for W3 presentation. The HTML allows use of various hierarchies of headers, indentation, fonts, and the linking of words and/or pictures to other addresses-uniform resource locators. The linking of texts, pictures, sounds, and server addresses is known as hypermedia

  4. Ten-year utilization of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Anderson, Terrance V.; Johnson, Arthur G.

    1978-01-01

    The Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been used heavily throughout the past ten years to accommodate exclusively university research, teaching, and training efforts. Averages for the past nine years show that the OSTR use time has been as follows: 14% for academic and special training courses; 44% for OSU research projects; 6% for non-OSU research projects; 2% for demonstrations for tours; and 34% for reactor maintenance, calibrations, inspections, etc. The OSTR has operated an average of 25.4 hours per week during this nine-year period. Each year, about 20 academic courses and 30 different research projects use the OSTR. Visitors to the facility average about 1,500 per year. No commercial radiations or services have been performed at the OSTR during this period. Special operator training courses are given at the OSTR at the rate of at least one per year. (author)

  5. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  6. Applications of Oregon State University's TRIGA reactor in health physics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Oregon State University TRIGA reactor (OSTR) is used to support a broad range of traditional academic disciplines, including anthropology, oceanography, geology, physics, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear engineering. However, it also finds extensive application in the somewhat more unique area of health physics education and research. This paper summarizes these health physics applications and briefly describes how the OSTR makes important educational contributions to the field of health physics

  7. Study of the reduced enrichment fuel conversion at the University of Missouri-Rolla reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, M.; Bolon, A.; Covington, L.

    1987-01-01

    The method used to analyze the low-enriched uranium core which has been proposed for the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor is described. Results of calculations for the high-enriched uranium core have been compared with the measured data whenever possible in order to verify this method. For most of the cases that were analyzed the proposed method is adequate and the results obtained for the low-enriched uranium core can be used in revising the licensing documents. (Author)

  8. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Y; Sagawa, H; Tsujimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive cylindrical multi-moderator type neutron spectrometer was constructed for measurement of low level environmental neutrons. This neutron spectrometer was applied for the determination of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor. The analysis of the leakage neutron energy spectra was performed by MCNP Monte Carlo code. From the obtained results, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is fairly good, which indicates the MCNP model is correctly simulating the UTR-KINKI.

  9. Present status of operation and utilization of Kyoto University Reactor, KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1988-01-01

    The Research Reactor Institute was established as an inter-university research institute in 1963. The main installation of the Institute is the KUR, a light water moderated, tank type reactor of 5,000 kW. In addition, a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator and a gamma ray irradiation facility with 10,000 Ci Co-60 are actively used for research. In 1974, Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) was constructed, and it has been used for research and education. The Reactor Utilization Center and the Fundamental Research Laboratory for Neutron Therapy were established in 1975 and 1976, respectively. Approximately 200 people work there, of them, some 80 do research and education, including 13 professors and 12 associate professors. All the experimental facilities of the Institute are available for the cooperative research projects of other universities and public research institutions in the fields of natural science and engineering, medical science, agriculture and forestry, fishery and stock-raising, environment science, cultural science and others. As a rule, the KUR is operated for about 70 hours from Tuesday morning to Friday evening every week. The annual examination by the government is carried out in spring. The total operation time was about 45,000 hours as of the end of 1987. The recent topics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. AKR-1 nuclear training reactor of Dresden Technical University turns twenty-five

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, in the night of July 27 to 28, 1978, the AKR-1 nuclear training reactor of the Dresden Technical University went critical for the first time and was commissioned. On the occasion of this anniversary, a colloquy was arranged with representatives from science, politics and industry, at which the reactor's history, the excellent achievements in research and training with the reactor, and the status and perspectives of this research facility were described. The AKR-1 had been built within the framework of the Nuclear Development Program of the then German Democratic Republic (GDR). The Nuclear Power Scientific Division of the Dresden Technical University had been entrusted with the responsibility, among other things, to train university personnel for the GDR Nuclear Power Program. The review by an expert group in 1996 of this plant had resulted in a recommendation in favor of long-term plant operation. A nuclear licensing procedure to this effect was initiated, and the necessary technical backfitting measures were implemented. The AKR-1 plant now equally serves for the specialized training of students and for research. (orig.) [de

  11. Documentation Experiences for Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 Conversion from HEU to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, T.-A.; Dennis, H.; Antoine, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Jamaican SLOWPOKE–2 (JM–1) is a 20 kW research reactor manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and has been operating since March 1984, in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS), at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus in Kingston, Jamaica. The pool type reactor has been primarily used for Neutron Activation Analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration. The University, assisted by the IAEA under the GTRI/RERTR program, is currently in the process of converting from HEU to LEU. Extensive documentation on policies, general requirements, elements of the conversion quality assurance (QA) system and conversion QA administrative procedures is required for the conversion. The core conversion activities are being carried out in accordance with current international standards and regulatory guidelines of the newly established Jamaican Radiation Safety Authority (RSA) with agreement between the RSA and IAEA or DOE related to Nuclear Safety and Control. The documentation structure has taken into consideration nuclear safety and licensing, LEU fuel design and conversion analysis, LEU fuel procurement and fabrication, removal of HEU fuel and reactor maintenance and conversion and commissioning, with the conversion QA manual at the apex of the structure. To a large extent, the documentation format will adhere to that of the IAEA applicable regulatory standards and guidance documents. The major challenge of the conversion activities, it is envisioned, will come from the absence of any previous regulatory framework in Jamaica; however, a timeline for the process, which includes training and equipping of regulators, will guide operation. (author)

  12. 1973 : Trudeau tangles with Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    In 1973, the Canadian government took measures to place oil exports under federal control and placed a freeze on oil prices. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau unveiled plans for a national energy policy that would dissolve the Borden policy which prevented western Canadian crude from accessing the Montreal refining market. Trudeau's policy would extend the oil price freeze and created a one-price national market for Canadian oil. Plans were also underway to create a national oil company that would stimulate exploration and exploitation of new energy resources. The Premier of Alberta was also implementing energy regulations at the same time, aimed at consolidating control of Alberta's own resources within the framework of the Constitution and preventing Ottawa from gaining full control of all of Alberta's energy resources. Other key events in 1973 were the introduction of Saskatchewan's Oil and Gas Conservation, Stabilization and Development Act which gave the province the right to take over the oil rights of all private companies in producing areas. The Polar Gas Project was created to conduct research into building a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands, and a Canadian Arctic gas study revealed that the Mackenzie Pipeline could be delivering gas by 1977. 1 tab., 1 fig

  13. dyschronic, a Drosophila homolog of a deaf-blindness gene, regulates circadian output and Slowpoke channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E C Jepson

    Full Text Available Many aspects of behavior and physiology are under circadian control. In Drosophila, the molecular clock that regulates rhythmic patterns of behavior has been extensively characterized. In contrast, genetic loci involved in linking the clock to alterations in motor activity have remained elusive. In a forward-genetic screen, we uncovered a new component of the circadian output pathway, which we have termed dyschronic (dysc. dysc mutants exhibit arrhythmic locomotor behavior, yet their eclosion rhythms are normal and clock protein cycling remains intact. Intriguingly, dysc is the closest Drosophila homolog of whirlin, a gene linked to type II Usher syndrome, the leading cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Whirlin and other Usher proteins are expressed in the mammalian central nervous system, yet their function in the CNS has not been investigated. We show that DYSC is expressed in major neuronal tracts and regulates expression of the calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO, an ion channel also required in the circadian output pathway. SLO and DYSC are co-localized in the brain and control each other's expression post-transcriptionally. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate they form a complex, suggesting they regulate each other through protein-protein interaction. Furthermore, electrophysiological recordings of neurons in the adult brain show that SLO-dependent currents are greatly reduced in dysc mutants. Our work identifies a Drosophila homolog of a deaf-blindness gene as a new component of the circadian output pathway and an important regulator of ion channel expression, and suggests novel roles for Usher proteins in the mammalian nervous system.

  14. Limiting the impact of recent outage experience in a midsize university reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is a light-water-cooled, graphite- and light-water-moderated, modified Argonaut-type reactor licensed to operate at steady-state power levels up to 100 kW. The UFTR continues to utilize high-enriched materials test reactor-type fuel in a piping circuit type of system versus the more familiar pool reactor design. Though somewhat limited for research and service, the UFTR is a valuable educational facility. Despite its relatively low power level, the two-slab core configuration provides a peak thermal flux near 2 x 10 12 n/cm 2 · s; in addition, other modifications and experimental adaptations have been implemented in the 36-yr history of the facility to enhance the potential of the facility for diverse types of unique educational usage. Its small physical size in a loop configuration makes it a good teaching tool, but it can also be associated with unique maintenance problems, as in this case. The mission of the UFTR is to serve regional needs for access to quality reactor usage in a variety of areas to support educational and training needs as well as research and service, including public information about nuclear energy. As the only nonpower reactor in the state of Florida in affiliation with an established and diverse nuclear and radiological engineering department, it has a strong role to play in education, training, research, and service, especially the former. As a result of its unique position, the facility has been quite successful in its mission. With so much educational usage scheduled, sometimes for classes arriving from 100 miles away, it is important to avoid unexpected outages as well as unexpectedly lengthy outages. Such planning usually is successful and has allowed the RFTR to build a clientele of more than four dozen regular educational users, although events in 1995 could have undetermined this effort

  15. REFINED METALLICITY INDICES FOR M DWARFS USING THE SLoWPoKES CATALOG OF WIDE, LOW-MASS BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhital, Saurav; Stassun, Keivan G.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; West, Andrew A.; Massey, Angela P.; Bochanski, John J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results from spectroscopic observations of 113 ultra-wide, low-mass binary systems, largely composed of M0-M3 dwarfs, from the SLoWPoKES catalog of common proper motion pairs identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Radial velocities of each binary member were used to confirm that they are comoving and, consequently, to further validate the high fidelity of the SLoWPoKES catalog. Ten stars appear to be spectroscopic binaries based on broad or split spectral features, supporting previous findings that wide binaries are likely to be hierarchical systems. We measured the Hα equivalent width of the stars in our sample and found that components of 81% of the observed pairs have similar Hα levels. The difference in Hα equivalent width among components with similar masses was smaller than the range of Hα variability for individual objects. We confirm that the Lépine et al. ζ-index traces iso-metallicity loci for most of our sample of M dwarfs. However, we find a small systematic bias in ζ, especially in the early-type M dwarfs. We use our sample to recalibrate the definition of ζ. While representing a small change in the definition, the new ζ is a significantly better predictor of iso-metallicity for the higher-mass M dwarfs.

  16. Ten years of TRIGA reactor research at the University of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kelly, Sean

    2002-01-01

    The 1 MW TRIGA Research Reactor at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory is the second TRIGA at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). A small (10 kW-1963, 250 kW-1968) TRIGA Mark I was housed in the basement of the Engineering Building until is was shutdown and decommissioned in 1989. The new TRIGA Mark II with a licensed power of 1.1 MW reached initial criticality in 1992. Prior to 1990, reactor research at UT usually consisted of projects requiring neutron activation analysis (NAA) but the step up to a much larger reactor with neutron beam capability required additional personnel to build the neutron research program. The TCNS is currently used to perform Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis to determine hydrogen and boron concentrations of various composite materials. The early 1990s was a very active period for neutron beam projects at the NETL. In addition to the TCNS, a real-time neutron radiography facility (NIF) and a high-resolution neutron depth profiling facility (NDP) were installed in two separate beam ports. The NDP facility was most recently used to investigate alpha damage on stainless steel in support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stewardship programs. In 1999, a sapphire beam filter was installed in the NDP system to reduce the fast neutron flux at the sample location. A collaborative effort was started in 1997 between UT-Austin and the University of Texas at Arlington to build a reactor-based, low-energy positron beam (TIPS). The limited success in obtaining funding has placed the project on hold. The Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program has grown rapidly and effectively doubled in size over the past 5 years but years of low nuclear research funding, an overall stagnation in the U.S. nuclear power industry and a persuasive public distrust of nuclear energy has caused a precipitous decline in many programs. Recently, the U.S. DOE has encouraged University Research Reactors (URR) in the U.S. to collaborate closely together by forming URR

  17. Reduced enrichment fuel and its reactivity effects in the University Training Reactor Moata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.

    1983-08-01

    Concern for nuclear proliferation is likely to preclude future supply of highly enriched uranium fuel for research reactors such as the University Training Reactor Moata. This study calculates the fuel densities necessary to maintain the reactivity per plate of the present high enrichment (90 per cent 235 U) fuel for a range of lower enrichments assuming that no geometry changes are allowed. The maximum uranium density for commercially available aluminium-type research reactor fuels is generally considered to be about 1.7 g cm -3 . With this density limitation, the minimum enrichment to maintain present reactivity per plate is about 35 per cent 235 U. For low enrichment (max. 20 per cent 235 U) fuel, the required U density is about 2.9 g cm -3 , which is beyond the expected range for UAl/sub x/-Al but within that projected for the longer term development and full qualification for U 3 O 8 -Al. Medium enrichment (nominally 45 per cent 235 U) Al/sub x/-Al would be entirely satisfactory as an immediate replacement fuel, requiring no modifications to the reactor and operating procedures, and minimal reappraisal of safety issues. Included in this study are calculations of the fuel coefficients at various enrichments, the effect of replacing standard fuel plates or complete elements with 45 per cent enriched fuel, and the reactivity to be gained by replacing 12-plate with 13-plate elements

  18. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1987-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year (September 1986 through August 1987) has returned to the increased levels of quality usage characteristic of the two years prior to the last reporting year when the maintenance outage to repair sticking control blades reduced availability for the year to near 50%. Indeed, the 91.5% availability factor for this reporting year is the highest in the last five years and probably in the 27 year history of the facility. As a final statement on the effectiveness of the corrective maintenance last year, the overall availability factor has been over 94% since returning to normal operations. The UFTR continues to experience a high rate of utilization in a broad spectrum of areas with total utilization continuing near the highest levels recorded in the early 1970's. This increase has been supported by a variety of usages ranging from research and educational utilization by users within the University of Florida as well as other researchers and educators around the state of Florida through the support of the DOE Reactor Sharing Program and several externally supported usages. Significant usage has also been devoted to facility enhancement where a key ingredient for this usage has been a stable management staff. Uses, reactor operation, maintenance, technical specifications, radioactive releases, and research programs are described in this report

  19. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Vernetson, W.G.

    1982-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has decreased by about 50% compared to the previous year, approaching the low levels of utilization characteristic of the previous two reporting years ending in August 1979 and August 1980 respectively. The energy generation also continues to be far below average historical levels and represents a drop of nearly 50% from the improved level of the previous year. The UFTR continues to operate with an outstanding safety record and in full compliance with regulatory requirements. The reactor and associated facilities continue to maintain a high in-state visibility and strong industry relationship. It is hoped that more indirect industry training will be accomplished in the upcoming year

  20. Status of University of Cincinnati reactor-site nuclear engineering graduate programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.N.; Christenson, J.M.; Eckart, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) nuclear engineering program faculty has now had 12 yr of experience in delivering reactor-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Currently, with the sponsorship of the Toledo-Edison Company (TED), we are conducting a multiyear on-site graduate program with more than 30 participants at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. The program enables TED employees with the proper academic background to earn a master of science (MS) degree in nuclear engineering (mechanical engineering option). This paper presents a brief history of tile evolution of UC reactor-site educational programs together with a description of the progress of the current program

  1. Radiation field studies at the training and research reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuschner, A.; Reiss, U.; Pretzsch, G.

    1983-01-01

    Results of radiation field studies in the experimental channels of the training and research reactor of the Technical University of Dresden are presented. The flux densities of thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined by means of activation detectors., Gamma dose rates have been measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured results show symmetry with respect to the vertical axis of the reactor and allow to draw conclusions with regard to the efficiency of the individual layers of the shield. They are an essential basis of performing irradiation experiments in the experimental channels. The results of measurements were compared with those of shielding and design calculations. Taking into account the measuring errors and the approximations used in the computational models, no unexpected deviations have been observed. Hence, the measured and calculated results can be assessed to be in good agreement. (author)

  2. DIGITAL PRESERVATION OF THE QUON SANG LUNG LAUNDRY BUILDING, FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dawson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of an emergency recording and archiving of a historic structure in Southern Alberta and explores the lessons learned. Digital recording of the Quon Sang Lung Laundry building in Fort Macleod, Alberta, was a joint initiative between Alberta Culture and Tourism and the University of Calgary. The Quon Sang Lung Laundry was a boomtown-style wood structure situated in the Fort Macleod Provincial Historic Area, Alberta. Built in the mid-1800s, the structure was one of the four buildings comprising Fort Macleod’s Chinatown. Its association with Chinese immigration, settlement, and emergence of Chinese-owned businesses in early twentieth-century Alberta, made the Quon Sang Lung Laundry a unique and very significant historic resource. In recent years, a condition assessment of the structure indicated that the building was not safe and that the extent of the instability could lead to a sudden collapse. In response, Alberta Culture and Tourism engaged the Departments of Anthropology and Archaeology and Geomatics Engineering from the University of Calgary, to digitally preserve the laundry building. A complete survey including the laser scanning of all the remaining elements of the original structure, was undertaken. Through digital modeling, the work guarantees that a three-dimensional representation of the building is available for future use. This includes accurate 3D renders of the exterior and interior spaces and a collection of architectural drawings comprising floor plans, sections, and elevations.

  3. Digital Preservation of the Quon Sang Lung Laundry Building, Fort Macleod, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.; Baradaran, F.; Jahraus, A.; Rubalcava, E.; Farrokhi, A.; Robinson, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the results of an emergency recording and archiving of a historic structure in Southern Alberta and explores the lessons learned. Digital recording of the Quon Sang Lung Laundry building in Fort Macleod, Alberta, was a joint initiative between Alberta Culture and Tourism and the University of Calgary. The Quon Sang Lung Laundry was a boomtown-style wood structure situated in the Fort Macleod Provincial Historic Area, Alberta. Built in the mid-1800s, the structure was one of the four buildings comprising Fort Macleod's Chinatown. Its association with Chinese immigration, settlement, and emergence of Chinese-owned businesses in early twentieth-century Alberta, made the Quon Sang Lung Laundry a unique and very significant historic resource. In recent years, a condition assessment of the structure indicated that the building was not safe and that the extent of the instability could lead to a sudden collapse. In response, Alberta Culture and Tourism engaged the Departments of Anthropology and Archaeology and Geomatics Engineering from the University of Calgary, to digitally preserve the laundry building. A complete survey including the laser scanning of all the remaining elements of the original structure, was undertaken. Through digital modeling, the work guarantees that a three-dimensional representation of the building is available for future use. This includes accurate 3D renders of the exterior and interior spaces and a collection of architectural drawings comprising floor plans, sections, and elevations.

  4. Transmutation research and fuel cycle (report on discussion at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu

    1999-01-01

    A symposium was held on a topic of 'Transmutation Research' on Dec. 21 and 22, 1999 at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. This meeting was held as a joint-meeting of KUR's specialist meeting and Tokyo University's activity supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture of Japan. This paper describes the overview of the discussions of this joint-meeting, and interprets their significance. Major themes discussed are, needed discussions on the transmutation research, policy and concepts of the organizations doing transmutation researches, a view from university side, transmutation researches in the oversea countries, opinions from various standpoints of the nuclear fuel cycle, conclusive discussions. 'the meanings of the transmutation research should be discussed together with the geological disposal and fast reactor system', 'transmutation may be a cooperative option for the disposal, thus, they should not be in a independent relation', and Balance evaluation will be needed' are the examples of the conclusive remarks of this meeting. (author)

  5. The American Imprint on Alberta Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics assigned to America's classical liberal ideology--rugged individualism, market capitalism, egalitarianism in the sense of equality of opportunity, and fierce hostility toward centralized federalism and socialism--are particularly appropriate for fathoming Alberta's political culture. The author contends that Alberta's early…

  6. Assessment in Alberta: Dimensions of Authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Frank G.

    The assessment programs of Alberta Education (Canada) are described, and the principles that guide these programs are reviewed. Alberta is committed to authentic assessment in its three major assessment programs: (1) the Diploma Examinations Program for certification in specific courses at the end of high school; (2) the Achievement Testing…

  7. The future of distributed power in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobenic, J.

    2002-01-01

    Maxim Power Corporation is a provider of distributed energy and environmental solutions with a total of 55 MW of installed generating capacity in Canada, Europe and Asia, with 35 MW in Alberta. The 8 MW Taber facility in southern Alberta was described. Maxim operates 25 other small scale power generation stations (1 MW units) across 4 sites in southern Alberta. All the sites are interconnected at 25 kV and are eligible for distribution credits. The 3 MW EVI facility which utilizes solution gas was also described in the PowerPoint presentation. Maxim operates an additional 3 projects totaling 10 MW. The paper made reference to issues regarding market attributes for distributed power, policy framework and the transition to a competitive power market in Alberta. The chronology of events in Alberta's power market from August 2000 to June 2001 was outlined. The impacts of deregulation on distributed power include: (1) artificially low price environment from market intervention, (2) high efficiency cogeneration opportunities have been eliminated, (3) business failures and reduced investment, and (4) private investment not afforded the same alternative cost recovery mechanisms as the Alberta balancing pool. The presentation concluded with a report card for Alberta's deregulation, giving a grade F for both present and future opportunities for distributed power in Alberta. 2 figs

  8. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  9. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  10. Systems dynamics (SD) strategy for Small Modular Reactor (SMR) marketing - Conquest at the MIT Energy Laboratory (Pres. MIT Energy Initiative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, T. H. [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This reactor has the specification as the power is 330 MWt pressurized water reactor (PWR) with integral steam generators and advanced safety features. In the plant design, it is planned for electricity generation of 100 MWe and thermal applications of seawater desalination where the life span is a 60-year operation design and three-year refueling cycle. Regarding of the licensing, the standard design was approved from the Korean regulator in mid-2012 and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a plan to build a demonstration plant to operate from 2017. According to the previous study of the marketing strategy of the Canadian small reactor, Safe LOW-POwer Kritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) reactor had been investigated in 1988. Therefore, it is interesting to compare SMART and SLOWPOKE. In this work, it is to find out the strategy of the successful marketing of SMART and suggest continuous marketing prospects. There are specifications and parameters of SMART in Tables 1 and 2. The public acceptance (PA) had been studies as safety-public interpretation, SLOWPOKE safety-experience and process, and economics in the previous paper of the SLOWPOKE, which was about the marketing strategy for the commercial nuclear reactor. The highly cognitive networking based dynamical modeling was discussed where the system is treated by a complex and non-linear way. The linear networking of the interested issue was changed by the SD algorithm where the feedback and multiple connections are added to the original networking theory. The non-linear method has shown the complexity of the marketing strategy, especially for the NPP which is the very expensive and safety focused facility.

  11. Systems dynamics (SD) strategy for Small Modular Reactor (SMR) marketing - Conquest at the MIT Energy Laboratory (Pres. MIT Energy Initiative)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    This reactor has the specification as the power is 330 MWt pressurized water reactor (PWR) with integral steam generators and advanced safety features. In the plant design, it is planned for electricity generation of 100 MWe and thermal applications of seawater desalination where the life span is a 60-year operation design and three-year refueling cycle. Regarding of the licensing, the standard design was approved from the Korean regulator in mid-2012 and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a plan to build a demonstration plant to operate from 2017. According to the previous study of the marketing strategy of the Canadian small reactor, Safe LOW-POwer Kritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) reactor had been investigated in 1988. Therefore, it is interesting to compare SMART and SLOWPOKE. In this work, it is to find out the strategy of the successful marketing of SMART and suggest continuous marketing prospects. There are specifications and parameters of SMART in Tables 1 and 2. The public acceptance (PA) had been studies as safety-public interpretation, SLOWPOKE safety-experience and process, and economics in the previous paper of the SLOWPOKE, which was about the marketing strategy for the commercial nuclear reactor. The highly cognitive networking based dynamical modeling was discussed where the system is treated by a complex and non-linear way. The linear networking of the interested issue was changed by the SD algorithm where the feedback and multiple connections are added to the original networking theory. The non-linear method has shown the complexity of the marketing strategy, especially for the NPP which is the very expensive and safety focused facility

  12. Twenty-ninth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The twenty-ninth annual progress report of the operation of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Contract DE-AC02-76ER03409 with the United States Department of Energy. This report also provides the University administration with a summary of the operation of the facility for the past year

  13. 78 FR 5840 - Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is noticing the termination of Facility Operating License No. R-115, for the University of Illinois... Operating License No. R-115 is terminated. The above referenced documents may be examined, and/or copied for...

  14. Annual report of the research results with Rikkyo University's joint-use reactor etc. for fiscal 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of research works by universities with Rikkyo University's joint-use reactor and RCNST's (Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology) instruments for fiscal 1974 are described. Comprising the areas of activation analysis (in such as earth science, biology and environmental science), hot atom chemistry, etc., the results are presented in individual summaries. (Mori, K.)

  15. Section 1: Alberta Power Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothari, R.; Quinn, D.

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out to produce a compendium of electric and magnetic field levels that exist in Canada and to characterize and classify the sources of electric and magnetic fields. Alberta Power's contribution to this project was mainly to measure electric and magnetic fields produced by transmission lines in their service area in Alberta. Ten 240 kV transmission lines, ten 144 kV transmission lines, one 72 kV transmission line, two 25 kV distribution lines, two substations, and one residence were monitored for 60 Hz electric and magnetic field levels. For the 240 kV transmission lines, the electric field ranged from 0.4 kV/m to 1.9 kV/m and the magnetic field from 2.5 milligauss to 27 milligauss at the edge of the right-of-way. For 144 kV lines, the electric and magnetic fields ranged from 0.24-1.00 kV/m and 2.25-12.00 milligauss, respectively, at the edge of the right-of-way. 5 tabs

  16. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard; Xu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow (∼3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10 8 positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  17. Reactivity worth measurement of the control blades of the University of Florida training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero-Leyva, Barbaro

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in order to measure the reactivity worth of the safety and regulating blades of the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) using the Inverse Kinetics, the Inverse Kinetics-Rod Drop method and the Power Ratio. The reactor's own instrumentation (compensated ion chamber) and an independent counting system (fission chamber) were used. A very smooth exponential decay of the flux was observed after 6s of the beginning of the transients using the reading of the reactor detector. The results of the measurements of the reactivity using both detectors were consistent and in good agreement. The compensated ion chamber showed a very smooth exponential behavior; this suggests that if we could record the power for a small sample time, say 0.1 s from the beginning of the transient, several additional research projects could be accomplished. First, precise intercomparison of the methods could be achieved if the statistics level is acceptable. Second, a precise description of the bouncing of the blades and its effects on the reactivity could be achieved. Finally, the design of a reactivity-meter could be based on such study. (author)

  18. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) provides facilities for research in isotopic, nuclear and earth sciences and collaborates with Scottish University departments on a wide range of research topics. One of its main areas of work is the Isotope Geology Unit. This has worked with the Nuclear Medicine Unit on the application of enriched stable isotope tracers in the biological and clinical sciences. The measurement of radioactive isomers is applied to quaternary geology, archaeology, nuclear medicine, health physics, oceanography, atomospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, nuclear waste disposal and mathematical modelling of the environment. There are also radiocarbon dating facilities. The facilities and the research undertaken at the Centre in the year 1987-1988, the Centre's twenty-fifth year are summarized in this report. (U.K.)

  19. Interim report on construction of data base for atomic energy science documents (concerning Kyoto University Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki

    1984-01-01

    The Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute was established in 1963 as a research institute for all universities in Japan utilizing the facilities in common. The construction of a document data base has been undertaken in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the institute. The data base concerns the research works performed at the institute and also the publications and reports on the research made by the personnel belonging to the institute. Input data are gathered from concerned researchers. In this interim report, the structure and contents of this data base are shortly described. One of the features of this data base is that it handles data with both Japanese and English at the same time. (Aoki, K.)

  20. Neutronics modeling of TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah using agent, KENO6 and MCNP5 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Xiao, S.; Choe, D.; Jevremovic, T.

    2010-01-01

    The TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah is modelled in 2D using the AGENT state-of-the-art methodology based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) and R-function theory supporting detailed reactor analysis of reactor geometries of any type. The TRIGA reactor is also modelled using KENO6 and MCNP5 for comparison. The spatial flux and reaction rates distribution are visualized by AGENT graphics support. All methodologies are in use in to study the effect of different fuel configurations in developing practical educational exercises for students studying reactor physics. At the University of Utah we train graduate and undergraduate students in obtaining the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license in operating the TRIGA reactor. The computational models as developed are in support of these extensive training classes and in helping students visualize the reactor core characteristics in regard to neutron transport under various operational conditions. Additionally, the TRIGA reactor is under the consideration for power uprate; this fleet of computational tools once benchmarked against real measurements will provide us with validated 3D simulation models for simulating operating conditions of TRIGA. (author)

  1. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  2. Reactor Physics Experiments by Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly Program (KUGSiKUCA Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA) program has been launched from 2003, as one of international collaboration programs of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). This program was suggested by Department of Nuclear Engineering, College of Advanced Technology, Kyunghee University (KHU), and was adopted by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government as one of among Nuclear Human Resources Education and Training Programs. On the basis of her suggestion for KURRI, memorandum for academic corporation and exchange between KHU and KURRI was concluded on July 2003. The program has been based on the background that it is extremely difficult for any single university in Korea to have her own research or training reactor. Up to this 2006, total number of 61 Korean under-graduate school students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of Kyunghee University, Hanyang University, Seoul National University, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Chosun University and Cheju National University in all over the Korea, has taken part in this program. In all the period, two professors and one teaching assistant on the Korean side led the students and helped their successful experiments, reports and discussions. Due to their effort, the program has succeeded in giving an effective and unique course, taking advantage of their collaboration

  3. Zap... Alberta is jolted by electric deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Of all Canadian provinces, Alberta has travelled the furthest along the electric deregulation road. On January 1, 2001, full retail competition came into effect. Wholesale electricity prices are set by the province through an auction process. The bids from purchasers are made through the Power Pool of Alberta against supply offers. Power prices increased from being amongst the lowest in the world to being amongst the highest in North America as a result of deregulation. Changes to the Electric Utilities Act were made recently by the Alberta government to try to mitigate the factors affecting power price increases. RBC Dominion Securities is of the opinion that the changes will not significantly impact the Alberta Pool Price. It is expected that the trend for power price increases to continue, despite some relief from relatively low-cost electricity being felt by other Canadian provinces as a result of the energy crisis in North America. Based on the Electric Competition Unfolds in Alberta report dated June 2, 2001 prepared by RBC Dominion Securities, this document examines the factors at play in electric price increases, assess the sustainability of current power prices in Alberta, and identify Canadian companies believed to be best positioned in the pipeline and gas and electric sectors to benefit from the high power prices in Alberta. Those companies were ATCO, Canadian Utilities, Westcoast Energy and TransCanada PipeLines, and TransAlta. 5 tabs., 5 figs

  4. Our petroleum legacy: The Alberta story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, R.

    1992-11-01

    Background information is presented on the importance of the petroleum industry in Alberta. Alberta holds over 70% of Canada's coal and natural gas reserves and, if bitumen is included, over 90% of Canada's established oil reserves. Alberta's major exports are dominated by crude oil and related products ($9.6 billion in 1990) and the oil and gas sector had $15.7 billion in revenues in 1991, over 4 times as much as the next most important sector, agriculture. About 140,000 Albertans are directly or indirectly employed in the oil and gas industry, about 11% of employed persons. The industry's capital spending in Alberta was $5.3 billion in 1991, and its total expenditures were about $15 billion, and during the 1980s the industry paid about $42 billion to the Alberta government in the form of taxes, royalties, and other fees. Other benefits of the oil and gas industry's presence in Alberta include those related to its employment of a skilled workforce, its advanced research capabilities, and economic spinoff effects from employment and technological development. The influence of recent events on the industry is outlined, including the effects of international energy commodity markets, deregulation, and higher exploration and development costs. The declining financial viability of the Alberta petroleum industry is noted and its future is discussed in the light of such factors as oil prices, markets, new technologies, environmental constraints, and the volume of new discoveries. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Big and Little Feet Provincial Profiles: Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dobson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This communiqué provides a summary of the production- and consumption-based greenhouse gas emissions accounts for Alberta, as well as their associated trade flows. It is part of a series of communiqués profiling the Canadian provinces and territories.1 In simplest terms, a production-based emissions account measures the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions produced in Alberta. In contrast, a consumption-based emissions account measures the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions generated during the production process for final goods and services that are consumed in Alberta through household purchases, investment by firms and government spending. Trade flows refer to the movement of emissions that are produced in Alberta but which support consumption in a different province, territory or country (and vice versa. For example, emissions associated with the production of Alberta crude oil that is exported to British Columbia for refining and sale as motor gasoline are recorded as a trade flow from Alberta to British Columbia. Moving in the opposite direction, emissions associated with the production of Saskatchewan crops that are exported to Alberta for processing and sale in Alberta grocery stores are recorded as a trade flow from Saskatchewan to Alberta. For further details on these results in a national context, the methodology for generating them and their policy implications, please see the companion papers to this communiqué series: (1 Fellows and Dobson (2017; and (2 Dobson and Fellows (2017. Additionally, the consumption emissions and trade flow data for each of the provinces and territories are available at: http://www.policyschool.ca/embodied-emissions-inputs-outputs-datatables-2004-2011/.

  7. Experimental study on the safety of Kyoto University Research Reactor at natural circulation cooling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Shen, Xiuzhong; Fujihara, Yasuyuki; Sano, Tadafumi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was experimentally investigated. • The distributions of the outlet temperature of the fuel elements under natural circulation operations were measured. • The average temperature rise and the average natural circulation flow velocity in core were calculated. • The safety of KUR under all of the normal operations with natural circulation cooling mode has been analyzed. • The natural circulation flow after the reactor shutdown was confirmed. - Abstract: In this study, the natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is experimentally investigated by measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures of the core under natural circulation operation at various thermal powers ranging from 10 kW to 100 kW and the shutdown state. In view of the uneven power distribution and the resultant inconsistent coolant outlet temperature in the core, eight measuring points located separately in the outlet of the fuel elements were chosen to investigate the distribution of the outlet temperature of the core. The natural circulation cooling capacity represented by the average natural circulation flow velocity in the core is calculated from the temperature difference between the outlet and inlet temperature of the core. The measured outlet temperature of the fuel elements shows a cross-sectional distribution agreeing with the distribution of the thermal output of the fuel elements in the core. Since the measured outlet temperatures decrease quickly in the flow direction in a small local region above the outlet of the core, the mixing of the hot water out of the core with the cold water around the core outlet is found to happen in the small region not more than 5 cm far from the core outlet. The natural circulation flow velocity in the core increases non-linearly with the thermal power. The safety of KUR has been analysed by conservatively estimating the

  8. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Florida. Final report for period August 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG02-96NE38152 was supplied to the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the U.S. Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program. The renewal proposal submitted in January 2000 originally requested over $73,000 to support various external educational institutions using the UFTR facilities in academic year 2000-01. The actual Reactor Sharing Grant was only in the amount of $40,000, all of which has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of our reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within the State of Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over fourteen million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the Southeast.

  9. Alberta's new competitive electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancher, L.

    1996-01-01

    The shape, speed and direction of further reforms in Alberta's electric power industry were forecast, following the introduction of a competitive framework for the industry, the first province to do so in Canada, effective January 1996. This study reviews the previously existing system ( a mix of investor-owned and municipally-owned utilities), as well as the proposed new structure as laid out in the new Electric Utilities Act, based on the three principles of unbundling, a competitive power pool and open system access transmission. The paper also reviewed some of the major issues that will have to be faced in the future, such as how to deal with market power and possible collusion between the generators to hold prices down, a problem that has been the well-known failing of the U.K. pool mechanism

  10. Outcrop - core correlation and seismic modeling of the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit, Fort McMurray area, northeast Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, F.J. [Alberta Geological Survey, Calgary, AB (Canada); Langenberg, C.W.; Cotterill, D.C.; Berhane, H. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    A joint study between the Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Calgary was conducted which involved a detailed facies analysis of cores and outcrops from the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in Alberta`s Steepbank area. A unified facies classification for the deposit was developed. Larger scale facies associations were also determined, as well as proxy sonic logs for outcrops used in seismic modeling. The cores which were displayed exhibited detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of 10 outcrops in the area. 7 refs.

  11. Preparation of mandatory documentation before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor at Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R.; Keil, W.M.; Pezzi, N.

    1991-01-01

    Before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor installed at Cordoba National University, it was necessary to send to the Regulatory Authority the mandatory documentation which is required in the licensing process. With the previous papers existing for the operation in the first years of the '70, a work program for the future operational training personnel was elaborated. Based on the Authority's applicable rules and the recommendations and with particular criteria originated in the working university conditions, the SAFETY report of RA-0 nuclear reactor was prepared. This paper describes the principal contents, items and documents involved in the safety report. (Author) [es

  12. Qualitative assessment of the value of the Ohio State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.; Johnson, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) is a major regional research, training, and service facility. The OSTR supports a wide variety of organizations at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels. Examples of usage of the OSTR are given in this paper to serve as a basis for assessing the value of the OSTR to its user organizations. It is difficult to assess the value of a facility such as the OSTR quantitatively, primarily because a dollar value cannot be assigned to many of the services that the OSTR performs, e.g., forensic analysis to assist police agencies in criminal cases. Significant qualitative statements can be made, however, to demonstrate the fact that the value of a research reactor facility such as the OSTR substantially outweighs the capital and operating costs of such a facility. Analysis of the data presented above clearly indicates that the value of the OSTR facility is overwhelmingly positive, i.e., the benefits associated with the services provided by the OSTR facility outweigh the cost of providing such services by perhaps as much as an order of magnitude

  13. Nuclear characteristics evaluation for Kyoto University Research Reactor with low-enriched uranium core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Ken; Unesaki, Hironobu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun Osaka (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A project to convert the fuel of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) is in progress as a part of RERTR program. Prior to the operation of LEU core, the nuclear characteristics of the core have been evaluated to confirm the safety operation. In the evaluation, nuclear parameters, such as the excess reactivity, shut down margin control rod worth, reactivity coefficients, were calculated, and they were compared with the safety limits. The results of evaluation show that the LEU core is able to satisfy the safety requirements for operation, i.e. all the parameters satisfy the safety limits. Consequently, it was confirmed that the LEU fuel core has the proper nuclear characteristics for the safety operation. (authors)

  14. Neutronic design of a LEU [low enriched uranium] core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.D.; Aybar, H.S.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The 10 kw HEU fuelled Ohio State University Reactor (OSURR) will be upgraded to operate at 500 kW with standardized 125 g 235 U LEU U 3 Si 2 fuel plates. An earlier scoping study based on two-dimensional diffusion calculations has identified the potential LEU core configurations for the conversion/upgrade of OSURR using the standardized plates in a 16-plate (+ 2 dummy plates) standard and 10-scoping study is improved for a more precise determination of the excess reactivities and safety rod worths for these potential configurations. Comparison of the results obtained by the improved model to experimental results and to the results of full-core Monte Carlo simulations shows excellent agreement. The results also indicate that the conversion/upgrade of OSURR can be realized with three possible LEU core configurations while maintaining a cold, clean shutdown margin of 1.57-1.91 % Δ k/k, depending on the configuration used. (Author)

  15. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  16. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  17. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  18. Alberta's electricity policy framework : competitive, reliable, sustainable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This paper described public policies in Alberta that are implemented to create an electric power industry that is competitive, reliable and sustainable. The success of Alberta's competitive electric market framework can be attributed to new investment in the industry along with new players participating in the electricity market. The Alberta Department of Energy is committed to a competitive wholesale market model and to competitively-priced electricity. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board supports the development of Alberta's vast resource base and facilitates power generation development and support through transmission development and an interconnected transmission system. A wholesale market Policy Task Force was established in 2005 to review the progress in Alberta's electric market design and its competitive retail market. This paper outlines a policy framework which addresses design of the regulated rate option post July 1, 2006; short-term adequacy; and long-term adequacy. Other inter-related market issues were also discussed, such as operating reserves market, transmission services, interties, demand response, balancing pool assets, credit, market power mitigation, and wind generation. It is expected that the recommendations in this paper will be implemented as quickly as possible following amendments to regulations or ISO rules. tabs., figs.

  19. URI Program Final Report FY 2001 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the URI program is to upgrade and improve university nuclear research and training reactors and to contribute to strengthening the academic community's nuclear engineering infrastructure. It should be noted that the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment can generally be subdivided into three categories: (1) to improve reactor operations, (2) to improve existing facility/NAA Laboratory operations, and (3) to expand facility capability. All of these items were selected recognizing the objectives of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to respond to the widespread needs in the academic reactor community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactor facilities, especially at large and diverse institutions such as the University of Florida. These needs have been particularly pressing at the UFTR which is the only such research and training reactor in the State of Florida which is undergoing rapid growth in a variety of technical areas. As indicated in Table 2, the first item is a security system control panel with associated wiring and detectors. The existing system is over 30 years old and has been the subject of repeated maintenance over the past 5 years. Some of its detection devices are no longer replaceable from stock. Modifications made many years ago make troubleshooting some parts of the system such as the backup battery charging subsystem essentially impossible, further increasing maintenance frequency to replace batteries. Currently, various parts of the system cable trays remain open for maintenance access further degrading facility appearance. In light of relicensing plans, this item is also a key consideration for housekeeping appearance considerations. The cost of a replacement ADEMCO Vista 20 security system including turnkey installation by a certified vendor was to be $2,206. Replacement of this system was expected to save up to 5 days of maintenance per year, decrease security alarm response

  20. Reactor laboratory course for Korean under-graduate students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students has been carried out at Kyoto University Critical Assembly of Japan. This course has been launched from fiscal year 2003 and has been founded by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government. Since then, the total number of 43 Korean under-graduate students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of 6 universities in all over the Korea, has been taken part in this course. The reactor physics experiments have been performed in this course, such as Approach to criticality, Control rod calibration, Measurement of neutron flux and power calibration, and Educational reactor operation. As technical tour of Japan, nuclear site tour has been taken during their stay in Japan, such as PWR, FBR, nuclear fuel company and some institutes

  1. Final report on the University of Florida U.S. Department of Energy 1995--96 Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Grant support has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of the reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over twelve million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the nation. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research activities were not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. In some cases external grant funding is limited or is used up, in which case the Reactor Sharing Grant and frequent cost sharing by the UFTR facility and the University of Florida provide the necessary support to complete a project or to provide more results to make a complete project even better. In some cases this latter usage has aided renewal of external funding. The role of the Reactor Sharing Program, though relatively small in dollars, has been the single most important occurrence in assuring the rebirth and continued high utilization of the UFTR in a time when many better equipped and better placed facilities have ceased operations. Through dedicated and effective advertising efforts, the UFTR has seen nearly every four-year college and university in Florida make substantive use of the facility under the Reactor Sharing Program with many now regular users. Some have even been able to support usage from outside grants where the Reactor Sharing Grant has served as seed money; still others have been assisted when external grants were depleted

  2. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  3. Knowledge, Power, and Social Policy: John M. MacEachran and Alberta's 1928 Sexual Sterilization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puplampu, Korbla P.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how academic knowledge and power have shaped the discourse on human classification and how political authorities use academic knowledge producers to legitimize public policy. Specifically, the article draws on the role of John M. MacEachran, a former academic at the University of Alberta, in the implementation of the Alberta…

  4. Post-Secondary Learning Priorities of Workers in an Oil Sands Camp in Northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Patrick J.; Steel, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports results to date of a three-year project by Athabasca University, intended to determine the education and training needs and interests of employees in a work camp in northern Alberta's oil sands. (Future reports will address results of efforts to provide programming suiting the needs identified, and the uptake, satisfaction,…

  5. License renewal and power upgrade of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, Howard C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cornell Mark II TRIGA reactor has been a principal facility for instruction and research in nuclear science and engineering at Cornell, and it has been extensively used by other departments at Cornell and by nearby universities and industries. Initially the fuel was low hydride, 8.5w/o 19%-enriched, aluminum clad; in 1974 it was changed to high-hydride, stainless-steel-clad. The maximum power has been 100 kW, with pulses to $2, and operation has been on a one-shift demand basis. Annual energy generation of 50 MWH has been typical. Standard features include a 4-inch tangential port and our 6-inch radial ports, a thermal column with hohlraum and vertical access, a central thimble, a 'rabbit', and a set of dry irradiation tubes, replacing the 'Lazy Susan'. The license was renewed and amended in November 1983; the new limits are 500 kW and $3 pulses. Physical changes to the facility included addition of a water-to-water heat exchanger and of a diffuser at the water outlet ∼ 60 cm above the core. The flow rate is 300 liters per minute in the primary (reactor) side of the heat exchanger. The temperature of the chilled water entering the secondary of the exchanger is ∼ 12?C; its flow rate is adjusted by a servo-controlled by-pass valve to maintain the desired range of pool water temperature. Steps taken to go to higher power included rearrangement of fuel elements to increase excess reactivity, recalibration of control rods, and power vs ion chamber current calibrations at successively higher power by comparing the rate of rise of pool temperature with a known rate using electrical heating elements. Steady-state operation has been done up to 480 kW (nominal) but pulsing at the newly allowed higher levels has not been tested as yet

  6. Severe transient analysis of the Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For this reason the modeling has been performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS). The basic design and normal transients have been performed successfully with MMS. However, the true test of an inherently safe concept lies in its response to more brutal transients. Therefore, such a demonstrative transient is chosen for the PSU ALWR: a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total loss of offsite ac power. Diesel generators are likewise unavailable. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. The low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The results of the transient analyses indicate excellent performance by the PSU ALWR in terms of inherently safe operation. The primary coolant enters full natural circulation, and removes all decay heat through the steam generators. Further, the steam generators continually supply sufficient steam to the shutdown power system, despite the abrupt changeover to the auxiliary feedwater system. Finally, even with coincident failures in the pressurization system, the primary repressurizes to near-normal values, without overpressurization. No core boiling or uncovery is predicted, and consequently fuel damage is avoided. 17 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Comparing the market for nuclear power in Alberta and Saskatchewan - draft paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratt, D. [Dept. of Policy Studies, Mount Royal College, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)], E-mail: dbratt@mtroyal.ca

    2009-07-01

    This paper compares the markets for nuclear power in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This is done by comparing the two provincial panels that were released in Spring 2009 (Saskatchewan's Uranium Development Partnership and Alberta's Nuclear Power Expert Panel). Each panels terms of reference, membership, process, analysis, recommendations, and public consultation process are examined. Other variables for comparison include the history of its involvement in the nuclear sector, the political support, and public support. It concludes by arguing that Saskatchewan is a better market for nuclear power and that it is likely that a nuclear reactor will be built in Saskatchewan, but that surplus electricity will also be exported to Alberta. The possibility of building new nuclear power plants in both Alberta and Saskatchewan is increasing. This would not only increase the size of the Canadian nuclear industry it would also geographically expand it. Many non-Westerners see the prairies as a homogenous whole, but there are critical differences between Alberta and Saskatchewan. Analyzing these political and market differences would provide a good predicative power over the ultimate success of the nuclear power initiatives. This paper conducts a detailed comparison of the Alberta Government's Nuclear Power Expert Panel (NPEP) report and the Saskatchewan Government's Uranium Development Partnership (UDP) report. Topics for comparison include the terms of reference, membership, process, analysis, recommendations, and public consultation process. It also examines the history of each province's involvement in the nuclear industry; the level of political support including the positions of the provincial political parties; and the level of public support and knowledge. (author)

  8. Comparing the market for nuclear power in Alberta and Saskatchewan - draft paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratt, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares the markets for nuclear power in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This is done by comparing the two provincial panels that were released in Spring 2009 (Saskatchewan's Uranium Development Partnership and Alberta's Nuclear Power Expert Panel). Each panels terms of reference, membership, process, analysis, recommendations, and public consultation process are examined. Other variables for comparison include the history of its involvement in the nuclear sector, the political support, and public support. It concludes by arguing that Saskatchewan is a better market for nuclear power and that it is likely that a nuclear reactor will be built in Saskatchewan, but that surplus electricity will also be exported to Alberta. The possibility of building new nuclear power plants in both Alberta and Saskatchewan is increasing. This would not only increase the size of the Canadian nuclear industry it would also geographically expand it. Many non-Westerners see the prairies as a homogenous whole, but there are critical differences between Alberta and Saskatchewan. Analyzing these political and market differences would provide a good predicative power over the ultimate success of the nuclear power initiatives. This paper conducts a detailed comparison of the Alberta Government's Nuclear Power Expert Panel (NPEP) report and the Saskatchewan Government's Uranium Development Partnership (UDP) report. Topics for comparison include the terms of reference, membership, process, analysis, recommendations, and public consultation process. It also examines the history of each province's involvement in the nuclear industry; the level of political support including the positions of the provincial political parties; and the level of public support and knowledge. (author)

  9. The University of Missouri Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, James C; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P; Peters, Nickie J; Solbrekken, Gary L; Kennedy, John [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Missouri (United States); Stillman, John A; Feldman, Earl E; Tzanos, Constantine P; Stevens, John G [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of five U.S. high performance research and test reactors that are actively collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to find a suitable low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel replacement for the currently required highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. A conversion feasibility study based on U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel was completed in 2009. It was concluded that the proposed LEU fuel assembly design, in conjunction with an increase in power level from 10 to 12 MWth, will (1) maintain safety margins during operation, (2) allow operating fuel cycle lengths to be maintained for efficient and effective use of the facility, and (3) preserve an acceptable level and spectrum of key neutron fluxes to meet the scientific mission of the facility. The MURR and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) team is continuing to work toward realization of the conversion. The 'Preliminary Safety Analysis Report Methodologies and Scenarios for LEU Conversion of MURR' was completed in June 2011. This report documents design parameter values critical to the Fuel Development (FD), Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) and Hydromechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF) projects. The report also provides a preliminary evaluation of safety analysis techniques and data that will be needed to complete the fuel conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR), especially those related to the U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel. Specific studies are underway to validate the proposed path to an LEU fuel conversion. Coupled fluid-structure simulations and experiments are being conducted to understand the hydrodynamic plate deformation risk for 0.965 mm (38 mil) thick fuel plates. Methodologies that were recently developed to answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request for Additional Information (RAI) regarding the MURR 2006 relicensing submittal will be used in the LEU conversion effort. Transition LEU fuel elements that will have a minimal impact on

  10. Utilisation of research and training reactors in the study programme of students at the Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Hascik, J.; Miglierini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Preparing operating staff for the nuclear industry is and also will be one of the most serious education processes, mainly in the Central-European countries where about 40-50% of the electricity is produced in nuclear power plants. In the Central-European region there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly, the level of education in universities and technical high schools of this area is also good. Slovak University of Technology Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad for utilisation of research and training reactors. (author)

  11. Report on application results of the nuclear reactor in Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. April 1994 - March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is on researching action state, application state, management state, and others of 1994 fiscal year at the Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. The experimental reactor has been used for the studies such as application of neutron radioactivity analysis to multi fields, application of fission and alpha track method to age determination and metallurgy, hot atom chemistry, neutron radiation effect on semiconductors and others, nuclear data measurement, organism, materials and products using neutron radiography, and development and application to inspection of radiation detectors such as neutron detector. This report was a report shown as a shape of research results of actions of the researchers. And, another report of colaborate research results using the Rikkyo University reactor was also published from the Atomic Energy Center, the University of Tokyo begun since April, 1974. (G.K.)

  12. Alberta, crisis or opportunity? IPPSA's vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.

    2001-01-01

    This power point presentation discussed the role of IPPSA and the facts about Alberta's power market, the goal of restructuring and the reality behind it in terms of managing the transition. IPPSA is a non-profit organization to promote a competitive electric marketplace for the benefit of non-regulated power producers and marketers. The role of IPPSA, which has been active in Alberta since deregulation began in 1993, is to ensure that Alberta deregulation protects consumer choice, renewable energy options and competition. IPPSA's environmental concerns involve tax based incentives, national climate change issues and the Kyoto Protocol. Environmental concerns can be addressed through responsible power generation to reduce greenhouse gases through the use of low impact generation sources such as run of river hydro, biomass and wind power. Alberta has also pioneered flare gas generation with currently 50 units in operation. IPPSA believes that in the long-term, Alberta's deregulation program will bring undeniable benefits to the industry and the consumer since competition will eventually create a downward pressure on price and spark innovation and choice. tabs., figs

  13. Alberta's clean energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the future of clean energy in Alberta. With the present economic growth of the oil sands industry in Alberta, it is expected that there will be very considerable increases in job opportunities and GDP in both Canada and US. The challenges include high-energy demand and reduction of the carbon footprint. Alberta has adopted certain approaches to developing renewable and alternate forms of energy as well as to increasing the efficiency of present energy use and raising environmental consciousness in energy production. Three areas where the effects of clean energy will be felt are energy systems, climate change, and regional impacts, for instance on land, water, and wildlife. Alberta's regulatory process is shown by means of a flow chart. Aspects of oil sands environmental management include greenhouse gas targets, air quality assurance, and water quality monitoring, among others. Steps taken by Alberta to monitor and improve air quality and water management are listed. In conclusion, the paper notes that significant amounts of money are being pumped into research and development for greenhouse gas and water management projects.

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  15. Home-made refurbishment of the instrumentation and control system of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio di Tigliole, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Salvini, A.; Musitelli, G.; Nardo, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia was dated and, in order to grant a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future, it became necessary to substitute or to upgrade the system. Since the substitution of the I and C system with a new-made one was very difficult to be performed due to long authorization procedures, an home-made refurbishment was planned. Using commercial components of high quality, almost a complete substitution, channel-by-channel, of the I and C system was realized without changing the operating and safety logics. The system includes: - the Reactor Linear Power Channel and Chart Recorder; - the Reactor Percent Power Safety Channel; - the High Voltage and Low Voltage Power Supply; - the Automatic Reactor Power Control; - the Fuel Elements and Cooling-Water Temperatures Measuring Channels; - the Water Conductivity Measuring Channel. The refurbished I and C system shows a very good operational behavior and reliability and will assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future

  16. Implementation of a Program on Experiencing and Application of Research Reactor for University Students Majoring in Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, K. W.; Han, K. W.; Won, J. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Ji, Y. J.; Oh, S. Y

    2007-05-15

    This report was written as following contents, to develop a program for university students majoring in science and technology, which is intended to provide the students with opportunities to obtain hands on experience and knowledge on various nuclear technology, through experiments using HANARO and its facilities. Thus obtain experience and knowledge are expected to be a great help for their current study and for their selection of a specific future study area. The purpose of this research is as follows: - development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO as part of their university study. - continuous operation of research reactor experimental programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. - development and operation of training programs of experiments using research reactor for university students majoring in nuclear engineering and also for university students majoring in diverse fields of science and technology such as physics, advanced metallurgy, mechanical engineering, energy engineering, radiological science, nanoscience, etc. to cultivate future potential users of HANARO as well as broadening the user group. As a whole, 263 students from 15 universities have completed the courses of the programs developed and offered by this project. Also, 5 textbooks have been developed to support the programs.

  17. Implementation of a Program on Experiencing and Application of Research Reactor for University Students Majoring in Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, K. W.; Han, K. W.; Won, J. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Ji, Y. J.; Oh, S. Y.

    2007-05-01

    This report was written as following contents, to develop a program for university students majoring in science and technology, which is intended to provide the students with opportunities to obtain hands on experience and knowledge on various nuclear technology, through experiments using HANARO and its facilities. Thus obtain experience and knowledge are expected to be a great help for their current study and for their selection of a specific future study area. The purpose of this research is as follows: - development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO as part of their university study. - continuous operation of research reactor experimental programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. - development and operation of training programs of experiments using research reactor for university students majoring in nuclear engineering and also for university students majoring in diverse fields of science and technology such as physics, advanced metallurgy, mechanical engineering, energy engineering, radiological science, nanoscience, etc. to cultivate future potential users of HANARO as well as broadening the user group. As a whole, 263 students from 15 universities have completed the courses of the programs developed and offered by this project. Also, 5 textbooks have been developed to support the programs

  18. The development of a small inherently safe homogeneous reactor for the production of medical isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, G.E.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: george.carlin@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The use of radioisotopes for various procedures in the health care industry has become one of the most important practices in medicine. New interest has been found in the use of liquid fueled nuclear reactors to produce these isotopes due to the ease of fuel processing and ability to efficiently use LEU as the fuel source. A version of this reactor is being developed at the Royal Military College of Canada to act as a successor to the SLOWPOKE-2 platform. The thermal hydraulic and transient characteristics of a 20 kWt version are being studied to verify inherent safety abilities. (author)

  19. The analysis and attribution of the time-dependent neutron background resultant from sample irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, M.T.; Corcoran, E.C.; Kelly, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has commissioned a Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system for the analysis of special nuclear materials. A significant, time-dependent neutron background with an initial maximum count rate, more than 50 times that of the time-independent background, was characterised during the validation of this system. This time-dependent background was found to be dependent on the presence of the polyethylene (PE) vials used to transport the fissile samples, yet was not an activation product of vial impurities. The magnitude of the time-dependent background was found to be irradiation site specific and independent of the mass of PE. The capability of RMCC's DNC system to analyze the neutron count rates in time intervals 235 U contamination was present on each irradiated vial. However, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy measurements of material leached from the outer vial surfaces after their irradiations found only trace amounts of uranium, 0.118 ± 0.048 ng of 235 U derived from natural uranium. These quantities are insufficient to account for the time-independent background, and in fact could not be discriminated from the noise associated with time-independent background. It is suggested that delayed neutron emitters are deposited in the vial surface following fission recoil, leaving the main body of uranium within the irradiation site. This hypothesis is supported by the physical cleaning of the site with materials soaked in distilled water and HNO 3 , which lowered the background from a nominal 235 U mass equivalent of 120 to 50 ng per vial. (author)

  20. Performance analysis of the intense slow-positron beam at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moxom, J.; Hathaway, A.G.; Bodnaruk, E.W.; Hawari, A.I.; Xu, J.

    2007-01-01

    An intense positron beam, for application in nanophase characterization, is now under construction at the 1 MW PULSTAR nuclear reactor at North Carolina State University (NCSU). A tungsten converter/moderator is used, allowing positrons to be emitted from the surface with energies of a few electron volts. These slow positrons will be extracted from the moderator and formed into a beam by electrostatic lenses and then injected into a solenoidal magnetic field for transport to one of three experimental stations, via a beam switch. To optimize the performance of the beam and to predict the slow-positron intensity, a series of simulations were performed. A specialized Monte-Carlo routine was integrated into the charged-particle transport calculations to allow accounting for the probabilities of positron re-emission and backscattering from multiple-bank moderator/converter configurations. The results indicate that either a two-bank or a four-bank tungsten moderator/converter system is preferred for the final beam design. The predicted slow-positron beam intensities range from nearly 7x10 8 to 9x10 8 e + /s for the two-bank and the four-bank systems, respectively

  1. Development and implementation of an automatic control algorithm for the University of Utah nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Kevan C.; Sandquist, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    The emphasis of this work is the development and implementation of an automatic control philosophy which uses the classical operational philosophies as a foundation. Three control algorithms were derived based on various simplifying assumptions. Two of the algorithms were tested in computer simulations. After realizing the insensitivity of the system to the simplifications, the most reduced form of the algorithms was implemented on the computer control system at the University of Utah (UNEL). Since the operational philosophies have a higher priority than automatic control, they determine when automatic control may be utilized. Unlike the operational philosophies, automatic control is not concerned with component failures. The object of this philosophy is the movement of absorber rods to produce a requested power. When the current power level is compared to the requested power level, an error may be detected which will require the movement of a control rod to correct the error. The automatic control philosophy adds another dimension to the classical operational philosophies. Using this philosophy, normal operator interactions with the computer would be limited only to run parameters such as power, period, and run time. This eliminates subjective judgements, objective judgements under pressure, and distractions to the operator and insures the reactor will be operated in a safe and controlled manner as well as providing reproducible operations

  2. Alberta producers' gas export prices slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharaiah, M.N.; Dubben, G.; Kolster, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Alberta gas producers have approved a new contract with California buyers that includes slightly lower wellhead prices and more flexible pricing terms. The 1 year agreement, will apply a flexible price formula to gas sales. A basic volume of 212 MMcfd will receive $1.52 (U.S.)/Mcf. A and S also will buy 200 MMcfd at prices paid for other Alberta gas in the California market. It will have the right to buy added volumes at prices indexed to gas sold into California from the U.S. Southwest. Ballots cast by producers were to be verified by regulatory agencies in Alberta and British Columbia. The more flexible price terms in the new contract are seen as a positive development for negotiations in a dispute over long term contracts

  3. The Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Crewdson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR is a collaborative bibliography of published resources significant to southern Alberta. Objectives and progress with evolving methodology, technology, issues and challenges are explored within the context of the library field. We investigate a collaborative digital library that allows librarians and non-librarians alike to share information on specific topics through MARC records. An outcome of a collaborative digital library is how to create and sustain interest within the library community. Southern Alberta region was selected based on the authors’ familiarity with the region. Some issues and questions remain to be resolved. Digital formats present a number of challenges in terms of selection and presentation. Legal issues relating to technology such as linking and location information have emerged. Basic technical issues remain, such as, how best to update links.

  4. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  5. Financial support for agricultural research in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teklemariam, Y.; Martin, J.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the objectives and operational guidelines of 'Farming for the future', Alberta Agriculture's main research funding program, is provided, with emphasis on aspects relevant to research on the effects of acid-forming emissions on livestock. The program has two main objectives: to improve farm income, and to increase the long-term viability of agriculture in Alberta. The Research Program funds agricultural research conducted by research scientists and the On-farm Demonstration Program supports testing and demonstration studies conducted by producers on their farms. The procedures for applying for funds, criteria for evaluation, and funding available for acid-forming emission research are discussed. 1 fig

  6. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro; Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk

    1998-01-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  7. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs

  8. Use of the TRIGA Reactor by the Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichler, M.; Buchtela, K.; Grass, F.; Ismail, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities uses the TRIGA Mark II Reactor mainly for neutron activation analysis. Transport of samples to and from the irradiation positions in the reactor is performed by fast pneumatic transfer systems (transfer time 20 msec and 300 msec) and slow conventional transport facilities. Gamma-spectrometric instrumentation equipped with loss free counting systems is used to handle the high count rates up to 500 000 counts/sec. During the last years neutron activation analysis was applied to investigate environmental samples (soil, dust, incineration ash), geological samples (rocks, sediments, fossils, volcanic gases), biological materials (lichens, mushrooms and other plant materials, human diet, biological reference materials), raw materials (phosphate, coal) and archaeological materials (ancient glass). Lichen analysis was used for environmental monitoring. The content of some of the trace elements can be correlated with industrial activities, like manganese content with steel industry, the occurrence of vanadium and nickel with oil firing plants and stainless steel industry, selenium is found in lichen near coal firing plants. The amount of chlorine and sodium indicates the application of salt for road treatment during winter time, aluminum, scandium and hafnium content depends on the amount of dust in the environment. A further environmental application of neutron activation analysis is the determination of trace elements in volcanic gases. The halogens, arsenic, antimony, selenium, tellurium and mercury were determined and their daily output was calculated. The distribution of trace elements in fossils of known age gives us a geochemical key to condition and development of the paleo-environment. For this purpose we determined rare earth elements in 250 million years old microfossils (conodonts). Neutron activation analysis served also for some non scientific but nevertheless useful purposes: Organic

  9. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anellis, L.G.; Johnson, A.G.; Higginbotham, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  10. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.

    1980-11-01

    Reported are: reactor operation, modifications, maintenance and tests, changes to technical specifications and standard operating procedures, radioactive releases and environmental surveillance, and training utilization

  11. Summary report of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, second half of 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    The Technical Report is published on occasion by summarizing in the form of prompt report the data required at the time of research and experiment, such as the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results for the articles made for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, the reports of study meetings and so on, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, the discussion on other papers and reports and others in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. In this report, the gists of 69 studies carried out by using the Research Reactor and 15 studies by using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are collected. Adoption number, classification, title, the names of reporters and gist are given for each report. (K.I.)

  12. Gaia Assorted Mass Binaries Long Excluded from SLoWPoKES (GAMBLES): Identifying Ultra-wide Binary Pairs with Components of Diverse Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelkers, Ryan J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Dhital, Saurav, E-mail: ryan.j.oelkers@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The formation and evolution of binary star systems are some of the remaining key questions in modern astronomy. Wide binary pairs (separations >10{sup 3} au) are particularly intriguing because their low binding energies make it difficult for the stars to stay gravitationally bound over extended timescales, and thus to probe the dynamics of binary formation and dissolution. Our previous SLoWPoKES catalogs, I and II, provided the largest and most complete sample of wide-binary pairs of low masses. Here we present an extension of these catalogs to a broad range of stellar masses: the Gaia Assorted Mass Binaries Long Excluded from SloWPoKES (GAMBLES), comprising 8660 statistically significant wide pairs that we make available in a living online database. Within this catalog we identify a subset of 543 long-lived (dissipation timescale >1.5 Gyr) candidate binary pairs, of assorted mass, with typical separations between 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 5.5} au (0.002–1.5 pc), using the published distances and proper motions from the Tycho -Gaia Astrometric Solution and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. Each pair has at most a false positive probability of 0.05; the total expectation is 2.44 false binaries in our sample. Among these, we find 22 systems with 3 components, 1 system with 4 components, and 15 pairs consisting of at least 1 possible red giant. We find the largest long-lived binary separation to be nearly 3.2 pc; even so, >76% of GAMBLES long-lived binaries have large binding energies and dissipation lifetimes longer than 1.5 Gyr. Finally, we find that the distribution of binary separations is clearly bimodal, corroborating the findings from SloWPoKES and suggesting multiple pathways for the formation and dissipation of the widest binaries in the Galaxy.

  13. Gaia Assorted Mass Binaries Long Excluded from SLoWPoKES (GAMBLES): Identifying Ultra-wide Binary Pairs with Components of Diverse Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelkers, Ryan J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Dhital, Saurav

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of binary star systems are some of the remaining key questions in modern astronomy. Wide binary pairs (separations >10 3 au) are particularly intriguing because their low binding energies make it difficult for the stars to stay gravitationally bound over extended timescales, and thus to probe the dynamics of binary formation and dissolution. Our previous SLoWPoKES catalogs, I and II, provided the largest and most complete sample of wide-binary pairs of low masses. Here we present an extension of these catalogs to a broad range of stellar masses: the Gaia Assorted Mass Binaries Long Excluded from SloWPoKES (GAMBLES), comprising 8660 statistically significant wide pairs that we make available in a living online database. Within this catalog we identify a subset of 543 long-lived (dissipation timescale >1.5 Gyr) candidate binary pairs, of assorted mass, with typical separations between 10 3 and 10 5.5 au (0.002–1.5 pc), using the published distances and proper motions from the Tycho -Gaia Astrometric Solution and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. Each pair has at most a false positive probability of 0.05; the total expectation is 2.44 false binaries in our sample. Among these, we find 22 systems with 3 components, 1 system with 4 components, and 15 pairs consisting of at least 1 possible red giant. We find the largest long-lived binary separation to be nearly 3.2 pc; even so, >76% of GAMBLES long-lived binaries have large binding energies and dissipation lifetimes longer than 1.5 Gyr. Finally, we find that the distribution of binary separations is clearly bimodal, corroborating the findings from SloWPoKES and suggesting multiple pathways for the formation and dissipation of the widest binaries in the Galaxy.

  14. Experimental determination of the total isothermal reactivity feedback coefficient for the University of Arizona TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, Gregory D.; Nelson, George W.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was performed to measure the total isothermal (or bath) feedback coefficient of reactivity for the University of Arizona TRIGA Research Reactor (UARR). It was found that the bath coefficient was temperature-dependent and may be represented by the expression α iso .2634 x 10 -2 + .3428 x 10 -3 T - 2.471 x 10 -5 T 2 + 3.476 x 10 -7 T 3 for the temperature range of 7 C to 43 C. (author)

  15. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  16. Characteristics of neutron irradiation facility and dose estimation method for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University research reactor institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Kanda, K.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron irradiation characteristics of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KIJRRI) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), is described. The present method of dose measurement and its evaluation at the KURRI, is explained. Especially, the special feature and noticeable matters were expounded for the BNCT with craniotomy, which has been applied at present only in Japan. (author)

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Virginia open-pool research reactor. Docket No. 50-062

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating Licence R-66 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Safety Evaluation Report related to renewal of the operating license for the CAVALIER Training Reactor at the University of Virginia (Docket No. 50-396)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating License R-123 to continue to operate the CAVALIER (Cooperatively Assembled Virginia Low Intensity Educational Reactor) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  20. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Purdue University: Docket No. 50-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Purdue University for a renewal of Operating License R-87 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by Purdue University and is located on the campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the enviroment

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Michigan State University (Docket No. 50-294)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Michigan State University (MSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-114 to continue to operate the TRIGA Mark I research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Michigan State University and is located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by MSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Lowell (Docket No. 50-223)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Lowell (UL) for renewal of operating license number R-125 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Lowell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  3. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Arizona (Docket No. 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Arizona for the renewal of Operating License R-52 to continue operating its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Arizona without endangering the health and safety of the public. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Measurement of radioactivity in air at the linear accelerator of Kyoto University reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebe, Yukimasa; Shimo, Michikuni

    1976-01-01

    It is well-known that the induced activities from a number of nuclides are generated in air during the operation of high energy accelerators. Of these, measurements were performed with the linear accelerator of Kyoto University reactor facility for the purpose of the clarification of the production mechanism and behavior of radioactive aerosols. The concentration in air and the size distribution of 13 N aerosols which have aerosols as the carrier among 13 N produced by the γ-n reaction of 14 N were measured with filter packs and by diffusion method, respectively. The density of number and size distribution of non-radioactive aerosols were measured to understand the production mechanism and behavior of 13 N aerosols. For the aerosol number density, Aitken nucleus number was measured with a Pollak counter. The results obtained show that (1) under the operating condition of the linear accelerator at that measurement time, 13 N aerosol concentration was (2 to 50) x 10 -13 Ci/cm 3 while 13 N gas component concentration was (1 to 25) x 10 -12 Ci/cm 3 , i.e. the ratio was approximately 1 : 10 (2) the average size of 13 N aerosols was 0.01 to 0.04 μm, and it was found that there was positive correlation to relative humidity; (3) during the operation of the accelerator, the generation of aerosols 10 to 100 times as much as the background level was observed. The size distribution of aerosols showed a peak around 0.01 μm; and others. Examination was carried out regarding a 13 N aerosol production model based on the sticking of aerosol-free 13 N to aerosols. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Reorganization of the radiologic protection of the nuclear reactor RA-0 for the next starting up at Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R.; Chautemps, N.A.; Rumis, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the fulfillment to the tasks for the new starting up of the RA-0 Nuclear Reactor situated at the National University of Cordoba, it was necessary to plan and organize the service of Radiologic Protection to meet the future requirements in normal operation. The special characteristics that an installation of this type has in the university field, required special attention for making the university staff become aware in the working proceedings to follow up in normal conditions, such as the case of emergency that would originate in the installation. The training of the teaching and non teaching staff of the National University of Cordoba, the adjusting of the installations, the obtention of dosimetry and measurement equipment and the implementation of a monitor system of the staff were the main tasks confronted for the reorganization of the sector. (Author) [es

  7. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Information is presented concerning operations at the UWNR reactor; operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance operations; radioactive waste disposal; summary of radiation exposures; results of environmental studies; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  8. Development of the Alberta Diagnostic Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Frank G.; Machura, Shirley

    The development of the Alberta Diagnostic Reading Program (ADRP) was based on a current psycholinguistic theory that describes reading as a process in which the reader uses background information to communicate with the author. To ensure its usefulness and effectiveness, the developers of the ADRP sought the advice and direct involvement of many…

  9. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1993 marked the last full year of the Commission operating as Alberta's representative in the energy regulatory arena in Canada and the USA; due to restructuring, these functions will be transferred to the Ministry of Energy in early 1994. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 40.2 million bbl, down 11% from 1992, and receipts of heavy crude were 3.7 million bbl, down 42% from 1992. Revenue from crude oil sales was $800 million, down 25% from 1992. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1993 included price determination and information collection. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Non-conventional development in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, P.

    1998-01-01

    Alberta's oil sands have been recognized as a major strategic resource in Alberta's and Canada's energy and economic future. The oil sands cover an area of almost 77,000 square kilometres and contain approximately 1.7 trillion barrels of oil, of which 300 billion barrels are believed to be recoverable. Highlights of Alberta production from 1973 to 1997 were reviewed. The review showed that by 1997, production of bitumen and synthetic crude oil from the oil sands reached 520,000 barrels per day which is 33 per cent of Alberta's and 25 per cent of Canada's total liquid petroleum production. Activities in oil sands development were outlined, including land sales, historical capital spending, predicted capital spending, technological improvements, and production and price forecasts. Improvements in oil recovery have been accounted for by technological improvements such as multi-lateral drilling, steam assisted gravity drainage, hydrotransport, and synergies with existing facilities. Since 1993, there has been a sharp increase in oil sands land sales. A total investment of $18.8 billion has been announced for the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River deposits for the near future. Prospects for continuing vigorous development in oil sand extraction was predicted. 1 tab., 9 figs

  11. Alberta industrial synergy CO2 programs initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, E.

    1998-01-01

    The various industrial sectors within Alberta produce about 350,000 tonnes of CO 2 per day. This presentation was concerned with how this large volume and high concentration of CO 2 can be used in industrial and agricultural applications, because every tonne of CO 2 used for such purposes is a tonne that does not end up in the atmosphere. There is a good potential for an industrial synergy between the producers and users of CO 2 . The Alberta Industrial Synergy CO 2 Programs Initiative was established to ultimately achieve a balance between the producers of CO 2 and the users of CO 2 by creating ways to use the massive quantities of CO 2 produced by Alberta's hydrocarbon-based economy. The Alberta CO 2 Research Steering Committee was created to initiate and support CO 2 programs such as: (1) CO 2 use in enhanced oil recovery, (2) creation of a CO 2 production inventory, (3) survey of CO 2 users and potential users, (4) investigation of process issues such as power generation, oil sands and cement manufacturing, and (5) biofixation by plants, (6) other disposal options (e.g. in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, in aquifers, in tailings ponds, in coal beds). The single most important challenge was identified as 'rationalizing the formation of the necessary infrastructure'. Failing to do that will greatly impede efforts directed towards CO 2 utilization

  12. Transmission policy in Alberta and Bill 50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, J.; Rosehart, W.; MacCormack, J.

    2009-01-01

    Plans developed by the Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) have determined that Alberta's electrical transmission system needs to be expanded. However, there are complex issues that must be considered in order to assess the nature and extent of the needed expansion. Various new amendments to the system were proposed in the Alberta government's Bill 50, including the construction of new transmission lines; the installation of a double circuit 500 kV alternating current line between Edmonton and the Gibbons-Redwater region; the construction of a new 240 kV substation in southeast Calgary; and the installation of 2 single circuit 500 kV alternating current lines between Edmonton and Fort McMurray. This study provided a review of the institutional framework instituted by the government's transmission policy and compared the costs and benefits of 2 large capacity high voltage DC (HVDC) transmission lines proposed for the Edmonton-Calgary corridor relative to the various other transmission system amendment suggestions. An evaluation of Alberta's proposed regulatory process under Bill 50 was also conducted. Results of the study indicated that the addition of the HVDC lines is an inefficient response to concerns over adequate supply and reliability. 72 refs., 18 tabs.

  13. Alberta air emissions : trends and projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This paper provided a summary of air emissions trends and projections for Alberta. Predicted regional distribution trends and industry sector emissions were presented. Historical and projected emissions included sulfur oxides (SO x ) nitrogen oxide (NO x ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and ammonia (NH 3 ). Results of the study indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were decreasing, while VOCs, NO x , SO x , PM 2.5 and NH 3 levels were increasing. Approximately 9 per cent of ammonia emissions were from point sources, while the majority of PM 2.5 emissions were attributed to unpaved roads and construction operations. Agricultural animal operations accounted for most of the VOC source emissions in the region. Increased development of the oil sands industry is contributing to increases in VOC emissions. Increases in NH 3 were attributed to growth in the agricultural sector and the increasing use of confined feeding operations in the region. Results of the study indicated that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Alberta will keep increasing as a result of Alberta's growing economy. It was concluded that emissions from other industrial sectors are also expected to increase. In 2005, Alberta's total GHG emissions were 233 megatonnes of CO 2 equivalent, of which 168 megatonnes were attributed to industry. Results were presented in both graph and tabular formats. 3 tabs., 25 figs

  14. How Alberta's market is spurring innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses how Alberta's market is spurring innovation in the power industry. Incentives for new generation technologies is provided by consumption growth, market prices, and transmission policy and development. Potential technologies include integrated gasification, combined cycle, integrated gasification and cogeneration, alternative fuels such as biomass, landfill gas, district heating, wind, solar as well as nuclear energy

  15. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three Nuclear Engineering Department classes make use of the reactor. Forty-eight students enrolled in NE 231 participated in a two-hour laboratory session introducing students to rector behavior characteristics. Twelve hours of reactor operating time were devoted to this session. NE 427 was offeed in the fall semester and had an enrollment of sixteen. Several NE 427 experiments use materials that are activated in the reactor. One experiment entitled Radiation Survey requires that students make measurements of radiation levels in and around the reactor laboratory. The irradiations in support of NE 427 and the radiation survey take place during normal isotope production runs, so no reactor time is specifically devoted to NE 427. The enrollment in NE 428 was twenty-four, as it was offered in both semesters

  16. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  17. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  18. The BC-Alberta intertie : impact of regulatory change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, J.; Hughes, K.

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected electricity system between the provinces of British Columbia (BC) and Alberta was discussed with reference to the Cranbrook-Langdon 500 kV line and two 138 kV transmission lines. The lines in British Columbia are owned by BC Hydro and operated by the BC Transmission Corporation, while the lines in Alberta are owned by AltaLink and operated by the Alberta Electric Systems Operator (AESO). The operating terms and conditions are established by an Interconnection Agreement between all parties. The Alberta-BC Intertie was designed to operate at an operating transfer capacity of 1200 MW from BC to Alberta, and 1000 MW from Alberta to BC. The operational limits on Intertie capacity were imposed due to voltage constraints within Alberta during high load periods resulting from insufficient transmission support. It was noted that available capacity is often under-utilized because sometimes it is not economical to schedule into or out of Alberta due to better market conditions in the Pacific Northwest. Transmission users in BC have explicit transmission rights which must be purchased on an hourly basis. However, transmission rights in Alberta follow dispatch of generation through Power Pool bidding. The impact of an under-utilized transmission capacity is higher wholesale prices in both Alberta and in the Pacific Northwest because ratepayers end up paying for the under-used capacity. This presentation also outlined regulatory change in Alberta with reference to consolidation of Alberta's Transmission Administrator, Power Pool Administrator and system controller functions; Alberta's new transmission policy; and, the enhanced role of market surveillance administrator. It also outlined the regulatory change in British Columbia with reference to the creation of the BC Transmission Corporation; the Heritage Contract; and, stepped rates and retail access. The effect of changes on intertie usage in both Alberta and British Columbia were also outlined. 31 refs

  19. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  20. Monte Carlo applications to core-following of the National Research Universal reactor (NRU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Wang, X.; Leung, T.

    2014-01-01

    Reactor code TRIAD, relying on a two-group neutron diffusion model, is currently used for core-following of NRU - to track reactor assembly locations and burnups. The Monte Carlo (MCNP or SERPENT) full-reactor models of NRU can be used to provide the core power distribution for calculating fuel burnups, with WIMS-AECL providing fuel depletion calculations. The MCNP/WIMS core-following results were in good agreement with the measured data, within the expected biases. The Monte Carlo methods, still very time-consuming, need to be able to run faster before they can replace TRIAD for timely support of NRU operations. (author)

  1. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 57 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as neutron radiography using a research reactor, measurement of Zr/Hf ratio in zirconium, interstitial germanium atoms in thermal neutron irradiation study, measurement of induced radioactivity due to neutrons in Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings, properties of semiconductor electrons in radiation study, induction of mutation in crops by neutron irradiation and utilization for breeding, thermal fluorescence mechanism of alkali halide and MgO single crystals, atomic configuration in PZT rhombohedron phase, modulated structure of Cu-Co alloys, excitation of nuclei by positron annihilation and others. (Kako, I.)

  2. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 61 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as radioactivation analysis of trace elements in rocks and minerals, anodic oxidation films of GaAs and structure, measurement of yield of uranium isotopes produced by reactor neutron irradiation of thorium, geochemical study of trace elements in hydrosphere by radio-activation analysis, various diseases and variation of elements in rat furs, Moessbauer spectroscopic study of gold compounds with singular coupling by Au-197, measurement of grass-eating quantity and rate of digestion of cows using Au and Eu, sickness biochemical study of trace elements in hair samples of patients and others. (Kako, I.)

  3. The determination of the thermal neutron and gamma fluxes at the Maryland University Training Reactor using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karceski, Jeffrey David; Ebert, David D.; Munno, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Determination of the dose received by a material in a mixed gamma and neutron field is of paramount concern to any research reactor owner. This dose can be separated into three distinguishable parts using standard thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) responses: 1) thermal neutron dose, 2) fission gamma dose, and 3) fission product gamma dose. For the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR), these respective fluences were determined for each of the associated experimental facilities. Quantifying the magnitude of the gamma and thermal neutron exposures at various reactor power levels was accomplished using Li-6F and Li-7F TLDs, respectively. These two types of dosimetry were chosen given the following considerations: 1) there is no existing standard established for fluence determination in a mixed field, 2) the LiF TLDs have a wide range of sensitivity to radiation, from 0.01 mR to 10,000 R, and 3) LiF TLDs are easy to read given the proper equipment. Standardization of the gamma/neutron doses was accomplished using the 500,000 Rad/hr Co-60 gamma source also located at the University of Maryland. (author)

  4. Radioisotope radiotherapy research and achievements at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Cutler, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) along with various other departments of the University of Missouri have been involved for many years in developing new means of internal radioisotopic therapy for cancer. These efforts have centered on methods of targeting radioisotopes such as brachytherapy, embolization of liver tumors with radioactive microspheres, small molecule-labeled chelate guidance for the treatment of bone cancer, and various means of radioimmunotherapy or labeled receptor agent targeting. All of this medical research and practical application of radioisotope therapy has been built on MURR's high neutron flux and outstanding reliability of operation, as well as MURR's flexibility in meeting the needs of researchers and the radiopharmaceutical industry. For many years MURR has produced Au-198 and Ir-192 wires for subsequent fabrication into brachytherapy sources for treatment of isolated tumors. An extension of this approach is embodied in Y-90 TheraSphere, which consists of Y-89-containing glass microspheres which are activated to contain Y-90 and injected in the blood supply of liver tumors. This approach leads to embolisation and very high radiation doses to tumor with minimal side effects, and is currently in use at six centers in the U.S. MURR has been instrumental in the development of bone agents such as Re-186 HEDP and Sm-153 Quadramet, the latter of which is now an approved drug for palliation of the pain from metastatic bone cancer. A related development is MURR's participation in trials using Ho-166 DOP to ablate diseased bone marrow in patients afflicted with multiple myeloma prior to reinfusion of cleansed, autologous marrow. This procedure has passed Phase I and II trials in the U.S., achieving approx. 50% complete remissions in multiple myeloma patients. MURR is currently upgrading its facilities to meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) requirements for Phase III of this

  5. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  6. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Washington State University TRIGA reactor. Docket No. 50-27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Washington State University (WSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-76 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Washington State University and is located on the WSU campus in Pullman, Whitman County, Washington. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by WSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Florida. Docket No. 50-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Florida (UF) for a renewal of Operating License R-56 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Florida and is located on the UF campus in Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by UF without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Cornell University TRIGA Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Cornell University for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Cornell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Kansas (Docket No. 50-148)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Kansas (KU) for a renewal of Operating License R-78 to continue to operate the KU 250-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Kansas and is located on the KU campus in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by KU without endangering the health and safety of the public. 17 references, 11 figures, 4 tables

  11. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Iowa State University (Docket No. 50-116)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Iowa State University (ISU) for a renewal of the Class 104 Operating License R-59 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Iowa State University, and is located on the ISU campus in Ames, Story County, Iowa. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by ISU without endangering the health and safety of the public. The principal matters reviewed are: design, testing, and performance of the reactor components and systems; the expected consequences of credible accidents; the licensee's management organization; the method used for the control of radiological effluents; the licensee's technical specifications; financial data and information; the physical protection program; procedures for training reactor operators; and emergency plans. 11 references, 15 figures, 13 tables

  12. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Brooklyn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron flux distributions of the entire reactor core and to compare it with the measured flux focusing at the irradiation ports. Integration of all these analysis provided the updated comprehensive neutron-gamma flux maps of the existing irradiation facilities of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor.

  13. Insight conference reports : Alberta power summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 18 presentations at this conference covered a wide range of topics dealing with the Canada's electric power industry. Issues of particular concern included lessons learned from restructuring in Alberta, Ontario and New Brunswick, as well as credit risk management in the power sector, power marketing in Alberta, and transmission issues. The challenges facing the industry regarding climate change and the commitment made by Canada under the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions was also discussed with particular reference to emissions trading and the need to harmonize environmental policies between federal and provincial jurisdictions. The move to deregulate the industry played an important role in restructuring a vertically integrated industry into power generation, transmission and distribution. High electricity prices eventually resulted in re regulation of the industry and a synergy between wholesale and retail markets. Four of the 18 papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs

  14. NGL supply from Alberta straddle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdam, B.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the current and future North American supply and demand and trends for natural gas liquids (NGLs) is presented. The current Alberta straddle plant configuration, the NGL pipeline system and product flow, and the profitability of straddle plants are described. The driving forces to increase Alberta's straddle plant capacity are also reviewed. These include: (1) increased gas production, (2) increased demand for ethane, (3) control of produced NGLs, and (4) the desire to maintain a competitive position. Highlights of the Centurion Project designed to meet the needs of Dow Chemicals and the producers by providing long-term ethane supply and physical access to a more liquid NGL market, the project's current status and 'next steps' were also summarized. tabs., figs

  15. Ambient air quality trends in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This document provided an overview of ambient air pollutant trends in Alberta. The report discussed the following pollutants having effect on human and environmental health: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulphide (H2 S ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), ozone (O 3 ), fine particulate matter (PM 2 .5), benzene, and benzopyrene. Each of these pollutants was described. The report provided data on annual average concentration trends and annual 99th percentile concentration as an indicator of peak concentrations. A map illustrating air quality monitoring stations in 2006 was also provided. The findings revealed that mean annual CO levels were the lowest they have been since 1990; hydrogen sulphide concentrations have fluctuated in time since 1990; most Edmonton and Calgary area stations showed significant decreasing trends in annual average NO 2 levels since 1990; and higher SO 2 concentrations have been found in the industrial areas of Alberta, such as the Redwater and Scotford oil sands locations. tabs., figs

  16. Transmission : key to the Alberta market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, D.

    2003-01-01

    AltaLink is Canada's first independent transmission company with 11,000 kilometres (km) of lines and 250 substations. It possesses a unique ownership structure with strong technical partners and financial capability. No major transmission system has been built in the last fifteen years in Alberta. The author examined the situation of power transmission in Alberta, indicating that developments should include capacity increase out of Fort McMurray, and better market integration with both British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. An efficient and effective market requires ample transmission capacity, which would allow for trade and competition, access for efficient generators, and access to regional markets. New transmission must be planned and achieved in a proactive manner. Generation developers must be assured that transmission will be available, and that tariffs and loss factors will be predictable and stable. figs

  17. Suffield a cornucopia for Alberta energy company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Operations of the Alberta Energy Company's (AEC) Suffield properties in southern Alberta, the company's major production area, were reviewed. With a staff of just over 100, Suffield was said to produce an average of 180 million cubic feet of natural gas and more than 4100 barrels of oil per day. Suffield's remaining reserves were estimated to be 814 billion cubic feet of gas and 6.4 million barrels of oil. The field was expected to be in production for the next 20 years. A master plan to minimize normal field decline and control operating costs at Suffield was developed by AEC. Cloning gas storage plants was one of the methods used by for cost control. Designing and constructing identical gas plants was another means of producing major savings, especially in areas such as equipment purchase, and construction

  18. 75 FR 27372 - University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... is housed in the Nuclear Energy Laboratory (NEL) located near the southwest corner of the University.... Therefore, license renewal should not change the environmental impact of facility operation. Data from the... analysis of human health and environmental impacts presented in this environmental assessment, the proposed...

  19. History of the research reactor institute of Kyoto University in view of nuclear science information data base (KURRIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki; Mizuma, Mitsuo (Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.); Kimura, Itsuro

    1994-02-01

    Since the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University was established as an inter-university research institute in 1963, a large number of cooperative research projects have been achieved by visiting scientists and its own staff in various research fields, making use of facilities centered around the Kyoto University Reactor, as well as the other experimental facilities. Ten years ago, the construction of the 'KURRIP' data base was initiated to grasp the whole aspect of the research activities at the Institute, in commemoration of its 20th anniversary. At the present time, KURRIP contains the information on 5,910 papers published for 29 years from 1963 to 1991. As this academic year is the 30th anniversary of the Institute, the history of its research activities was reviewed again using this data base. All of the publications were classified by authors's affiliations, kinds of papers, publishers, fields of studies, and research facilities used, and their historical variations are checked and discussed. (author).

  20. A review of research activities at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in view of research publication information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki; Mizuma, Mitsuo; Kimura, Itsuro.

    1995-01-01

    A database of research publication was constructed for the purpose of grasping all of the research activities at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The database named KURRIP collects all of the research publications of the Institute by not only its own staff but also visiting scientists. The publications are in the form of original papers, review papers, papers in proceedings, short notes and letters, synopses over 3 pages presented orally at scientific meeting, books and doctoral theses. At present, the KURRIP database contains the information on 6,210 items which have been published for 30 years since the Institute was established as an interuniversity research institute for joint use of a research reactor and other related large facilities in 1963. By utilizing the KURRIP database, the analyses have been done: (1) affiliation of the authors, (2) kind of publications, (3) classification of publishers, (4) research fields, and (5) experimental facilities. The KURRIP database is now stored in the Data Processing Center of Kyoto University and can be utilized through a computer center at one of the main national universities in Japan. (author)

  1. Asian interests in Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, D.; Laureshen, C.

    2004-01-01

    The growing Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands and import opportunities was discussed along with the feasibility of marketing bitumen to Asia. Asia is an obvious new market for Canadian heavy oil and bitumen due to an increasing demand for petroleum products in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. This paper examined the following three criteria that will determine the success of any initiative to move Canadian crude oil to Asian-Pacific markets: (1) a sustainable supply from Alberta; a pipeline to transport the crude to a deepwater port on the west coast; and, a guaranteed market at the other end. The basis for Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands is the sustainable secure supply of oil for growing Asian markets; heavy dependence on supplies from the Middle East; the desire to diversify supply sources; and, opportunities to invest in oil sands developments. Examples of Asian (Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China) missions to Alberta were presented along with the challenges of getting products to market with reference to Enbridge's new market access plan, Terasen's staged capacity expansion for heavy crudes and refined products, and sea transport from Prince Rupert. The paper also included graphs depicting world GDP; incremental increase in world primary energy demand by fuel for 2000 to 2020; world oil demand by region; oil demand by region in Asia; oil demand and supply in northeast Asia (Japan, China, Korea) and dependence level on Middle Eastern oil; oil demand and supply in China; China's petroleum production and consumption; refined products market forecast for 2000 to 2020; 2002 crude oil imports to Asia; 2004 refining capacity; product quality comparisons; cost competitive study; and energy policy objectives for China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. 19 figs

  2. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1992 marked the end of chronically depressed natural gas prices and a significant reduction in natural gas surpluses. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, unchanged from 1991, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.3 million bbl, up 4% from 1991. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1.1 billion, down from $1.64 billion in 1991. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1992 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. In 1991, the middle east crisis caused prices to spike at the commencement of the Gulf war, but these quickly stabilized. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, down 1.5% from 1990, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.1 million bbl, up 5% from 1990. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1,642,244,000, down from $2,078,197,000 in 1990. Loss of the Montreal market through pipeline closure led to increased pressure on prices, particularly on heavy crudes. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1991 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. NOVA Corporation of Alberta annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Nova Corporation and its related businesses are involved in natural gas production, gas pipelines, consulting services, and upgrading of natural gas into chemicals and plastics. Nova owns Alberta Gas Transmission Division, the primary gas transportation system in Alberta, with 11,400 miles of pipeline and total deliveries in 1992 of 3.4 trillion ft 3 . Nova also owns 50% of Foothills Pipe Lines Ltd., one of Canada's largest carriers of exported gas, and 50% of TQM Pipeline Partnership, which transports natural gas in Quebec. Nova conducts its chemicals business through Novacor Chemicals Ltd., which has plants in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and the USA. Novacor's major petrochemicals are methanol, ethylene, propylene, and styrene and its major plastics are polystyrene, polypropylene, and polyethylene. Nova's gas-producing branch Novalta Resources produced 26 billion ft 3 of natural gas in 1992 and has proven reserves of 334 billion ft 3 . Nova's net income in 1992 was $164 million, compared to only $46 million in 1991. The company's operations, along with management discussion and analysis, are presented for 1992 and financial statements are included. 20 figs., 43 tabs

  5. Safety evaluation report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to NUREG-1135, ''Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Construction Permit and Operating License for the Research Reactor at the University of Texas'' (SER) May 1985. The reactor facility is owned by The University of Texas at Austin (UT, the applicant) and is located at the University's Balcones Research Center in Austin, Texas. This supplement to the SER (SSER) describes the changes to the reactor facility design from the description in the SER. The SER and SSER together reflect the facility as built. The SSER also documents the reviews that the NRC has completed regarding the applicant's emergency plan, security plan, and technical specifications that were identified as open in the SER

  6. Ten years's reactor operation at the Technical University Zittau - operation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konschak, K.

    1990-01-01

    The Zittau Training and Research Reactor ZLFR is in use for purposes of teaching the engineers who will operate the nuclear power plants in the GDR since 10 years. Since commissioning it was started up more than 1600 times, approximately two thirds of the start-ups being utilized for purposes of teaching. A number of teaching experiments were installed that demonstrate fundamental technological processes in nuclear reactors in a manner easy to understand. The high level of nuclear safety manifests itself, among other things, in extremely low radiation exposures of the operating personal and the persons to be trained. (author)

  7. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Calibration of A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Facility: Experience at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norlida Yussup

    2011-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility at Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA reactor has been built in year 2008 and been operated since then. PGNAA is a technique used to determine the presence and quantity of trace elements such as boron, hydrogen and carbon which are more difficult to detect with other neutron analysis method. A calibration is essential to ensure the system works as required and the output is valid and reliable. The calibration was carried out by using Standard Reference Material (SRM). Besides, background data was also acquired for comparisons and analysis. The results are analyzed and discussed in this paper. (author)

  9. Irradiation positions for fission-track dating in the University of Pavia TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, Massimo; Meloni, Sandro; Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Bigazzi, Giulio

    2002-01-01

    An irradiation position arranged is described in the present paper for fission-track dating in the Triga Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia. Fluence values determined using the NIST glass standard SRM 962a for fission-track dating and the traditional metal foils are compared. Relatively good neutron thermalization (φ th /φ f = 0.956) and lack of significant fluence spatial gradients are good factors for fission-track dating. Finally, international age standards (or putative age standards) irradiated in this new position yielded results consistent with independent reference ages. (author)

  10. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in latter half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 69 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  11. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in first half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 54 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  12. Dry reloading and packaging of spent fuel at TRIGA MARK I reactor of Medical University Hanover (MHH), Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferkamp, D.

    2008-01-01

    which is protected against contamination spreading and provided with a conventional driven by a floor conveyor trolley. 4. Mobile Reloading Station placed directly on the shipping cask, containing adapter to each type of shipping cask, shielded sliding plates and provided with a loading plate for positioning of six packs into the shipping cask. 5. Auxiliary systems including: - cask lid lifting device; - video monitoring device for the shipping cask lids and loads; - air film gliders for transport of shipping casks. Finally one concludes: the dry reloading station for spent fuel packaging into the shipping casks has successfully operated for TRIGA MARK I reactor at Medical University Hanover as well as at the VKTA - Research Reactor in Rossendorf, Germany. It is available as a proven technique for the dry reloading of spent fuels into the shipping casks. (author)

  13. Fire, Aim… Ready? Alberta's Big Bang Approach to Healthcare Disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Cam

    2010-08-01

    Alberta's abolition in 2008 of its health regions and the creation of Alberta Health Services (AHS) was a bold move, but the reasons for the change remain hazy. The stated goals were to "help make Alberta's … system more effective and efficient" and to "provide equitable access to health services and long-term sustainability." Data show, however, that Alberta's health regions were already performing well on these goals relative to other provinces, and where changes have since occurred, they cannot necessarily be attributed to AHS.

  14. A Cooperative Industry - Government Woodland Caribou Research Program in Northeastern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Rippin

    1996-01-01

    the Alberta Departments of Environmental Protection and Energy. The research aspect of the program has been developed and implemented by staff of the University of Alberta, Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries, the Alberta Fish and Wildlife and Forest Services and the Alberta Environmental Centre. The program also incorporates a public information and liaison function. Newsletters, information videos, brochures and public consultation are the means used to accomplish this task.

  15. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Neutron flux and gamma dose measurement in the BNCT irradiation facility at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Ferrari, M.; Postuma, I.; Fatemi, S.; Prata, M.; Ballarini, F.; Carante, M. P.; Farias, R.; González, S. J.; Marrale, M.; Gallo, S.; Bartolotta, A.; Iacoviello, G.; Nigg, D.; Altieri, S.

    2018-01-01

    University of Pavia is equipped with a TRIGA Mark II research nuclear reactor, operating at a maximum steady state power of 250 kW. It has been used for many years to support Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. An irradiation facility was constructed inside the thermal column of the reactor to produce a sufficient thermal neutron flux with low epithermal and fast neutron components, and low gamma dose. In this irradiation position, the liver of two patients affected by hepatic metastases from colon carcinoma were irradiated after borated drug administration. The facility is currently used for cell cultures and small animal irradiation. Measurements campaigns have been carried out, aimed at characterizing the neutron spectrum and the gamma dose component. The neutron spectrum has been measured by means of multifoil neutron activation spectrometry and a least squares unfolding algorithm; gamma dose was measured using alanine dosimeters. Results show that in a reference position the thermal neutron flux is (1.20 ± 0.03) ×1010 cm-2 s-1 when the reactor is working at the maximum power of 250 kW, with the epithermal and fast components, respectively, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal component. The ratio of the gamma dose with respect to the thermal neutron fluence is 1.2 ×10-13 Gy/(n/cm2).

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee's annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Opportunities for CANDU for the Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Bock, D.; Miller, A.; Kuran, S.; Keil, H.; Fiorino, L.; Hau, K.; Zhou, X.; Dunbar, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The Alberta oil sands bitumen deposits comprise of one of the largest sources hydrocarbon in the world, and have emerged as the fastest growing, soon to be dominant, source of crude oil in Canada. The oil industry has made great strides in improving the effectiveness of gathering this resource. In particular, alternatives to open-pit mining have been developed which enable in-site recovery of underground deposits with a minimum of environmental disruption. The main challenge that remains is the large quantity of energy needed in the process of extracting the oil and upgrading it to commercial levels. For a typical in-situ extraction project, about 18% of the energy content of the oil produced is used up in the extraction process, while a further 5% is used in generating hydrogen to upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Looking ahead, even as improvements in energy use efficiency, (and hydrocarbon use efficiency) counterbalance the increases in hydrocarbon demand from economic growth (particularly in the developing world), Canada and Alberta recognize that the oil sands resource will be needed, and both support the development of this resource in an environmentally responsible way. The large energy requirement for the oil sands extraction process represents a challenge with regard to both environmental impact and security of supply. The use of natural gas, the current energy supply, has impacts in terms of air quality (via NOX and other emissions) and also represents a large greenhouse gas emissions component. As the oil sands industry expands, the availability of natural gas also becomes a concern, as does price and price stability. With this background, the opportunity for nuclear reactors to provide an economical, reliable, virtually zero-emission source of energy for the oil sands becomes very important. Over the last few years, developments in oil sands extraction technology, and developments in CANDU technology through the Advanced CANDU Reactor, (ACR

  19. The Alberta Electrical Grid: What to Expect in the Next Few Years in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Livingston

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Alberta government has stated that it wants to make significant changes to the supply of electricity to the current electrical grid for the province. These changes include the phasing out of coal generation by 2030, the supply of 30 per cent of electricity from renewables by 2030 and the introduction of a socalled capacity market in addition to the current electrical energy market. The achievement of these objectives will require a number of fundamental changes to the existing electrical grid. This paper provides an overall description of these changes. The paper first examines the current grid structure in which coal and gas provide the base load supply in the amount of 90 per cent of electricity demand, and renewables are a relatively small source of supply for the remaining 10 per cent. It then reviews the current simple energy market in Alberta that uses a single price auction to determine the wholesale price of electricity. The paper then notes that the achievement of these changes will require a large amount of investment in the next 15 years to create new generating capacity that currently does not exist. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO has forecast that by 2032, Alberta will need an additional 7,000 megawatts of gas generation, 5,000 megawatts of wind, 700 megawatts of solar and 350 megawatts of hydro. To put this in context, the Ontario grid currently has 4,213 megawatts of wind (11 per cent of total generating capacity and 380 megawatts of solar (one per cent of generating capacity. The Alberta government has made two fundamental changes in the electricity market to make this happen. First, it has introduced a Renewable Energy Program (REP to incent investment in renewables. They asked industry to bid on a 20 year contract for supply of electricity that offered a guaranteed fixed price that was independent of the existing wholesale market. The first round of bidding (REP 1 announced in December 2017 resulted in 600

  20. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 65 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as Moessbauer spectroscopic study of ferrocene and its derivative iodides by I-129, decomposition of cadmium telluride during heat treatment, element distribution in resource living things and environmental substances produced in northern ocean, radioactivation analysis of trace elements in blood of tumor-bearing animals, radioactivation analysis of noble metal elements in geochemical samples, relaxation phenomena by gamma-gamma perturbation angle correlation, separation of components in Allende meteorite and their radioactivation analysis, measurement of cross section of Pa-231 (n, gamma) reaction and others. (Kako, I.)

  1. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 47 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as diffusion of impurities ion-implanted in silicon into natural oxide films, origin of igneous rocks by trace element distribution study, element distribution in black ore and its accompanying rocks and origin of black ore, reprocessing of molten salt fuel of thorium group, forerunning martensite transformation of Fe-Pt invar alloy, change of nucleic acid component to recoil tritium at cryogenic temperature, gamma irradiation effect of KC1 containing Pb 2+ , radiation effect on cadmium halide crystals and impurity metallic ions and others. (Kako, I.)

  2. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride. Report on session 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The activities over the 1982-3 session are reviewed and all the research projects listed. These include reactor related activities (physics and radiochemistry, health physics and nuclear medicine and engineering), those of the isotope geology unit and NERC radiocarbon laboratory, the computing department and the teaching programme. The demand for irradiations, particularly for activation analysis has continued. There was no major maintenance shut-down in the year. (U.K.)

  3. Implementation of the clean air strategy for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H.S.; Angle, R.P. [Alberta Dept. of Environmental Protection, Alberta (Canada); Kelly, M. [Clean Air Strategic Alliance, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Air quality and its effects on the environment and human health have received considerable attention during the last three decades in Alberta, Canada. Among the issues receiving a high priority are acid deposition, smog and global warming. There are various sources of emissions to Alberta`s atmosphere, many of which relate to the extraction, processing, and burning of fossil fuels; pulp and paper manufacture; and transportation. There are also natural sources of contaminants, such as particulates from forest fires and methane from bogs. The extraction, processing and combustion of fossil fuels play an important role in Alberta`s economy. The province produces over 80 % of the oil and natural gas in Canada, and nearly half the coal. Low sulphur coal is used in power plants to supply more than 90 % of the electricity used in this province by nearly three million people. As a result, Alberta is responsible for about 27 % of the CO{sub 2}, 23 % of the nitrogen oxides, and 16 % of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated in Canada. Alberta`s air quality is monitored by the Government of Alberta at nine continuous, eight intermittent, over 250 static, and 12 precipitation monitoring stations. Parameters such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide, particulates, and ion-content of precipitation are measured. Industry operates a large number of ambient and static SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S monitoring stations across Alberta, with monitoring costs estimated at 56-80 million USD annually. The unique features of the Clean Air Strategy for Alberta (CASA) have already been published elsewhere. This presentation discusses the mechanism and progress on its implementation. (author)

  4. Implementation of the clean air strategy for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H S; Angle, R P [Alberta Dept. of Environmental Protection, Alberta (Canada); Kelly, M [Clean Air Strategic Alliance, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Air quality and its effects on the environment and human health have received considerable attention during the last three decades in Alberta, Canada. Among the issues receiving a high priority are acid deposition, smog and global warming. There are various sources of emissions to Alberta`s atmosphere, many of which relate to the extraction, processing, and burning of fossil fuels; pulp and paper manufacture; and transportation. There are also natural sources of contaminants, such as particulates from forest fires and methane from bogs. The extraction, processing and combustion of fossil fuels play an important role in Alberta`s economy. The province produces over 80 % of the oil and natural gas in Canada, and nearly half the coal. Low sulphur coal is used in power plants to supply more than 90 % of the electricity used in this province by nearly three million people. As a result, Alberta is responsible for about 27 % of the CO{sub 2}, 23 % of the nitrogen oxides, and 16 % of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated in Canada. Alberta`s air quality is monitored by the Government of Alberta at nine continuous, eight intermittent, over 250 static, and 12 precipitation monitoring stations. Parameters such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide, particulates, and ion-content of precipitation are measured. Industry operates a large number of ambient and static SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S monitoring stations across Alberta, with monitoring costs estimated at 56-80 million USD annually. The unique features of the Clean Air Strategy for Alberta (CASA) have already been published elsewhere. This presentation discusses the mechanism and progress on its implementation. (author)

  5. Alberta electric industry annual statistics for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Tables containing data on electric energy generation and capacity for Alberta are provided for the following aspects: capacity and generation of power plants for 1998; capacity of power plants by type, unit, and energy resource for 1998; generating units approved for construction for 1998; generating units completed in 1998; transmission additions approved for construction and completed for 1998; net annual generating capacity and generation for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by plant for 1998; net annual generation by energy resource and type for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by energy resource and type for 1998; generation capacity reserve; relative capacity and generation by type of energy resource for 1998; capacity, generation and fuel consumption of isolated plants for 1998; other industrial on-site plant capacity and generation for 1998. Also listed are: energy resource consumption and energy conversion efficiency of thermal power plants for 1998; stack emissions from thermal generating plants for 1998; non-utility electric generators, wind and hydro for 1998; and hydroelectric energy utilization and conversion efficiency for 1998. Tables contain information on electric energy generation and capacity for hydroelectric energy stored in reservoirs in 1998; details of non-coincident net peak generation and load by utility operators for the Alberta electric system for 1998; and Alberta electric system generation and load at peak load hour for 1998. Further tables cover electric energy distribution for interchange and distribution for 1998 and 1981-1998; annual energy distribution to ultimate customers for 1988-1998 and to ultimate customers for 1998; and the number of electric utility customers in 1998. Final tables cover the transmission and distribution systems with data on: circuit km of such lines for 1988-1998; total circuit km of such lines by major electric utility for 1998 and number of rural electric utility customers for 1998

  6. Looming labour shortages challenge Alberta resource industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.

    2005-07-01

    The shortage of skilled manpower that is threatening the viability of Alberta's resource industry is discussed. According to statistics compiled by the Canadian Resource Development the Canadian labour force grew by about 226,000 per year during the last quarter century; this will be reduced by about 125,000 per year during the current decade. It is forecast that by 2016, the annul growth will be near zero. To make up for this unprecedented shortfall, the annual rate of immigration required would have to be as high as 650,000 per year. The Alberta Chamber's Workforce Development Committee is aware of the urgency of the situation and is attempting to aggressively investigate the causes of the shortage of skilled labour and finding ways to deal with the problem. Current investigation appears to point the finger at the state of post-secondary education, most particularly the significantly higher underemployment among aboriginal youth and the likelihood that skills programs training developed to encourage First Nation's people would be the most effective way to help easing the growing labour shortage. Too few educational placement for students, a lack of adequate training equipment and financial resources in post-secondary institutions, and the variations in the quality of provincial educational standards receive the most blame, combined with a lack of awareness of employment opportunities or training programs, and the inability to migrate to high opportunity employment areas. A notable program addressing this issue is the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training System which helps young people to start their apprenticeship training while still in high school, and encourage them to continue their training after graduation from high school. The federal government and other groups also encourage participation among Ab originals and work towards eliminating some of the underlying factors of labour shortages, including cultural biases, barriers to inter

  7. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  8. Millennium Open Pit Mine, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on the east bank of the Athabasca River, are found the Steepbank and Millennium mines. These open pit mines produce oil sands that are processed to recover bitumen, and then upgrade it to refinery-ready raw crude oil, and diesel fuel. The ASTER images were acquired September 22, 2000 and July 31, 2007, cover an area of 22.5 x 25.5 km, and are located near 57 degrees north latitude, 111.5 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  9. Alberta petroleum equipment and services directory, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A directory is presented of Alberta companies that provide equipment and services to the oil industry. In the main section, companies are listed alphabetically by name, along with their addresses, phone/fax numbers, contact personnel, and lists of products and/or services. A separate alphabetical name index and a product/service index are included. A section covering provincial and territorial government agencies and non-governmental associations and institutes is appended, giving name, address, phone/fax number, leading personnel, and a summary of activities

  10. Worldwide market developments : lessons for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    A review of competitive retail electricity markets in Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and California were discussed, highlighting lessons for Alberta policy makers, market designers and electricity retailers. Some of the emerging strategies in the retail electricity marketplace such as horizontal integration, generation retailing, defensive retailing and virtual vertical integration were explored. Emphasis was on showing that electricity retailing is not an easy business. It is a business for large and existing players, and although horizontal and vertical integration have growth and profit potential, there are also risks

  11. Evolving Nature of School Psychology in Alberta: Politics and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Coranne; Zwiers, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the practice of school psychology in the province of Alberta reflects the entrenchment of assessment with the emerging possibility of a broader service provider role. This article articulates the influence that politics and government has had on the role of school psychologists in Alberta schools as special education…

  12. Education Reform in Alberta: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda L.; Webber, Charles F.

    This paper discusses what educational leadership might look like at the start of the 21st century, specifically within the context of Alberta. It also provides a brief synopsis of some of Alberta's major reforms of the past decade, and it presents some of the key findings and recommendations of a 1998 study entitled "An Analysis of Attitudes…

  13. Predicting lodgepole pine site index from climatic parameters in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Monserud; Shongming Huang; Yuqing. Yang

    2006-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the impact of climatic variables on site productivity of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) for the province of Alberta. Climatic data were obtained from the Alberta Climate Model, which is based on 30-year normals from the provincial weather station network. Mapping methods were based...

  14. Priority issues affecting operators' and suppliers' liens: the Alberta perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Selected aspects of priority issues in contractual obligations in the petroleum industry were discussed, focusing on the priority issues claimed by suppliers and operators with respect to Alberta properties. Discussions touched upon suppliers' lien rights in Alberta, operators' set-off rights, and on some of the priority issues involving operators' liens

  15. Learning and Technology in Alberta (1975 to 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's education system is a leader in the use of technology in teaching and learning. New information technologies create options for how teachers teach, how students learn, and how classrooms look and operate. This document chronicles the history of computer technology in Alberta from 1975-2009. The information is arranged in a tabulated…

  16. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, Belkaid

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  17. Circle of Courage Infusion into the Alberta Indigenous Games 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Dawn Marie

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of indigenous people from across North America came to the Enoch Cree Nation for the Alberta Indigenous Games, six days of sport, education, and cultural awakening. The vision of the Alberta Indigenous Games is to recognize the value and potential of Indigenous culture and the young people. Activities include sports, indigenous arts,…

  18. The contribution of a small TRIGA university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Bastuerk, M.; Boeck, H.

    2002-01-01

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL are mentioned. The second topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development

  19. The contribution of a small triga university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Weber, H.W.

    2001-01-01

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27 A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL will be mentioned. The second topic treated in this paper shows the international co-operation in the field of superconductors. This research work is carried out under two European TMR-Network programs. The third topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development. (orig.)

  20. Utilization of a typical 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at a University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Musilek, A.

    2007-01-01

    The 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor operates since March 1962 at the Atominstitut Vienna/Austria. Its main tasks are nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron- and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection and dosimetry, and low temperature physics and fusion research. Academic research is carried out by students in the above mentioned fields coordinated and supervised by about 70 staff members with the aim of a masters- or PhD degree in one of the above mentioned areas. During the past 15 years about 580 students graduated through the Atominstitut. In addition, the Atominstitut co-operates closely with the nearby located IAEA in research projects, coordinated research programs (CRP) and supplying expert services. Regular training courses are carried out for the IAEA for Safeguard Trainees, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is stored for calibration purposes at the Atominstitut belonging to the IAEA. (author)

  1. Vision 20/20 : saving for the future Alberta advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milke, M.

    2006-03-01

    As part of the Alberta Vision 20/20 project, Alberta's past and present spending patterns on natural resources and choices for the future were examined. Trust funds in Alberta, Alaska, and Norway were also compared, in order to learn from other jurisdictions. This report presented findings from Phase 3 of Vision 2020. The objectives of the study were to provide insight on what Alberta's economic, social and policy landscape might look like in the coming decades given expected demographic changes; benchmark Alberta's performance on key economic and social indicators and analyze government performance in related policy areas; supply useful, accessible information and possible solutions to Albertans about some of the challenges that demographic change is likely to bring; encourage discussion of issues among Albertans, including legislators and the media; and, where appropriate, encourage actions to mitigate or alleviate foreseeable problems. The guiding principles of the Vision 20/20 were first presented. Alberta's fiscal context and labyrinth of savings funds were examined. A detailed explanation and literature review of resource trust funds in Norway, Alaska, and Alberta were then provided followed by a comparison of the Alberta, Alaska, and Norway funds. Last, the report presented Alberta's options and discussion as well as recommendations. It was recommended that Alberta's annual per capita spending should not exceed population growth and inflation; the province should consider transfers of additional resource revenue into the Heritage Fund in the manner of the state of Alaska; and the province should deposit between 30 per cent and 40 per cent of all nonrenewable resource revenues in the Heritage Fund annually. 38 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs., 4 appendices

  2. Groundwater and underground coal gasification in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluszka, A.; MacMillan, G.; Maev, S.

    2010-01-01

    Underground coal gasification has potential in Alberta. This presentation provided background information on underground coal gasification and discussed groundwater and the Laurus Energy demonstration project. A multi-disciplined approach to project assessment was described with particular reference to geologic and hydrogeologic setting; geologic mapping; and a hydrogeologic numerical model. Underground coal gasification involves the conversion of coal into synthesis gas or syngas. It can be applied to mined coal at the surface or applied to non-mined coal seams using injection and production wells. Underground coal gasification can effect groundwater as the rate of water influx into the coal seams influences the quality and composition of the syngas. Byproducts created include heat as well as water with dissolved concentrations of ammonia, phenols, salts, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and liquid organic products from the pyrolysis of coal. A process overview of underground coal gasification was also illustrated. It was concluded that underground coal gasification has the potential in Alberta and risks to groundwater could be minimized by a properly designed project. refs., figs.

  3. Positive year for Alberta power pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid-Carlson, D.

    1997-01-01

    The electricity power pool in Alberta completed its first year under deregulation. Results to date indicate that the competitive market has operated as intended. The effects of electricity pricing on the oil industry following deregulation were described, given the fact that electricity prices represent the second largest cost item to the oil industry after labour. The peculiarities of the mechanism of electricity pricing (based on hourly matching of supply offers to demand bids) were explained, highlighting the opportunities and risks to the oil industry caused by the hourly price variations and the difficulties involved in accurately forecasting on-peak and off-peak prices a full year in advance. In 1996 predicted average price was $14 to $17/MWh. The actual average price was $13.40/MWh. The general conclusion was that Alberta continues to have a surplus of electricity generation and is well positioned to to take advantage of its low generating costs, at least over the longer term. Short term bidding practices, however, may results in slightly higher system marginal prices

  4. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anderson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS. Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018 at http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  5. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kerry; Pankratz, Al; Mooney, Curtis; Fleetham, Kelly

    2018-02-01

    A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS). Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018) at http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  6. Alberta's transmission development policy : review and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbings, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    Alberta's Department of Energy (ADOE) released a policy paper in November 2003 regarding power transmission development for the province. The transmission development policy (TDP) is intended to promote economic growth in Alberta while ensuring consumers with reliable, reasonably priced electricity. This presentation reviewed the main features of the policy and then focused on the allocation of costs to generation customers. The author argued that the proposed changes would result in a sub-optimal development of generation and higher total electricity bills for consumers. He argued that the policy will spare generation customers of any obligation to pay wire-related costs other than local interconnection costs. This would weaken a long-standing ADOE policy which requires generators to pay costs that depend on their location on the transmission system. With the new proposal, generators would not be responsible for ancillary service costs even when they provide direct benefits, and they would pay for system losses on a zonal basis. The author recommended that location charges should be large enough to influence the siting decisions of generators. He also recommended that generators should pay their fare share of transmission use-of-system charges, including ancillary services that provide benefits to generators in the form of a stable, reliable transmission system. 2 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Experience in operation and maintenance of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia in the time period July 1974 - June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambieri, A.; Cingoli, F.; Genova, N.; Meloni, S.; Perlini, G.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the 250 kW steady state/250 MW pulsed TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia over the past two years is presented and discussed. Reactor maintenance activity is presented as well. Data for reactor utilization and a summary of the health physics procedures are also given. Since the third European Conference of TRIGA Reactor Users in 1974, reactor operation took place smoothly without major troubles. Because of the core excess decrease due to reactor operation and consequent burn-up, ten new stainless steel clad fuel elements were bought from General Atomic. Reactor operation license expired at the end of 1975 and it is now under way the bureaucratic work to get its renewal. The aging of the electronic equipment raises minor problems and the predicted switching to a new solid state equipment started by changing the old electromechanical rod position indicators with new digital ones. The installation of the Euracos II facility (Enriched Uranium Converter Source), described at the last TRIGA Users Conference, began at the end of 1975 and it is still under way. The first operation of the facility will take place at reduced power so that the removal of the graphite blocks from thermal column was not accomplished. The installation of the facility is described and the procedures of its operation in connection with reactor operation are presented as well. (author)

  8. Recently-developed neutron activation analysis techniques utilizing the University of California at Irvine TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.; Chambless, D.; Cortes T, E.; DeLancey, K.; Garzonov, E.; Miller, D.A.; Miller, G.E.; Purcell, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The University of California at Irvine (UCI) 250 kW TRIGA Mark I reactor is used extensively for neutron activation analysis (NAA) studies. These particularly include basic technique studies and application studies in the fields of environmental pollution, crime investigation, archaeology, oceanography, and geochemistry. In recent NAA studies at UCI, a number of techniques have been developed which considerably improve the usefulness of such a research reactor for NAA work, and which should be of interest and use to others. Six of these techniques will be described in further detail in the full paper. They are as follows: development and use of (1) an automated high-precision rapid transfer system for instrumental NAA measurements with induced activities having half lives as short as 0.5 second, (2) an automated measurement system and computer program for making accurate dead-time corrections under conditions where the Ge(Li) spectrometer deadtime is changing rapidly during the counting period, (3) a technique to minimize the loss of mercury from samples during reactor irradiation via the use of dry-ice-packed, vented TRIGA rotary rack tubes, (4) a technique for compacting powdered samples, by pre-irradiation treatment with a solution of paraffin in carbon disulfide, to provide reproducible irradiation and counting geometries, (5) a method utilizing hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) as a pre-irradiation treatment material for removal of sodium from aqueous and wet-ashed samples, and (6) a computerized system for predicting in advance of activation, from approximate known elemental compositions, the total counting rate, deadtime, spectrum shape, principal photopeaks, and approximate actual lower limits of instrumental NAA detection of designated elements for any selected irradiation and decay times. (author)

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Zero-Power Reactor at Cornell University, Docket No. 50-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Cornell University (CU) for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a zero-power reactor (ZPR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the ZPR facility can continue to be operated by CU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Initial test results of the Omron face cue entry system at the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhiro, Akira T.; Vaughn, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor facility is testing, in collaboration with Omron Transaction Systems, Inc., the Omron Face Cue facial recognition system for access control to its restricted area. The installation of this system is the first of its kind at a security-relevant facility in the U.S. and within the research reactor community. The Face Cue is an on-demand device based on facial recognition and storage technology. The image processing methodology is as follows: (1) facial position detection, (2) background elimination, (3) facial features discrimination via application of a wavelet transform. The extracted facial feature values are compared to the data archived in its database and access is provided upon meeting the authorization criteria. The current test phase consisted of assessing the functionality of the Face Cue during daily use and in terms of its robustness (flexibility) as a function of the following physical parameters: (1) subject's distance away from the Face Cue, (2) ambient lighting conditions, (3) subject's facial orientation, (4) subject's facial expression and (5) peripheral facial features/modifications. The system has operated at nearly 100% reliability during several test intervals with approximately 7,000 entry attempts to date. (author)

  11. Results from Accelerator Driven TRIGA Reactor Experiments at The University of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kelly, S.; Braisted, J.; Krause, M.; Welch, L.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Transmutation of High-Level Waste (ATW) is one possible solution to the fuel reprocessing back-end problem for the disposal of high level waste such as minor actinides (Am, Np or Cm) and long-lived fission products. International programs continue to support research towards the eventual construction and operation of a proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source coupled to a subcritical 'neutron amplifier' for more efficient HLW transmutation. This project was performed under DOE AFCI Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE). A 20 MeV Electron Linac was installed in the BP no 5 cave placing neutron source adjacent to an offset reactor core to maximize neutron coupling with available systems. Asymmetric neutron injection 'wasted' neutrons due to high leakage but sufficient neutrons were available to raise reactor power to ∼100 watts. The Linac provided approximately 100 mA but only 50% reached target. The Linac cooling system could not prevent overheating at frequencies over 200 Hz. The Linac electron beam had harmonics of primary frequency and periodic low frequency pulse intensity changes. Neutron detection using fission chambers in current mode eliminated saturation dead time and produced better sensitivity. The Operation of 'dual shielded' fission chambers reduced electron noise from linac. Benchmark criticality calculation using start-up data showed that the MCNPX model overestimates reactivity. TRIGA core was loaded to just slightly supercritical by adding graphite elements and measuring reactivity of $0.037. MCNPX modeled TRIGA core with and without graphite to arrive at 'true' measured subcritical multiplication of 0.998733± 0.00069. Thus, Alpha for the UT-RACE TRIGA core was approximately 155.99 s -1 . The Stochastic Feynman-Alpha Method (SFM) accuracy was evaluated during transients and reactivity changes. SFM was shown to be a potential real-time method of reactivity determination in future ADSS but requires stable

  12. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities

  13. Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present TLÜ Akadeemilises Raamatukogus / Sander Jürisson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikooli Akadeemilises Raamatukogus on üleval näitus "Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present", mis annab ülevaate Kanada Alberta provintsi eestlaste loost. Näitus valmis Alberta Eesti Kultuuripärandi Seltsi koostöös Alberta Provintsi Arhiivi Kultuuripärandi Osakonnaga Edmontonis

  14. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrochers, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the first year of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta was presented. The way in which electricity is bought and sold in Ontario and throughout North America is changing. Costs are no longer fixed and regulated. Electricity is becoming a commodity with high levels of price volatility. The paper presented hedging options for Alberta consumers, contracting lessons, market issues and lessons for Ontario. A comparison of Alberta's deregulation schedule with that of Ontario's was included. One year after market opening in Alberta, power prices have dropped significantly. There is a greater than expected demand side response, increased development in power generation, and a decrease in natural gas prices. Issues that still need to be addressed in Alberta include billing and load settlement issues, invoicing/billing standards, the lack of competition at the retail level, and future balancing of pool charges. Energy Advantage Inc. (EA) does not foresee the same drastic increase in price as seen in Alberta market opening, but suggests that uncertainty and volatility will exist in Ontario. In Alberta, customers who did nothing and stayed on default were the ones who benefited, but took a great risk. EA suggests that customers must understand how and when they use electricity, how much is used during on- and off-peak hours, and in the summer versus the winter. When electricity is priced hourly, it is important to know consumption patterns. 7 figs

  15. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jaluvka, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members in the Research and Test Reactor Department at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. MURR LEU conversion is part of an overall effort to develop and qualify high-density fuel within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion (USHPRR) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3).

  16. Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity report to the Alberta Minister of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity regarding the restructuring of the electric power industry in the province of Alberta. Strategic issues affecting restructuring over the long term were considered with particular attention to small consumers. The long term vision (Vision 2012) for electric power restructuring is to promote efficient and competitive markets attracting investment and innovation that will result in fair and equitable prices for consumers. It was noted that while the restructuring system is currently in place, progress has not been even across the system. It is expected that it will take several years before a restructured electricity industry is fully functioning. Recommendations were presented to establish a plan to address issues regarding restructuring within power generation, transmission, distribution and export/import policies. The issue of market power, competitiveness and consumer education was also discussed. It was also noted that there are many external forces that impact the electricity system, many of which come from outside Alberta. These include fluctuations in gas prices, electricity demand, changes in the United States, regulatory decisions in other jurisdictions and unexpected business events. It was emphasized that a strong, liquid and competitive wholesale market is vital to achieving Vision 2012. Key factors for a competitive wholesale market include adequate generation, transmission capability and export/import capacity. The report presents the following 3 scenarios: business as usual, managed transition, and freedom 2012. A review of restructuring in several other jurisdictions around the world was also provided. 1 tab., 1 fig

  17. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Duval, P.; Jurisson, S.S.; Robertson, J.D.; Wall, J.D.; Quinn, T.P.; Volkert, W.A.; Neumeyer, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  18. Alberta royalty structure changes seen lacking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Canadian petroleum companies have welcomed a revamp of Alberta's royalty structure but say it falls short of what is needed to revitalize activity in the province. The changes will give producers a cut in royalties of at least $170 million (Canadian)/year, offer incentives for new drilling, and index royalty levels to prices. The new royalty plan also will reward companies that funnel more capital into increased exploration programs. The industry association the new royalty rates tied to prices could increase royalties if prices rise above $26 (Canadian)/bbl for oil and $1.70 (Canadian)/Mcf for natural gas. Royalty take would decline below these prices. Oil prices currently are near the $26/bbl level. CAPP the it is difficult to assess the effects of the royalty changes in reactivating shut-in wells and increasing production from marginal wells

  19. Guide to Alberta's competitive electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    A crucial point was reached at the beginning of 2001 in the process of competitive electricity market in Alberta, when record high prices were reached in both the natural gas and electricity markets. In this document, the intent was to present, in a non-technical way, the new electricity market. It was designed to cover issues as they flow, from generator to consumer. Therefore, it began with a market model illustration going through each step of the process. Frequently asked questions, developed using the input from 160,000 Albertans, were answered in each section. The first section of the document dealt with a competitive market. In section 2, the electricity supply was discussed, followed by section 3 and the wholesale electricity market. In section, 4, the reader was invited to explore customer choice, and consumer information was provided in section 5. tabs., figs

  20. FTA figures in Alberta-California gas price tiff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Canadian government and industry officials are considering a grievance procedure under the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement in a natural gas price conflict with California regulators. Industry groups and the federal and Alberta governments are considering action under the FTA and other possible responses to recent rulings by the California Public Utilities Commission. Other options being considered are appeals against the CPUC policy to the U.S. energy secretary and the governor of California or court challenges. Meantime, Alberta's government the new export volumes of gas sales to California will be approved only after existing contracts with the 190 Alberta producers have been filled

  1. Clean air strategy for Alberta: Background project reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    As a background to the development of a clean air strategy for Alberta, reports are presented which cover the definition of what clean air is, the applicability of full cost accounting to this strategy, market-based approaches to managing Alberta air emissions, gas and electric utility incentives programs for energy efficiency, energy efficiency legislation in Alberta and other jurisdictions, initiatives which address emissions reduction in the transportation sector, coordination of science and technology relevant to clean air issues, and initiatives in energy and environmental education

  2. Canada's first competitive electricity market: the Alberta experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, D.

    1997-01-01

    The restructuring of the electric power industry as experienced in the province of Alberta was discussed. Alberta's electric industry structure today is comprised of a power pool and open access transmission. The forces for change, the evolution of the new structure, the new Electric Utilities Act that defined restructuring, features of the restructured industry, the organization and functions of the Alberta Power Pool and the Transmission Administrator, the day-to-day functioning of the Power Pool, the price setting mechanism, access to the transmission system, the legislated financial hedges, the timeline for the retirement of the existing generation system, and anticipated future developments were described

  3. Energy literacy in Alberta : a collective challenge : discussion and framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.

    2010-03-15

    The actions needed to advance energy literacy in Alberta were discussed. Advancing Energy Literacy in Alberta (AELA) is a process that supports the objectives of Alberta's energy strategy through the development of a multi-stakeholder process that will lead to better energy information, education and outreach initiatives for the province's large and diverse audience. Advancing energy literacy is in the interest of the energy community and the economic well being of the province. Strategies for launching an energy literacy program were also discussed. tabs.

  4. Epithermal neutron beam for BNCT research at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigg, D.W.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Wemple, C.A.; Tripard, G.E.; Gavin, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    A new epithermal-neutron beam facility for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) research and boronated agent screening in animal models is in the final stages of construction at Washington State University (WSU). A key distinguishing feature of the design is the incorporation of a new, high-efficiency, neutron moderating and filtering material, Fluental, developed by the Technical Research Centre of Finland. An additional key feature is the provision for adjustable filter-moderator thickness to systematically explore the radiobiological consequences of increasing the fast-neutron contamination above the nominal value associated with the baseline system. (author)

  5. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, E T; Diaz, N J [Department of Nuclear Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Kniedler, G S [Reactor Analysis Group, TVA, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1983-09-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of

  6. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.; Diaz, N.J.; Kniedler, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of the

  7. A cost comparison of nuclear and fossil power for the Alberta tar sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochaski, R.O.; Smith, D.W.

    1977-04-01

    One technique envisaged for commercial development of the Alberta tar sands is in-situ removal of bitumen by injection of steam into the formation at high temperature and pressure. The 3000 MW of thermal power required for a typical 20 Gg/d plant could be supplied by a nuclear reactor. Accordingly, an economic comparison was made between a CANDU organic-cooled reactor and a conventional coal-fired station, using a variety of financial ground rules. This analysis shows that for debt-financed cases, nuclear power has essentially no economic competition from coal. For equity cases, the competitive position of a coal-fired station is heavily dependent on the cost of coal delivered to the tar sands area, discount rate, amortization period and inflation rate. (author)

  8. Development of a practical Monte Carlo based fuel management system for the Penn State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip; Ivanov, Kostadin; Frederick Sears, C.

    2008-01-01

    A practical fuel management system for the he Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR) based on the advanced Monte Carlo methodology was developed from the existing fuel management tool in this research. Several modeling improvements were implemented to the old system. The improved fuel management system can now utilize the burnup dependent cross section libraries generated specifically for PSBR fuel and it is also able to update the cross sections of these libraries by the Monte Carlo calculation automatically. Considerations were given to balance the computation time and the accuracy of the cross section update. Thus, certain types of a limited number of isotopes, which are considered 'important', are calculated and updated by the scheme. Moreover, the depletion algorithm of the existing fuel management tool was replaced from the predictor only to the predictor-corrector depletion scheme to account for burnup spectrum changes during the burnup step more accurately. An intermediate verification of the fuel management system was performed to assess the correctness of the newly implemented schemes against HELIOS. It was found that the agreement of both codes is good when the same energy released per fission (Q values) is used. Furthermore, to be able to model the reactor at various temperatures, the fuel management tool is able to utilize automatically the continuous cross sections generated at different temperatures. Other additional useful capabilities were also added to the fuel management tool to make it easy to use and be practical. As part of the development, a hybrid nodal diffusion/Monte Carlo calculation was devised to speed up the Monte Carlo calculation by providing more converged initial source distribution for the Monte Carlo calculation from the nodal diffusion calculation. Finally, the fuel management system was validated against the measured data using several actual PSBR core loadings. The agreement of the predicted core

  9. Feasibility study of the underwater neutron radiography facility using the University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, D.; Xiao, S.; Jevremovic, T.; Yang, X.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor provides usable neutron yields for neutron radiography. Currently, UUTR reactor has three irradiators (Central, Pneumatic, and Thermal irradiators) and one Fast neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF). These irradiators are very small so they are not suitable for neutron radiography. UUTR has three beam ports but they are not available due to the structure of the core. All sides of the core are occupied by FNIF, Thermal Irradiator, and three ion chambers. The only available position for underwater vertical beam port is on the top of the FNIF. There are two factors necessary to fulfill to be able to realize vertical underwater beam port: noninterruption to other facilities and radiation shielding. Designing the vertical beam port as movable ensures good access to the core and pool, while still providing a good neutron radiography environment. Keeping the top of the beam port below the surface of the pool the water represents biological shield. Neutron radiographs, with a simple setup of efficient neutron converters and digital camera systems, can produce acceptable resolution with an exposure time as short as a few minutes. It is important to validate the design with calculations before constructing the beam port. The design of the beam port is modeled using the MCNP5 transport code. A minimum of 10 5 neutrons/cm 2 -sec thermal neutron flux is required for high resolution neutron radiography. Currently, the UUTRIGA is in the process of upgrading its power from 100 kW to 250 kW. Upon the completion of the upgrading, the maximum neutron flux in the core will be ∼7x10 12 neutrons/cm 2 -sec. This paper discusses a modeling and evaluation of capability for a neutron radiography facility. (author)

  10. Health status of refugees settled in Alberta: changes since arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Katerina; Krahn, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    This paper sought to examine which pre- and post-migration factors might be associated with changes in refugees' health status. Using linear regression, the associations between pre- and post-migration factors and changes in self-rated mental and physical health status were examined in 525 refugees from the 1998 Settlement Experiences of Refugees in Alberta study. Having spent time in a refugee camp and having held professional/managerial jobs in one's home country were associated with a greater decline in mental health status since arrival in Canada. Having completed a university degree in one's home country was associated with a greater decline in physical health status. Being employed was associated with greater improvements in mental health status. Perceived economic hardship was associated with greater declines in physical health status. A higher number of settlement services received during the first year in Canada was associated with greater improvements in both mental and physical health status. Longer residence in Canada was associated with greater declines in physical health status but not in mental health status. While little can be done to alter refugees' pre-migration experiences, public policies can affect many post-migration experiences in order to mitigate the negative health consequences associated with resettlement. Results of this study point to the need for continued provision of settlement services to assist refugees with job training, labour market access, and credential recognition, as well as counseling for refugees who experienced the trauma of living in a refugee camp.

  11. Development of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for detection of CO2, CH4 and PM in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michael; Crowther, Blake; Lemon, Robert; Valupadas, Prasad; Fu, Long; Leung, Bonnie; Yang, Zheng; Huda, Quamrul; Chambers, Allan

    2005-05-01

    Rapid expansion of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, including the oil sands, has challenged the Alberta Government to keep pace in its efforts to monitor and mitigate the environmental impacts of development. The limitations of current monitoring systems has pushed the provincial government to seek out advanced sensing technologies such as satellite imagery and laser based sensors. The Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) of Utah State University, in cooperation with Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency (AEMERA), has developed North America's first mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system designed specifically for emissions measurement. This instrument is housed inside a 36' trailer which allows for mobility to travel across Alberta to characterize source emissions and to locate fugitive leaks. DIAL is capable of measuring concentrations for carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at ranges of up to 3 km with a spatial resolution of 10 meters. DIAL can map both CO2 and CH4, as well as particulate matter (PM) in a linear fashion; by scanning the laser beam in both azimuth and elevation DIAL can create images of emissions in two dimensions. DIAL imagery may be used to understand and control production practices, characterize source emissions, determine emission factors, locate fugitive leaks, assess plume dispersion, and confirm air dispersion modeling. A system overview of the DIAL instrument and some representative results will be discussed.

  12. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dallas; Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  13. Present status of Kyoto University reactor research result data base KURRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki

    1986-01-01

    The construction of KURRIP data base was begun in 1982, and in 1983, the data base concerning the literatures published in five years from 1978 to 1982 was set up in the Kyoto University Large Computer Center, and it has become available generally. In fiscal year 1984, the data concerning the literatures published from 1974 to 1977 and in 1983 were added. Moreover in this fiscal year, the work is carried out to input the data concerning the literatures published from 1970 to 1973 and in 1984. The data retrievable at present are those for ten years from 1974 to 1983. The results of having retrieved these data about a number of items are reported in this paper. The classification according to the places of employment of authors, the classification according to the kinds of literatures, the classification according to the languages used, the classification according to the installations used, the classification according to the fields of research, and the classification according to the magazines which printed the data are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Sulphur output from oil sands : dramatically changing Alberta's sulphur balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Aquin, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discussed sulphur production from Alberta's gas and oil sands industries. While sulfur derived from natural gas production in the province is expected to decline as natural gas reserves diminish, Alberta's oil sands contain high amounts of sulphur. It is not yet known how much sulphur will be produced from the province's oil sands facilities. Alberta had considerable stockpiles of sulphur in the 1970s. By 1980, inventories began to decline. By 1996, output had increased to 7.1 million tonnes. Alberta's sulphur inventory reached 9.7 million tonnes following the collapse of the Soviet Union's government mandated fertilizer industry. In 2006, sulphur supplies in Alberta reached 12 million tonnes. Reduced global output has now lowered sulphur stockpiles. Increases in sulphur prices tend to reduce market demand, and lower prices will not typically change the volume of sulphur produced as a byproduct of oil and gas operations. Bitumen-derived sulphur output is expected to exceed gas-derived sulphur output in the near future. Sulphur from oil sands processing is expected to increase by 5 million tonnes by 2017. Increased sulphur production levels in Alberta will present a significant challenge for all sectors of the hydrocarbon industry. It was concluded that developing a plan for storing, selling or disposing of the sulphur will help to ensure the profitability of oil sands operations

  15. Evaluating the role of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doluweera, G.H.; Jordaan, S.M.; Moore, M.C.; Keith, D.W.; Bergerson, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Developing long-term carbon control strategies is important in energy intensive industries such as the oil sands operations in Alberta. We examine the use of cogeneration to satisfy the energy demands of oil sands operations in Alberta in the context of carbon management. This paper evaluates the role of cogeneration in meeting Provincial carbon management goals and discusses the arbitrary characteristics of facility- and product-based carbon emissions control regulations. We model an oil sands operation that operates with and without incorporated cogeneration. We compare CO 2 emissions and associated costs under different carbon emissions control regulations, including the present carbon emissions control regulation of Alberta. The results suggest that incorporating cogeneration into the growing oil sands industry could contribute in the near-term to reducing CO 2 emissions in Alberta. This analysis also shows that the different accounting methods and calculations of electricity offsets could lead to very different levels of incentives for cogeneration. Regulations that attempt to manage emissions on a product and facility basis may become arbitrary and complex as regulators attempt to approximate the effect of an economy-wide carbon price. - Highlights: ► We assess the effectiveness of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta. ► Cogeneration can offset a significant portion of Alberta's high carbon electricity. ► CO 2 reduction potential of cogeneration may be higher if installed immediately. ► Product based policies should approximate the effect of an economy-wide policy.

  16. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, first half of 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This book contains 56 brief reports of studies carried out at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. These reports deal with 'Neutron Transmutation Doping on Compound Semiconductor', 'Study on the Influence of the Neutron Irradiation on the Low Temperature Strength of Various Welded Joint of Dissimilar Materials', 'Low Temperature Irradiation Effect on Iron-Alloys and Ceramics', 'Luminescent Phenomena from Some Kinds of Rock and Mineral Slices Accompanied with Gamma-irradiation', 'Study of Irradiation Effects on Simulated Waste Glass Irradiated Using 10 B(n,γ) 7 Li Reaction', 'Neutron Spectrometry with CR-39 Track Detector', 'Performance Study on Superconducting Magnet Materials in Thermonuclear Fusion Conditions', 'Fast Neutron Radiography with KUR-Linac', 'Study of Photo-Excited Metastable State and Their Relaxation of Irradiation Defects in Silicon and Diamond by Using a SQUID Magnetometer', 'Moessbauer Study on Radiation Damage of Metals and Alloys', 'Radiation Damages in Super Ionic Conductors', 'Basic Study on 74 As Production by (γ,n) Reaction', etc. (N.K.)

  17. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 10 8 n/cm 2 · s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n epi and 20 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n epi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power

  18. MAPLE: a Canadian multipurpose reactor concept for national nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstone, R.F.

    1984-06-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, following an investigation of Canadian and international needs and world-market prospects for research reactors, has developed a new multipurpose concept, called MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental). The MAPLE concept combines H 2 O- and D 2 O-moderated lattices within a D 2 O calandria tank in order to achieve the flux advantages of a basic H 2 O-cooled and moderated core along with the flexibility and space of a D 2 O-moderated core. The SUGAR (Slowpoke Uprated for General Applied Research) MAPLE version of the conept provides a range of utilization that is well suited to the needs of countries with nuclear programs at an early stage. The higher power MAPLE version furnishes high neutron flux levels and the variety of irradiation facilities that are appropriate for more advanced nuclear programs

  19. Methods for producing and upgrading liquid hydrocarbons from Alberta coal. [Canada - Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Production of synthetic crude oils by co-processing coal and heavy oil or bitumen has been the subject of research efforts in Alberta since 1979. This booklet describes the treatment that is necessary for these crude oils to become suitable as feedstocks for refineries as evolved in research projects. Sections are headed: hydroprocessing of coal-based liquids; functional group analysis; isotopic studies of co-processing schemes; chemistry of coal liquefaction; co-processing process development; molecular interactions between heavy oil and coal species during co-processing; combined processing of coal, heavy oil and natural gas; and coprocessing of coal and bitumen with molten halide catalysts. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Is the restructuring of Alberta's power market on the right track? Evaluating Alberta's first two years of deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellenius, K.; Adamson, S.

    2003-07-01

    The performance of Alberta's restructured electricity market was evaluated since its move to wholesale competition in January 2001. This paper presents the following eight conclusions that the authors arrived at following the evaluation: (1) To meet growing demand, the electricity prices in Alberta would have increased regardless of the type of environment (regulated or not). Capacity investment was required, and it was believed that moving to competition was the best way to attract investors. (2) Success in attracting private investment was attained as a result of Alberta's open market. It has restored reliability of supply and moderated prices. (3) Price comparisons must take into account what the prices would have been if the market had remained regulated. Due to unique generation costs and regulatory environments, comparisons with other regulated jurisdictions is inappropriate. (4) Convergence with other energy rates that would have been seen under regulation is being noted with respect to Alberta's market prices. (5) Under deregulation, prices increase according to the need for new investment and fall after the investment is made. Alberta has been on a path toward continued reduction in wholesale prices since 2001. (6) The non-price benefits of restructuring include improved generation efficiency, captured residual value from regulated assets, and shifting investment risk of new capacity additions from consumers to generators. (7) Downward pressure on prices was noted as a result of deregulation, as expected. (8) Significant value for consumers was captured through Alberta's restructuring process. 7 tabs., 7 figs

  1. Annual compensation for pipelines in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The Surface Rights Board (SRB) in Alberta held a hearing in November 2007 to address three issues involving a pipeline for Enbridge Pipelines (Athabasca) Inc. as well as several land owner issues in Townships 66-68 and Ranges 17-19, all west of the 4th Meridian. The issues the SRB examined were the appropriate amount (i.e. magnitude) of compensation payable under right of entry orders under consideration; the appropriate structure of the compensation award; and to whom the compensation was payable. This document presented a review by the Farmer's Advocate Office (FAO) of the published decision of the SRB. The verbatim decision and rationale used by the SRB to award annual compensation for loss and/or ongoing nuisance and inconvenience was presented. The document could be useful to landowners as they determine their negotiation strategy when faced with considering future pipeline access agreements. The document included a discussion of the context for the decision and a case review. Specific topics that were covered included the rationale for the decision; long term effects of pipeline arguments and SRB commentary; the award and determination; and what still needs to be done. It was concluded that the SRB requires evidence in order to answer several questions regarding the magnitude of any losses, and to what degree, if any, had the nuisance, inconvenience, and loss of rights already been anticipated and factored into the operator's final offer

  2. A retailer's perspective on generation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willerton, K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several reasons for a retailer to invest in power generation. This investment acts as a risk management hedge against fixed price retail load, while improving competitiveness in illiquid wholesale markets. Investing in power generation leverages the retailer's wholesale trading capabilities. It also provides appropriate returns. Some of the factors that ensure the success of a retailer investing in power generation are low cost structure, low risk, strong forward commodity market, owners with large healthy balance sheets, and willingness to finance projects entirely with equity. A cost comparison was presented for different generation technologies. ENMAX chose to invest in wind power since the costs were comparable to that of other technologies. In addition, green credits will lower the cost of wind power. With low environmental impacts and no fuel risk, wind energy fitted ENMAX's retail strategy. Green power at ENMAX (GREENMAX) was the first to implement a Green Power Residential program in 1998, followed by the Green Power Commercial program in 2000. The author discussed the McBride Lake Wind Farm located near Fort MacLeod, Alberta. figs

  3. Alberta books big revenues in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, R.

    1996-01-01

    A 17.9 per cent increase over 1995 in oil and gas revenues were reported for Alberta through August 1996. Revenues from crude oil were up 12.6 per cent and from natural gas 30.7 per cent. The level of increase in revenues is expected to hold for the remainder of the year, save for the prospects of Iraq re-entering the market in force. This would cause a steep decline in prices and some panic trading in energy stocks. Nevertheless, producers are well positioned for the year ahead, as capital spending and drilling activity are based on lower price forecasts. Oil production over 1995 was down slightly through August. Light and medium crude production was down 4.5 per cent. Synthetic production fell by 0.8 per cent. Natural gas production will have a record year. Through August output was up 4.6 per cent over 1995, sales were up 19.3 per cent, and exports were ahead by just under one per cent. Natural gas liquids were the biggest revenue booster, increasing by 46.3 per cent over 1995

  4. Alberta Reclamation Research annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reclamation Research Technical Advisory Committee (RRTAC) was appointed by the Alberta Land Conservation and Reclamation Council to assist in technical matters related to the development and administration of the Council's research program. RRTAC develops reclamation research under four major program areas, and activities in these areas during the year are described in this report. The Plains Coal Reclamation Research Program addresses questions relating to groundwater and soil reconstruction in plains coal mining zones. The Mountain and Foothills Reclamation Research Program focuses on water management, soil reconstruction, reforestation, and wildlife habitat development, with objectives including control of erosion on a variety of disturbances such as coal mines and ash pits. The Oil Sands Reclamation Research Program is attempting to develop techniques to establish self-sustaining, erosion-free cover on oil sand tailings pond dikes, and to return tailings sand storage and overburden dumps to productive forests. The Oil and Gas Reclamation Research Program is concerned with disposal of drilling wastes and reclamation of lands disturbed by oil and gas activities. Under each program, the objectives, basic problems investigated, and research approach are presented, followed by description of specific projects involving such subjects as hydrology, revegetation, soil-water interactions, landscape and watershed design, soil reconstruction and amendment, and soil compaction. A list of research reports is included. 69 refs., 8 figs

  5. The University and the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan

    This paper presented views on the role of the university, and particularly the University of Alberta, in the community in the 1970s. Such indicators as population growth, income growth, rising level of education, rising levels of taxation, the rapidity of technological advance, shifts in social pattern, all pointed to a rapidly growing demand on…

  6. A nuclear reactor for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.; Fenton, N.

    1989-07-01

    Global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years. In the northern hemisphere, many countries consume in excess of 25 percent of their primary energy supply for building heating. Satisfying this need, within the constraints now being acknowledged for sustainable global development, provides an important opportunity for district heating. Fuel-use flexibility, energy and resource conservation, and reduced atmospheric pollution from acid gases and greenhouse gases, are important features offered by district heating systems. Among the major fuel options, only hydro-electricity and nuclear heat completely avoid emissions of combustion gases. To fill the need for an economical nuclear heat source, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has designed a 10 MW plant that is suitable as a heat source within a network or as the main supply to large individual users. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees C, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on AECL's successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype for the commercial unit is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba. With capital costs of $7 million (Canadian), unit energy costs are projected to be $0.02/kWh for a 10 MW unit operating in a heating grid over a 30-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees C, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  7. The potential for coalbed methane (CBM) development in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This report presents fiscal and regulatory recommendations of the coalbed methane (CBM) Advisory Committee which consists of representatives from Alberta's oil and gas industry who participated in a study to determine the potential for coalbed methane development in the province. CBM is a natural gas produced as a by-product of the coal formation process. This study examined the CBM reserve base in Alberta along with the necessary steps and strategies required to develop it. There is increased interest in natural gas from Alberta's coal resources because of the forecast for reasonable natural gas prices coupled with an increase in energy demand. The remaining established natural gas reserves are estimated at 43 trillion cubic feet and unconventional supplies of natural gas will be needed by 2008 to meet this increasing demand. The recoverable reserves of CBM are estimated to be between 0 and 135 trillion cubic feet. This report discussed the following mitigation strategies suggested by industry that may applicable to CBM development in Alberta: (1) potential technical mitigation strategies, (2) potential land access and tenure strategies, (3) potential water disposal and diversion mitigation strategies, (4) potential non-technical mitigation strategies, and (5) potential economic mitigation strategies. The study concluded that since no two CBM basins are the same, it is necessary to have good baseline resource inventory data. It was also noted that evolving management, drilling and completion techniques will continue to enhance the economic understanding of Alberta's extensive coal beds. It was suggested that lessons from CBM development in the United States can be useful for development in Alberta since there are currently no publicly recognized commercial production of CBM in Alberta. 24 refs., 6 tabs., 25 figs

  8. Refining the focus: Alberta's international marketing strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This strategic plan is the key initiative established under 'Alberta's Framework for International Strategies'. Its objective is to ensure the wellbeing of Albertans, sustaining Alberta's environment, and economic growth through successfully taking advantage of Alberta's many opportunities for marketing its goods, products, and services. It is predicated on industry and government continuing to work together to sustain a strong market-driven economy, strengthen Alberta's economic advantages and build an economic environment conducive to investment and growth in quality jobs. At present more than 150 foreign markets buy Alberta's goods and services, but the obvious focus of any strategy must be those regions and sectors of industry that offer the greatest possibilities for new and expanded opportunities for Alberta business. Accordingly, this strategy identifies priorities, selects the best initiatives and develops activities to achieve economic growth. Adding value to Albertan commodities before they are being shipped to export markets is a particular objective of the plan. An equally important consideration is to achieve growth through expansion of existing investments, attract new investment to the province, and to increase exports in response to international market and investment opportunities for Alberta's goods and services. Major topics discussed in the document include a discussion of the importance of trade and investment, a thorough analysis of the marketing priorities, the strategic framework, and priority market profiles for the United States, Japan,China, other Asia-Pacific markets, the European Union, Mexico, the Middle East and South Asia, and South America.

  9. Status report about the works for the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor at the Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R; Carballido, C.; Oliveras, T.

    1991-01-01

    After two years of works at the Cordoba National University for the new start-up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor, the results obtained are herein presented. Starting with practically null infrastructure at the beginning, specially in human resources and instrumentation of the reactor, the objectives can be considered satisfactory. The training in work of the future operational staff, the design and the construction of the instrumentation and the fitting of the installations are the principal items described in this paper. An special attention is devoted to the insertion of this type of installation in the university organization, usually not prepared for the quality and control activities, which is necessarily considered in these type of works. (Author) [es

  10. Loading and initial start-up testing of the low-enrichment uranium core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Conversion of the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel elements was begun in August 1985, with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the university. Conversion of the OSURR from HEU to LEU fuel was successfully completed. The reactor is operational at 10-kW steady-state thermal power. Measurements of selected core parameters have been made and compared with predicted values and previous values for the HEU core. In general, measured results agree well with predicted performance, and minor changes have been detected in certain core parameters as a result of the change to LEU fuel. Future plans include additional core testing and a possible increase in operating power

  11. Fabrication and testing of a 4-node micro-pocket fission detector array for the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2017-08-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) have been fabricated and tested previously, but successful testing of these prior detectors was limited to single-node operation with specialized designs. Described in this work is a modular, four-node MPFD array fabricated and tested at Kansas State University (KSU). The four sensor nodes were equally spaced to span the length of the fuel-region of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor core. The encapsulated array was filled with argon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the MPFDs. The unified design improved device ruggedness and simplified construction over previous designs. A 0.315-in. (8-mm) penetration in the upper grid plate of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor was used to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The MPFD array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been developed to support pulse-mode operation. Neutron-induced pulses were observed on all four sensor channels. Stable device operation was confirmed by testing under steady-state reactor conditions. Each of the four sensors in the array responded to changes in reactor power between 10 kWth and full power (750 kWth). Reactor power transients were observed in real-time including positive transients with periods of 5, 15, and 30 s. Finally, manual reactor power oscillations were observed in real-time.

  12. Innovations and enhancements in neutronic analysis of the Big-10 university research and training reactors based on the AGENT code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, M.; Shanjie, X.; Burns, A.; Hopkins, J.; Satvat, N.; Gert, G.; Tsoukalas, L. H.; Jevremovic, T.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. This paper summarizes salient aspects of the 'virtual' reactor system developed at Purdue Univ. emphasizing efficient neutronic modeling through AGENT (Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport) a deterministic neutron transport code. DOE's Big-10 Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Consortium was launched in 2002 to enhance scholarship activities pertaining to university research and training reactors (URTRs). Existing and next generation URTRs are powerful campus tools for nuclear engineering as well as a number of disciplines that include, but are not limited to, medicine, biology, material science, and food science. Advancing new computational environments for the analysis and configuration of URTRs is an important Big-10 INIE aim. Specifically, Big-10 INIE has pursued development of a 'virtual' reactor, an advanced computational environment to serve as a platform on which to build operations, utilization (research and education), and systemic analysis of URTRs physics. The 'virtual' reactor computational system will integrate computational tools addressing the URTR core and near core physics (transport, dynamics, fuel management and fuel configuration); thermal-hydraulics; beam line, in-core and near-core experiments; instrumentation and controls; confinement/containment and security issues. Such integrated computational environment does not currently exist. The 'virtual' reactor is designed to allow researchers and educators to configure and analyze their systems to optimize experiments, fuel locations for flux shaping, as well as detector selection and configuration. (authors)

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Research Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Docket No. 50-57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the State University of New York at Buffalo for a renewal of Operating License R-77 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the State University of New York and is located on the campus in Buffalo, New York. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  14. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  15. Harmonization of industrial and oilfield waste management issues in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halla, S.

    1999-01-01

    There has been an ongoing discussion concerning the harmonization of waste management requirements within Alberta between the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environment (AENV), with the ultimate goal of publishing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that will lay out the division of responsibilities between the two authorities on this matter. An overview is included of waste management in Alberta and of the harmonization agreements attained to date, with a stress on oil field waste issues. The EUB and AENV developed a MOE on the harmonization of waste management in Alberta, and a discussion is made of the concept of equivalency, which is used in the development of 'EUB guide 58: oilfield waste management requirements for the upstream petroleum industry' and will be a guiding principle for the MOU. Although the EUB's processes for waste management will not be exactly the same as AENV's, the EUB has made the commitment that, as a minimum, the requirements will provide the same level of environmental protection and public safety equivalent to that provided by AENV

  16. Alberta benefits : economic impacts of northern gas pipeline construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rylska, N.L.; Graebeiel, J.E.; Mirus, R.K.; Janzen, S.S.; Frost, R.J.

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the potential economic impact and benefits to Alberta from the proposed development of the Alaska Highway Pipeline (AHP) and the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline (MVP). It also includes a planning framework for business and industry in the province. Each proposed pipeline was evaluated separately. The paper includes a list of Alberta companies that stand to benefit from the construction of one or both pipelines. The main findings indicate that northern pipeline development will bring opportunities to Alberta business in design, construction and management. There will be a secondary impact on petrochemical industries and infrastructure. Both pipeline developments will increase employment and yield billions of dollars in gross domestic product. The existing oil and gas industry in Alberta will receive value-added opportunities in areas of specialized expertise such as natural gas and natural gas liquid storage, natural gas liquid processing, and gas to liquid technology projects. The industry will also benefit from power generation and cogeneration. The northern pipelines have the potential to improve the role of First Nations in economic development. Gas consumers in Alberta should benefit from a secure supply of gas and lower prices. refs., tabs., figs

  17. Power Pool of Alberta annual report 2000 : building a market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As of January 1, 2001, deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta became a reality, and was accompanied by steady growth in demand for electricity combined with other factors that pushed the price of electricity upward. The Power Pool of Alberta ensures that market operations are open and fair. Its mandate, under the Electric Utilities Act, is the overall market surveillance in Alberta's electric industry. It is accomplished by working closely with industry and seeking feedback through four standing committees: Human Resources, Operations, Finance and Audit, and Balancing Pool. The goal for the coming years is to build confidence in the market, whereby consumers are confident about the fairness of the market price for electricity in Alberta, the choices available, and the continued reliability of the electric system in Alberta. The Energy Trading System was explained with information about system control and customer service, and details provided on the consultation and collaboration processes. The financial analysis of the year 2000 was provided, as well as a statement of operation, a balance sheet, and a statement of cash flows. tabs., figs

  18. Make the Alberta Carbon Levy Revenue Neutral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. McKenzie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The new carbon levy of $30 per tonne, announced in November 2015 as part of the report issued by the Alberta government’s Climate Leadership Panel, is a positive move in the direction of pricing carbon emissions. The levy is expected to generate $3 billion in net revenue by 2018, and possibly as much as $5 billion by 2030. While there is some discussion in the report of what should be done with the revenues generated by the carbon levy, it is somewhat vague on the details, leaving a number of options open to the government. The purpose of this briefing paper is to argue that the revenues from the carbon levy should be used to lower existing taxes – the carbon tax should be revenue neutral, generating no new net revenue for the government. The basic argument is that the carbon levy can be viewed through two lenses. The first lens is the imposition of a price on carbon emissions which (at least partly reflects the social costs of emissions. Viewed through this price lens, the carbon levy plays an important role in incenting firms and individuals to change their behaviour and move towards less carbon intensive activities. The second lens is the role of a carbon tax as a part of the broad revenue system. Viewed through this tax lens, a carbon tax is not a very good, or efficient, way of generating revenue. The reason for this is somewhat nuanced, but the basic idea is that the carbon tax is applied to a narrower base than broader-based taxes. Broad based taxes generally impose lower costs on the economy than narrow based taxes. Moreover, carbon taxes interact with other taxes in the economy, exacerbating the economic costs associated with those taxes. And those costs are quite high – research shows that the total cost to the economy of raising an additional $1 in revenue through the corporate income tax in Alberta is $3.79; for the personal income tax the cost is $1.71. These taxes therefore impose higher costs on the economy than they raise

  19. Final report : Alberta renewable diesel demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-02-15

    The Alberta renewable diesel demonstration (ARDD) was a demonstration project aimed at providing information and operating experience to stakeholders in the diesel fuel industry. The demonstration took renewable diesel from the lab to the road, providing hands-on experience at 2 and 5 per cent blends (B2 in winter and B5 in shoulder and summer seasons). The ARDD fleet consisted of 59 vehicles running on two types of renewable diesel, notably fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and hydrogenated-derived renewable diesel (HDRD). This report was a summary of the observations of the ARDD. The report provided a general account of the project scope, methods and observations employed in a multi-stakeholder, real-world demonstration of low-level renewable diesel fuels in challenging winter conditions. The purpose of the report was to provide feedback to stakeholders regarding the use of renewable diesel fuels in Canada's on-road diesel fuel market and to confirm the operability of low level renewable diesel blends under the specific conditions tested ensuring full and continuous compliance with CAN/CGSB 3.520. The report discussed Canada's fuel distribution system in western Canada; the blending facility; blending techniques; fuel retail locations; fuel properties; fuel handling; fuel selection; and fuel testing. It was concluded that the ARDD demonstrated that B2 blends of canola methyl ester and 2 per cent blends of hydrogenation derived renewable diesel were fully operable in winter conditions in the study area when cloud points were adjusted to meet CAN/CGSB requirements. 4 refs., 15 tabs., 20 figs., 2 appendices.

  20. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  1. Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund : 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A review of the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund as it operated under the new investment framework established in 1997 was presented. The new statutory mission of the Fund is to provide stewardship of the savings from Alberta's non-renewable resources by providing the greatest financial returns on those savings for current and future generations of Albertans. In 1998, the Fund earned $947 million in income with nearly $25 million of income being retained to ensure that the value of the Fund grows to off-set the effects of inflation. Net assets of the Fund on March 31, 1998 was $ 12.3 billion. Operation of the Fund, the accounting method used, and details about the Transition Portfolio and the Endowment Portfolio are provided. An assessment of Alberta's economic climate accompanies the auditor's report and the detailed financial statements of the Fund. tabs

  2. Reforming Long-Term Care Funding in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, R Trafford; Repin, Nadya; Sutherland, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Like many provinces across Canada, Alberta is facing growing demand for long-term care. Issues with the mixed funding model used to pay long-term care providers had Alberta Health Services concerned that it was not efficiently meeting the demand for long-term care. Consequently, in 2010, Alberta Health Services introduced the patient/care-based funding (PCBF) model. PCBF is similar to activity-based funding in that it directly ties the complexity and care needs of long-term care residents to the payment received by long-term care providers. This review describes PCBF and discusses some of its strengths and weaknesses. In doing so, this review is intended to inform other provinces faced with similar long-term care challenges and contemplating their own funding reforms.

  3. Should upgrading and refining be enhanced in Alberta?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgarpour, S.

    2006-01-01

    Although world oil prices are rising, the price of bitumen remains stable. It was noted that surplus refinery capacity is disappearing and that skilled labour, infrastructure, transportation systems, environmental management and technology development are among some of the challenges facing heavy hydrocarbon development. Pie charts indicating global reserves of crude oil and heavy crude oil showed that although the Middle East leads in world proven oil reserves, nearly half of the heavy crude oil and natural bitumen deposits are in Canada. As a global energy leader, Alberta is using its' world class expertise to develop the vast energy resources of the province and to market these resources and abilities to the world. This presentation summarized processing activities in Alberta and outlined the markets for petrochemicals. A graph representing North American petroleum supply and demand from 2001 to 2019 was also presented along with a review of Alberta's upgrading and refining capacity and infrastructure opportunities for crude oil, natural gas, petrochemicals and electricity. Alberta's crude oil markets by 2020 are likely to be the Far East, California, Heredity's, Wyoming, Chicago, Cushing, United States Gulf Coast, and the East Coast. The benefits of upgrading in Alberta include inexpensive feedstock, existing upgrader and petrochemical sites and low transportation costs. In addition, more refining capacity in the province would provide market diversification for bitumen products; higher investment and value-added in Alberta; opportunity to provide feedstock to petrochemicals; production of synthetic diluent in the province; and, smaller environmental footprint and greater energy efficiency. The cumulative impact of oil sands development on government revenues was discussed along with the challenge of addressing the issue of a skilled labour shortage, infrastructure needs, and developing a business case for a carbon dioxide pipeline. tabs., figs

  4. Cancer incidence attributable to air pollution in Alberta in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Abbey E.; Grundy, Anne; Khandwala, Farah; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Brenner, Darren R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified outdoor air pollution (fine particulate matter [PM2.5]) as a Group 1 lung carcinogen in humans. We aimed to estimate the proportion of lung cancer cases attributable to PM2.5 exposure in Alberta in 2012. Methods: Annual average concentrations of PM2.5 in 2011 for 22 communities across Alberta were extracted from the Clean Air Strategic Alliance Data Warehouse and were population-weighted across the province. Using 7.5 µg/m3 and 3.18 µg/m3 as the annual average theoretical minimum risk concentrations of PM2.5, we estimated the proportion of the population above this cut-off to determine the population attributable risk of lung cancer due to PM2.5 exposure. Results: The mean population-weighted concentration of PM2.5 for Alberta in 2011 was 10.03 µg/m3. We estimated relative risks of 1.02 and 1.06 for theoretical minimum risk PM2.5 concentration thresholds of 7.5 µg/m3 and 3.18 µg/m3, respectively. About 1.87%-5.69% of incident lung cancer cases in Alberta were estimated to be attributable to PM2.5 exposure. Interpretation: Our estimate of attributable burden is low compared to that reported in studies in other areas of the world owing to the relatively low levels of PM2.5 recorded in Alberta. Reducing PM2.5 emissions in Alberta should continue to be a priority to help decrease the burden of lung cancer in the population. PMID:28659352

  5. Alberta oil and gas industry annual statistics for 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A compilation of statistical data from Alberta's oil and gas industry was presented to provide energy analysts and economists a single source of consistent energy-related data. Alberta is Canada's largest crude oil and natural gas producer. This report provides current monthly and historical annual energy data covering the last decade. Data is organized by energy type including butane, ethane, natural gas, natural gas liquids, oil, propane and sulphur. This CD-Rom also included statistical data on energy supply, energy production, disposition, and prices. tabs

  6. Preventing Domestic Violence in Alberta: A Cost Savings Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lana Wells; Casey Boodt; Herb Emery

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show that Alberta has the fifth highest rate of police reported intimate partner violence and the second highest rate of self reported spousal violence in Canada, and despite a 2.3 percent decline over the last decade, the province’s rate of self-reported domestic violence has stubbornly remained among the highest in Canada; rates of violence against women alone are 2.3 percentage points higher than the national average. In fact, every hour of every day, a woman in Alberta will...

  7. Threshold Considerations and Wetland Reclamation in Alberta's Mineable Oil Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Foote

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oil sand extraction in Alberta, Canada is a multibillion dollar industry operating over 143 km² of open pit mining and 4600 km² of other bitumen strata in northern boreal forests. Oil production contributes to Canada-wide GDP, creates socio-cultural problems, provides energy exports and employment, and carries environmental risks regarding long-term reclamation uncertainties. Of particular concern are the implications for wetlands and water supply management. Mining of oil sands is very attractive because proven reserves of known quality occur in an accessible, politically stable environment with existing infrastructure and an estimated 5.5 billion extractable barrels to be mined over the next five decades. Extraction occurs under a set of limiting factors or thresholds including: limited social tolerance at local to international levels for externalities of oil sand production; water demands > availability; limited natural gas supplies for oil processing leading to proposals for hydroelectric dams and nuclear reactors to be constructed; difficulties in reclaiming sufficient habitat area to replace those lost. Replacement of the 85 km² of peat-forming wetlands forecast to be destroyed appears unlikely. Over 840 billion liters of toxic fluid byproducts are currently held in 170 km² of open reservoirs without any known process to purify this water in meaningful time frames even as some of it leaches into adjacent lands and rivers. Costs for wetland reclamation are high with estimates of $4 to $13 billion, or about 6% of the net profits generated from mining those sites. This raises a social equity question of how much reclamation is appropriate. Time frames for economic, political, and ecological actions are not well aligned. Local people on or near mine sites have had to change their area use for decades and have been affected by industrial development. Examining mining effects to estimate thresholds of biophysical realities, time scales

  8. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitz Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much more pronounced at higher power levels with vortex shedding also occurring. A departure from nucleate boiling analysis showed that while nucleate boiling begins near 210 kW it remains in this state and does not approach the critical heat flux at powers up to 500 kW. Based on these studies, two upgrades are proposed for extended operation and possibly higher reactor power level. Together with the findings from Part I studies, we conclude that increase of the reactor power is highly feasible yet dependable on its purpose and associated investments.

  9. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  10. Training the next generation of Space and Earth Science Engineers and Scientists through student design and development of an Earth Observation Nanosatellite, AlbertaSat-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B. A.; Bottoms, J.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation addresses the design and developmental process of a Nanosatellite by an interdisciplinary team of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Alberta. The Satellite, AlbertaSat-1, is the University of Alberta's entry in the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge (CDSC); an initiative to entice Canadian students to contribute to space and earth observation technologies and research. The province of Alberta, while home to a few companies, is very limited in its space industry capacity. The University of Alberta reflects this fact, where one of the major unifying foci of the University is oil, the provinces greatest resource. For students at the U of A, this lack of focus on astronautical, aerospace and space/earth observational research limits their education in these industries/disciplines. A fully student operated project such as AlbertaSat-1 provides this integral experience to almost every discipline. The AlbertaSat-1 team is comprised of students from engineering, physics, chemistry, earth and atmospheric science, business, and computer science. While diverse in discipline, the team is also diverse in experience, spanning all levels from 1st year undergraduate to experienced PhD. Many skill sets are required and the diverse group sees that this is covered and all opinions voiced. Through immersion in the project, students learn quickly and efficiently. The necessity for a flawless product ensures that only the highest quality of work is presented. Students participating must research and understand their own subsystem as well as all others. This overall system view provides the best educational tool, as students are able to see the real impacts of their work on other subsystems. As the project is completely student organized, the participants gain not only technical engineering, space and earth observational education, but experience in operations and financial management. The direct exposure to all aspects of the space and earth

  11. Cancer incidence in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta : 1995-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Alberta Cancer Board, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Division of Population Health and Information Surveillance

    2009-02-15

    A high number of cases of cholangiocarcinoma, a rare form of bile duct cancer, as well as high rates of other cancers were reported by a physician working in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta in 2006. Concerns were raised by local residents, attributing cancers in their community to environmental contamination from a range of industrial development including the oil sands development, uranium mining and pulp mills. However, an initial review of the Alberta Cancer Registry did not confirm an increased incidence of cancer in Fort Chipewyan. In the summer/fall of 2007, a working group was formed to support the Alberta Cancer Board in doing a cluster investigation based on the guidelines of the United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. This report presented an investigation to determine if there was an elevated rate of cholangiocarcinoma in Fort Chipewyan and whether there was an elevated rate of cancers overall in Fort Chipewyan. The report provided background information on the Athabasca oil sands, uranium mining, and Fort Chipewyan as well as previous investigations of cancer incidence in Fort Chipewyan. Study methods were also presented with particular reference to study and comparison populations; cancer classification and inclusion criteria; active case ascertainment and verification; methods of analysis; and ethical approval. Results were also presented. The specific cancers that were discussed were cholangiocarcinoma, leukemia, colon cancer, and cancer in First Nations in Alberta. It was concluded that the observed number of cases of cholangiocarcinoma was within the expected range. 121 refs., 12 tabs., 3 figs., 5 appendices.

  12. Alberta Consumers' Valuation of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Red Meat Attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo; Gao, Fei; Unterschultz, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes Alberta consumers’ perceptions toward extrinsic and intrinsic attributes of bison and beef steaks. In contrast to published Canadian consumer studies on bison meat that were undertaken prior to May 2003, before the first BSE case of Canadian origin was identified in beef cattle...

  13. Alberta's oil sands fiscal system : historical context and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report described the fiscal system applied to Alberta's oil sands. It is the first technical report forming part of a series designed to provide information and to invite comment as part of the Government of Alberta's public review of the fiscal system applied to the province's oil and gas resources. Specifically, this report assessed the robustness of Alberta's oil sands fiscal system and assessed how the regime balanced the risks and rewards to both investors and Albertans across a range of expected and probable economic outcomes. The report provided an explanation of the history and context of Alberta's royalty regime and included a case-by-case approach. It also provided a discussion of the oil sands fiscal system description. Next, it described the methodology employed for the analysis of the oil sands fiscal system. It also provided the assumptions for 5 scenario cases and presented the fiscal map approach for assessing project economics and fiscal system performance. Last, summary observations were presented. It was found that the oil sands fiscal system is very flexible for adverse economic conditions and much less so for highly profitable conditions. tabs., figs

  14. As good as it gets : Alberta economic profile and forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, T.

    2006-04-01

    This economic profile and forecast report for the province of Alberta revealed that nearly every sector of the economy is operating at full, or near full capacity. Alberta's strong economy is a result of high energy prices, rapid population growth and rising employment. Increased provincial government spending along with tax reductions for businesses also contribute to a strong economy. However, the the province still faces some economic challenges, including a general labour shortage. Forestry and agriculture are under pressure of low commodity prices and high input costs, and the province has not articulated a long-term strategy for managing non-renewable natural resource revenue. In addition, the provincial economy is highly dependent upon volatile energy prices. Despite these challenges, the report states that the momentum is on the side of continued economic growth in Alberta. The Canada West Foundation is forecasting real growth in the gross domestic product of 5.2 per cent for 2006 and 4.7 per cent for 2007. The strong energy sector is largely responsible for much of Alberta's economic growth. An estimated 20,000 wells will be drilled in the province in 2006, and high oil prices will lead to record drilling and oil sands investment. This report also highlighted the economic activity in other sectors, including manufacturing, tourism, international exports, hi-tech, forestry, agriculture, and construction. Information regarding interprovincial migration and population growth was included along with public finances. 16 figs

  15. Alberta's air quality index : facts at your fingertip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Alberta Environment measures the airborne concentrations of carbon dioxide, fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and sulphur dioxide on a continuous basis at air quality monitoring stations in Edmonton, Calgary, Red Deer and Beaverlodge. Every hour, the readings are converted to an Air Quality Index (AQI) number to report on Alberta's outdoor air quality as either good, fair, poor or very poor. The categories relate to guidelines under Alberta's Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act and reflect the maximum acceptable levels specified by the National Ambient Air Quality Objectives. Current air quality conditions are available to the public through Alberta Environment's web site or by phoning a toll free number. Both Edmonton and Calgary report good air quality at least 90 per cent of the time. Occasionally, air quality in the two cities may reach the fair category, but it is seldom poor. Fair, poor or very poor air quality occurs with strong temperature inversion and light winds. Under these conditions, air pollutants, usually from automobiles, are trapped in a layer of stagnant air. Fair and poor air quality can also be caused by summer heat when photochemical smog forms by chemical reactions with oxides of nitrogen and volatile hydrocarbons. 1 ref., 1 tab., 1 fig

  16. School Identity in the Context of Alberta Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Merlin; Gereluk, Dianne; Kowch, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The central tenet of this investigation is that educational institutions possess their own school identity. Acknowledging that school identity is influenced by institutional mechanisms and personal dynamics, we examine school identity in the context of 13 Alberta charter schools. Narratives of 73 educational stakeholders across the network of…

  17. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta`s energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB`s position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board`s efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs.

  18. Market making vs. market manipulation : an Alberta perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Alberta Stock Exchange's (ASE's) filing and disclosure requirements for market making and promotion contracts are outlined. The discussion focuses on the differences between market making and market manipulation, acceptable and unacceptable methods of market making and promotion and common trading and securities legislation violations associated with these types of activities

  19. Issues and strategies for large power buyers in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.

    2001-01-01

    America's leading commodity risk management company, Enron has 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2000. It operates EnronOnline, the largest e-commerce site in the world. With some corporate profile information on Enron and Enron Canada and its involvement in the Alberta electricity market, the author proceeded to discuss risk management issues and program development. It was stated that Enron believes that future outcomes can be changed, and risk management is a dynamic and iterative process used as a tool to decrease uncertainty. The risk appetite is defined and electricity risks clarified, then a review of physical operation characteristics is conducted. The risk management program and policy are defined, as well as the controls and reporting. The tools and tactics are defined and one is now ready for the implementation phase. The next section was devoted to credit and contracting issues before moving to the Alberta electricity market fundamentals and pricing and some insight provided on questions such as import/export in Alberta, regulatory issues, prices in Alberta. The last section of the presentation touched on EnronOnline which is a free, Internet-based global transaction system where one can view real time prices. tabs., figs

  20. Alberta High School, College Elevate Learning with Rare Joint Venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    The refusal by a group of parents in Olds, Alberta, in 2003 to accept a provincial grant to renovate their high school set in motion a remarkable collaboration that spawned an innovative learning campus for an entire community and beyond. The new Olds High School, which opened in 2010, is part of a new Community Learning Campus (CLC), a joint…

  1. The Saskatchewan-Alberta large acceptance detector for photonuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, E. B.; Cameron, J.; Choi, W. C.; Fielding, H. W.; Green, P. W.; Greeniaus, L. G.; Hackett, E. D.; Holm, L.; Kolb, N. R.; Korkmaz, E.; Langill, P. P.; McDonald, W. J.; Mack, D.; Olsen, W. C.; Peterson, B. A.; Rodning, N. L.; Soukup, J.; Zhu, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Caplan, H. S.; Pywell, R. E.; Skopik, D. M.; Vogt, J. M.; van Heerden, I. J.

    1992-09-01

    The Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD) is a 4 π detector designed and built for studies of photonuclear reactions with a tagged photon beam. The design and performance of the detector are described. Its characteristics have been studied by examining p-p elastic scattering with a proton beam at TRIUMF.

  2. Tourism and recreation system planning in Alberta provincial parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F.J. Eagles; Angela M. Gilmore; Luis X. Huang; Denise A. Keltie; Kimberley Rae; Hong Sun; Amy K. Thede; Meagan L. Wilson; Jennifer A. Woronuk; Ge Yujin

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, system planning in parks and protected areas concentrated on biogeographical concepts, while neglecting tourism and recreation. The existing system plan for parks and protected areas in Alberta, Canada, divides the province into six natural regions based on a geographic classifi cation system (Grassland, Parkland, Foothills, Rocky Mountains, Boreal...

  3. Alberta oil and gas industry : annual statistics for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Alberta's 1997 annual and historical statistics for the supply and disposition of the following oil and gas products was presented: (1) crude oil and equivalent, (2) gas, (3) ethane, (4) propane, (5) butanes, (6) NGL mixes, and (7) sulphur. Statistics regarding the deliveries and average price of the products, and a statistical summary of well drilling activities in the province were also provided. tabs

  4. Alberta oil and gas industry: annual statistics for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Statistical data for 1995 concerning the supply and disposition of crude oil and equivalent, natural gas, ethane, butanes, natural gas liquids, and sulphur in the Province of Alberta, were provided. A list of new wells drilled during 1995, and an annual well count, were also included

  5. Alberta oil and gas industry : annual statistics for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Alberta's 1996 annual and historical statistics for the supply and disposition of the following oil and gas products was presented: (1) crude oil and equivalent, (2) natural gas, (3) ethane, (4) propane, (5) butanes, (6) natural gas liquids, and (7) sulphur. Statistics regarding the deliveries and average price of the products and statistical data on drilling activity during 1996 were also included. Tables

  6. A Review of School Board Cyberbullying Policies in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Nicole; Rinaldi, Christina

    2012-01-01

    An online search for school board cyberbullying/bullying policies in Alberta was conducted. The results showed that while only five school boards had a bullying policy, many schools had technology or Internet use guidelines. The online search included an assessment of one extensive school board cyberbullying policy as well as Internet use…

  7. Issues and strategies for large power buyers in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D. [ENRON Canada Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    America's leading commodity risk management company, Enron has 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2000. It operates EnronOnline, the largest e-commerce site in the world. With some corporate profile information on Enron and Enron Canada and its involvement in the Alberta electricity market, the author proceeded to discuss risk management issues and program development. It was stated that Enron believes that future outcomes can be changed, and risk management is a dynamic and iterative process used as a tool to decrease uncertainty. The risk appetite is defined and electricity risks clarified, then a review of physical operation characteristics is conducted. The risk management program and policy are defined, as well as the controls and reporting. The tools and tactics are defined and one is now ready for the implementation phase. The next section was devoted to credit and contracting issues before moving to the Alberta electricity market fundamentals and pricing and some insight provided on questions such as import/export in Alberta, regulatory issues, prices in Alberta. The last section of the presentation touched on EnronOnline which is a free, Internet-based global transaction system where one can view real time prices. tabs., figs.

  8. Resource Allocation and Public Policy in Alberta's Postsecondary System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneston, Bob; Boberg, Alice

    2000-01-01

    Resource allocation in Alberta's postsecondary system has changed substantially since 1994, designed to reapportion financial responsibility for higher education, increase vocational outcomes of postsecondary education, and increase transfer of knowledge and technology to the private sector. This paper outlines how resource allocation has been…

  9. The Challenge of Integrating Renewable Generation in the Alberta Electricity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kent Fellows

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Renewable electric generation is forecast to enjoy an increasing share of total capacity and supply regimes in the future. Alberta is no exception to this trend, having initiated policy incentives in response to calls for increasing the fraction of wind and solar energy available to the province over the next decade.1 This call is coming from various sectors including advocacy groups, the provincial government and some utilities. The University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy convened a roundtable discussion on Sept. 15, 2015. Given the wide-ranging aspects of increased renewables integration (for example the policy options, economic forces and engineering/technical issues the topic demands attention from a wide range of experts and stakeholders. To that end, we endeavoured to group expert panellists and representatives of utilities, public agencies, academe and consumer groups to consider the planning necessary to integrate new renewable capacity into the existing and future grid system in the province and its potential impact. The purpose of the roundtable was to facilitate and foster a knowledge exchange between interested and knowledgeable parties while also aggregating this knowledge into a more complete picture of the challenges and potential strategies associated with increased renewables integration in the Alberta electricity grid.

  10. Protecting consumer interests in Alberta's deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains why the province of Alberta decided to deregulate its electricity sector. In the early 1990s, electricity rates were reasonable in Alberta, there was no utility debt, and electricity costs were low. In 1994 California's open access transmission system suggested that open markets would result in lower electricity rates and attract new economic activity. The government of Alberta also believed that competitive markets would set prices with no need for economic regulation. In the initial transition to competition, regulated electricity rates were offered to customers who were not ready to switch to the new competitive market. The RRO rate was set by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). The rates included the forecasted cost of purchasing energy from markets, cost of system access, and retail service costs. The end of the RRO rate was scheduled for 2005 when the market was expected be well developed. This paper also describes other protection mechanisms for consumers. Alberta's new electricity policy (NEP) eliminates generator participant costs related to transmission. EUB's zonal interconnection charges are also overruled along with the EUB-approved 50/50 division of transmission costs. Under the NEP, the ISO is to build transmission in anticipation of new generation. Consumers will fund the total cost to build new transmission capacity for exports and imports. This new transmission policy is a complete change from the original government policy which allocated some transmission costs to generators. The sudden change in policy was due to pressure from oil sands producers and oil sands co-generation developers. The claimed benefit to Albertans is a 25 per cent reduction in pool price and greater system reliability. However, the author cautioned that government interference with competitive electricity markets will cripple the electric power industry in the foreseeable future because it interferes with market prices

  11. Alberta immigrant integration into the petroleum industry : final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-15

    Alberta is in the midst of a labour shortage, especially in the petroleum industry. Traditionally, the petroleum industry has secured employees by hiring them away from competitors, service providers, other geographic locations, or other industries, mostly by escalating worker compensation. However, this is no longer seen to be a sustainable solution due to higher industry costs and inflation. A good opportunity exists for Alberta's oil and gas industry to address worker demand and minimize the negative impacts associated with current and future labour concerns by increasing the participation of workers who are under-represented in the workforce, such as Aboriginals, women, and internationally trained workers. This report presented the details of a project called the Alberta immigrant integration into the petroleum industry project in order to determine the tools, resources and support processes needed by petroleum industry employers to increase the employment and retention of internationally trained workers already living in Alberta into the upstream petroleum industry. The report outlined the gaps in information, tools, resources and services that were preventing the petroleum industry from taking advantage of the skills and experience offered by Alberta's labour pool of internationally trained workers in any significant way. The report also presented an overview of strategic priorities and recommended activities, duly endorsed by stakeholders, in order to improve the recruitment and integration of internationally trained workers into the petroleum industry workforce. It was concluded that employers who develop the skills and capability to effectively recruit and integrate internationally trained workers into their workforce will have a clear advantage in the competition for skilled employees. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Recent rubber crumb asphalt pavement projects in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleyman, H.R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Pulles, B.C.M.; Treleaven, L.B. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Several countries around the world have been using rubber crumb (RC) for pavement applications for more than 20 years. The performance of asphalt pavements is enhanced by the use of recycled tires, which has the added advantage of solving the problem of tire disposal. In 2002, the Tire Recycling Management Association of Alberta (TRMA) and Alberta Transportation (AT) evaluated the feasibility and performance of an overlay using asphalt rubber (AR) pavement in Alberta. A partnership in the project was formed by AT, the City of Calgary, the City of Edmonton, and Strathcona County, where each one paved one section of a road with AR in conjunction with a section using conventional or other asphalt mixture types. The roads selected were: (1) 112 Avenue North West in Calgary, (2) 17 Street and Baseline Road in Strathcona County, (3) 137 Avenue in Edmonton, and (4) highway 630 in the vicinity of North Cooking Lake (Alberta Transportation). Two different AR pavement thicknesses were used to study the effects of overlay thicknesses on the performance of the overlay. The structural and functional factors were monitored before, during and after the construction of all sections. The preliminary evaluation of the application of AR in Alberta was presented, along with a summary of test results and performances of AR pavement sections. A full freeze-thaw cycle is required (Spring 2003) before the results of the analysis of the testing are known. The reduced thickness AR sections performed in a similar manner to those with full thickness AC sections. 10 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  13. The regulatory context of gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, B.S.; Cook, C.

    1999-01-01

    The legislative and regulatory regime regarding gas flaring in Alberta was reviewed. The issue of gas flaring has received much attention from petroleum industry regulators in Alberta. Residents living in the vicinity of flares have identified them as sources of odour, smoke, noise and air quality-related health concerns. Sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide emissions from the flare stacks may contribute to acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The Strosher Report, released by the Alberta Research Council in 1996, has also identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other products of incomplete combustion. The public opposition to solution gas flaring has caused regulators to consider new options designed to reduce the adverse economic and environmental impacts that may be associated with gas flaring. This paper discusses the roles of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection in administering legislation that impacts on gas flaring. In March 1999, the EUB released a guide containing the following five major points regarding gas flaring: (1) implementation of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance's (CASA's) recommendations to eventually eliminate flaring, by starting immediately to reduce flaring, and improve the efficiency of flares, (2) adoption of the CASA schedule of reduction targets for solution gas flaring, (3) conducting a review of the current approval process for small-scale electrical generation systems to encourage co-generation as a productive use of solution gas that is being flared, (4) creating better public notification requirements for new and existing facilities, and (5) discussing conflict resolution between operators and landowners. 26 refs

  14. Economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timilsina, G.R.; LeBlanc, N.; Walden, T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the international media recognized Alberta's oil sands as part of the global oil reserves, thereby establishing Canada as second to Saudi Arabia as potential oil producing nations. The economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands industry on economies were assessed at regional, provincial and international levels for the 2000 to 2020 period. A customized input-output model was used to assess economic impacts, which were measured in terms of changes in gross domestic product; employment and labour income; and, government revenues. Cumulative impacts on employment by sector and by jurisdiction were also presented. An investment of $100 billion is expected through 2020, resulting in production of crude bitumen and synthetic crude oil outputs valued at about $531 billion. The impact of the oil sands industry on local employment was also evaluated. It was shown that activities in the oil sands industry will lead to significant economic impact in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the rest of Canada. Alberta's local economy would be the main beneficiary of oil sands activities with nearly 3.6 million person years employment created in Alberta during the 2000 to 2020. Another 3 million person years employment would be created in other Canadian provinces and outside Canada during the same time period. A sensitivity analysis on the responsiveness to oil prices and the removal of various constraints incorporated in the main analysis was also presented. The federal government will be the largest recipient of revenues generated to to oil sands activities. The results of the study were compared with that of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies. This first volume revealed the results of the study while the second volume includes the data and detailed results. 48 refs., 57 tabs., 28 figs

  15. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jury, J.W. ed.

    1990-01-01

    These fifteen papers were presented by students in nuclear engineering from the Universities of Toronto and Manitoba, the Royal Military College, Ecole Polytechnique, McMaster University, and Trent University. They cover the areas of CANDU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE reactor systems and fuel, applied nucleonics, and simulation theory and thermalhydraulics. (L.L.)

  16. A report of the research works in joint use of Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute for the period of October 1977 to March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is the report of the results of each investigation performed in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, during the second half of fiscal year 1977. It includes 61 reports. It is briefly divided into 5 reports on radiation proper, 11 reports on biology and medicine and 45 reports on physics, chemistry and mineralogy. In the last 45 reports, 6 reports on material, 10 reports on activation analysis and 1 report on dating are included. Since each report is limited to the abstract of 1 page using the same format, details of the contents are not known. However, general trends of Investigations may be known. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Asthma-related productivity losses in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen X Thanh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nguyen X Thanh, Arto Ohinmaa, Charles YanInstitute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaObjectives: To estimate the number and cost of asthma-related productivity loss days due to absenteeism and presenteeism (at work but not fully functioning in Alberta in 2005.Methods: Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study focused on people of working age (18–64 years, who reported having an asthma diagnosis. Total asthma-related disability days, including in-bed days and activity-restricted days, were estimated by multiplying the difference in the means of total disability days between asthmatics and nonasthmatics adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and other health conditions by a multiple linear regression, with the number of asthmatics in the population. Number of productivity loss days was a sum between the number of in-bed days (absenteeism and the number of activity-restricted days multiplied by a reduction in functional level (presenteeism, adjusted for five working days per week. Other data from Alberta or Canadian published literature, such as a reduction in functional level of 20%–30%, a labor participation rate of 73%, and an average wage of $158 per day in 2005, were also used for analyses.Results: The prevalence of asthma was estimated at 8.5% among approximately 2.1 million people of working age in Alberta in 2005. The difference in the means of total disability days between asthmatics and nonasthmatics was 0.487 (95% CI: 0.286–0.688 in a period of two weeks or 12.7 (7.5–17.9 in one year. With the reduction in functional level of 20%–30%, the number of asthma-related productivity loss days was estimated from 442 (259–624 to 533 (313–753 thousand, respectively. The corresponding cost was from $70 ($41–$99 to $84 ($49–$119 million. Of these, the presenteeism accounted for 42% to 52%.Conclusions: The results suggest that an improvement in the controlling of asthma could have a

  18. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization; Dante en Alberta: chroniques d'une civilisation droguee au petrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Belkaid

    2010-07-01

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  19. Preparation and planning for the replacement of the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor rotary specimen rack assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Dodd, B.; Johnson, A.G.; Carpenter, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    Recently there have been a number of indications that the rotating rack may be approaching the end of its useful life. In order to benefit from the experience of other reactors who have removed and replaced their rotating racks, General Atomic (GA) was contacted and previous TRIGA Conference proceedings were scanned. It was determined that a number of facilities, had experienced difficulties with their lazy susans and eventually had to replace them. However, most of the written descriptions of this project were not sufficiently detailed to be of great use. The purpose of this paper is to identify some of the more important questions related to the replacement of our rotating rack assembly and OSU's currently proposed solutions, with a view towards soliciting ideas from other members of the TRIGA reactor community

  20. SemGroup acquisition of central Alberta midstream : case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, T.

    2005-01-01

    A case study of SemGroup's acquisition of Central Alberta Midstream was presented. SemCAMS specializes in providing more efficient supply, storage, and distribution assets and services. Seminole Canada Gas is a leading independent natural gas marketing and energy asset management company that currently markets 369 MMbtu per day. The company purchases natural gas in western Canada for fee-based marketing services while also managing firm transportation contracts and providing gas storage for third party customers. SemCAMS owns the largest sour gas processor in Alberta as well as 3 sour gas processing plants, 600 miles of gathering pipeline, and a sweet gas processing plant. the company is also planning increased drilling and production activities and is now pursuing aggressive land acquisition policies. Over 25,000 square miles of land have been acquired. It was concluded that midstream companies should be customer-focused, provide reliability and guarantees, infrastructure investment and optimization. tabs., figs