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Sample records for alberta university slowpoke reactor

  1. Utilization of the SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SLOWPOKEs are typically low power research reactors that have a limited number of applications. However, a significant range of NAA can be performed with such reactors. This paper describes a SLOWPOKE-based NAA program that is performing a valuable series of studies in Jamaica, including geological mapping and pollution assessment. (author)

  2. Performance of small reactors at universities for teaching, research, training and service (TRTS): thirty five years' experience with the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) facility, operated during 1976-2011, was the only research reactor in Atlantic Canada as well as the only one associated with a chemistry department in a Canadian university. The most outstanding features of the facility included: a rapid (100 ms) cyclic pneumatic sample transfer system, a permanently installed Cd-site, and a Compton-suppression gamma-ray spectrometer. The usage encompassed fundamental as well as applied studies in various fields using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The facility was used for training undergraduate/graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, technicians, and visiting scientists, and for cooperative projects with other universities, research organizations and industries. (author)

  3. Removal of Beryllium Material during Decommissioning of a Slowpoke Reactor, Toronto, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Slowpoke (acronym for Safe LOW-POwer Kritical Experiment) is a low energy, tank-in-pool type nuclear research reactor designed by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the late 1960s. The fuel cage is surrounded by a beryllium assembly at the bottom of a water pool about 6 m deep. The beryllium reflects neutrons back into the core. Basically, the reactor is a subcritical mass of fuel, which the surrounding beryllium makes critical. The rate of reaction is controlled by inserting a neutron absorbing cadmium rod. Slowpokes have a maximum power of 100 kW and normally operate at about 20 kW. The University of Toronto SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor research services ended in December 1998, and the reactor was finally defuelled in June 2000. On 10 November 2000, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issued the decommissioning licence to the University of Toronto for its SLOWPOKE-2 Nuclear Reactor Facility. The reactor decommissioning was completed in January 2001. The beryllium material was to have been shipped under the operating licence, but actually it was shipped under the decommissioning licence. The CNSC revoked the decommissioning licence for the University of Toronto SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor Facility on 24 February 2012, and the site was returned to the university for unrestricted site use. The following is a description of the incident involving the beryllium material management

  4. SLOWPOKE: heating reactors in the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years, nuclear heating could become as important as nuclear electricity generation. To fill that need, AECL has designed a 10 MW nuclear heating plant for large buildings. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on the successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba, and the design of a 10 MW commercial unit is well advanced. With capital costs in the range $5 million to $7 million, unit energy costs could be as low as $0.02 per kWh, for a unit operating at 50% load factor over a 25-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees Celsius, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe, nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  5. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  6. Operation of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past sixteen years lCENS has operated a SLOWPOKE 2 nuclear reactor almost exclusively for the purpose of neutron activation analysis. During this period we have adopted a strategy of minimum irradiation times while optimizing our output in an effort to increase the lifetime of the reactor core and to maintaining fuel integrity. An inter-comparison study with results obtained with a much larger reactor at IPEN has validated this approach. The parameters routinely monitored at ICENS are also discussed and the method used to predict the next shim adjustment. (author)

  7. Operation of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, C.N.; Lalor, G.C.; Vuchkov, M.K. [University of the West Indies, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2001-07-01

    Over the past sixteen years lCENS has operated a SLOWPOKE 2 nuclear reactor almost exclusively for the purpose of neutron activation analysis. During this period we have adopted a strategy of minimum irradiation times while optimizing our output in an effort to increase the lifetime of the reactor core and to maintaining fuel integrity. An inter-comparison study with results obtained with a much larger reactor at IPEN has validated this approach. The parameters routinely monitored at ICENS are also discussed and the method used to predict the next shim adjustment. (author)

  8. Keeping research reactors relevant: A pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE is a small, inherently safe, pool-type research reactor that was engineered and marketed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in the 1970s and 80s. The original reactor, SLOWPOKE-1, was moved from Chalk River to the University of Toronto in 1970 and was operated until upgraded to the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in 1973. In all, eight reactors in the two versions were produced and five are still in operation today, three having been decommissioned. All of the remaining reactors are designated as SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. These research reactors are prone to two major issues: aging components and lack of relevance to a younger audience. In order to combat these problems, one SLOWPOKE -2 facility has embraced a strategy that involves modernizing their reactor in order to keep the reactor up to date and relevant. In 2001, this facility replaced its aging analogue reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. The digital control system provides a better interface and allows flexibility in data storage and retrieval that was never possible with the analogue control system. This facility has started work on another upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system that will be installed in 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a web-based simulation and training system that will allow licensed operators, students and researchers to use an online simulation tool for training, education and research. The tool consists of: 1) A dynamic simulation for reactor kinetics (e.g., core flux, power, core temperatures, etc). This tool is useful for operator training and student education; 2) Dynamic mapping of the reactor and pool container gamma and neutron fluxes as well as the vertical neutron beam tube flux. This research planning tool is used for various researchers who wish to do irradiations (e.g., neutron

  9. A new safety principle for the SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowpoke-2 (LEU core) is a pool type nuclear reactor with a maximum thermal power of 20 kW. It uses a pelletized uranium oxide fuel (19.9% enrichment) and provides a useful high neutron flux in the order of 1012 n.cm-2s-1. The key safety features built into the reactor design are the strictly limited amount of excess reactivity and the negative reactivity feedback characteristics, which provides a demonstrably safe self-limiting power excursion response to large reactivity insertions. However, the limited amount of excess reactivity also limits the continuous prolong reactor operation at full power. With a 3.7 mk excess reactivity, the reactor can operate for about one day at the full power, 20 kW, before this excess activity is lost due to temperature effects and Xe poisoning. A new safety concept is proposed in this paper to extend the continuous operation time to months by increasing the excess reactivity from 4 mk to 6 mk. This new concept has been demonstrated using a Matlab/simulink model of Slowpoke-2. (author)

  10. Training new operators for the SLOWPOKE reactor at Ecole Polytechnique: theory and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two years we trained two new operators for the SLOWPOKE reactor at Ecole Polytechnique. In this paper we describe how the training program for these operators was designed. We also discuss the shortcomings that were identified in the program and the modifications it required when being put in use.

  11. A novel approach to the production of medical radioisotopes: the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hilborn, J.W. [retired, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Carlin, G.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P. [Royal Canadian Navy, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    In 2009, the unexpected 15-month outage of the Canadian NRU nuclear reactor resulted in a sudden 30% world shortage, with higher shortages experienced in North America than in Europe. Commercial radioisotope production is from just eight nuclear reactors, most being aging systems near the end of their service life. This paper proposes a more efficient production and distribution model. Tc-99m unit doses would be distributed to regional hospitals from ten integrated 'industrial radiopharmacies', located at existing licensed nuclear reactor sites in North America. At each site, one or more 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE nuclear reactors would deliver 15 litres of irradiated aqueous uranyl sulfate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells, for extraction of Mo-99; and the low-enriched uranium would be recycled. Purified Mo-99 would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily for road delivery to all of the nuclear medicine hospitals within a 3-hour range. At the current price of $20 per unit dose, the annual gross income from 10 sites would be approximately $360 million. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor evolved from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors at the end-of-core life, enabling them to continue their primary missions of research and education, together with full time commercial radioisotope production. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both deterministic and probabilistic reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture is a dilute aqueous solution of low-enriched uranyl sulfate containing approximately 1 kg of U-235. The reactor is controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector. Safety analysis was carried out for both normal operation and transient conditions. The most severe

  12. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing radiation fields due to a release of fission products in the reactor container of several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy core have been observed. It is believed that these increases are associated with the fuel fabrication where a small amount of uranium-bearing material is exposed to the coolant at the end-welds of the fuel element. To investigate this phenomenon samples of reactor water and gas from the headspace above the water have been obtained and examined by gamma spectrometry methods for reactors of various burnups at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and Kanata Isotope Production Facility. An underwater visual examination of the fuel core at Ecole Polytechnique has also provided information on the condition of the core. This report (Volume 1) summarizes the equipment, analysis techniques and results of tests conducted at the various reactor sites. The data report is published as Volume 2. (author). 30 refs., 9 tabs., 20 figs

  13. The Development of Neutron Radiography and Tomography on a SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L. G. I.; Lewis, W. J.; Hungler, P. C.

    Development of neutron radiography at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) started by trying to interest the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) in this new non-destructive testing (NDT) technique. A Californium-252 based device was ordered and then installed at RMC for development of applicable techniques for aircraft by the first author. A second and transportable device was then designed, modified and used in trials at RCAF Bases and other locations for one year. This activity was the only foreign loan of the U.S. Californium Loan Program. Around this time, SLOWPOKE-2 reactors were being installed at four Canadian universities, while a new science and engineering building was being built at RMC. A reactor pool was incorporated and efforts to procure a reactor succeeded a decade later with a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor being installed at RMC. The only modification by the vendor for RMC was a thermal column replacing an irradiation site inside the reactor container for a later installation of a neutron beam tube (NBT). Development of a working NBT took several years, starting with the second author. A demonstration of the actual worth of neutron radiography took place with a CF-18 Hornet aircraft being neutron and X-radiographed at McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, CA. This inspection was followed by one of the rudders that had indications of water ingress being radiographed successfully at RMC just after the NBT became functional. The next step was to develop a neutron radioscopy system (NRS), initially employing film and then digital imaging, and is in use today for all flight control surfaces (FCS). With the third author, a technique capable of removing water from affected FCS was developed at RMC. Heating equipment and a vacuum system were utilized to carefully remove the water. This technique was proven using a sequence of near real time neutron images obtained during the drying process. The results of the drying process were correlated with a relative humidity

  14. Keeping research reactors relevant: a pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, the Royal Military College of Canada replaced its aging analogue SLOWPOKE-2 reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. An upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system has been completed and will be installed in October 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a simulation and training system that will enhance training, education and research by licensed operators, students and researchers.

  15. Standardization of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica for routine NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) has been involved in conducting multipurpose geochemical surveys, the results of which were published in 'A Geochemical Atlas of Jamaican Soils'. The primary analytical tool for these studies was neutron activation analysis (NAA) using the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at the Centre. The neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor is extremely stable, thus allowing a semi-absolute method for quantitative NAA. This has several advantages, but requires preparation and measurement of the single- or multi-element standards for each gamma-spectroscopy system (GSS). The NAA laboratory at ICENS operates three GSSs. The primary ('master') GSS was standardized using single element standards for over 50 elements, naturally occurring in most geological and biological materials. The standardization of the secondary GSS's was achieved by transferring of the elemental sensitivities of the master GSS using an instrumentation-free standardization approach. Implementation of this methodology and its utilization in the routine analytical work is described. (author)

  16. The SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada: applications for the Canadian Armed Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has a 20 kW SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor which is used for teaching and research. Since its commissioning, the reactor facility and instruments have been continuously upgraded to develop and enhance nuclear capabilities for the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Specific applications of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) and neutron imaging relevant to the CAF are discussed. (author)

  17. The SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada: applications for the Canadian Armed Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has a 20 kW SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor which is used for teaching and research.Since its commissioning, the reactor facility and instruments have been continuously upgraded to develop and enhance nuclear capabilities for the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Specific applications of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) and neutron imaging relevant to the CAF are discussed. (author)

  18. A program for the a priori evaluation of detection limits in instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program that permits the a priori calculation of detection limits in monoelemental matrices, adapted to instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor, is described. A simplified model of the gamma spectra is proposed. Products of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions induced by the fast components of the neutron flux that accompanies the thermal flux at the level of internal irradiation sites in the reactor have been included in the list of interfering radionuclides. The program calculates in a systematic way the detection limits of 66 elements in an equal number of matrices using 153 intermediary radionuclides. Experimental checks carried out with silicon (for short lifetimes) and aluminum and magnesium (for intermediate lifetimes) show satisfactory agreement with the calculations. These results show in particular the importance of the contribution of the (n,p) and (n,α) reactions in the a priori evaluation of detection limits with a SLOWPOKE type reactor

  19. SLOWPOKE: neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis permits the non-destructive determination of trace elements in crude oil and its derivatives at high sensitivity (up to 10-9 g/g) and good precision. This article consists of a quick survey of the method followed by an illustration based on the results of recent work at the SLOWPOKE reactor laboratory at the Ecole Polytechnique

  20. Inertial fusion energy - research at the University of Alberta and a proposed Alberta/Canada Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion Energy is being pursued internationally using a number of different approaches from magnetic confinement energy to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recently there has been significant advancement in inertial confinement fusion using laser drivers with the expectation of the demonstration of large fusion yield within the next year or two opening the path to engineering of fusion reactors based on high energy laser drivers. The Laser Plasma Research group at the University of Alberta has been involved in inertial fusion energy (IFE) research for the past few decades. The current status of IFE and the activities of the University of Alberta Research group in this area is reviewed. Funding of IFE related research in Canada has been very limited and Canada has fallen behind in this area. Given the major developments occurring internationally it is time to increase activities in Canada. A plan for an expanded Alberta/Canadian program in IFE in the near future is discussed. (author)

  1. Use of the Slowpoke-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada for book conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present project investigated the use of the mixed radiation field produced by the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to prolong the life of biodeteriorated books. Research into past studies of radiation treatment indicated that the primary biodeteriorating agents, insects and moulds, can be reduced enough to return books to the 'natural' level of infestation with a dose of 2-3kGy where they will age in a manner consistent with a 'normal' book. Based on research of the potential negative effects of irradiation on paper, including depolymerization, loss of paper strength and durability, discoloration, and harm to ink, it was found that at doses below 8kGy, at a dose rate of 2.4kGy, there is no serious harm to the paper. Based on a desired dose range of 2 to 8kGy, and the dimensions and flux mapping of the radiation field in the reactor pool, a 60cm x 58cm x 43.5cm vacuum-sealed box, with a Cadmium foil neutron shield, is proposed. A preliminary feasibility study suggests that the capital and operating costs of this irradiation procedure would be approximately C$15000 and C$600, respectively. (author)

  2. The Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor: neutron activation analysis in environmental and health studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 24 years of existence the reactor has been utilized mainly for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) and has played an important role in the development of research programs in the areas of archaeology, biology, chemistry, forensics, geochemistry, and mining as well as for the production of short lived radioisotopes for experimental work in the physics department. However, over the last fifth teen years our main thrust has been environmental geochemistry, agriculture and health related studies, with interesting results that have implications for land use, farming practices, diabetic control and dietary intakes during pregnancy. (author)

  3. INAA of trace elements in biological materials using the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological standard reference materials Orchard Leaves SRM 1571 and Oyster Tissue SRM 1566a was analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, Jamaica at (ICEN) and at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Brazil. The comparison of the results with those obtained with the more powerful reactor are used to evaluate the possibilities of INAA for the analysis of biological samples at ICENS. The detection limits, the precision and accuracy of the results obtained in both laboratories are compared. The advantages and disadvantages of the different irradiation facilities are discussed. Some results obtained for Jamaican biological samples are also presented. (author)

  4. SLOWPOKE-2 31 years and still glowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981, a SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor was installed at SRC Environmental Analytical Laboratories facility in Saskatoon and it has been operated trouble-free ever since it's commissioning. The SLOWPOKE reactor was designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) in the 1970's and is a low-energy, pool type reactor. The design is such that the heat produced by the reactor limits its reactivity and hence the reactor cannot run into uncontrolled power excursion, thus providing a high degree of inherent safety. Too small to be used as a source of power generation, the SLOWPOKE is used as a neutron source for an analytical technique known as neutron activation analysis (NAA). NAA is a non-destructive technique that allows for the analysis of many elements of the periodic table by producing radioactive isotopes which can then by analyzed using gamma spectroscopy, or by inducing fission in U 235 for analysis of uranium by delayed neutron counting. The history and basic design features of the reactor will be discussed. Applications of the NAA technique used at the laboratory will also be presented.

  5. Experimental and computational determination of radiation dose rates in the SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor designed to use Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) dioxide fuel was commissioned at the Royal Military College of Canada/College militaire royal du Canada in September 1985. The enrichment is 19.89% in 235U . The reactor is a pool-type design, moderated and cooled by light water with the core located at the bottom of a 5.87 m pool, ensuring a 4.42 m layer of water above the core to provide the necessary radiation shielding. Cooling is by means of natural convection, the reactor power being limited to 20 kWth. The design allows free access to the reactor pool: in addition to the pneumatic irradiation system permitting the positioning of small samples within the beryllium reflector and close to the core, larger samples can be positioned in the pool against the reactor vessel using an 'elevator'-type positioning device. Several research projects have taken and are taking advantage of this equipment, most notably investigations of intense radiation effects on advanced polymers such as epoxies and poly-ether-ether-ketones (PEEKs). These research activities however require sound knowledge of the dose rates at the various irradiation sites within the reactor vessel, as well as at incremental positions within the pool. Accurate measurements of the particle fluxes were attempted before, but unfortunately yielded limited information due to the complexity of the composite radiation field and the capabilities of the instrumentation at that time. The present work aims at yet another attempt to gather sound dose rate data, using improved radiation detectors on one hand, and better computational resources (both hardware and software) on the other hand. All research on particle dose rates was performed with the reactor at steady-state half power (10 kWth) and at the reactor core mid-height. (author)

  6. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  7. A Financial Plan for Alberta Colleges and Universities: Recommendations and Research Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bernard S.; And Others

    This is the final report of the Financial Plan Project for Colleges and Universities. Its primary purpose is to present proposals on a financial plan for Alberta universities and public colleges. Following a brief review of financing postsecondary education in Canada, it focuses on the last ten years of Alberta practice; the treatment is…

  8. Dr Malcolm King Honoured at University of Alberta Annual General Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available On September 25, 2003, Dr Malcolm King, former Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS President and member, was honoured by the University of Alberta (U of A with the University of Alberta Board of Governors Award of Distinction for 2003. The following are highlights of an article written by Ryan Smith for ExpressNews.

  9. University of Alberta targets tailings, accelerates forest growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2008-10-15

    The excess water contained in oilsand slurry pipelines results in man-made tailings ponds which could have environmental consequences. A team of researchers at the University of Alberta aims to reduce or eliminate tailings ponds by reducing water consumption and increasing the use of warm process water recycling. The broader scope of the research involves a study of the interactions of the complex mixtures of oil, sand and water during the transportation in pipelines and the prediction of slurry pipeline wear rates. Improvements in the pipeline process can increase the efficiency of the oilsands industry by reducing the bitumen lost during pipeline transport. Another research team at the University has been experimenting with 50 different plants that will survive and reproduce in tailings ponds to accelerate the reclamation of tailings ponds as well as the dikes that surround them. Plants such as sunflowers, some mustards and grasses that grow on tailings ponds draw water out of the ponds rendering them more hospitable to the environment. 1 fig.

  10. Various applications using the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History will record that the reactor pool at the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC was one of the first SLOWPOKE pools to be constructed (mid 1970s), even though the reactor itself was the last SLOWPOKE reactor to be installed and commissioned (1985). The unique and very useful feature of the reactor pool is that it is uncovered, allowing for applications in addition to the NAA and radioisotope production applications initially advertised. Because the installation of a tangential neutron beam tube (NBT) had been planned from the beginning, an outer irradiation site inside the reactor container was replaced by a thermal column. Next, a positioning system was added to accept large objects such as flight control surfaces from DND's CF-18 fighter aircraft. Imaging of these surfaces using film is being phased out with the introduction of digital imaging. Very recently a tomography stage was designed and built and is now integrated into the neutron imaging system. Also in the open pool are three pulley and rope 'elevators', two of which allow for large samples to be exposed to various kinds of radiation directly outside of the reactor container. The third elevator is located against the west pool wall, which allows for sample exposure to radiation without any neutron contribution. At the time of negotiating the purchase of the reactor, a teaching package consisting of an in-pool borated ion chamber and an outlet thermocouple was ordered. Automatic irradiation and counting systems in the form of cyclic, pseudo-cyclic, and long counting options were added to the original manual irradiation option. This past summer (2010), a delayed neutron counting system (DNCS) was built and installed in the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC. Examples will be given for the above-mentioned applications.

  11. Royal Military College of Canada SLOWPOKE-2 facility. Integrated regulating and instrumentation system (SIRCIS) upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at the Royal Military College of Canada has operated the only digitally controlled SLOWPOKE reactor since 2001 (Version 1.0). The present work describes ongoing project development to provide a robust digital reactor control system that is consistent with Aging Management as summarized in the Facility's Life Cycle Management and Maintenance Plan. The project has transitioned from a post-graduate research activity to a comprehensively managed project supported by a team of RMCC professional and technical staff who have delivered an update of the V1.1 system software and hardware implementation that is consistent with best Canadian nuclear industry practice. The challenges associated with the implementation of Version 2.0 in February 2012, the lessons learned from this implementation, and the applications of these lessons to a redesign and rewrite of the RMCC SLOWPOKE-2 digital instrumentation and regulating system (Version 3) are discussed. (author)

  12. Computing Services Planning, Downsizing, and Organization at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrametti, Monica

    1993-01-01

    In a six-month period, the University of Alberta (Canada) campus computing services department formulated a strategic plan, and downsized and reorganized to meet financial constraints and respond to changing technology, especially distributed computing. The new department is organized to react more effectively to trends in technology and user…

  13. The Jamaican Slowpoke HEU-LEU core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HEU core of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE research reactor is scheduled for conversion to LEU. The actual conversion process will most likely be contracted to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Preliminary calculations have indicated that the total activity of used HEU core in Jamaica (∼8 TBq) should be about half that of the Montreal used HEU core. There is sufficient infrastructure both onsite and offsite to maneuver the loaded transportation flask to the shipping vessel. Appropriate licenses for the importation of the new fuel and exportation of the used fuel will be applied for once a provisional timetable has been established. (author)

  14. Recent Progress in Low-Temperature Research from the Davis Lab at the University of Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John P.; Rojas, Xavier; Yang, Yikai; Duh, Andrej; Popowich, Greg

    2013-03-01

    In this talk I will briefly describe our recent progress towards new low-temperature experiments at the University of Alberta in the Davis Lab. We are currently setting up two nuclear demagnetization fridges - one new cryostat that has two independent 9 T magnets (the second magnet being useful for a double demag stage or combined high field and low temperature experiments). The other fridge is an older unit that is extensively refurbished, with all new pumping systems. We are planning numerous experiments at the intersection of low-temperature physics and nanoscience, including quantum properties of nanomechancial resonators and quantum fluids in confined geometries. Concerning the latter, we have fabricated high quality microfluidic devices suitable for low-temperature research. We will discuss our progress towards quantum fluids measurements using these devices. Generous support from the University of Alberta, Faculty of Science, CFI, NSERC, nanoBridge, CIFAR, and CSEE.

  15. District heating with SLOWPOKE energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System, a benign nuclear heat source designed to supply 10 thermal megawatts in the form of hot water for local heating systems in buildings and institutions, is at the forefront of these developments. A demonstration unit has been constructed in Canada and is currently undergoing an extensive test program. Because the nuclear heat source is small, operates at atmospheric pressure, and produces hot water below 100 degrees Celcius, intrinsic safety features will permit minimum operator attention and allow the heat source to be located close to the load and hence to people. In this way, a SLOWPOKE Energy System can be considered much like the oil- or coal-fired furnace it is designed to replace. The low capital investment requirements, coupled with a high degree of localization, even for the first unit, are seen as attractive features for the implementation of SLOWPOKE Energy Systems in many countries

  16. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  17. Status of Japanese university reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Yoshiaki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    Status of Japanese university reactors, their role and value in research and education, and the spent fuel problem are presented. Some of the reactors are now faced by severe difficulties in continuing their operation services. The point of measures to solve the difficulties is suggested. (author)

  18. Status of Japanese university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Status of Japanese university reactors, their role and value in research and education, and the spent fuel problem are presented. Some of the reactors are now faced by severe difficulties in continuing their operation services. The point of measures to solve the difficulties is suggested. (author)

  19. Kyoto University Reactor diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the safety of a nuclear reactor, it is very important that the operators and manager make exact judgement about the various conditions of the nuclear reactor occurring at times. The research is advanced for the purpose of adopting a computer system for the research reactor of Kyoto University (KUR), offering effective information to operators and maintenance workers, making the advice for exactly judging the conditions of the reactor by sufficiently grasping them, consequently, developing the system for increasing the safety of the reactor. For the development of this system, also technical officials took part positively and cooperated in the research and development based on the experience of the maintenance and operation of the research reactor carried out daily. The system comprises the data acquisition part, data base, abnormality diagnostic part, man-machine interface part, and individual dealing part. The abnormality of the reactor is identified by the judgement of operators by referring to the data memorized in the data base, then, the reactor is operated. The constitution of the computer system used is shown. The CPU is a minicomputer ECLIPSE S-140, and the main memory is 512 kB. The auxiliary memories are a fixed disk equipment of 73 MB, two floppy disk equipments and a magnetic tape equipment. Respective subsystems are explained. (Kako, I.)

  20. Geoscience Garden: an outdoor teaching installation at the University of Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, J. W.; Locock, A.

    2009-05-01

    Spatial awareness, and the abilities to position observations and inferences on a two-dimensional map and within the three-dimensional environment of the Earth's crust, are some of the the larger challenges facing beginning Earth Science students. Studies have shown that outdoor observations of outcrops are vital in the development of these spatial skills. However, teaching the techniques of field geology to Earth Science students is challenging in many parts of the continental interior, where nearly flat-lying, weakly consolidated, poorly exposed sedimentary rocks may be concealed beneath recent soils and Quaternary sediments. At the University of Alberta, these problems are offset by field courses at distant locations in more varied terrains during the spring and summer, but the distances (~300 km) and climate make fieldwork difficult during a busy teaching year that extends from September to April. The Geoscience Garden will be a unique landscaped area within the University of Alberta campus in which large (1 - 5 m), boulders and rock slabs will be built into oriented, simulated outcrops. These will be arranged in a layout that represents the geology of western and northern Canada in condensed form. The Garden, currently in the process of installation, will provide an artificial field environment in which Earth Science students can develop observational skills, and construct a simple geological map. They will be able to interpret the mapped area in terms of a three-dimensional structure, and make stratigraphic inferences about the order of deposition of the units and the environmental changes that occurred during the geologic history of the simulated area. In addition to more common rock types, the Garden will also display specimens of mineral deposits in geological context, and illustrate their importance to rural and northern communities. A buried boulder that has high magnetic susceptibility will provide a target for introductory geophysical field surveys

  1. Arkansas Tech University reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the nuclear reactor project at Arkansas Tech University (ATU). The reactor will be a part of the Center for Energy Studies (CES) located on the ATU campus in Russellville, Arkansas. It will be used for education, training, and research. The Arkansas Tech University TRIGA Reactor (ATUTR) is a TRIGA Mark I that will be operated in two basic modes: steady state and pulsing. The maximum power level for steady-state operation is 250 kW(thermal), and the maximum step reactivity insertion will be 2.0$. The inherent safety of this reactor comes from the large negative temperature coefficient of the uranium-zirconium-hydride fuel-moderator elements. Principal design parameters for the reactor are summarized. The application for reactor construction and operating license was submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in November 1989. The review process is continuing. ATU plans to continue to work with local industry and the public to provide a wide variety of services related to nuclear science and engineering

  2. University Of Alberta Flare Research Project: final report November 1996 - September 2004. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research program examined the emissions, combustion processes, and fluid mechanics related to flaring. This report focuses on the emissions and efficiencies of flares under operating conditions typical of solution gas flares. The topic of solution gas flaring and the environmental concerns associated with these flares is introduced. The research goals of the project, the approach adopted to conduct the research, and the specific objectives of the report are also presented. Generic pipe flares under well-controlled conditions were studied experimentally in order to understand the performance of flares in general. The research was conducted in wind tunnels where the wind speed, from a known direction, could be set to provide for control over the wind. The laboratory setting also allowed the researchers to blend together different gases to create a varied, but known, flare stream for testing. The majority of these tests were conducted at the University of Alberta within the confines of a closed-loop wind tunnel to test reduced-scale flares. This provided the foundation for subsequent testing and modeling regarding the characterization of flare performance. Experiments were also conducted at the National Research Council in Ottawa to test full-scale flares in a single-pass wind tunnel which served to verify and extend the experimental work accomplished at the University of Alberta. The study showed that smoking flares, a visible indication of soot being emitted, need to be avoided and that fuel droplets in the flare stream enhance the robustness of combustion and result in reduced inefficiencies. The final conclusion is that the combustion efficiency of unassisted solution gas flares could be very high and the emissions of potentially toxic compounds could be very low as long as the flare stream being burned has a relatively high energy density (approximately 20 MJ/m3 or higher), the flare stack size is designed appropriately for the flow rate of flare gas to

  3. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  4. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilborn, J. [Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  5. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-08-31

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included.

  6. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included

  7. Utilisation of British University Research Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncton, P. J.; And Others

    British experience relating to the employment of university research reactors and subcritical assemblies in the education of nuclear scientists and technologists, in the training of reactor operators and for fundamental pure and applied research in this field is reviewed. The facilities available in a number of British universities and the uses…

  8. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  9. Teaching chemistry with neutron activation analysis at Dalhousie University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) has been operating since July 1976 and has proven to be an invaluable tool in many teaching programs. These reactors are inherently safe and are designed to serve teaching and research needs of the universities, research centers, hospitals, etc. Since the DUSR has been, from its inception, associated with the Trace Analysis Research Centre, which is the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Department of Chemistry, the main thrust of its use continues to be in the field of nuclear analytical chemistry. Both teaching and research programs involve trace element analysis by neutron activation

  10. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  11. Reactor physics education at Seoul National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor physics education and research programs of Seoul National University (SNU), which focus on high fidelity and efficient reactor simulation and uncertainty evaluation, are presented. In order to foster the students to have proper knowledge and experience in both deterministic and probabilistic reactor analysis methods with clear understanding of the physical behaviors of nuclear reactors, the undergraduate and graduate courses cover various mathematical and numerical methods as well as the principles of nuclear characteristics and physical behaviors. The research areas span from the development of the methods and computer programs for direct whole core calculation involving the method of characteristics transport calculation to the Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Those covers cross section generation, resonance treatment, depletion method, advanced nodal methods, space-time kinetics method, Monte Carlo whole core calculation with thermal feedback and et cetera. The reactor physics curriculum, the contents of the relevant courses, and the cutting edge research topics and the achievements of SNU reactor physics education are detailed. (author)

  12. University of Florida training reactor. Annual progress report, September 1, 1984-August 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor discusses: reactor operation; personnel; modifications made to the reactors; reactor maintenance; and testing of reactor systems

  13. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  14. Present status of BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, we have two facilities for BNCT such as a reactor-based and an accelerator-based neutron source. In this article, we will present the characteristics overview of both facilities. (author)

  15. External hazards assessment of heating reactor installations in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is developing the 10-MW Slowpoke Energy System, a small, economically competitive reactor, for conventional district heating systems used at large industrial complexes, hospitals, and universities. This type of reactor would be situated within urban centers and likely adjacent to existing powerhouse complexes (desirable from an operation point of view). These existing complexes pose some interesting challenges in the area of hazards to the reactor facility from sources external to the facility, i.e., external hazards. Because of proximity of the reactor facility to the general public (the exclusion boundary is the reactor building itself), a detailed assessment of the external hazards is important for demonstrating feasibility and acquiring licensing approval. This paper briefly describes the methodology of an external hazards study

  16. Safety analysis for non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-power reactors have been operating in Canada since 1945, with NRU (National Research Universal, 1957) being the oldest operating non-power reactor. Presently, there are five generic 'types' of non-power reactors: NRU, ZED-2, SLOWPOKE, MNR and MAPLE, the latter undergoing commissioning as the MDS Medical Isotope Reactor. These reactors range in thermal power from 200 Watts to more than 100 MW. Other non-power reactors are likely to be built for new applications and to replace older reactors. The uniqueness of each reactor, the wide range of power levels and the evolution of safety philosophy over time have lead to non-uniform practices for safety analysis. This non-uniformity may be a problem for the preparation by the licensee and review by the regulator of the safety analysis report required for licensing of the reactor facility. Clearly, there is no universally applicable practice, while at the same time, expectations for safety analyses have evolved in order to demonstrate higher levels of overall safety. This paper examines a new 'graded approach' to preparing the safety analysis report for reactors of diverse features but with a common standard of safety. It discusses necessary content, methods and the training and qualification of the safety analyst. (author)

  17. Alberta大学程序设计教学模式探究%Probe on Teaching Mode of Java Language Programming in Alberta University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米娜瓦尔·努拉合买提; 玛依拉·别克强塔伊娃

    2011-01-01

    More and more universities have made Java language programming as a foundational course,whether the learning hours that assigned for the course is reasonable and the continuous courses after learning Java is arranged well need to further study.Through investigating the programming courses of Computing Science department of Alberta University,Canada,the paper mainly presents several teaching methods on programming courses of Universities.%越来越多的大学开设Java语言作为计算机程序设计类基础课程,但对本课程的学时分配以及对学完Java语言后的后续课程安排是否合理,还有待于进一步的研究。文章通过对加拿大Alberta大学计算机科学系程序设计教学的调查研究,阐述该校程序设计教学中的几大特点。

  18. The Oarai Branch of IMR, Tohoku University as open facility for university researchers utilizing fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For advanced future research activities utilizing fission reactors and hot laboratories, effective interlinks among fission reactors and hot laboratories are indispensable. Oarai Branch of Institute for Materials Research in Tohoku University has been playing an important role for supplying related tools for university researchers, in fission reactor irradiation and post irradiation examinations, under tight collaboration with JAERI and JNC. Now the Oarai Branch is planning to expand its collaborative functions, utilizing multi-reactors over the world and making effective interlinks among related hot laboratories in several institutions. The talk will give rough view of the present plan of the Oarai Branch, IMR, Tohoku University for tight and effective collaboration among institutions. (author)

  19. RELAP/SCDAPSIM Reactor System Simulator Development and Training for University and Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behaviour of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology development program called SDTP (SCDAP Development and Training Program). SDTP involves more than 60 organizations in 28 countries. One of the important applications of the code is for simulator training of university faculty and students, reactor analysts, and reactor operations and technical support staff. Examples of RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based system thermal hydraulic and severe accident simulator packages include the SAFSIM simulator developed by NECSA for the SAFARI research reactor in South Africa, university-developed simulators at the University of Mexico and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and commercial VISA and RELSIM packages used for analyst and reactor operations staff training. This paper will briefly describe the different packages/facilities. (authors)

  20. Wanna be in health physics? Try a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultimately, the key radiation protection issue is each individual's understanding - i.e., understanding of the technical aspects, the safety implications, and the need for their commitment to the overall program. University research reactors can offer a wide range of radiation protection experiences to develop this understanding for not only the health physicist but also any individual involved with nuclear science and technology applications. This paper discusses such topics as radiopharmaceutical research and development, nutritional studies, and reactor maintenance as activities associated with the University of Missouri - Columbia Research Reactor Center (MURR). 3 refs., 1 tab

  1. Reactor physics experiments at Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974. It has three independent cores, namely, two solid-moderated cores (A, B cores) and one light water-moderated core (C core). A pulsed neutron generator by D-T reactions and new FFAG proton accelerator are installed, which can be used in combination with the A-core. In the KUCA, basic studies on reactor physics are being performed. Recent research topics includes 1) nuclear characteristics of thorium fueled reactor, 2) critical experiments loaded with erbium at various spectrum indices, 3) subcriticality measurements, 4) development of innovative neutron detector and 5) simulation experiments of accelerator driven system (ADS). For education, the reactor laboratory course on reactor physics is offered for 12 Japanese universities since 1975. More than 150 graduate or undergraduate students majoring in nuclear engineering are joining this course every year and same reactor laboratory course has been offered for Korean and Swedish students.

  2. The keys to success in marketing small heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the SLOWPOKE Energy System requires acceptance of the SLOWPOKE reactor within the community where the reactor's energy is to be used. Public acceptance will be obtained once the public is convinced that this nuclear heat source is needed, safe and of economic benefit to the community. The need for a new application of nuclear energy is described and the ability of small reactors used for district heating to play that role is shown. The safety of the reactor is being demonstrated with the establishment of the SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and with open, candid discussion with the involved community. Economic arguments are reviewed and include discussion of quantitative and qualitative issues. (orig.)

  3. The keys to success in marketing small heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the SLOWPOKE Energy System requires acceptance of the SLOWPOKE reactor within the community where the reactor's energy is to be used. Public acceptance will be obtained once the public is convinced that this nuclear heat source is needed, safe and of economic benefit to the community. The need for a new application of nuclear energy is described and the ability of small reactors used for district heating to play that role is shown. The safety of the reactor is being demonstrated with the establishment of the SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and with open, candid discussion with the envolved community. Economic arguments are reviewed and include discussion of quantitative and qualitative issues. (author)

  4. Electricity competition in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of Alberta's electric power industry was presented with particular focus on the deregulation process within the industry, the new market structure and future evolution of the industry. A series of graphs and tables were presented for illustration purposes. They indicated that in 1998, coal was the major source of energy for electric power generation, followed by natural gas and hydro. The total installed capacity for utility generation was 7367 megawatts. The three major power utilities in Alberta are Alberta Power, Edmonton Power and TransAlta Utilities. Several viewgraphs highlighted important milestones in the evolution of Alberta's Electricity Supply Industry (ESI) from 1970 to 1995. On January 1, 1996 Alberta ESI adopted a wholesale market structure. This paper also discussed issues regarding the independent transmission administrator (TA). Basically, a TA is legislated to provide open access to the transmission system, whereas the power pool administrator is responsible for the adminis tration of the pool energy market. 1 tab., 2 figs

  5. Using deterministic methods for research reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an alternative to prohibitive Monte Carlo simulations, deterministic methods can be used to simulate research reactors. Using various microscopic cross section libraries currently available in Canada, flux distributions were obtained from DRAGON cell and supercell transport calculations. Then, homogenization/condensation is done to produce few-group nuclear properties, and diffusion calculations were performed using DONJON core models. In this paper, the multigroup modular environment of the code DONJON is presented, and the various steps required in the modelling of SLOWPOKE hexagonal cores are described. Numerical simulations are also compared with experimental data available for the EPM Slowpoke reactor. (author)

  6. Is Alberta`s gas running out?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, G.

    1995-09-18

    The state of Alberta`s natural gas resources were reviewed and according to certain groups of experts reserves and resources were found to be less plentiful than generally believed. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) also reported that gas reserves in non-frontier areas declined by 1.8% lat year, to 67.4 trillion cubic feet. It was estimated that this supply would last for 13 years. The National Energy Board (NEB) indicated that thousands of Alberta`s unconnected pools may not be economical to develop. The CAPP annual reserves report also indicated that average gas pools found in recent times were only one quarter of the size of gas pools found before 1980. It was argued by this same group of experts that low gas prices, particularly for Alberta exports, have made drilling uneconomical, while others maintained that price fluctuations must be accepted as part of selling a commodity that is marketed world-wide. Ed Wolf, an independent geologist, estimated that gas prices,factoring in environmental costs, should be increased to $4 per mcf to justify exporting Canadian natural gas. However, others have argued that reserve figures have been underestimated. As proof of that they point to the fact that there is no shortage of investment capital; exploration and production activities, funded by investment, would not continue if natural gas production were not cost-effective. The Ziff Energy Group estimated that discovered and frontier reserves total 426 tcf, or 65 years` supply, excluding tight gas from low porosity formations which have been estimated to provide up to 300 years of supply at current levels of demand. As well, new technologies have improved the industry`s ability to find new reserves. The debate between economic nationalists and free marketeers continues.

  7. The need to address the larger universe of HEU-fueled reactors, including critical assemblies, pulsed reactors and propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The RERTR program has focused thus far primarily on ending shipments of HEU fuel to research reactors. This has resulted in giving highest priority to reactors with steady thermal powers of 1 megawatt or more, because they require regular refuelling. Critical facilities and pulsed reactors can also of serious concern, because some of them contain very large amounts of barely-irradiated HEU and plutonium. They could be costly to convert - and conversion to LEU may be impractical for fast-neutron critical assemblies. An assessment should be carried out first, therefore, as to which are still needed. Critical assemblies are required today primarily to benchmark Monte Carlo neutron-transport codes. Perhaps the world nuclear community could share a few instead of each reactor-design institute having its own. There is also a whole universe of HEU-fuelled pressurized-water reactors used to power submarines and other types of nuclear-powered ships. These reactors collectively require much more HEU fuel each year than research reactors. The risk of HEU diversion from their fuel cycles is not zero but it is difficult for outsiders to discuss conversion because of the fuel designs are classified. This makes the conversion of Russia's civilian icebreaker reactors of particular interest because issues of classified fuel design are less problematic and these reactors load annually fuel containing about 400 kg of U-235. Another reason for interest in developing LEU fuel for these reactors is that the KLT-40 icebreaker reactor is being adapted for a floating nuclear power plant. Finally, the research-reactor community is, in any case, faced with developing fuels that can operate at power-reactor-fuel temperatures because there are a few high-powered research reactors that operate in this temperature range. (author)

  8. TRIGA reactor relocation at the University of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Texas at Austin (UT) is in the process of relocating its TRIGA reactor facilities. This undertaking includes the construction of a new reactor building with laboratories and offices and the decommissioning of the existing facility. The main campus of The University of Texas at Austin is becoming congested, and several major research projects (mostly engineering) are moving to the Balcones Research Center ∼ 8 miles from the main campus. The process of constructing a new nuclear facility in today's regulatory environment can best be described as challenging. Fortunately, research reactor licensing is not as complicated as that for commercial power facilities, although many procedures are similar. Unfortunately, the university has its own challenging procedures for building construction. Considerable time has been expended coordinating the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and UT licensing and construction activities. The paper summarizes the major steps and dates accomplished. The new reactor facility at the Balcones Research Center will enhance the universities ability to carry on teaching and research activities. The increased power level and the Mark II arrangement will allow us to perform new and additional projects. Considerable time and effort were devoted by the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory staff to ensure that the facility would provide educational and research flexibility over the next several years

  9. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Engineering Physics. The Mechanical Engineering Building is near the southwestern border of the University of.... The UWNR is located in the Mechanical Engineering Building on the main campus of the University of... conventional construction within the Mechanical Engineering Building. Throughout most of the Reactor...

  10. The MNSR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This tank-in-pool reactor is based on the same design concept as the Canadian Slowpoke. The core is a right circular cylinder, 24 cm diameter by 25 cm long, containing 411 fuel pin positions. The pins are HEU-Aluminium alloy, 0.5 cm in diameter. Critical mass is about 900 g. The reactor has a single cadmium control rod. The back-up shutdown system is the insertion of a cadmium capsule in a core position. Excess reactivity is limited to 3.5mk. In both the MNSR and Slowpoke, the insertion of the maximum excess reactivity results in a power transient limited by the coolant/moderator temperature to safe values, independent of any operator action. This reactor is used primarily in training and neutron activation analysis. Up to 64 elements have been analyzed in a great variety of different disciplines. (author)

  11. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

  12. Utilization of research reactors in universities and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, five research reactors and a critical assembly are operated by the universities. They are opened to all university researchers, the system of which is financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Japanese government. Usually KUR is operated eight cycles per year. One cycle consists of the following four week operation: 1. Mainly for researchers from other universities; 2. Mainly for researchers in the institute; 3. Mainly for beam experiment; 4. Sort time experiment. In the weeks of 1 ∼ 3 the KUR is operated continously from Tuesday morning to Friday evening. The experiment include studies on physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering etc. Recently the medical application of research reactors has become popular in Japan. The new technique of the boron neutron capture thereby has been successfully applied to brain tumors and will be to melanoma (skin cancer) in near future. (author)

  13. Use of university research reactors to teach control engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University research reactors (URRs) have provided generations of students with the opportunity to receive instruction and do hands-on work in reactor dynamics, neutron scattering, health physics, and neutron activation analysis. Given that many URRs are currently converting to programmable control systems, the opportunity now exists to provide a similar learning experience to those studying systems control engineering. That possibility is examined here with emphasis on the need for the inclusion of experiment in control engineering curricula, the type of activities that could be performed, and safety considerations

  14. Congestion management in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenges facing Alberta regarding electricity market design and congestion management were described. The electricity market in the province consists of a central power pool, an open access transmission network, and a single pool price, unlike many other jurisdictions in North America which have adopted a location margin price (LMP) design with significant price differences between various locations within the power network. Alberta's transmission network is regulated and provides carrier functions. Power moves freely throughout Alberta's power pool network with no congestion, therefore the common pool price signals market participants throughout the entire network with no segregation into zones. Alberta is currently at a cross road in choosing between a single pool price model or a nodal price model. In the first instance, the province would have to strengthen the transmission network to maintain the market at a reasonable size. The alternative would permit Alberta to use market-based techniques to deal with the evolution of many smaller markets in the province, but these would be very small by North American standards and their ability to compete would be questionable

  15. Status of the University of Virginia reactor LEU conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Virginia began working on converting the CAVALIER and UVAR reactors to LEU fuel in the Spring of 1986. Early in 1987, based on reactor use considerations, a decision was made to shut down the CAVALIER. A decommissioning plan was submitted to the NRC, and the decommissioning order was issued in early 1992. There is now a tentative agreement to donate the CAVALIER equipment without fuel to the University of North Texas. Design calculations for the UVAR were completed, and the Safety Analysis Report was submitted to the NRC in late 1989. The DOE/EG ampersand G order to manufacture UVAR fuel was placed at B ampersand W in March 1992, and conversion is expected to take place early in 1993

  16. Control of occupational exposure in a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A university institute operating a research reactor and other installations is an institution where occupational exposure may occur, but has some typical characteristics not necessarily fully consistent with Radiation Protection Standards. As the dose records indicate a trend to lower doses, the problems are rather of a formal than of a technical nature. Some of the problems in practical radiation protection are addressed and solutions are discussed. (author)

  17. Alberta Unites on Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Education policy in the province of Alberta is set by Alberta Education, a ministry led by the province's minister of education. There are two key policies or ministerial orders that guide professional learning in Alberta. The Teaching Quality Standard outlines the knowledge, skills, and attributes that teachers are expected to possess. The…

  18. Development of a neutron tomography system using a low flux reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungler, P. C.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Lewis, W. J.; Bevan, G. A.; Gabov, A.

    2011-09-01

    A neutron tomography instrument was designed and developed at the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada with Queen's University to enhance these institutions' non-destructive evaluation capabilities. The neutron imaging system was built around a Safe Low-Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE-2) nuclear research reactor. The low power and physical geometry of the reactor required that a novel design be developed to facilitate tomography. A unique rotisserie style rotary stage and clamping apparatus was developed. Furthermore, the low flux at the image plane (3×10 4 n cm -2 s -1), necessitated that the image acquisition and reconstruction processes be optimized. Tomographs of numerous samples were obtained using the new tomography instrument at RMC.

  19. Development of a neutron tomography system using a low flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron tomography instrument was designed and developed at the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada with Queen's University to enhance these institutions' non-destructive evaluation capabilities. The neutron imaging system was built around a Safe Low-Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE-2) nuclear research reactor. The low power and physical geometry of the reactor required that a novel design be developed to facilitate tomography. A unique rotisserie style rotary stage and clamping apparatus was developed. Furthermore, the low flux at the image plane (3x104 n cm-2 s-1), necessitated that the image acquisition and reconstruction processes be optimized. Tomographs of numerous samples were obtained using the new tomography instrument at RMC.

  20. Decommissioning Experience: University of Virginia Reactors, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There were two research reactors at the University of Virginia. CAVALIER operated at a maximum power of 100 W from 1974 to 1988. The other reactor (generally referred to as the UVA reactor) operated at a maximum power of 1 MW or 2 MW from 1960 to 1998. The water contained in the pool was utilized to provide shielding during the segmenting and removal of highly contaminated components in the pool. This work was performed by divers using plasma arc cutting equipment. A cask liner was first placed in the reactor pool. The higher activity items were preferentially loaded nearest the centre of the cask, and the lower activity items loaded in the liner annulus to provide shielding. Because air sampling performed during segmentation proved that no airborne contamination was produced, no confinement structure was necessary. After shipment of the removed components, the remaining pool water was sampled and confirmed suitable for discharge to the sanitary sewer (through filters). Decontamination of the pool structures was performed using a water jet cutting process. Once the pool surfaces had been cleaned to bare concrete, surfaces were sampled for activation. The only activated concrete was detected radially around the beam tubes through the pool wall (author)

  1. Major Refurbishment of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research reactor fleet is aging with few replacements being built. At the same time the technology for refurbishment of the older reactors has advanced well beyond that of currently installed equipment. The disparity between new and old technology results in an inability to find simple replacements for the older, highly integrated components. The lack of comprehensive guidance for digital equipment adds to the technical problems of installing individual replacement parts. Up to this point, no U. S. facilities have attempted a complete modernization effort because of the time commitment, financial burden, and licensing required for a total upgrade. The University of Florida Training Reactor is tackling this problem with a replacement of nearly all of the major facility sub-systems, including electrical distribution, reactor controls, nuclear instrumentation, security, building management, and environmental controls. This approach offers increased flexibility over the piece-by-piece replacement method by leveraging modern control systems based on global standards and capable of good data interchange with higher levels of redundancy. The UFTR reviewed numerous technologies to arrive at the final system architecture and this 'clean-slate' installation methodology. It is this concept of total system replacement and strict use of modular, open-standards technology that has allowed for a facility design that will be easy to install, maintain, and build upon over time

  2. The role of the Iowa State University research reactor in nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 19, 1959, the Iowa State University Research Reactor (ISURR) was made critical for the first time. In the 29 yr since then, the reactor has been an integral part of the nuclear engineering program. Throughout its history, the major use of the ISURR has been as an educational tool. The reactor is currently used in both the undergraduate and graduate programs at ISU. The paper provides the reactor description and discusses reactor experiments for undergraduates and reactor use in graduate education

  3. Hybrid simulation of boiling water reactor dynamics using a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ''hybrid'' reactor/simulation (HRS) testing arrangement has been developed and experimentally verified using The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) TRIGA Reactor. The HRS uses actual plant components to supply key parameters to a digital simulation (and vice versa). To implement the HRS on the Penn State TRIGA reactor, an experimental or secondary control rod drive mechanism is used to introduce reactivity feedback effects that are characteristic of a boiling water reactor (BWR). The simulation portion of the HRS provides a means for introducing reactivity feedback caused by voiding via a reduced order thermal-hydraulic model. With the model bifurcation parameter set to the critical value, the nonlinearity caused by the neutronic-simulated thermal/hydraulic coupling of the hybrid system is evident upon attaining a limit cycle, thereby verifying that these effects are indeed present. The shape and frequency of oscillation (∼ 0.4 Hz) of the limit cycles obtained with the HRS are similar to those observed in operating commercial BWRs. A control or diagnostic system specifically designed to accommodate (or detect) this type of anomaly can be experimentally verified using the research reactor based HRS

  4. The Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) nuclear analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research (MURR) began operations in 1966 and has operated at 10 megawatts over 90 percent of the time since 1977. The MURR organizational structure includes reactor operations, health physics and technical service and research groups. The Nuclear Analysis Program is one of the major research areas and also includes mission components of teaching and service utilizing neutron activation analysis, isotope production and gamma-ray spectroscopy in the diverse study of both the physical and life sciences. (author) 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  5. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Reactor Research and Education Center

    2015-06-15

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  6. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  7. Generation opportunities in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid-Carlson, D. [Optimum Energy Management Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Optimum Energy Management Inc. (OEMI) specializes in: (1) energy management services and training, (2) regulatory consulting, and (3) energy economics and forecasting. As an example of the company`s special expertise, this historical account and future supply and demand forecast for electricity, and for oil and gas in Alberta was presented. The exercise included a review of the Alberta Pool price study and power generation opportunities in a deregulated market, including risks. A rise in pool prices to $25 to $30 per MWh by the year 2000, and a softening of prices beyond the turn of the century were predicted, along with continued regulatory reform and increased levels of competition. Natural gas convergence is expected to drive electricity prices in the future. 1 tab., 11 figs.

  8. Alberta propylene upgrading prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very significant byproduct recovery and purification scheme is at present being prepared by TransCanada Midstream (TCMS). Alberta Economic Development commissioned an independent study to identify propylene supply options while proceeding with the evaluation of various propylene derivatives with regard to their fit with the Alberta context. Identification of chemical companies with derivative interests was also accomplished. By 2005, it is estimated that 280 kilo-tonnes of propylene will be available on an annual basis from byproduct sources. Those sources are oil sands upgraders, ethylene plants and refineries. The ranges of impurities and supply costs vary between the different sources. An option being considered involves pipeline and rail receipt with a major central treating and distillation facility for the production of polymer grade (PG) propylene with propane and other smaller byproducts. Special consideration was given to three chemicals in this study, namely: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and acrylic acid (AA). Above average growth rates were identified for these chemicals: demand is growing at 6 to 7 per cent a year for both PP and ACN, while demand for AA grows at 8 per cent annually. Two other possibilities were identified, propylene oxide (PO) and phenol. The study led to the conclusion that low capital and operating costs and shipping costs to the Pacific Rim represent advantages to the development of propylene derivatives in the future in Alberta. 4 refs., 87 tabs., 7 figs

  9. Using Usability Evaluation to Inform Alberta's Personal Health Record Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan; Bellwood, Paule; Davies, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Alberta Health is deploying the Personal Health Portal (PHP) (MyHealth.Alberta.ca) to all people in the province of Alberta, Canada. The PHP will include several components such as a Personal Health Record (PHR) where users can enter and access their own health data. For the first PHR of its kind in Canada, Alberta Health asked the University of Victoria's eHealth Observatory to evaluate the PHP, including the PHR. The evaluation includes pre-design, design, and adoption evaluation. This paper focuses on early usability evaluations of the PHR software. Persona-based usability inspection was combined with usability testing sessions using think aloud. These evaluations found that while people were familiar with the web-based technology, several aspects of the PHR information architecture, content, and presentation could be improved to better support and provide value to the users. The findings could be helpful to others designing and implementing similar PHR software. PMID:25676994

  10. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors

  11. Alberta oil sands crudes : upgrading and marketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashar, M. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Open pit mining and in situ techniques, such as steam stimulation, are used to recover Alberta's bitumen and heavy oil resources, which have higher viscosities than conventional hydrocarbons. The bitumen is typically upgraded to synthetic crude oil (SCO). In the simplest processing scheme, the bitumen is blended with diluent for ease in pipeline transport and then processed at refineries with upgrading facilities. The bitumen is also upgraded to light SCO at world-scale upgraders in Alberta. The SCO is then processed at refineries in downstream markets. The 2 categories of upgrading, notably primary and secondary upgrading, were described in this article along with technology options for both categories. Slurry hydrocracking is regarded as the most interesting emerging residual fuel upgrading technology. It combines special catalyst mixes with the latest slurry reactor designs as well as innovative catalyst capture and recycle schemes to produce very high conversions and potentially superior upgrading economics. The increase in volume and rate of SCO from Alberta provides refiners in the oil sands marketing sector an unprecedented choice of opportunities to improve profitability. Key trends indicate that production will increase substantially from 2008 to 2030. 5 figs.

  12. Alberta oil sands crudes : upgrading and marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open pit mining and in situ techniques, such as steam stimulation, are used to recover Alberta's bitumen and heavy oil resources, which have higher viscosities than conventional hydrocarbons. The bitumen is typically upgraded to synthetic crude oil (SCO). In the simplest processing scheme, the bitumen is blended with diluent for ease in pipeline transport and then processed at refineries with upgrading facilities. The bitumen is also upgraded to light SCO at world-scale upgraders in Alberta. The SCO is then processed at refineries in downstream markets. The 2 categories of upgrading, notably primary and secondary upgrading, were described in this article along with technology options for both categories. Slurry hydrocracking is regarded as the most interesting emerging residual fuel upgrading technology. It combines special catalyst mixes with the latest slurry reactor designs as well as innovative catalyst capture and recycle schemes to produce very high conversions and potentially superior upgrading economics. The increase in volume and rate of SCO from Alberta provides refiners in the oil sands marketing sector an unprecedented choice of opportunities to improve profitability. Key trends indicate that production will increase substantially from 2008 to 2030. 5 figs

  13. 77 FR 27487 - License Amendment Request From The State University of New York, University of Buffalo Reactor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires... COMMISSION License Amendment Request From The State University of New York, University of Buffalo Reactor....resource@nrc.gov . The University of Buffalo Decommissioning Plan and License Amendment Request...

  14. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  15. Helium in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Helium is found in small quantities in natural gas in Alberta and most natural gases throughout the world. This report outlines its properties and its present day uses such as the space program, welding of metals, controlled atmospheres for growing crystals for semi-conductors, chromatography, heat transfer, leak-testing, and research and medical-biological applications. It also appears that liquid helium will be necessary to provide a practical source of the low temperature necessary for the many potential applications of superconductivity. These offer many possibilities for savings in energy-related applications. This report also examines helium supply and demand in the USA, the principal source of supply to the Western world, Japan, which must import all its requirements, and Canada. Since the failure of Canadian Helium's Saskatchewan plant in 1977, Canada has no indigenous supply and no apparent sources which are viable under current technology. Alberta had 33.1 billion feet/sup 3/ of helium as of December 31, 1977 contained in its proved reserves of natural gas. None of this is economically recoverable under current commercial technology. By 1985, when a commercial plant would come on stream, 72% of the ultimate reserve of 47 Bcf will still be available. Alberta now has a process being field-tested which has an energy requirement only 25-30% of that of the presently available method. Should the test be successful, it will make possible the economic recovery of helium from the province's pipeline gases and the sale of the technology to other countries. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Radioactive waste management in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joint utilization by the researchers of the universities and others in whole Japan of the reactor facilities in Kyoto University was begun in 1965. The facility for abandoning radioactive waste was constructed in fiscal year 1963, and comprises 500 kg/h vaporization and concentration facility, 2 systems of 5 m3/h flocculation, precipitation and filtration facility, and 2 systems of 5 m3/h ion exchange facility for liquid waste, 50x103 kg pressing capacity, four-column type press for reducing volume of solid waste, and waste store for 400 standard drums. Radioactive Waste Treatment Department was organized, and the stipulations on security and radiation injury prevention were enforced in 1964. Liquid and solid wastes have been accepted since 1964. The radioactivity in discharged water in each year is shown. About 600 m3 of waste liquid has been accepted in one year since 1980. The trust of solid waste treatment to Japan Radioisotope Association has been carried out 51 times. The radioactive waste which is temporarily stored in the waste store is reported. Hereafter, the construction of the facility for storing large finished equipment and the appearance of waste treatment enterprises are desirable. (K.I.)

  17. Unique educational opportunities at the Missouri University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) went critical in 1966, it has been a center where students from many departments conduct their graduate research. In the past three decades, hundreds of graduate students from the MU departments of chemistry, physics, anthropology, nuclear engineering, etc., have received masters and doctoral degrees based on research using neutrons produced at MURR. More recently, the educational opportunities at MURR have been expanded to include undergraduate students and local high school students. Since 1989 MURR has participated in the National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. As part of this program, undergraduate students from universities and colleges throughout the United States come to MURR and get hands-on research experience during the summer. Another program, started in 1994 by the Nuclear Analysis Program at MURR, allows students from a local high school to conduct a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment. We also conduct tours of the center, where we describe the research and educational programs at MURR to groups of elementary school children, high school science teachers, state legislators, professional organizations, and many other groups

  18. Radioactive waste management in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoura, Kazukuni [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1997-02-01

    The joint utilization by the researchers of the universities and others in whole Japan of the reactor facilities in Kyoto University was begun in 1965. The facility for abandoning radioactive waste was constructed in fiscal year 1963, and comprises 500 kg/h vaporization and concentration facility, 2 systems of 5 m{sup 3}/h flocculation, precipitation and filtration facility, and 2 systems of 5 m{sup 3}/h ion exchange facility for liquid waste, 50x10{sup 3} kg pressing capacity, four-column type press for reducing volume of solid waste, and waste store for 400 standard drums. Radioactive Waste Treatment Department was organized, and the stipulations on security and radiation injury prevention were enforced in 1964. Liquid and solid wastes have been accepted since 1964. The radioactivity in discharged water in each year is shown. About 600 m{sup 3} of waste liquid has been accepted in one year since 1980. The trust of solid waste treatment to Japan Radioisotope Association has been carried out 51 times. The radioactive waste which is temporarily stored in the waste store is reported. Hereafter, the construction of the facility for storing large finished equipment and the appearance of waste treatment enterprises are desirable. (K.I.)

  19. Wood residues in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forest products industry is the third largest economic sector in Alberta, producing pulp and paper, dimensional lumber, paneling, and value added products, providing some 40,000 jobs . 'Value added' is a key component of expanding economic activity within the forest products sector. Wood residues can play a key role in obtaining more value from forest resources by providing new products, serving as feedstock to energy and chemical production, and playing a role in agriculture and land reclamation. One of the principal roles of the Forest Products Development Branch of the Alberta Economics Department is to encourage the development of the industry by creating new uses for these materials and developing awareness of the scope of the resource. Distances to markets, economic competition from conventional energy sources and coordination of research efforts are substantial barriers to further development that the Forest Products Development Branch has to face daily. Some notable successes in recent years are described. These include the Wood Residue Inventory and the Wood Residue Database that provide data on availability and principal location of wood residues, also a listing of contacts at the mills who produce the materials

  20. Instrumentation upgrade at the Training Reactor of Budapest University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After more than 30 years of operation, parts of the instrumentation of the Training Reactor of Budapest University is still working with original circuit boards, components from the 70's. Nowadays, with the convenience of using integrated circuits and computers, it is expectable to change from the old technology to a newer, more up-to-date measurement system, with higher reliability and with services that cannot be made with current instrumentation. Our radiation control system will be soon upgraded to a new, self-developed hightech data acquisition system. Its heart is a microcontroller based, standalone circuit. With this change reliability will dramatically improve due to small number of components, to modular firmware witten in assembly, and to the simple power supply unit. We solved the problem of remote data access (data representation), data archivation, and on-line measurements using ethernet network connection, a linux based database system with automated data upload softwares, and common, off the shelf web browsers. Software reliability was maximized by using only commercial, proven software applications which was tested by million of people. Data security is made by storing collected data on more computers, in more formats (raw text file, database file), updating them minute by minute. Using only local network addresses, encrypted data transfers, and secure connections very good access security is achieved. This way of measurement system development helps us to save time, and to make cheap systems with high flexibility. In my presentation I will show these systems in detail, with all the novel and useful features we made and are using currently at our training reactor. (author)

  1. Status of woodland caribou in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Edmonds

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent review of woodland caribou {Rangifer tarandus caribou status in Alberta estimated that there are between 3600 and 6700 caribou occupying 113 000 km2 of habitat. There are two ecotypes of caribou in Alberta; the mountain ecotype in the west central region and the boreal ecotype primarily in the north. Mountain caribou populations are stable or declining and boreal populations, where data are available, appear to be stable or declining slowly. A major initiative in caribou management in Alberta has been the development of the Woodland Caribou Conservation Strategy. This document was developed over two and a half years by a committee of multi-stakeholder representatives. The past five years has seen an increase in baseline inventory and applied research jointly funded by government, industry and universities, addressing a wide range of management issues from caribou response to logging to interactions of moose, wolves and caribou in the boreal ecosystem. Land use conflicts on caribou range remain high with timber harvesting, oil and gas development, peat moss extraction, coal mining, agricultural expansion and increasing road access overlapping. Cumulative effects of these disturbances are poorly understood and have received little attention to date.

  2. Information and education programs at the Washington State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tours of the Nuclear Radiation Center are a common activity throughout the year, conducted for University classes, organized tour groups from other universities, private tour groups, and individuals. Increased awareness of nuclear activity and the existence of a research reactor on-campus has led to a heightened interest in reactor operations. The information and education programs at Washington State University have been directed at the individual needs and requirements of diverse interests. (author)

  3. The University of Missouri Research Reactor facility can melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a waste compacting system for reducing the volume of radioactive aluminum cans has been designed, built and put into operation. In MURR's programs of producing radioisotopes and transmutation doping of silicon, a large volume of radioactive aluminum cans is generated. The Can Melter System (CMS) consists of a sorting station, a can masher, an electric furnace and a gas fired furnace. This system reduces the cans and other radioactive metal into barrels of solid metal close to theoretical density. The CMS has been in operation at the MURR now for over two years. Twelve hundred cu ft of cans and other metals have been reduced into 150 cu ft of shipable waste. The construction cost of the CMS was $4950.84 plus 1680 man hours of labor, and the operating cost of the CMS is $18/lb. The radiation exposure to the operator is 8.6 mR/cu ft. The yearly operating savings is $30,000. 20 figs., 10 tabs

  4. 76 FR 69296 - University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... published in the Federal Register on July 21, 2011 (76 FR 43733-43737). The NRC received no request for a..., 2011 (76 FR 60091-60094), and concluded that renewal of the facility operating license will not have a... COMMISSION University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of...

  5. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  6. The need to address the larger universe of HEU-fueled reactors, including: Critical assemblies, pulsed reactors and propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RERTR program has focused on ending shipments of HEU fuel to research reactors. Highest priority has been given to reactors with steady thermal powers ≥ 1 megawatt. Since the cores of critical assemblies and pulsed reactors can contain huge amounts of HEU, they should be a second focus. Also, since many aging and specialized HEU-fuelled reactors may no longer be needed, more emphasis should be given to initiatives that could assist in their shutdown and decommissioning, including providing access to regional reactors with superior facilities. HEU-fuelled ship-propulsion reactors should also be addressed. Russia's civilian icebreaker reactors are of particular interest because their fuel design is considered less sensitive than that of naval reactor fuel. Moreover, Russia's KLT-40 icebreaker reactor is being adapted for a floating nuclear power plant and LEU icebreaker fuel could be used for converting Russian research reactors such as PIK and SM-3, that operate at power-reactor temperatures. (author)

  7. Operation and utilization experience of UTR-KINKI, a low flux university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI, is the first and smallest university reactor in Japan. Since 1961, it had been operated at 0.1 W for the first 13 years mainly for teaching and training of university student. It increased its power to 1.0 W in 1974 and thereafter has been operated both for educational and research purposes. General uses of UTR-KINKI are teaching and training of university student, miscellaneous reactor physics experiments, reactor noise analysis, irradiation of wide variety of samples including small animals and maggots of drosophia, neutron radiography, radio-chemistry, radiation chemistry and activation analysis. At present time, it is being operated about 40 days for educational purposes and about 70 days for miscellaneous research uses for one year. Besides these, it has been operated since 1981 for about 80 days per year for visiting researchers from other universities all over Japan. (author)

  8. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Alberta Learning: Early Development Instrument Pilot Project Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Wanda; Harris-Lorenze, Elayne

    The Early Development Instrument (EDI) was designed by McMaster University to measure the outcomes of childrens early years as they influence their readiness to learn at school. The EDI was piloted in several Canadian cities in recent years through two national initiatives. Building on these initiatives, Alberta Learning piloted the EDI as a…

  10. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants

  11. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, fiscal year 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis services; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  12. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  13. Verification of the MCNP model for the University of Texas TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MCNP model of The University of Texas TRIGA reactor has been used for design calculations for the neutron collimator system in the through beam port. The TRIGA MCNP model was verified by comparing its results with experimentally determined values

  14. Alberta Chamber of Resources : 1997 resources guide and directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources (ACR) is composed of 140 member companies from the oil and gas industry, forestry, pulp and paper, mining, oil sands, utilities, contractors, suppliers, consultants, banking and other service groups, as well as representatives from universities and governments. ACR's activities during 1996 were reviewed. These included supporting or sponsoring a careers forum, and various other networking and information sharing opportunities, a study of the potential for Alberta's minerals industry, and exploring opportunities for research in the forestry sector and the further development of Alberta's oil sands. Studies of the transportation and infrastructures strategies for Alberta's resources, royalty regimes, tenure and compensation issues associated with oil sands reservoirs that are 'capped' by natural gas reservoirs, taxation issues related to oil sands development, mineral rights tenure, and toll design and royalty issues affecting Alberta's natural gas sector rounded out the Chamber's activities. The annual review also profiled a number of ACR member companies, among them Koch Oil Company Ltd., Pardee Equipment Ltd., Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Clearwater Welding and Fabricating Ltd., and Weldwood of Canada. A listing of all ACR members was also provided

  15. Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Thirtieth annual progress report, July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the thirtieth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor and covers such topics as: personnel; reactor facility; cobalt-60 facility; education and training; Radionuclear Application Laboratory; Low Level Radiation Monitoring Laboratory; and facility research utilization

  16. Introduction to the status of reactor physics education in Tsinghua University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the general situation of reactor physics education in Tsinghua University, including its history, the course series of the undergraduates and graduates and the reactor physics experiment education. This paper also simply introduces the students studying in nuclear engineering field and other nuclear engineering related courses. (author)

  17. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such a broad

  18. Alberta's new oil boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A massive expansion of Canada's oil sands and the oil-mining business is underway. The prediction is that within five years there will be at least three, possibly six, huge new open pit mines north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. It was suggested that within 20 years, possibly half of Canada's oil supply will come from the oil sands industry which has already attracted $10 billion worth of developments. Unlike conventional crude, the oil sands contain bitumen, water, clay, minerals and lots of sands. Shallow deposits are mined like coal. Deeper formations make use of in-situ thermal recovery techniques. Extraction costs are presently at $15 per barrel, aiming for $12 by 1999. Return on investment is in double digits. Estimates of reserves in the Athabasca, Cold Lake, Peace River and Wabasca deposits go as high as 1.7 trillion barrels, or about twice as much as Saudi Arabia's conventional crude reserves. Syncrude has built a $5 billion production facility and two pipelines have already been proposed to transport the oil sands crude to midwestern US refineries. US refineries prize synthetic crude as excellent mixing stock. The major problem with oil sands is that unlike conventional oil, these reserves require an enormous amount of energy to exploit, which in turn means lots of foul air and greenhouse gases. There are many environmental unknowns, and without a clear management framework in sight the addition of two or three Syncrude-size operations has the potential to create a real and significant acid rain problem in the Western Canada Basin

  19. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

  20. Science Hall of Atomic Energy in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Science Hall of Atomic Energy was built as a subsidiary facility of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The purpose of this facility is to accept outside demands concerning the application of the research reactor. The building is a two story building, and has the floor area of 901.47 m2. There are an exhibition room, a library, and a big lecture room. In the exhibition room, models of the Kyoto University Research Reactor and the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are placed. Various pictures concerning the application of the reactor are on the wall. In the library, people from outside of the Institute can use various books on science. Books for boys and girls are also stocked and used for public use. At the lecture room, various kinds of meeting can be held. (Kato, T.)

  1. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  2. China joins Alberta oilsands research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that China's state oil company has bought a stake in an in situ oilsands research project in northern Alberta. China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC) will invest $6.5 million in the Underground Test Facility (UTF) operated by Alberta Oilsands Technology and Research Authority (Aostra) near Fort McMurray. It is the first foreign research investment for CNPC. The UTF is a joint venture by provincial agency Aostria, the Canadian federal government, and commercial partners in underground mining techniques to extract crude oil from bitumen. Alberta opened a trade office in Beijing in 1991 and now sells several hundred million dollars a year in petroleum equipment and services to China. A horizontal well in situ steam injection process is approaching the production stage at the UTF. It is to begin producing at a rate of 2,000 b/d this fall. The current project is a followup to a pilot project

  3. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  4. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigliole, A. Borio Di; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Provasi, M.C.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G. [University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (L.E.N.A), Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  5. Irradiated Hardware Characterization and Packaging During Decommissioning of the Ford Nuclear Reactor at University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of all irradiated hardware during decommissioning of experimental and research reactors always presents a host of challenges not normally associated with characterization of irradiated hardware from commercial nuclear reactors. The campaign to characterize all of the irradiated hardware from the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan was no exception. The Ford Nuclear Reactor was an MTR pool style reactor that was in continual use up to the point of decommissioning. Some of the unique challenges involved with experimental pool reactors are the lack of symmetry around the core for neutron activation analysis calculations, the large inventory of activated components, the high degree of variability within that inventory, and the packaging of the entire inventory into the most efficient liner combinations. The entire high activity inventory was successfully packaged into two (2) steel fuel pool liners and shipped in two (2) cask shipments. (authors)

  6. Alberta oil sands royalty regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term objective of the Oil Sands Business Unit of Alberta Energy is to pave the way for Alberta's bitumen production to reach 3 million barrels per day by 2020. This presentation described the national government's role in resource development. It was emphasized that since the Crown is the owner of the oil sands resource, it would benefit by providing strategic leadership and by generating a larger royalty base. The oil sands fiscal regime was described with reference to generic royalty, risk sharing, investment, and project economics. Business rule principles were also outlined along with criteria for project expansions. Both upstream and downstream challenges and opportunities were listed. 4 figs

  7. Taking samples from the reactor components in preparation for dismantling the TRIGA reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After shutting down the facility at the end of 1996 the spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor at the Medical University of Hanover (MHH) were returned to the United States in the summer of 1999 and thus disposed of for the MHH. Consequently one of the main prerequisites for dismantling the TRIGA reactor as planned has been fulfilled. In preparation for dismantling the facility a number of samples were taken from the various reactor components in 2000. The aim of the samples being taken was to establish the radiological condition of the facility in more detail, in particular the condition of the activated components in the reactor tank and the biological shield in the core area. Up to now the calculated estimates for these components had been based mainly on the details provided in the facility documentation when operation started at the beginning of the 1970s, showing that the evaluation of the activity and dose rates was too high. This was confirmed in 1998 in the course of measuring contamination and dose rates when samples were taken from some reactor components before the fuel elements were removed. For example, drill samples were taken from the bottom part of a graphite blind element and from the central radiation beam tube in the core area and then analyzed by the U.R.A. Laboratory of the University of Regensburg. As it is planned to dismantle the reactor facility completely by hand, it is necessary to have realistic radiological data in order to prepare for the dismantling procedure. Furthermore, both the release of radioactive materials into the environment and the costs for external disposal of the radioactive waste from the dismantling of the reactor are to be kept to a minimum. (orig.)

  8. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  9. University Reactor Instrumentation Program. Final report, September 30, 1993--March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has received a total of $115,723.00 from the Department of Energy (DOE) Instrumentation Program (DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-91ID13083) and $40,000 in matching funds from the University of Massachusetts Lowell administration. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has been serving the University and surrounding communities since it first achieved criticality in May 1974. The principle purpose of the facility is to provide a multidisciplinary research and training center for the University of Massachusetts Lowell and other New England academic institutions. The facility promotes student and industrial research, in addition to providing education and training for nuclear scientists, technicians, and engineers. The 1 MW thermal reactor contains a variety of experimental facilities which, along with a 0.4 megacurie cobalt source, effectively supports the research and educational programs of many university departments including Biology, Chemistry, Nuclear and Plastics Engineering, Radiological Sciences, Physics, and other campuses of the University of Massachusetts system. Although the main focus of the facility is on intra-university research, use by those outside the university is fully welcomed and highly encouraged

  10. A Multi-Phased Sampling Effort to Characterize a University TRIGA Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological characterization project was conducted at the University of Illinois (University) TRIGA research nuclear reactor in July 2005 as part of the long-term facility decommissioning project. The characterization effort included multiple survey and sampling techniques designed to assess both contamination of the reactor building and equipment and activation of reactor components and the reactor bio-shield. Radiation measurements included alpha and beta surface contamination measurements, gamma dose rate measurements, and gross gamma radiation measurements. Modeling was conducted based on the field measurements to predict concentrations of activation products in reactor components that were not directly sampled. The sampling effort included collecting removable contamination swipes, concrete samples from the reactor room floor and bio-shield, soil samples from below and around the perimeter of the reactor building, graphite samples from graphite moderator, and metal samples from reactor components. Concrete samples were obtained using an innovative technology that allowed for quick sample collection and analysis. Concrete, soil, graphite, and metal samples were analyzed on-site using liquid scintillation counters and gamma spectroscopy. Additional samples were sent off-site for analysis. (authors)

  11. Alberta's shale gas regulatory structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shale gas refers to gas found in coal seems. In Alberta, shale gas is regulated in the same manner as natural gas. Existing royalty and tenure rules apply. Shale gas development is in its early stage, but interest is increasing due to the growing demand for natural gas, higher prices and maturing conventional supply. Although the estimated gas in place is high, with potential targets in Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Mississippian and Devonian shales, the actual recoverable amount is not currently known. A map illustrating the distribution of coal zones with shale gas potential in Alberta was presented along with a review of plans to provide information on shale gas resource evaluation. The information would reveal how it is defined, where it is located and the resource potential. The Alberta Geological Survey will create geological and geochemical maps showing areas of current shale gas production. Regulations and policies that address mineral and land tenure issues were presented along with key principles of Alberta's royalty framework. figs

  12. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  13. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  14. Update on the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) is in the process of upgrading the research and operational capabilities of the MU Research Reactor (MURR) and associated facilities. The plans include an expanded research building that will double the laboratory space, the addition of new research programs, instrumentation and equipment, a cold neutron source, and improved reactor systems. These enhancements, which are in various stages of completion, will greatly expand the present active multidisciplinary research programs at MURR

  15. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning: University of Florida personnel associated with the reactor; Facility operation; Modifications to the operating characteristics or capabilities of the UFTR facility; Significant maintenance, tests and survelliances of UFTR reactor systems and facilities; Changes to technical specifications, standard operating prceedures and other documents; Radioactive releases and environmental surveillance; Education, research and training utilization; and Theses, publications, reports and oral presentations of work related to the use and operation of the UFTR

  16. Study of a new automatic reactor power control for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation of a new Instrumentation and Control (IC) system for the TRIGA Mark-II reactor at University of Pavia has recently been completed in order to assure a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future. The intervention involved nearly the whole IC system and required a channel-by-channel component substitution. One of the most sensitive part of the intervention concerned the Automatic Reactor Power Controller (ARPC) which permits to keep the reactor at an operator-selected power level acting on the control rod devoted to the fine regulation of system reactivity. This controller installed can be set up using different control logics: currently the system is working in relay mode. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to set up a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) configuration of the new controller installed on the TRIGA reactor of Pavia so as to optimize the response to system perturbations. The analysis have shown that a continuous PID offers generally better results than the relay mode which causes power oscillations with an amplitude of 3% of the nominal power

  17. Experience in operation and maintenance of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in the operation and maintenance of the 250 kW steady state/250 MW pulsed TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia in the past two years is reported. Data for the reactor utilization and of Health Physics activity are also presented. Since the Second European Conference of TRIGA Reactor Users in 1972, reactor operation continued normally. No major troubles occurred during this time except for rotary specimen rack rotation. Maintenance of reactor facilities, including the substitution of the rotary specimen rack with a new one manufactured on-site is described. In June 1974 measurements of fluxes in the thermal column, with most of the graphite elements removed, were carried out in order to install a neutron converter in thermal column. Some results of fluxes and cadmium ratio values are reported. A description of the converter facility set up is given. (U.S.)

  18. 75 FR 54657 - University of Florida; University of Florida Training Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... UFTR. In addition, samples are collected of water, soil, and vegetation at twenty-two locations within...-central part of Florida about midway between the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. The reactor is housed in a vault-type building which serves as a confinement. The Nuclear Reactor Building and its...

  19. Utilization Status and Development Layout of Research Reactors in Tsinghua University, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University (INET), as the largest education institute of nuclear science in P.R. China, operates three research reactors. How to broaden the utilization of our RRs is the challenge we have to face. In this article, current utilization status of the swimming pool reactor will be introduced. The feasibility of developing the RRs into training center and the advantages of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) for nuclear hydrogen production will be put forward. (author)

  20. Education and training activities at North Carolina State University's PULSTAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor utilization has been an integral part of the North Carolina State University's (NCSU's) nuclear engineering program since its inception. The undergraduate curriculum has a strong teaching laboratory component. Graduate classes use the reactor for selected demonstrations, experiments, and projects. The reactor is also used for commercial power reactor operator training programs, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and sample and tracer activation for industrial short courses and services as part of the university's land grant mission. The PULSTAR reactor is a 1-MW pool-type reactor that uses 4% enriched UO2 pellet fuel in Zircaloy II cladding. Standard irradiation facilities include wet exposure ports, a graphite thermal column, and a pneumatic transfer system. In the near term, general facility upgrades include the installation of signal isolation and computer data acquisition and display functions to improve the teaching and research interface with the reactor. In the longer term, the authors foresee studies of new core designs and the development of beam experiment design tools. These would be used to study modifications that may be desired at the end of the current core life and to undertake the development of new research instruments

  1. Shielding design for research and education reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of education and research at the University, 20-KW powered SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor has been chosen as a prototype reactor. In order to study the safety characteristics of the reactor, exposure rate has been estimated at the pool boundary. Reactor core as a radiation source is assumed to be cylindrical volume source. Thus point kernel integration method can be applied to determine the exposure rate. For the sake of simplicity, calculation was done only for the prompt fission gamma rays and fission product gamma rays. As a result, the maximum exposure rate at the pool boundary was estimated to be 18R/min at the same height of the center of the core. In order to examine the accuracy for the point kernel integration method, two shielding experiments were carried out: one for the water tank only and the other for with concrete blocks outside the water tank. Water tank was made of wood pieces which is 13.4cm wide, 1.5cm thick and 2.15m long. Thus the water tank has the total dimension of 1 m radius and 2.1 m height. The experiment was carried out for the radiation source of 0.968 mCi Co-60 at the center of the water tank and the penetrated gamma rays were measured at 5 different detector positions. For the measurement and analysis of the responses, NaI(T1) 3''x3'' detector and 256 channel multichannel analyzer was utilized. To convert pulse height distribution to the exposure rate, Moriuchi conversion factor was adopted. Data from the calculations by point kernel method were well agreed within 10% band with the data from the the experiments. (Author)

  2. U.S. university reactors: What they are and what they do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most underappreciated facts in the academic and industrial communities today is that there are 35 licensed university nuclear research and training reactors in operation on 33 campuses (two universities have two reactors each) in 25 states. These facilities, in conjunction with their respective nuclear engineering and science departments, provide the professional expertise and the backbone of our nation's human resources for exploiting the nuclear sciences and technology on which so much of society depends today. Areas of contribution and service include biomedical applications (therapy and diagnosis), radioisotope tracer applications, neutron activation analysis and detection, materials testing and enhancement, neutron radiography applications, and radioisotope production, to name just a few

  3. Broad scope educational role of a midsize university reactor NAA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broad scope educational activities at the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory (NAAL) associated with the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) have been implemented to serve a deserve and multidisciplinary academic clientele to meet a wide spectrum of educational needs for students at all academic levels. Educational usage of the complementary laboratory facilities is described and the importance of such academic experimental experience is emphasized for developing and maintaining a cadre of professionals in the analytical applications of nuclear energy. The synergistic operation of the NAAL and the reactor at the University of Florida to serve as a model worthy of emulation for other similar facilities is emphasized. (author)

  4. A smart electricity policy for Alberta : enhancing the Alberta advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The promotion of sustainable energy technologies under a competitive electricity market in Alberta was discussed. The electric power industry in Alberta is currently in a crisis with rising electricity prices. The government has tried to mitigate the impacts by providing large rebates to help ease the financial burden on consumers. The author argued that unless the fundamental causes of the problem are dealt with, Albertans will soon face even larger problems. This paper described a new approach to electricity sector planning in Alberta. In particular, the approach focused on conserving energy and improving energy efficiency as well as on increasing the use of low-impact renewable energy such as small hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, biomass and waste fuel generators and cogenerators. New policies would protect consumers from price and resource instability as well as from human health and environmental degradation. Additional policies would promote diversity in electricity supply and competition. Competition encourages electricity suppliers to work through market based mechanisms instead of government regulation or intervention. Competition in the electricity markets may also lead to increased customer choice, a larger number players in the electricity generation sector, and greater opportunities for trade. Increased competition may force producers to develop cost effective technologies that promote sustainable development to mitigate some environmental impacts. 3 tabs

  5. Improving Alberta's electricity market liquidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors affecting liquidity in Alberta's electricity market. i.e. the ability of the market to absorb a reasonably large buy or sell order without unduly impacting price, thus signifying the existence of a reasonable 'depth' in the market, and other key elements of the market, are explained. The current situation in Alberta with respect to these key elements (many buyers and sellers, transparent price signal, absence of market power), are reviewed in order to gauge liquidity. The conclusion is that large marketers, attractive loads and generators can move energy with relative ease, but smaller loads, unattractive profiles suggest that the market is not liquid enough. Examples of indicators supporting the notion of imperfect liquidity are cited and discussed. The overall conclusion is that despite apparent weaknesses, the liquidity situation appears to be improving. Another prediction/conclusion is that prospects for further progress towards greater liquidity will be enhanced by careful handling of MAP II auctions, and by greater involvement from loads

  6. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of advanced robotic systems capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of economically performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. The approach to achieving the program objective is a transition from teleoperation to the capability of autonomous operation within three successive generations of robotic systems. The strategy adopted in order to achieve the program goals in an efficient and timely manner consists in utilizing, and advancing where required, state-of-the-art robotics technology through close interaction between the universities and the manufacturers and operators of nuclear power plants. There is a potentially broad range of applications for the robotic systems developed in the course of this project. Therefore, it is expected that efforts to obtain additional support from other agencies, e.g., DOD and NASA, will be successful. Areas of cooperation with other nations (e.g., Japan, France, Germany) are being explored. This Program features a unique teaming arrangement among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Odetics, Gulf State Utilities, Florida Power and Light Company, Remotec, and Telerobotics International

  7. Planning and implementation of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA research reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Istanbul Technical University TRIGA Research Reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Energy, which went critical on March 11, 1979 is basically a pulsing type TRIGA Mark - II reactor. Completion of the ITU-TRR contributed to broaden the role of the Institute for Nuclear Energy of the Technical University in Istanbul in the nuclear field by providing for the first time adequate on-campus experimental facilities for nuclear engineering studies to ITU students. The research program which is currently under planning at ITU-NEE encompasses: a) Neutron activation analysis studies by techniques and applications to chemistry, mining, materials research, archaeological and biomedical studies; b) applications of Radioisotopes; c) Radiography with reactor neutron beams; d) Radiation Pulsing

  8. Planning the procedure for dismantling the TRIGA Reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this contribution is to provide an overview of the procedure for dismantling the TRIGA reactor at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH). In particular, the dismantling concept and techniques, the amount and the handling of radioactive material, the measurements for release, radiation protection for persons and the environment are presented. (author)

  9. The development of a universal diagnostic probe system for Tokamak fusion test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, R.; Cabral, R.; Manos, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the largest such facility in the U.S., is discussed with respect to instrumentation in general and mechanisms in particular. The design philosophy and detailed implementation of a universal probe mechanism for TFTR is discussed.

  10. 78 FR 5840 - Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115... No. R-115, for the University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor (ATR). The NRC has terminated the..., Facility Operating License No. R-115 is terminated. The above referenced documents may be examined,...

  11. 77 FR 13376 - Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52 The... No. R-52, for the University of Arizona Research Reactor (UARR). The NRC has terminated the license... released for unrestricted use. Therefore, Facility Operating License No. R-52 is terminated. For...

  12. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  13. Assessment of RELAP5 model for the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousbia-Salah Anis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5 is a system code developed at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors. The code RELAP5 is widely used for safety analysis studies of commercial nuclear power plants. However, recent released version of RELAP5/3.2 and over present significant capabilities for analysis of nuclear reactor research systems. As a contribution to the assessment of RELAP5/3.3 for research reactor safety analysis, experimental data from the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor - UMLRR are used. The UMLRR is a 1 MW light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open-pool type research reactor. This paper presents the development and the validation of a UMLRR-RELAP model using experimental data. For this purpose, a series of experiments were performed for benchmarking RELAP5 calculations for research reactor systems. As a result of this study, the UMLRR nodalization is shown to be representative of the experimental data reactor behavior.

  14. Canadian Experience in Application of Graded Approach for Safety Assessment of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Research reactors are typically used for basic and applied research, education and training, production of isotopes, material testing, neutron activation analysis and other purposes. Most research reactors have a small potential for hazard to the public compared with power reactors. Safety assessment for the research reactors needs to be undertaken to evaluate compliance with safety requirements and to determine the measures to ensure reactor safety. Considering the different types of research reactors and their associated utilization, safety assessment should be commensurate with the potential hazard, ensuring that the design and operation of each reactor lead to adequate safety and defence in depth. The scope of presentation will cover the following topics: - Canadian regulatory framework for licensing research reactors; - Graded approach applied to safety assessment of the research reactors; - Use of graded approach to safety assessment of SLOWPOKE and NRU reactors. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has developed a regulatory framework for licensing small reactor facilities (including research reactors) that sets out requirements for the safety analysis and reactor design. CNSC staff considers each application individually in determining how much rigour and stringency are required for the safety assessment. All important factors affecting the overall reactor safety, such as safety system design, inherent safety features, the amount of fissile and fissionable materials, and the source terms are considered. The graded approach introduced, allows safety requirements to be implemented in such way that the level of safety assessment is proportional to the potential hazards posed by the research reactor. Licensing requirements vary with the type of facility and they may be applied in a graded fashion based on overall risk. Graded approach can be applied to all components of safety assessment including radiation risk, safety functions, defence in

  15. Applied research and service activities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University Of Missouri operates MURR to provide an intense source of neutron and gamma radiation for research and applications by experimenters from its four campuses and by experimenters from other universities, government and industry. The 10 MW reactor, which has been operating an average of 155 hours per week for the past eight years, produces thermal neutron fluxes up to 6-7x1014 n/cm2-s in the central flux trap and beamport source fluxes of up to 1.2x1014 n/cm2-s. The mission of the reactor facility, to promote research, education and service, is the same as the overall mission of the university and therefore, applied research and service supported by industrial firms have been welcomed. The university recognized after a few years of reactor operation that in order to build utilization, it would be necessary to develop in-house research programs including people, equipment and activity so that potential users could more easily and quickly obtain the results needed. Nine research areas have been developed to create a broadly based program to support the level of activity needed to justify the cost of operating the facility. Applied research and service generate financial support for about one-half of the annual budget. The applied and service programs provide strong motivation for university/industry association in addition to the income generated. (author)

  16. Research Reactor Utilization at the University of Utah for Nuclear Education, Training and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the years of nuclear renaissance we all recognize a need for modernizing the approaches in fostering nuclear engineering and science knowledge, in strengthening disciplinary depth in students’ education for their preparation for workforce, and in helping them learn how to extend range of skills, develop habits of mind and subject matter knowledge. The education infrastructure at the University of Utah has been recently revised to incorporate the experiential learning using our research reactor as integral part of curriculum, helping therefore that all of our students build sufficient level of nuclear engineering literacy in order to be able to contribute productively to nuclear engineering work force or continue their education toward doctoral degrees. The University of Utah TRIGA Reactor built 35 years ago represents a university wide facility to promote research, education and training, as well as is used for various applications of nuclear engineering, radiation science and health physics. Our curriculum includes two consecutive classes for preparation of our students for research reactor operating license. Every year the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s representatives hold the final exam for our students. Our activities serve the academic community of the University of Utah, commercial and government entities, other universities and national laboratories as well. (author)

  17. Development of neutron beam projects at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the UT-TRIGA research reactor was licensed and has become fully operational. This reactor, the first new US university reactor in 17 years, is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located on the Balcones Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. The TRIGA Mark II reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation, 3 dollar pulsing, and includes five beam ports. Various neutron beam-line projects have been assigned to each beam port. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) are close to completion and will be operational in the near future. The design of the NDP instrument has been completed, a target chamber has been built, and the thermal neutron collimator, detectors, data acquisition electronics, and data processing computers have been acquired. The target chamber accommodates wafers up to 12'' in diameter and provides remote positioning of these wafers. The design and construction of the TCNS has been completed. The TCNS consists of a moderator (mesitylene), a neon heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and neutron guide tubes. In addition, fission-fragment research (HIAWATHA), Neutron Capture Therapy, and Neutron Radiography are being pursued as projects for the other three beam ports. (author)

  18. Contribution of a small university reactor to nuclear research in education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Triga Mark II reactor in Vienna, operated by the Vienna University of Technology, is the research reactor facility closest to the IAEA. Its main tasks are nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection and dosimetry, and low temperature physics and fusion research. Academic research is carried out by students in the fields mentioned. The students are coordinated and supervised by about 70 staff members with the aim of a Master's Degree or PhD in one of the areas mentioned. In addition, the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities cooperates closely with the IAEA, located nearby, in research projects, coordinated research projects (CRPs) and in supplying expert services. Regular training courses are performed for the IAEA for safeguard trainees. Moreover, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. Special nuclear material (SNM) belonging to the IAEA is stored for calibration purposes at the Atomic Institute. A summary follows of how and to what extent low power research reactors can efficiently be used to serve university education and training, cooperation with international and national networks, as well as for the IAEA in various fields, such as nuclear safeguards and participation in international coordinated projects

  19. Self-sustainability of a research reactor facility with neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term self-sustainability of a small reactor facility is possible because there is a large demand for non-destructive chemical analysis of bulk materials that can only be achieved with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The Ecole Polytechnique Montreal SLOWPOKE Reactor Facility has achieved self-sustainability for over twenty years, benefiting from the extreme reliability, ease of use and stable neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE reactor. The industrial clientele developed slowly over the years, mainly because of research users of the facility. A reliable NAA service with flexibility, high accuracy and fast turn-around time was achieved by developing an efficient NAA system, using a combination of the relative and k0 standardisation methods. The techniques were optimized to meet the specific needs of the client, such as low detection limit or high accuracy at high concentration. New marketing strategies are presented, which aim at a more rapid expansion. (author)

  20. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed

  1. Operational experience with the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia is in operation since 1965. The annual operational time at nominal power (250 kW) is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities and BNCT research. Few tens of hours per year are dedicated also to electronic devices irradiation and student training courses. Few homemade upgrading of the reactor were realized in the past two years: components of the secondary/tertiary cooling circuit were substituted and a new radiation area monitoring system was installed. Also the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system was almost completely refurbished. The presentation describes the major extraordinary maintenance activities implemented and the status of main reactor systems: - The I and C System: complete substitution, channel-by-channel without changing the operating and safety logics; - Tertiary and secondary water-cooling circuits: complete substitution of the tertiary water-cooling circuit and partial substitution of the components of the secondary water-cooling circuit; - Reactor Building Air Filtering and Ventilation System: installation of a computerized air filtering and ventilation system; - Radiation Area Monitoring System: new system based on a commercial micro-computer and an home-made software developed on Lab-View platform. The system is made of a network of different instruments coupled, trough a serial bus line RS232, with a data acquisition station; - Fuel Elements: at the moment, the core is made of 48 Aluminium clad and 34 SST clad TRIGA fuel elements controlled periodically for their elongation and/or bowing. All components and systems undergo ordinary maintenance according to the Technical Prescriptions and to the 'Good Practice Procedures'. In summary, the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia shows a very good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or

  2. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kjordan@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Springfels, D., E-mail: dspringfels@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Schubring, D., E-mail: dlschubring@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, PO Box 118300, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed.

  3. Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research Reactor Facility staff is in the process of upgrading the operational and research capabilities of the reactor and associated facilities. The upgrades include an extended life aluminide fuel element, a power increase, improved instrumentation and control equipment, a cold neutron source, a building addition, and improved research instrumentation and equipment. These upgrades will greatly enhance the capabilities of the facility and the research programs. This paper discusses the parts of the upgrade and current status of implementation. (author)

  4. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  5. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    OpenAIRE

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the n...

  6. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  7. Progress state of the decommissioning of Rikkyo University reactor in FY2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikkyo University Atomic Energy Research Institute submitted the file for the decommissioning plan change in 2012 toward the reactor facility demolishment, received the approval, and is promoting the decommissioning work on the research reactor with a schedule for two years from 2012. Since the decommissioning work of FY2012 has finished, this paper reports this progress state. The contents of the decommissioning work plan are to make the reactor facilities stationary condition by performing the following works: (1) implementation of decontamination and removal of the core internals within nuclear reactor facilities, (2) attainment of the state, in which the operation associated with the generation of radioactive waste, does not occur, (3) stop of partial functions of the facilities under performance maintaining, including the disposal facilities of liquid waste, and (4) storage of dismantled materials in vessels after partial dismantling and removal. This paper reports the operations conducted in FY2012, such as the decontamination and removal of the core internals of the nuclear reactor, removal of pneumatic tubes and sample transfer tubes, and function stop measures for plumbing system belonging to the reactor accessory facilities. (A.O.)

  8. Antique equipment extravaganza in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddock, K.

    2005-10-01

    CIM's centennial dragline project which took place from 1997 to 2001 was a project to salvage the world's oldest dragline. The project involved moving the 1917 Bucyrus Class 24 dragline from an old coal pit at Luscar's Coal Valley mine, near Edson Alberta, to the Reynolds Alberta Museum (RAM) at Wetaskiwin, where it was restored and put on display. In August 2005, the RAM hosted an extensive surface mining and construction equipment exposition which featured a display of mining and construction machines. The event was the annual International Convention and Old Equipment Exposition of the Historical Construction Equipment Association based in Bowling Green, Ohio. The Wetaskiwin event was arranged to celebrate Alberta's centennial, and was the first ever held outside the United States. The show included demonstrations featuring the evolution of earthmoving methods through the decades, beginning with horsepower, then steam and gasoline powered excavating tools, a range of different pull-type graders, scrapers and packers drawn by steam traction engines and early gas-powered crawler tractors, all made by bygone manufacturers from the early twentieth century. A section was also dedicated to early diesel powered equipment from the 1930s to 1955. Classic construction machines were put to work to construct permanent facilities such as roads and parking lots for the museum. Machines from 1955 to 1980 were also at work in another section dedicated to crawler tractors and scrapers. The performance of the machines demonstrated the great steps that earthmoving technology has taken over the past 70 years. Cable operated excavators also had their own area of activity to demonstrate several notable machines 5 figs.

  9. Is Alberta's gas running out?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of Alberta's natural gas resources were reviewed and according to certain groups of experts reserves and resources were found to be less plentiful than generally believed. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) also reported that gas reserves in non-frontier areas declined by 1.8% lat year, to 67.4 trillion cubic feet. It was estimated that this supply would last for 13 years. The National Energy Board (NEB) indicated that thousands of Alberta's unconnected pools may not be economical to develop. The CAPP annual reserves report also indicated that average gas pools found in recent times were only one quarter of the size of gas pools found before 1980. It was argued by this same group of experts that low gas prices, particularly for Alberta exports, have made drilling uneconomical, while others maintained that price fluctuations must be accepted as part of selling a commodity that is marketed world-wide. Ed Wolf, an independent geologist, estimated that gas prices,factoring in environmental costs, should be increased to $4 per mcf to justify exporting Canadian natural gas. However, others have argued that reserve figures have been underestimated. As proof of that they point to the fact that there is no shortage of investment capital; exploration and production activities, funded by investment, would not continue if natural gas production were not cost-effective. The Ziff Energy Group estimated that discovered and frontier reserves total 426 tcf, or 65 years' supply, excluding tight gas from low porosity formations which have been estimated to provide up to 300 years of supply at current levels of demand. As well, new technologies have improved the industry's ability to find new reserves. The debate between economic nationalists and free marketeers continues

  10. The future of distributed power in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxim Power Corporation is a provider of distributed energy and environmental solutions with a total of 55 MW of installed generating capacity in Canada, Europe and Asia, with 35 MW in Alberta. The 8 MW Taber facility in southern Alberta was described. Maxim operates 25 other small scale power generation stations (1 MW units) across 4 sites in southern Alberta. All the sites are interconnected at 25 kV and are eligible for distribution credits. The 3 MW EVI facility which utilizes solution gas was also described in the PowerPoint presentation. Maxim operates an additional 3 projects totaling 10 MW. The paper made reference to issues regarding market attributes for distributed power, policy framework and the transition to a competitive power market in Alberta. The chronology of events in Alberta's power market from August 2000 to June 2001 was outlined. The impacts of deregulation on distributed power include: (1) artificially low price environment from market intervention, (2) high efficiency cogeneration opportunities have been eliminated, (3) business failures and reduced investment, and (4) private investment not afforded the same alternative cost recovery mechanisms as the Alberta balancing pool. The presentation concluded with a report card for Alberta's deregulation, giving a grade F for both present and future opportunities for distributed power in Alberta. 2 figs

  11. The American Imprint on Alberta Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics assigned to America's classical liberal ideology--rugged individualism, market capitalism, egalitarianism in the sense of equality of opportunity, and fierce hostility toward centralized federalism and socialism--are particularly appropriate for fathoming Alberta's political culture. The author contends that Alberta's early…

  12. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  13. Introduction of Kyoto University Research Reactor with low enriched uranium core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light water moderated / cooled tank-type reactor. The project to convert the KUR fuel from HEU to LEU was achieved on March 24, 2010. After the successful achievement of first criticality on April 15 and the reactor has been operating since May 28. The nuclear design of KUR with LEU core is calculated using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.3 and the burn-up calculations are performed using SRAC-COREBN. In this paper, the purpose of the project to convert the KUR fuel, the fuel transport, the experimental results, the burn-up characteristics and calculation of KUR LEU core are presented. (author)

  14. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

  15. Ten-year utilization of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been used heavily throughout the past ten years to accommodate exclusively university research, teaching, and training efforts. Averages for the past nine years show that the OSTR use time has been as follows: 14% for academic and special training courses; 44% for OSU research projects; 6% for non-OSU research projects; 2% for demonstrations for tours; and 34% for reactor maintenance, calibrations, inspections, etc. The OSTR has operated an average of 25.4 hours per week during this nine-year period. Each year, about 20 academic courses and 30 different research projects use the OSTR. Visitors to the facility average about 1,500 per year. No commercial radiations or services have been performed at the OSTR during this period. Special operator training courses are given at the OSTR at the rate of at least one per year. (author)

  16. Analysis of kyoto university reactor physics critical experiments using NCNSRC calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kyoto university reactor physics experiments on the university critical assembly is used to benchmark validate the NCNSRC calculations methodology. This methodology has two lines, diffusion and Monte Carlo. The diffusion line includes the codes WIMSD4 for cell calculations and the two dimensional diffusion code DIXY2 for core calculations. The transport line uses the MULTIKENO-Code vax Version. Analysis is performed for the criticality, and the temperature coefficients of reactivity (TCR) for the light water moderated and reflected cores, of the different cores utilized in the experiments. The results of both Eigen value and TCR approximately reproduced the experimental and theoretical Kyoto results. However, some conclusions are drawn about the adequacy of the standard wimsd4 library. This paper is an extension of the NCNSRC efforts to assess and validate computer tools and methods for both Et-R R-1 and Et-MMpr-2 research reactors. 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR

  18. Decommissioning of an argonaut type reactor at the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor ARGOS is a training nuclear reactor that was active, from 1962 to 1976, at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Barcelona (Spain). It is an Argonaut type experimental Reactor with 10 kW of maximal thermal power, and was set up by the main Spanish Nuclear Research Centre, presently named CIEMAT, in the period 1958-1962. In 1977, the nuclear installation was halted for technical, economical and administrative reasons. The fuel burn-up of the reactor was 2.7 kWh. In 1992 the fuel was removed from the site and a dismantling project was launched by an academic team of the UPC Nuclear Energy Department. In 1998 the Spanish authorities approved the dismantling plan which was based on the IAEA document Planning and Management of the Decommissioning of Research and Other Small Nuclear Facilities, IAEA 1993. In this plan the University proposed to set up its own dismantling group mainly based on its own academic staff and experimental facilities

  19. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  20. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, Davide; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate experimental reactors from power ones, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the...

  1. Effects of manipulating slowpoke calcium-dependent potassium channel expression on rhythmic locomotor activity in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C. McKiernan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic motor behaviors are generated by networks of neurons. The sequence and timing of muscle contractions depends on both synaptic connections between neurons and the neurons’ intrinsic properties. In particular, motor neuron ion currents may contribute significantly to motor output. Large conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (BK currents play a role in action potential repolarization, interspike interval, repetitive and burst firing, burst termination and interburst interval in neurons. Mutations in slowpoke (slo genes encoding BK channels result in motor disturbances. This study examined the effects of manipulating slo channel expression on rhythmic motor activity using Drosophila larva as a model system. Dual intracellular recordings from adjacent body wall muscles were made during spontaneous crawling-related activity in larvae expressing a slo mutation or a slo RNA interference construct. The incidence and duration of rhythmic activity in slo mutants were similar to wild-type control animals, while the timing of the motor pattern was altered. slo mutants showed decreased burst durations, cycle durations, and quiescence intervals, and increased duty cycles, relative to wild-type. Expressing slo RNAi in identified motor neurons phenocopied many of the effects observed in the mutant, including decreases in quiescence interval and cycle duration. Overall, these results show that altering slo expression in the whole larva, and specifically in motor neurons, changes the frequency of crawling activity. These results suggest an important role for motor neuron intrinsic properties in shaping the timing of motor output.

  2. The analysis and attribution of the time-dependent neutron background resultant from sample irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has commissioned a Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system for the analysis of special nuclear materials. A significant, time-dependent neutron background with an initial maximum count rate, more than 50 times that of the time-independent background, was characterised during the validation of this system. This time-dependent background was found to be dependent on the presence of the polyethylene (PE) vials used to transport the fissile samples, yet was not an activation product of vial impurities. The magnitude of the time-dependent background was found to be irradiation site specific and independent of the mass of PE. The capability of RMCC's DNC system to analyze the neutron count rates in time intervals 235U contamination was present on each irradiated vial. However, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy measurements of material leached from the outer vial surfaces after their irradiations found only trace amounts of uranium, 0.118 ± 0.048 ng of 235U derived from natural uranium. These quantities are insufficient to account for the time-independent background, and in fact could not be discriminated from the noise associated with time-independent background. It is suggested that delayed neutron emitters are deposited in the vial surface following fission recoil, leaving the main body of uranium within the irradiation site. This hypothesis is supported by the physical cleaning of the site with materials soaked in distilled water and HNO3, which lowered the background from a nominal 235U mass equivalent of 120 to 50 ng per vial. (author)

  3. Ten years of TRIGA reactor research at the University of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 MW TRIGA Research Reactor at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory is the second TRIGA at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). A small (10 kW-1963, 250 kW-1968) TRIGA Mark I was housed in the basement of the Engineering Building until is was shutdown and decommissioned in 1989. The new TRIGA Mark II with a licensed power of 1.1 MW reached initial criticality in 1992. Prior to 1990, reactor research at UT usually consisted of projects requiring neutron activation analysis (NAA) but the step up to a much larger reactor with neutron beam capability required additional personnel to build the neutron research program. The TCNS is currently used to perform Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis to determine hydrogen and boron concentrations of various composite materials. The early 1990s was a very active period for neutron beam projects at the NETL. In addition to the TCNS, a real-time neutron radiography facility (NIF) and a high-resolution neutron depth profiling facility (NDP) were installed in two separate beam ports. The NDP facility was most recently used to investigate alpha damage on stainless steel in support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stewardship programs. In 1999, a sapphire beam filter was installed in the NDP system to reduce the fast neutron flux at the sample location. A collaborative effort was started in 1997 between UT-Austin and the University of Texas at Arlington to build a reactor-based, low-energy positron beam (TIPS). The limited success in obtaining funding has placed the project on hold. The Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program has grown rapidly and effectively doubled in size over the past 5 years but years of low nuclear research funding, an overall stagnation in the U.S. nuclear power industry and a persuasive public distrust of nuclear energy has caused a precipitous decline in many programs. Recently, the U.S. DOE has encouraged University Research Reactors (URR) in the U.S. to collaborate closely together by forming URR

  4. Management of nuclear knowledge on an international scale using a small university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Atominstitut Vienna operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor since March 1962 used for nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron- and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection, dosimetry, low temperature physics and fusion research. During the past 20 years about 640 students graduated with a diploma - or PhD degree from the Atominstitut attached to the University of Technology Vienna. To perform nuclear relevant academic studies the Atominstitut offers about 100 highly specialised theoretical lectures and about 10 practical courses where students have to perform experiments in small groups of four on subjects mentioned above. Although the TRIGA reactor is a rather low power research reactor it is very easy and cheap to operate and an excellent tool to transfer knowledge and experience to the younger generation. This reactor is therefore not only used by other European universities such as University of Manchester or Bratislava Technical University but also by nuclear institutions such as the GRS/Germany, NPP Bohunice and NPP Mochovce for nuclear training. On an international scale the Atominstitut co-operates closely with the nearby located IAEA in international research projects, coordinated research programs (CRP) and supplying expert services. Regular training courses are carried out for the IAEA for Safeguard Trainees, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. In the past 20 years more than 120 IAEA fellows from all over the world have been trained at the Atominstitut. The fellows spend between one to twelve month at the Atominstitut and are integrated in the respective work program. Experience showed that out of this fellowship a long-term relation between the institutes continues. The paper focuses especially on the transfer of knowledge between

  5. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year (September 1986 through August 1987) has returned to the increased levels of quality usage characteristic of the two years prior to the last reporting year when the maintenance outage to repair sticking control blades reduced availability for the year to near 50%. Indeed, the 91.5% availability factor for this reporting year is the highest in the last five years and probably in the 27 year history of the facility. As a final statement on the effectiveness of the corrective maintenance last year, the overall availability factor has been over 94% since returning to normal operations. The UFTR continues to experience a high rate of utilization in a broad spectrum of areas with total utilization continuing near the highest levels recorded in the early 1970's. This increase has been supported by a variety of usages ranging from research and educational utilization by users within the University of Florida as well as other researchers and educators around the state of Florida through the support of the DOE Reactor Sharing Program and several externally supported usages. Significant usage has also been devoted to facility enhancement where a key ingredient for this usage has been a stable management staff. Uses, reactor operation, maintenance, technical specifications, radioactive releases, and research programs are described in this report

  6. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has decreased by about 50% compared to the previous year, approaching the low levels of utilization characteristic of the previous two reporting years ending in August 1979 and August 1980 respectively. The energy generation also continues to be far below average historical levels and represents a drop of nearly 50% from the improved level of the previous year. The UFTR continues to operate with an outstanding safety record and in full compliance with regulatory requirements. The reactor and associated facilities continue to maintain a high in-state visibility and strong industry relationship. It is hoped that more indirect industry training will be accomplished in the upcoming year

  7. Status of University of Cincinnati reactor-site nuclear engineering graduate programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) nuclear engineering program faculty has now had 12 yr of experience in delivering reactor-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Currently, with the sponsorship of the Toledo-Edison Company (TED), we are conducting a multiyear on-site graduate program with more than 30 participants at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. The program enables TED employees with the proper academic background to earn a master of science (MS) degree in nuclear engineering (mechanical engineering option). This paper presents a brief history of tile evolution of UC reactor-site educational programs together with a description of the progress of the current program

  8. Evidence of possible flooding of the reflector at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence to indicate that water may have flooded the void spaces inside the aluminum cladding which surrounds the graphite reflector at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor (OSTR). This paper presents and discusses this evidence, as well as data from a number of experiments which were performed in an attempt to confirm whether or not flooding actually has occurred. The safety implications of a flooded reflector are presented and shown to be of little concern based in part on the OSTR's history of high water purity in the reactor tank. It is concluded that the sole concern is a reduction in the usefulness of certain beam ports. Proposed methods of surveillance to detect corrosion of the reflector cladding are also briefly discussed. (author)

  9. The research reactor TRIGA Mark II of the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Eberhardt, Klaus [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2012-10-15

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Mainz was built in the 1960ies on the initiative of Fritz Strassmann, co-discoverer of the fission, at that time the director of the Institute for Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry. On August 3{sup rd}, 1965 the TRIGA Mainz reached first criticality with the insertion of the 57{sup th} fuel element in the reactor core. Two years later, in April 1967, the Nobel Prize laureate Otto Hahn initiated the first of now more than 18,000 pulses at the official inauguration. Since then, the TRIGA Mainz has operated without failure about 200 days per year. The TRIGA Mainz can be operated in the steady state mode at power levels ranging up to 100 kW{sub th}, depending on the requirements of the different experiments. Pulse-mode operation is also possible. (orig.)

  10. The research reactor TRIGA Mark II of the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Mainz was built in the 1960ies on the initiative of Fritz Strassmann, co-discoverer of the fission, at that time the director of the Institute for Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry. On August 3rd, 1965 the TRIGA Mainz reached first criticality with the insertion of the 57th fuel element in the reactor core. Two years later, in April 1967, the Nobel Prize laureate Otto Hahn initiated the first of now more than 18,000 pulses at the official inauguration. Since then, the TRIGA Mainz has operated without failure about 200 days per year. The TRIGA Mainz can be operated in the steady state mode at power levels ranging up to 100 kWth, depending on the requirements of the different experiments. Pulse-mode operation is also possible. (orig.)

  11. A climatological study on winds at the Kyoto University Reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A climatological study of winds at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) site is done by using the data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System of Japan Meteorological Agency, with a view to supporting the operations for environmental protection in case of reactor accident. At the KUR site, the land and sea breeze is appeared for one-third, a considerable part, of the year. The sea breezes from the Osaka Bay and the Kii Channel are clearly discernible, for each of which the different patterns of the diurnal variation of wind are built up at the site. For strong southerly wind experienced at the site under conditions that winds owing to synoptic pressure pattern are predominant, variable wind directions are seen in some observing stations in the Osaka plain, which is in contrast with strong westerly wind which shows a uniform flow in the Osaka plain. (author)

  12. Safety Re-evaluation of Kyoto University Research Reactor by reflecting the Accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at rated thermal power of 5MW. After the accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we have settled a 40-ton water tank near the reactor room, and prepared a mobile fire pump and a mobile power generator as additional safety measures for beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). We also have conducted the safety re-evaluation of KUR, and confirmed that the integrity of KUR fuels could be kept against the BDBA with the use of the additional safety measures when the several restrictions were imposed on the reactor operation.

  13. Twenty-ninth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twenty-ninth annual progress report of the operation of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Contract DE-AC02-76ER03409 with the United States Department of Energy. This report also provides the University administration with a summary of the operation of the facility for the past year

  14. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  15. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  16. Kinetic parameters of the University of Maryland reactor by the interval distribution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rossi alpha of the University of Maryland Reactor was measured at criticality and at shutdown by the Babala interval-distribution method. At criticality, α/sub c/ = 145.8 +- 2.9 s-1. At shutdown, α/sub s/ = 1025.8 +- 4.1 s-1. The shutdown reactivity was found to be rho/sub s/β = -6.04 +- 0.14 dollars. An inverse kinetics analysis of a rod-drop experiment gave rho/sub s//β = -6.23 +- 0.13 dollars, which is considered with the interval-distribution result

  17. University of Florida Training Reactor. Annual progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has increased dramatically compared to previous years, even exceeding the levels of utilization characteristic of the early 1970's in some areas such as energy generation. Indeed, the total energy generation (kWh) for this reporting year is at the highest level ever and represents an increase of over 300% over the 1982-1983 reporting year which itself had an increase of 50% over the 1981-1982 reporting year

  18. Spring Coulee, Alberta : geology, production and potential hydrocarbon bearing zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostridge, L.A.; Stewart, R.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience, Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology

    2008-07-01

    The mineral rights to 2 sections of land in the Spring Coulee area in southern Alberta are owned by the University of Calgary. Although the area is relatively unexplored, various pools in the area surrounding the University of Calgary's sections indicate that there is a potential for hydrocarbons to be located on the two sections. In order to examine the hydrocarbon potential on the two sections, the Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology (CREWES) Project shot an extensive 3C-2D seismic survey in January 2008. Gravity surveys across southern Alberta have observed anomalies and deep seismic data has indicated that Precambrian faulting is present on a large scale, which is then reflected in the younger Cretaceous sediments. This paper reported on a preliminary investigation into how the large-scale faulting occurs in the Spring Coulee area with respect to the University of Calgary land. The potential hydrocarbon bearing zones in the Spring Coulee area are the Bow Island, Base of Fish Scale, Sawtooth, Sunburst, Madison and Livingstone formations. Future work in the Spring Coulee area involves processing and interpreting the recently acquired seismic data, comparing large-scale basement faulting systems to seismic data and performing petrophysical and fluid replacement analyses of the area. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  19. Knowledge, Power, and Social Policy: John M. MacEachran and Alberta's 1928 Sexual Sterilization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puplampu, Korbla P.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how academic knowledge and power have shaped the discourse on human classification and how political authorities use academic knowledge producers to legitimize public policy. Specifically, the article draws on the role of John M. MacEachran, a former academic at the University of Alberta, in the implementation of the Alberta…

  20. Status of social economy provision of wind electric energy in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, J. [Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    The development of cooperatives in Canada's energy sector has been mapped and studied through research performed by a doctoral candidate in Political Science at Simon Fraser University. This document has been prepared as part of the research program of the BC-Alberta Social Economy Research Alliance (BALTA). 34 refs.

  1. Interim report on construction of data base for atomic energy science documents (concerning Kyoto University Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute was established in 1963 as a research institute for all universities in Japan utilizing the facilities in common. The construction of a document data base has been undertaken in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the institute. The data base concerns the research works performed at the institute and also the publications and reports on the research made by the personnel belonging to the institute. Input data are gathered from concerned researchers. In this interim report, the structure and contents of this data base are shortly described. One of the features of this data base is that it handles data with both Japanese and English at the same time. (Aoki, K.)

  2. The University of Birmingham, nuclear power, and start of UK reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As long ago as 1919 Sir Oliver Lodge, the first principal of The University of Birmingham presented a remarkable prescient account of the potential of nuclear power. However, he could not have predicted that a mere 20 years later, in that university, Peierls and Frisch would begin to lay the foundations with their calculation that the critical mass of 235U was only of the order of 1 kg. It is generally the case that work in the field of pure physics leads to the initiating discovery; metallurgy follows with the development of the resultant technology. In this paper, it is illustrated how the shortage of suitable materials (and facilities) forced the UK to follow a route which would lead to the development of gas cooled reactors. (author)

  3. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) provides facilities for research in isotopic, nuclear and earth sciences and collaborates with Scottish University departments on a wide range of research topics. One of its main areas of work is the Isotope Geology Unit. This has worked with the Nuclear Medicine Unit on the application of enriched stable isotope tracers in the biological and clinical sciences. The measurement of radioactive isomers is applied to quaternary geology, archaeology, nuclear medicine, health physics, oceanography, atomospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, nuclear waste disposal and mathematical modelling of the environment. There are also radiocarbon dating facilities. The facilities and the research undertaken at the Centre in the year 1987-1988, the Centre's twenty-fifth year are summarized in this report. (U.K.)

  4. The New Emergency Core Cooling (NECC) system for the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Emergency Core Cooling (NECC) system is the penultimate of seven major safety upgrades being implemented at the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor in Chalk River. The NECC upgrade was designed to improve the original systems for core cooling in the event of an unisolable failure within the primary cooling circuit. The NECC upgrade ensures that water is automatically made available to the emergency cooling circuit pumps in the event of a break. Reactor core cooling is achieved from the discharge of these pumps which distribute emergency coolant to the individual fuel rods. Heated water from the vessel returns to the heat exchangers within the emergency cooling circuits for heat removal to the secondary coolant. The NECC upgrade significantly improves protection for a wide range of Loss Of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) through the use of design features such as component redundancy, automatic initiation and hazard qualification. The introduction of the NECC upgrade combined with previous improvements in liquid confinement capability provide a closed loop system that ensures stable long term reactor core cooling. CATHENA (Canadian Algorithm for THErmalhydraulic Network Analysis) analysis was performed to assess the NECC upgrade and to validate the design for credible leak scenarios. (author)

  5. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR [University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reactors in the US are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1,000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive Al, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube

  6. Neutronic Analysis of the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigliole, A. Borio Di [University of Pavia, Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, Via Bassi 4, 27100 Pavia (Italy); University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy, Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Cammi, A. [Polytechnic of Milano, Department of Energy, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Physics Department, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126, Milano (Italy); Pattavina, L.; Previtali, E. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Physics Department, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126, Milano (Italy); Scian, G. [University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy, Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    An advanced computational tool based on Monte Carlo code was developed for the neutronic analysis of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia and the results from simulations were benchmarked with the experimental data. The neutron analysis was performed by means of the 3-D continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes MCNP4C and MCNP5. All core components were reproduced in good detail and the model allows the description of different core and fuel configurations with good versatility. In a first step, the results from the simulations with fresh fuel at room temperature were compared with the experimental data about critical core parameters at zero power level, quoted in the reactor First Criticality Final Report; a very good agreement was found and the goodness of the model was proved. Afterwards, neutron flux and reactivity dependence on the fuel and moderator temperature was studied in detail; all the available methods for the simulation of thermal effects were analyzed in order to model the reactor in the stationary operating condition at 250 kW. The model was updated to the present configuration and the use of specific S({alpha},{beta}) cross sections was found to be of primary importance for a correct simulation of low-energy neutrons scattering within moderator. (author)

  7. Neutronic Analysis of the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced computational tool based on Monte Carlo code was developed for the neutronic analysis of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia and the results from simulations were benchmarked with the experimental data. The neutron analysis was performed by means of the 3-D continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes MCNP4C and MCNP5. All core components were reproduced in good detail and the model allows the description of different core and fuel configurations with good versatility. In a first step, the results from the simulations with fresh fuel at room temperature were compared with the experimental data about critical core parameters at zero power level, quoted in the reactor First Criticality Final Report; a very good agreement was found and the goodness of the model was proved. Afterwards, neutron flux and reactivity dependence on the fuel and moderator temperature was studied in detail; all the available methods for the simulation of thermal effects were analyzed in order to model the reactor in the stationary operating condition at 250 kW. The model was updated to the present configuration and the use of specific S(α,β) cross sections was found to be of primary importance for a correct simulation of low-energy neutrons scattering within moderator. (author)

  8. The AKR training reactor of the University of Technology Dresden and its experimental programme for education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training and research reactor AKR (from the German Ausbildungskernreaktor) of the University of Technology Dresden was put into operation in the late 1970s, i.e. at a time when experts in Western and Eastern European countries expected an extensive development of nuclear energy generation. In the eastern part of Germany, i.e. the former German Democratic Republic, a 70 MW(el) WWER nuclear power plant (NPP) was in operation at Rheinsberg since 1966. A further five NPPs of the Russian WWER type (440 MW(e)) were put into operation at Greifswald on the Baltic Sea coast between 1973 and 1989. Three more plants were under construction at that site. At the end of the 1980s, a new NPP was being planned at Stendal, a 1000 MW(e) WWER plant. For construction, licensing, operation and maintenance of these NPPs, a well educated and trained staff was required. Authorities and technical surveillance organizations should have qualified experts at their disposal, too. Consequently, in 1968 the University of Technology Dresden introduced appropriate courses for the education of nuclear engineers in order to contribute to fulfilling the demands of industry, science and administration. Students were taught in lectures, but theoretical knowledge had to be combined with practical experience based on an extensive programme of fundamental experiments in the fields of reactor physics, neutron physics, nuclear technology, radiation measurement techniques, radiation protection, radiation dosimetry and others. The full scale of this experimental programme can preferably be made available by small training reactors which can be operated with great diversity in terms of experimental intentions and without commercial restrictions

  9. Alberta, crisis or opportunity? IPPSA's vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This power point presentation discussed the role of IPPSA and the facts about Alberta's power market, the goal of restructuring and the reality behind it in terms of managing the transition. IPPSA is a non-profit organization to promote a competitive electric marketplace for the benefit of non-regulated power producers and marketers. The role of IPPSA, which has been active in Alberta since deregulation began in 1993, is to ensure that Alberta deregulation protects consumer choice, renewable energy options and competition. IPPSA's environmental concerns involve tax based incentives, national climate change issues and the Kyoto Protocol. Environmental concerns can be addressed through responsible power generation to reduce greenhouse gases through the use of low impact generation sources such as run of river hydro, biomass and wind power. Alberta has also pioneered flare gas generation with currently 50 units in operation. IPPSA believes that in the long-term, Alberta's deregulation program will bring undeniable benefits to the industry and the consumer since competition will eventually create a downward pressure on price and spark innovation and choice. tabs., figs

  10. URI Program Final Report FY 2001 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the URI program is to upgrade and improve university nuclear research and training reactors and to contribute to strengthening the academic community's nuclear engineering infrastructure. It should be noted that the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment can generally be subdivided into three categories: (1) to improve reactor operations, (2) to improve existing facility/NAA Laboratory operations, and (3) to expand facility capability. All of these items were selected recognizing the objectives of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to respond to the widespread needs in the academic reactor community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactor facilities, especially at large and diverse institutions such as the University of Florida. These needs have been particularly pressing at the UFTR which is the only such research and training reactor in the State of Florida which is undergoing rapid growth in a variety of technical areas. As indicated in Table 2, the first item is a security system control panel with associated wiring and detectors. The existing system is over 30 years old and has been the subject of repeated maintenance over the past 5 years. Some of its detection devices are no longer replaceable from stock. Modifications made many years ago make troubleshooting some parts of the system such as the backup battery charging subsystem essentially impossible, further increasing maintenance frequency to replace batteries. Currently, various parts of the system cable trays remain open for maintenance access further degrading facility appearance. In light of relicensing plans, this item is also a key consideration for housekeeping appearance considerations. The cost of a replacement ADEMCO Vista 20 security system including turnkey installation by a certified vendor was to be $2,206. Replacement of this system was expected to save up to 5 days of maintenance per year, decrease security alarm response

  11. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Florida. Final report for period August 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG02-96NE38152 was supplied to the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the U.S. Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program. The renewal proposal submitted in January 2000 originally requested over $73,000 to support various external educational institutions using the UFTR facilities in academic year 2000-01. The actual Reactor Sharing Grant was only in the amount of $40,000, all of which has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of our reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within the State of Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over fourteen million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the Southeast.

  12. Use of training reactor VR-1 Vrabec in training specialists for nuclear power facilities at Czech universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training reactor VR-1 VRABEC is being built at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague. It is a pool type reactor with enriched uranium (36% 235U); demineralized light water serves as the moderator and reflector, the reactor core is cooled by natural convection. The rated output is 100 W, short-term operation at 1 kW being possible. The neutron flux density is 1 to 3 x 1014 m-2 s-1. The reactor will find application in education (75% time) in the courses: heat and nuclear engines and equipment, electricity generation, nuclear engineering, and nuclear chemical engineering. The reactor workshop is equipped with ample instrumentation such as multichannel analyzers, dosimetric instruments, activity meters and state-of-the-art computers. (Z.M.)

  13. Alberta producers' gas export prices slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Alberta gas producers have approved a new contract with California buyers that includes slightly lower wellhead prices and more flexible pricing terms. The 1 year agreement, will apply a flexible price formula to gas sales. A basic volume of 212 MMcfd will receive $1.52 (U.S.)/Mcf. A and S also will buy 200 MMcfd at prices paid for other Alberta gas in the California market. It will have the right to buy added volumes at prices indexed to gas sold into California from the U.S. Southwest. Ballots cast by producers were to be verified by regulatory agencies in Alberta and British Columbia. The more flexible price terms in the new contract are seen as a positive development for negotiations in a dispute over long term contracts

  14. The Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Crewdson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR is a collaborative bibliography of published resources significant to southern Alberta. Objectives and progress with evolving methodology, technology, issues and challenges are explored within the context of the library field. We investigate a collaborative digital library that allows librarians and non-librarians alike to share information on specific topics through MARC records. An outcome of a collaborative digital library is how to create and sustain interest within the library community. Southern Alberta region was selected based on the authors’ familiarity with the region. Some issues and questions remain to be resolved. Digital formats present a number of challenges in terms of selection and presentation. Legal issues relating to technology such as linking and location information have emerged. Basic technical issues remain, such as, how best to update links.

  15. Energy Alberta 1994: A review of Alberta energy resources in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of Alberta's energy industry for the year 1994 was provided. Included in the review were remarks from the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) co-chairmen and the chairman for the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB). Changes in the direction of energy regulations were highlighted, followed by a review of production, reserves, sales, markets and other business information for the year 1994. Activities of ERCB undertaken to regulate Alberta's energy resources, including environmental regulation, were summarized for all sectors. An accounting of revenues and expenditures of the Board during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1994 were also provided

  16. Preparation of mandatory documentation before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor at Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor installed at Cordoba National University, it was necessary to send to the Regulatory Authority the mandatory documentation which is required in the licensing process. With the previous papers existing for the operation in the first years of the '70, a work program for the future operational training personnel was elaborated. Based on the Authority's applicable rules and the recommendations and with particular criteria originated in the working university conditions, the SAFETY report of RA-0 nuclear reactor was prepared. This paper describes the principal contents, items and documents involved in the safety report. (Author)

  17. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  18. Clinical experience of BNCT for brain and skin tumors at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research nuclear reactor of Kyoto University (KUR), which was established in 1963, has the power of 5 MW and has rendered services to scientists in various fields including biology and medicine. The first clinical application was carried out on a brain tumor patient by Professor Hatanaka in 1974. Eight Japanese, 2 German and one American patients were treated. The ages of patients were 9-66 years and all were male. Skin tumors were irradiated at KUR to measure 10B content in the tissues by Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube (NMNGT) attached to KUR, before BNCT. Except in a few cases, patients had recurrent tumours after previous treatment by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgical treatments. The absorbed dose used in the previous radiotherapy before BNCT was a curative dose. The time intervals between previous radiotherapy and BNCT varied. The treated skin tumours included various grades of melanoma. Some cases appeared to be astrocytoma grade IV

  19. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  20. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively. PMID:27423022

  1. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Report of Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, is published on occasion summarizing in the form of prompt report the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results of the articles made for trial, the circumstance of radiation control and waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the remarkable results obtained amid research, new method, the discussion on other papers and reports and others. In this report, 40 summaries of the Visiting Research Projects utilizing the KUR and 13 summaries of those utilizing the KUCA in 1988, and 2 unreported summaries before 1988 are collected. In each summary, the number of adoption, title, the names of reporters and the gist of report are given. (K.I.)

  2. A multifaceted approach to radionuclide radiotherapy: The MURR [Missouri University Research Reactor] radioisotope program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal radionuclide radiotherapy of malignancies began with various forms of radium injections, solutions, and implants early in this century and achieved its most wide-spread success in the application of 131I iodide for the treatment of thyroid metastases. Implants such as 198Au and 192Ir, and colloids such as 32P chromic phosphate, have also proved useful, but the greatest utility would be found for radiotherapeutic drugs possessing the selectivity for other forms of cancer that radioiodine shows for thyroid carcinoma. The objective of tumor radiotherapy is the selective destruction of malignant cells by radiation while sparing normal tissue. Recent improvements in the guidance mechanisms of radiopharmaceuticals have made possible a third wave of radiotherapeutics that may revolutionize the treatment of malignancies. The basic guidance methods include direct placement (implants), anatomical-physiological deposition, chemical-physiological concentration, and immunochemical uptake. These new drugs are primarily based on reactor-produced beta emitters, because typical beta ranges of 1 to 10 mm are the most appropriate for radiotherapy. The Missouri University research reactor (MURR) Radioisotope Applications Group has been involved for 10 yr in collaborative research to bring about this new generation of cancer-fighting drugs and is currently producing isotopes for clinical trials of all these types of treatment

  3. Water flow characteristics of Baumkuchen type fuel elements for Kyoto University high neutron flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University high neutron flux reactor is a light water-moderated and cooled, divided core type reactor with heavy water reflector. In the core, six inside fuel elements and twelve outside fuel elements are arranged in double ring form, and two cylindrical, divided cores are placed at 15 cm distance. The flow rate distribution and pressure loss in the fuel elements constitute the base of the thermo-hydraulic design of the core, therefore the model fuel elements of full size were made, and the water flow experiment was carried out to examine their characteristics. It was found that the flow velocity in channels was strongly affected by the accuracy of channel gaps. The calculation of pressure loss in fuel elements, the experiments on inside fuel elements and outside fuel elements, and the results of experiments such as the calibration of the cooling channels in outside fuel elements, the relation between total flow rate and pressure loss, and the characteristics of flow at the time of reverse flow are reported. The general characteristics of flow in fuel elements were in good agreement with the prediction. In the pressure loss in fuel elements, the friction between fuel plates and the resistance of nozzles were the controlling factors under the rated operating conditions of the HFR. (Kako, I.)

  4. LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACIDENT SIMULATIONS IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W D; Goodman, R L; Heaberlin, S W; Hesson, G M; Nealley, C; Kirg, L L; Marshall, R K; McNair, G W; Meitzler, W D; Neally, G W; Parchen, L J; Pilger, J P; Rausch, W N; Russcher, G E; Schreiber, R E; Wildung, N J

    1981-02-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship among the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. Subsequent experiments establish the fuel rod failure characteristics at selected peak cladding temperatures. Fuel rod cladding pressurization simulates high burnup fission gas pressure levels of modern PWRs. This document contains both an experiment overview of the LOCA simulation program and a review of the safety analyses performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to define the expected operating conditions as well as to evaluate the worst case operating conditions. The primary intent of this document is to supply safety information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to establish the overall safety of the experiment. A hazards review summarizes safety issues, normal operation and three worst case accidents that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  5. Assessment of the implications of conversion of university research and training reactors to low enrichment uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tasks associated with conversion of a research reactor from HEU to LEU fuel are: initial program planning; safety analysis and license amendment; core physics calculations; operating thermal-hydraulics analysis; plant engineering modifications; LEU fuel specifications, procurement of fuel, and calculational confirmation of design; training of staff personnel; HEU core physics measurements and fuel disposal; and experimental verification of reactor behavior with LEU fuel. LEU fuel conversion of the 25 NRC licensed, university-owned reactors considered in this study is based upon the reactor fuel cycle, the type of license modification, and fuel meat technology. Reactors that operate on routine refueling cycles could periodically replace depleted HEU elements with fresh LEU elements. Ultimate full core conversion would depend on the average element residence time in the core. Reactors with lifetime cores would convert by full core replacement as a one-time event. For some reactors, LEU conversion depends upon high density uranium fuel meat technology development. The majority should be able to convert using a direct substitution of current fuel meat technology though some fuel plate or rod internal modifications may be necessary for 16 of the reactors

  6. The survey on the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor Building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, the stability of the supporting ground has been analyzed. This report concerns the ground survey which has been carried out to obtain the basic data on the supporting ground. The outline of the ground around the construction site of High Flux Reactor has been already made clear by the last survey. Therefore, the purpose of this ground survey is mainly to make clear the mechanical properties of the soil. The survey has been carried out concerning the supporting ground and several layers deeper than that. The main items obtained are as follows. (1) modulus of deformation (2) breaking strength and creep strength (3) coefficient of permeability (4) ground water level. (author)

  7. Non-conventional development in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta's oil sands have been recognized as a major strategic resource in Alberta's and Canada's energy and economic future. The oil sands cover an area of almost 77,000 square kilometres and contain approximately 1.7 trillion barrels of oil, of which 300 billion barrels are believed to be recoverable. Highlights of Alberta production from 1973 to 1997 were reviewed. The review showed that by 1997, production of bitumen and synthetic crude oil from the oil sands reached 520,000 barrels per day which is 33 per cent of Alberta's and 25 per cent of Canada's total liquid petroleum production. Activities in oil sands development were outlined, including land sales, historical capital spending, predicted capital spending, technological improvements, and production and price forecasts. Improvements in oil recovery have been accounted for by technological improvements such as multi-lateral drilling, steam assisted gravity drainage, hydrotransport, and synergies with existing facilities. Since 1993, there has been a sharp increase in oil sands land sales. A total investment of $18.8 billion has been announced for the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River deposits for the near future. Prospects for continuing vigorous development in oil sand extraction was predicted. 1 tab., 9 figs

  8. Competing pipelines in Alberta - a tolling issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications of the emergence of competing pipelines in the intra-Alberta market were reviewed from the vantage point of the Industrial Gas Consumers Association of Alberta, comprised of the eight largest natural gas consumers in the province. The Association is concerned with the possible impacts caused by producer-driven pipelines such as the Palliser Pipeline, Alliance Pipeline or the Alberta Pipeline proposals, taking a run at Nova Gas Transmission's quasi-monopoly within the province. Issues of concern to the Association are: (1) access of Alberta industry to natural gas, (2) cost of moving gas from the field to plant gate, (3) impact on long-term gas development, (4) impact on gas prices within the province, and (5) impact on the availability on natural gas liquids used as industrial feedstock. The Association views the competing pipeline proposals with concern because it believes that while change is both necessary and inevitable, competition does not necessarily means more assured supply, at better prices to industry that rely on natural gas. In the view of the Association the best that is likely to result from the new competitive proposals is turning the present monopoly into an oligopoly, with significant potential for the oligopoly pipelines to abuse their position, thus putting at risk their considerable investment in industrial plants by sudden changes in natural gas transportation cost structure

  9. Alberta industrial synergy CO2 programs initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various industrial sectors within Alberta produce about 350,000 tonnes of CO2 per day. This presentation was concerned with how this large volume and high concentration of CO2 can be used in industrial and agricultural applications, because every tonne of CO2 used for such purposes is a tonne that does not end up in the atmosphere. There is a good potential for an industrial synergy between the producers and users of CO2. The Alberta Industrial Synergy CO2 Programs Initiative was established to ultimately achieve a balance between the producers of CO2 and the users of CO2 by creating ways to use the massive quantities of CO2 produced by Alberta's hydrocarbon-based economy. The Alberta CO2 Research Steering Committee was created to initiate and support CO2 programs such as: (1) CO2 use in enhanced oil recovery, (2) creation of a CO2 production inventory, (3) survey of CO2 users and potential users, (4) investigation of process issues such as power generation, oil sands and cement manufacturing, and (5) biofixation by plants, (6) other disposal options (e.g. in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, in aquifers, in tailings ponds, in coal beds). The single most important challenge was identified as 'rationalizing the formation of the necessary infrastructure'. Failing to do that will greatly impede efforts directed towards CO2 utilization

  10. CNPC, Alberta Ink Deal to Boost Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Keyu

    1996-01-01

    @@ At the invitation of the Provincial Government of Alberta, Canada, a petroleum delegation led by Vice President of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) Zhou Yongkang arrived in Calgary, a petroleum city in Canada, on June 8,1996 for a one-week visit.

  11. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1993 marked the last full year of the Commission operating as Alberta's representative in the energy regulatory arena in Canada and the USA; due to restructuring, these functions will be transferred to the Ministry of Energy in early 1994. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 40.2 million bbl, down 11% from 1992, and receipts of heavy crude were 3.7 million bbl, down 42% from 1992. Revenue from crude oil sales was $800 million, down 25% from 1992. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1993 included price determination and information collection. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. University of Arizona TRIGA reactor. Annual utilization report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984 (Docket 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Annual Report covering the period July 1, 1983 through June 30, 1984, for the activities of the TRIGA Mark I Reactor at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. This report is submitted in compliance of Section 6.7e of the Facility Technical Specifications and Paragraph 50.59(b) of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  14. Final report on the University of Florida U.S. Department of Energy 1995--96 Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Grant support has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of the reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over twelve million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the nation. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research activities were not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. In some cases external grant funding is limited or is used up, in which case the Reactor Sharing Grant and frequent cost sharing by the UFTR facility and the University of Florida provide the necessary support to complete a project or to provide more results to make a complete project even better. In some cases this latter usage has aided renewal of external funding. The role of the Reactor Sharing Program, though relatively small in dollars, has been the single most important occurrence in assuring the rebirth and continued high utilization of the UFTR in a time when many better equipped and better placed facilities have ceased operations. Through dedicated and effective advertising efforts, the UFTR has seen nearly every four-year college and university in Florida make substantive use of the facility under the Reactor Sharing Program with many now regular users. Some have even been able to support usage from outside grants where the Reactor Sharing Grant has served as seed money; still others have been assisted when external grants were depleted.

  15. Final report on the University of Florida U.S. Department of Energy 1995--96 Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant support has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of the reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over twelve million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the nation. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research activities were not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. In some cases external grant funding is limited or is used up, in which case the Reactor Sharing Grant and frequent cost sharing by the UFTR facility and the University of Florida provide the necessary support to complete a project or to provide more results to make a complete project even better. In some cases this latter usage has aided renewal of external funding. The role of the Reactor Sharing Program, though relatively small in dollars, has been the single most important occurrence in assuring the rebirth and continued high utilization of the UFTR in a time when many better equipped and better placed facilities have ceased operations. Through dedicated and effective advertising efforts, the UFTR has seen nearly every four-year college and university in Florida make substantive use of the facility under the Reactor Sharing Program with many now regular users. Some have even been able to support usage from outside grants where the Reactor Sharing Grant has served as seed money; still others have been assisted when external grants were depleted

  16. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  17. Identification of a leaking TRIGA fuel element at the nuclear reactor facility of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a periodical activity of characterization of the ionic-exchange resins of the demineralizer of the primary cooling circuit of the TRIGA Mark-2 reactor of the University of Pavia a small but detectable amount of Cs137 contamination was measured. Since the reactor has been running for several hundreds of hours at full power without showing any anomaly in the radiometric and thermo-hydraulic parameters, the reactor was brought to the nominal power of 250 kW for one hour and a sample of water was collected from the reactor tank and analysed in a low-background gamma ray detector. As a result a small amount of fission products were detected in the reactor pool water (a few Bq/g) suggesting the existence of a possible clad defect in one or more fuel elements. Since no halogens such as iodine and bromine were detected in the sampled water, the more likely hypothesis, also supported by literature, seemed to be a micro-fissure in the neck of an instrumented fuel element. A dedicated apparatus for reactor pool water sampling and on-line spectroscopy measurements was realized. As expected, the fission product leakage was due to a micro-fissure of a fuel element that released noble gas only when the fuel element was heated up to a temperature around 90 Celsius degrees. The leaking fuel element was identified and removed from its position and the reactor was back in regular operation after 2 months from leakage detection. (authors)

  18. Utilisation of research and training reactors in the study programme of students at the Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparing operating staff for the nuclear industry is and also will be one of the most serious education processes, mainly in the Central-European countries where about 40-50% of the electricity is produced in nuclear power plants. In the Central-European region there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly, the level of education in universities and technical high schools of this area is also good. Slovak University of Technology Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad for utilisation of research and training reactors. (author)

  19. License renewal and power upgrade of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cornell Mark II TRIGA reactor has been a principal facility for instruction and research in nuclear science and engineering at Cornell, and it has been extensively used by other departments at Cornell and by nearby universities and industries. Initially the fuel was low hydride, 8.5w/o 19%-enriched, aluminum clad; in 1974 it was changed to high-hydride, stainless-steel-clad. The maximum power has been 100 kW, with pulses to $2, and operation has been on a one-shift demand basis. Annual energy generation of 50 MWH has been typical. Standard features include a 4-inch tangential port and our 6-inch radial ports, a thermal column with hohlraum and vertical access, a central thimble, a 'rabbit', and a set of dry irradiation tubes, replacing the 'Lazy Susan'. The license was renewed and amended in November 1983; the new limits are 500 kW and $3 pulses. Physical changes to the facility included addition of a water-to-water heat exchanger and of a diffuser at the water outlet ∼ 60 cm above the core. The flow rate is 300 liters per minute in the primary (reactor) side of the heat exchanger. The temperature of the chilled water entering the secondary of the exchanger is ∼ 12?C; its flow rate is adjusted by a servo-controlled by-pass valve to maintain the desired range of pool water temperature. Steps taken to go to higher power included rearrangement of fuel elements to increase excess reactivity, recalibration of control rods, and power vs ion chamber current calibrations at successively higher power by comparing the rate of rise of pool temperature with a known rate using electrical heating elements. Steady-state operation has been done up to 480 kW (nominal) but pulsing at the newly allowed higher levels has not been tested as yet

  20. Severe transient analysis of the Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For this reason the modeling has been performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS). The basic design and normal transients have been performed successfully with MMS. However, the true test of an inherently safe concept lies in its response to more brutal transients. Therefore, such a demonstrative transient is chosen for the PSU ALWR: a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total loss of offsite ac power. Diesel generators are likewise unavailable. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. The low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The results of the transient analyses indicate excellent performance by the PSU ALWR in terms of inherently safe operation. The primary coolant enters full natural circulation, and removes all decay heat through the steam generators. Further, the steam generators continually supply sufficient steam to the shutdown power system, despite the abrupt changeover to the auxiliary feedwater system. Finally, even with coincident failures in the pressurization system, the primary repressurizes to near-normal values, without overpressurization. No core boiling or uncovery is predicted, and consequently fuel damage is avoided. 17 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Technology transfer programs using a low power nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE II nuclear reactor developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is well suited for neutron activation analysis and the production of small quantities of radionuclides. Emphasis has been placed on local research groups to transfer appropriate technology developed in their laboratories into the community. The development of several research protocols and associated technology is reviewed and their successful implementation into local industry is outlined. These include for example, the monitoring of environmental chlorinated compounds, the irradiation of gem stones, placer gold-mining efficiency measurements and measuring industrial flow-processes. (author) 6 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Implementation of a Program on Experiencing and Application of Research Reactor for University Students Majoring in Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was written as following contents, to develop a program for university students majoring in science and technology, which is intended to provide the students with opportunities to obtain hands on experience and knowledge on various nuclear technology, through experiments using HANARO and its facilities. Thus obtain experience and knowledge are expected to be a great help for their current study and for their selection of a specific future study area. The purpose of this research is as follows: - Development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO as part of their university study. - Continuous operation of research reactor experimental programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. - Development and operation of training programs of experiments using research reactor for university students majoring in nuclear engineering and also for university students majoring in diverse fields of science and technology such as Physics, Radiation, Mechanical engineering, Fire fighting, Medicine and Biology to cultivate future potential users of HANARO as well as broadening the user group. As a whole, 244 students from 15 universities have completed the courses of the programs developed and offered by this project. Also, 5 textbooks have been developed to support the programs

  4. Aspects of Reactor Physics Research at the Victoria University of Manchester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Engineering Department at Manchester University was established in 1959. Since that time post-graduate reactor physics studies have gradually enlarged and developed, starting virtually from scratch; experimental studies have concentrated on light-water systems and centred on the accelerator-driven, natural-uranium, light-water exponential. The paper contains a survey of the work to date, discussion of the results obtained, outlines of proposed future work, and, as they arise in the text, descriptions of various low-cost, labour-saving experimental techniques which have been adopted. The various divisions of the work are described below. The authors have studied neutron diffusion in light water using both pulsed source and steady source methods. In the former method they have particularly stressed full harmonic analysis to the extent of actually studying the higher modes as opposed to most former work which has tried only to eliminate them. In the study of steady source methods they have concentrated on eliminating all effects from finite source and detector size, resonance activation, flux perturbation and so on. The results of both are discussed and compared. A very careful measurement of absorption cross-sections by the pulsed technique, taking care to eliminate harmonic and other effects likely to lead to error is also in progress and is described. Thermal neutron spectra in ''poisoned'' light water are being measured as a means of investigating and developing integral detector techniques. This discussion includes some interesting time- and cost-saving examples. Large foil activation and counting techniques for measuring spatially averaged neutron densities, and hence a number of reactor parameters, have been studied. Some interesting points have arisen, particularly with regard to spectrum measurement. The method makes possible many reactor physics investigations with limited resources. A low-cost natural uranium, light-water exponential has been

  5. Home-made refurbishment of the instrumentation and control system of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia was dated and, in order to grant a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future, it became necessary to substitute or to upgrade the system. Since the substitution of the I and C system with a new-made one was very difficult to be performed due to long authorization procedures, an home-made refurbishment was planned. Using commercial components of high quality, almost a complete substitution, channel-by-channel, of the I and C system was realized without changing the operating and safety logics. The system includes: - the Reactor Linear Power Channel and Chart Recorder; - the Reactor Percent Power Safety Channel; - the High Voltage and Low Voltage Power Supply; - the Automatic Reactor Power Control; - the Fuel Elements and Cooling-Water Temperatures Measuring Channels; - the Water Conductivity Measuring Channel. The refurbished I and C system shows a very good operational behavior and reliability and will assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future

  6. Development of Commercial Neutron Activation Analysis Service with a Small Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that with sufficient motivation the staff of a SLOWPOKE type reactor facility can develop a commercial NAA service generating enough revenues to pay the salaries of all those involved as well as reactor maintenance costs. The NAA service should be fast and continuously available; industry often requires a turn-around time of one day. At the École Polytechnique NAA Laboratory, years of work have led to the successful development of a hybrid NAA method combining the k0 method and the improved relative method. It offers large savings in time as well as improved flexibility and accuracy. (author)

  7. A Fully-reconstituted Safety Basis for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor, (UFTR), is restructuring its licensing framework to help facilitate its upgrade to a digital controls system. The strategy focuses on creating an encompassing safety analysis to prove, unequivocally, that the UFTR represents a negligible risk to the health and safety of the public. This will allow a change in the Limiting Safety System Settings (LSSS) and for a reduction in the number of safety system and components (SSCs) that are defined as safety related by the Code of Federal Regulations. The safety analysis is predicated on two postulated events: a rapid insertion of a large amount of positive reactivity and the release of fission products caused by mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. These have been selected as limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence. The rapid insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software. Analysis shows that a reactivity insertion of $2.00 creates a maximum peak fuel temperature approximately 250 .deg. below the failure limit of 530C. The radioisotope inventory of the fission products is modeled using the ORIGEN-S module in SCALE6.1. The doses to the workers and members of the public are determined with COMPLY software and shows that the worstcase hypothetical exposures are approximately 6.5% of the annual regulatory limit

  8. Development and implementation of an automatic control algorithm for the University of Utah nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of this work is the development and implementation of an automatic control philosophy which uses the classical operational philosophies as a foundation. Three control algorithms were derived based on various simplifying assumptions. Two of the algorithms were tested in computer simulations. After realizing the insensitivity of the system to the simplifications, the most reduced form of the algorithms was implemented on the computer control system at the University of Utah (UNEL). Since the operational philosophies have a higher priority than automatic control, they determine when automatic control may be utilized. Unlike the operational philosophies, automatic control is not concerned with component failures. The object of this philosophy is the movement of absorber rods to produce a requested power. When the current power level is compared to the requested power level, an error may be detected which will require the movement of a control rod to correct the error. The automatic control philosophy adds another dimension to the classical operational philosophies. Using this philosophy, normal operator interactions with the computer would be limited only to run parameters such as power, period, and run time. This eliminates subjective judgements, objective judgements under pressure, and distractions to the operator and insures the reactor will be operated in a safe and controlled manner as well as providing reproducible operations

  9. Transmission : key to the Alberta market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AltaLink is Canada's first independent transmission company with 11,000 kilometres (km) of lines and 250 substations. It possesses a unique ownership structure with strong technical partners and financial capability. No major transmission system has been built in the last fifteen years in Alberta. The author examined the situation of power transmission in Alberta, indicating that developments should include capacity increase out of Fort McMurray, and better market integration with both British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. An efficient and effective market requires ample transmission capacity, which would allow for trade and competition, access for efficient generators, and access to regional markets. New transmission must be planned and achieved in a proactive manner. Generation developers must be assured that transmission will be available, and that tariffs and loss factors will be predictable and stable. figs

  10. Ambient air quality trends in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provided an overview of ambient air pollutant trends in Alberta. The report discussed the following pollutants having effect on human and environmental health: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulphide (H2S), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzene, and benzopyrene. Each of these pollutants was described. The report provided data on annual average concentration trends and annual 99th percentile concentration as an indicator of peak concentrations. A map illustrating air quality monitoring stations in 2006 was also provided. The findings revealed that mean annual CO levels were the lowest they have been since 1990; hydrogen sulphide concentrations have fluctuated in time since 1990; most Edmonton and Calgary area stations showed significant decreasing trends in annual average NO2 levels since 1990; and higher SO2 concentrations have been found in the industrial areas of Alberta, such as the Redwater and Scotford oil sands locations. tabs., figs

  11. Alberta petroleum equipment and services directory 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This directory provides information on approximately 1450 companies operating in the service and supply segment of the Alberta oil and natural gas industry. Entries are arranged alphabetically. Each entry provides the name of the company, location of main office, names of key personnel at this location, banking connections, type of services or supplies provided and the number of employees. The alphabetical directory is supplemented by a detailed subject index

  12. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  13. NOVA Corporation of Alberta annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nova Corporation and its related businesses are involved in natural gas production, gas pipelines, consulting services, and upgrading of natural gas into chemicals and plastics. Nova owns Alberta Gas Transmission Division, the primary gas transportation system in Alberta, with 11,400 miles of pipeline and total deliveries in 1992 of 3.4 trillion ft3. Nova also owns 50% of Foothills Pipe Lines Ltd., one of Canada's largest carriers of exported gas, and 50% of TQM Pipeline Partnership, which transports natural gas in Quebec. Nova conducts its chemicals business through Novacor Chemicals Ltd., which has plants in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and the USA. Novacor's major petrochemicals are methanol, ethylene, propylene, and styrene and its major plastics are polystyrene, polypropylene, and polyethylene. Nova's gas-producing branch Novalta Resources produced 26 billion ft3 of natural gas in 1992 and has proven reserves of 334 billion ft3. Nova's net income in 1992 was $164 million, compared to only $46 million in 1991. The company's operations, along with management discussion and analysis, are presented for 1992 and financial statements are included. 20 figs., 43 tabs

  14. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1992 marked the end of chronically depressed natural gas prices and a significant reduction in natural gas surpluses. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, unchanged from 1991, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.3 million bbl, up 4% from 1991. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1.1 billion, down from $1.64 billion in 1991. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1992 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. In 1991, the middle east crisis caused prices to spike at the commencement of the Gulf war, but these quickly stabilized. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, down 1.5% from 1990, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.1 million bbl, up 5% from 1990. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1,642,244,000, down from $2,078,197,000 in 1990. Loss of the Montreal market through pipeline closure led to increased pressure on prices, particularly on heavy crudes. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1991 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  16. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  17. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  18. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro [Medical University of Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk [NOELL-KRC, D-97064 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  19. A Cooperative Industry - Government Woodland Caribou Research Program in Northeastern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Rippin

    1996-01-01

    the Alberta Departments of Environmental Protection and Energy. The research aspect of the program has been developed and implemented by staff of the University of Alberta, Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries, the Alberta Fish and Wildlife and Forest Services and the Alberta Environmental Centre. The program also incorporates a public information and liaison function. Newsletters, information videos, brochures and public consultation are the means used to accomplish this task.

  20. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, M J; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 ...

  1. The Evolution of Integrated Chronic Disease Prevention in Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, Kim; Wolbeck Minke, Sharlene; Khalema, Ernest; Smith, Cynthia; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    Background Recognition of the common risk factors for leading chronic diseases in Canada has contributed to the development of integrated chronic disease prevention and health promotion approaches. The Alberta Heart Health Project studied the capacity of health organizations in Alberta, Canada, to engage in heart health promotion. This article describes how the Alberta Heart Health Project acted on emerging research findings describing the preliminary stages of integrated chronic disease prev...

  2. Use of the TRIGA Reactor by the Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities uses the TRIGA Mark II Reactor mainly for neutron activation analysis. Transport of samples to and from the irradiation positions in the reactor is performed by fast pneumatic transfer systems (transfer time 20 msec and 300 msec) and slow conventional transport facilities. Gamma-spectrometric instrumentation equipped with loss free counting systems is used to handle the high count rates up to 500 000 counts/sec. During the last years neutron activation analysis was applied to investigate environmental samples (soil, dust, incineration ash), geological samples (rocks, sediments, fossils, volcanic gases), biological materials (lichens, mushrooms and other plant materials, human diet, biological reference materials), raw materials (phosphate, coal) and archaeological materials (ancient glass). Lichen analysis was used for environmental monitoring. The content of some of the trace elements can be correlated with industrial activities, like manganese content with steel industry, the occurrence of vanadium and nickel with oil firing plants and stainless steel industry, selenium is found in lichen near coal firing plants. The amount of chlorine and sodium indicates the application of salt for road treatment during winter time, aluminum, scandium and hafnium content depends on the amount of dust in the environment. A further environmental application of neutron activation analysis is the determination of trace elements in volcanic gases. The halogens, arsenic, antimony, selenium, tellurium and mercury were determined and their daily output was calculated. The distribution of trace elements in fossils of known age gives us a geochemical key to condition and development of the paleo-environment. For this purpose we determined rare earth elements in 250 million years old microfossils (conodonts). Neutron activation analysis served also for some non scientific but nevertheless useful purposes: Organic

  3. Canadian Universities Go West to Fill Eastern Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchard, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The booming, oil-rich economy of Alberta, Canada, has left universities on the eastern side of the country scrambling for students, as families and recent high-school graduates move westward to seek their fortunes. Peter D. Halpin, executive director of the Association of Atlantic Universities, says that, "The Alberta economy has been an economic…

  4. Summary report of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, second half of 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Report is published on occasion by summarizing in the form of prompt report the data required at the time of research and experiment, such as the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results for the articles made for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, the reports of study meetings and so on, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, the discussion on other papers and reports and others in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. In this report, the gists of 69 studies carried out by using the Research Reactor and 15 studies by using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are collected. Adoption number, classification, title, the names of reporters and gist are given for each report. (K.I.)

  5. The study on the stability of the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of the study on the stability of the supporting gwound which has been carried out as a part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute. In this work the finite element method is used. The stresses and displacements of the ground are calculated under the following conditions; (1) Stress-strain relationships for the individual elements are linear. (2) The problem is analyzed on two-dimensional plane strain distributions. (3) No-tension analysis is applied to the calculation for earthquake load. (4) The mechanical properties of the ground are obtained from the soil survey which has been performed at the construction site of High Flux Reactor building. The results are summarized as follows; (1) The settlement of the building is estimated to be about 2 -- 5 cm for long-time loading, including the result from elastic theory, while the relative settlement is about 0.3 cm at both ends of the building. (2) Safety factor is larger than 1.4 for long-time loading. (3) Maximum angle of the deformation of the building due to the earthquake load is estimated to be about 9.2 x 10-3 degree (1.6 x 10-4 rad). (4) Safety factor is larger than 1.2 -- 1.3 for earthquake load. Judging from these results described above, the ground at the construction site of the High Flux Reactor is appropriate for the supporting ground of the reactor building, and the mat foundation can be adopted for the foundation form. (author)

  6. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alroumi Fawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control rod reactivity (worths for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is widely benchmarked for various reactor types and complexities in their geometric arrangements of the assemblies and reactor core material distributions. Thus, it is used as a base methodology to evaluate neutronics variables of the research reactor at the University of Utah. With its much shorter computation time than MCNP6, AGENT provides agreement with the MCNP6 within a 0.5 % difference for the eigenvalue and a maximum difference of 10% in the power peaking factor values. Differential and integral control rod worths obtained by AGENT show well agreement with MCNP6 and the theoretical model. However, regulating the control rod worth is somewhat overestimated by both MCNP6 and AGENT models when compared to the experimental/theoretical values. In comparison to MCNP6, the total control rod worths and shutdown margin obtained with AGENT show better agreement to the experimental values.

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Virginia open-pool research reactor. Docket No. 50-062

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating Licence R-66 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  9. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to renewal of the operating license for the CAVALIER Training Reactor at the University of Virginia (Docket No. 50-396)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating License R-123 to continue to operate the CAVALIER (Cooperatively Assembled Virginia Low Intensity Educational Reactor) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Arizona (Docket No. 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Arizona for the renewal of Operating License R-52 to continue operating its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Arizona without endangering the health and safety of the public. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Oklahoma Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Oklahoma for a renewal of Operating License R-53 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Oklahoma and is located on the campus in Norman, Cleveland County, Oklahoma. The staff concludes that the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN) reactor facility can continue to be operated by University of Oklahoma without endangering the health and safety of the public

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Purdue University: Docket No. 50-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Purdue University for a renewal of Operating License R-87 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by Purdue University and is located on the campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the enviroment

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Michigan State University (Docket No. 50-294)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Michigan State University (MSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-114 to continue to operate the TRIGA Mark I research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Michigan State University and is located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by MSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Lowell (Docket No. 50-223)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Lowell (UL) for renewal of operating license number R-125 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Lowell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  16. Fire, Aim… Ready? Alberta's Big Bang Approach to Healthcare Disintegration

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Cam

    2010-01-01

    Alberta's abolition in 2008 of its health regions and the creation of Alberta Health Services (AHS) was a bold move, but the reasons for the change remain hazy. The stated goals were to “help make Alberta's … system more effective and efficient” and to “provide equitable access to health services and long-term sustainability.” Data show, however, that Alberta's health regions were already performing well on these goals relative to other provinces, and where changes have since occurred, they c...

  17. Utilization of research and training reactors in the study program of students at Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technologies, but also to travel to perform practical exercises at foreign training or experimental reactors as: TRIGA II Reactor in Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria (3 practical exercises per study for about 10 students yearly since 1990); School Reactor of the Technical University of Budapest, Hungary (one week per study, about 10 students yearly since 1983); Training Reactor of the CVUT, Prague, Czech Republic (3 days per study, about 10 students yearly since 1998); Experimental reactor ASTRA in Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf (1999-2000) A 4 weeks' IAEA Regional Training Course 'Safety management and utilisation of research reactors' on Safety, Management and Utilization of Research Reactors was held in Bratislava (Slovakia) and Vienna (Austria) during March 05-30th 2001. IAEA in co-operation with the Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Slovak University of Technology and the Atominstitut of Austrian Universities Vienna prepared and realized this training course with the aim to train junior staff from research reactors in various aspects of safety, management and utilization of research reactors. All participants had to have at least 4 years experiences in operation, management, utilization or regulation of research reactors. Lectures covered the topics in nuclear design and operation, neutron physics, reactor physics, health physics, dosimetry, reactor instrumentation, fuel management decontamination procedures, preparation of experiments at research reactors and others. Beside theoretical part of the course, the practical exercises at TRIGA II reactor in Vienna constituted an important part of training. ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network: Feasibility Study for Central-European Region. In frame of this project, prepared for the Central-European region, students participating in nuclear engineering education will visit participating institute to carry out laboratory practices and student as well as diploma work. We

  18. Characteristics of neutron irradiation facility and dose estimation method for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University research reactor institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron irradiation characteristics of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KIJRRI) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), is described. The present method of dose measurement and its evaluation at the KURRI, is explained. Especially, the special feature and noticeable matters were expounded for the BNCT with craniotomy, which has been applied at present only in Japan. (author)

  19. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alroumi Fawaz; Kim Donghoon; Schow Ryan; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Control rod reactivity (worths) for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I) are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is ...

  20. 75 FR 27372 - University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... as a result of license renewal. Radiation monitoring instrumentation available to the reactor... that may be released off site. There should be no increase in occupational or public radiation exposure... released from the facility nor was there any solid waste released. In addition, no environmental...

  1. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs

  2. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  3. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Opportunities for CANDU for the Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta oil sands bitumen deposits comprise of one of the largest sources hydrocarbon in the world, and have emerged as the fastest growing, soon to be dominant, source of crude oil in Canada. The oil industry has made great strides in improving the effectiveness of gathering this resource. In particular, alternatives to open-pit mining have been developed which enable in-site recovery of underground deposits with a minimum of environmental disruption. The main challenge that remains is the large quantity of energy needed in the process of extracting the oil and upgrading it to commercial levels. For a typical in-situ extraction project, about 18% of the energy content of the oil produced is used up in the extraction process, while a further 5% is used in generating hydrogen to upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Looking ahead, even as improvements in energy use efficiency, (and hydrocarbon use efficiency) counterbalance the increases in hydrocarbon demand from economic growth (particularly in the developing world), Canada and Alberta recognize that the oil sands resource will be needed, and both support the development of this resource in an environmentally responsible way. The large energy requirement for the oil sands extraction process represents a challenge with regard to both environmental impact and security of supply. The use of natural gas, the current energy supply, has impacts in terms of air quality (via NOX and other emissions) and also represents a large greenhouse gas emissions component. As the oil sands industry expands, the availability of natural gas also becomes a concern, as does price and price stability. With this background, the opportunity for nuclear reactors to provide an economical, reliable, virtually zero-emission source of energy for the oil sands becomes very important. Over the last few years, developments in oil sands extraction technology, and developments in CANDU technology through the Advanced CANDU Reactor, (ACR

  5. Implementation of the clean air strategy for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H.S.; Angle, R.P. [Alberta Dept. of Environmental Protection, Alberta (Canada); Kelly, M. [Clean Air Strategic Alliance, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Air quality and its effects on the environment and human health have received considerable attention during the last three decades in Alberta, Canada. Among the issues receiving a high priority are acid deposition, smog and global warming. There are various sources of emissions to Alberta`s atmosphere, many of which relate to the extraction, processing, and burning of fossil fuels; pulp and paper manufacture; and transportation. There are also natural sources of contaminants, such as particulates from forest fires and methane from bogs. The extraction, processing and combustion of fossil fuels play an important role in Alberta`s economy. The province produces over 80 % of the oil and natural gas in Canada, and nearly half the coal. Low sulphur coal is used in power plants to supply more than 90 % of the electricity used in this province by nearly three million people. As a result, Alberta is responsible for about 27 % of the CO{sub 2}, 23 % of the nitrogen oxides, and 16 % of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated in Canada. Alberta`s air quality is monitored by the Government of Alberta at nine continuous, eight intermittent, over 250 static, and 12 precipitation monitoring stations. Parameters such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide, particulates, and ion-content of precipitation are measured. Industry operates a large number of ambient and static SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S monitoring stations across Alberta, with monitoring costs estimated at 56-80 million USD annually. The unique features of the Clean Air Strategy for Alberta (CASA) have already been published elsewhere. This presentation discusses the mechanism and progress on its implementation. (author)

  6. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning operations at the UWNR reactor; operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance operations; radioactive waste disposal; summary of radiation exposures; results of environmental studies; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  7. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  8. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Noble Brooklyn; Choe Dong-Ok; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron f...

  9. Alberta report says airborne sulphur may reduce fertility in dairy cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to a new report from the University of Alberta airborne sulphur in the gas from sour gas plants may reduce fertility levels in dairy cattle. The report found no differences in mortality rates or milk production levels in dairy herds located near sour gas plants or far away from them, but there was evidence that dairy heifers on farms near sour-gas plants took longer to have their first calf, or for adult cows to become pregnant again. No similar effects were observed in beef cattle. The debate over the effects of sour gas on human and animal health has been going on for some 30 years with sometimes contradictory results. Recent regulations by the Alberta government require the oil industry to reduce flaring by 25 per cent. Beef industry experts acknowledge that the oil industry is complying with the new rules, nevertheless, public concern about sour gas continues unabated

  10. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on 'introduction of total micro-element analysis system and its application in Kyoto University Reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lecture contents are here summarized that have been presented in the specialist research meeting of research reactor institute of Kyoto University held under the theme 'Introduction of total micro-element analysis system and its application in Kyoto University Reactor'. Here 12 lectures were presented and the current states of radiochemical neutron activation analysis in Thailand and Korea were also mentioned. (M.H.)

  11. Alberta electric industry annual statistics for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tables containing data on electric energy generation and capacity for Alberta are provided for the following aspects: capacity and generation of power plants for 1998; capacity of power plants by type, unit, and energy resource for 1998; generating units approved for construction for 1998; generating units completed in 1998; transmission additions approved for construction and completed for 1998; net annual generating capacity and generation for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by plant for 1998; net annual generation by energy resource and type for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by energy resource and type for 1998; generation capacity reserve; relative capacity and generation by type of energy resource for 1998; capacity, generation and fuel consumption of isolated plants for 1998; other industrial on-site plant capacity and generation for 1998. Also listed are: energy resource consumption and energy conversion efficiency of thermal power plants for 1998; stack emissions from thermal generating plants for 1998; non-utility electric generators, wind and hydro for 1998; and hydroelectric energy utilization and conversion efficiency for 1998. Tables contain information on electric energy generation and capacity for hydroelectric energy stored in reservoirs in 1998; details of non-coincident net peak generation and load by utility operators for the Alberta electric system for 1998; and Alberta electric system generation and load at peak load hour for 1998. Further tables cover electric energy distribution for interchange and distribution for 1998 and 1981-1998; annual energy distribution to ultimate customers for 1988-1998 and to ultimate customers for 1998; and the number of electric utility customers in 1998. Final tables cover the transmission and distribution systems with data on: circuit km of such lines for 1988-1998; total circuit km of such lines by major electric utility for 1998 and number of rural electric utility customers for 1998

  12. Training reactor VR 1 at the Czech Technical University in Prague is operational

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed information on the construction work of the VR 1 VRABEC training reactor is presented (building and assembling work, inactive tests) and its technical description is given, with emphasis on the conception of the device and the crucial parts of its technology. The basic parameters of the reactor are as follows: rated power output 1 kW(thermal); fuel of the IRT-2M type (36% 235U enrichment, imported from the former USSR); reactor vessels (pools) made of stainless steel, 2300 mm in diameter, 4720 mm high, wall thickness 15 mm, bottom thickness 20 mm; reactor shielding: 3000 mm water layer above the reactor core, lateral shielding: about 850 mm of water plus a 950 mm layer of special heavy concrete; working temperature inside the reactor, which is affected by the ambient temperature, is about 20 degC; reactor core cooling proceeds by natural convection; pressure is atmospheric; control system consists of 5 to 7 UR-70 type control rods distributed as follows: 3 scram rods, 2 control rods, 0 to 2 experimental rods; neutron source: Am-Be, 185 GBq. (Z.S.). 10 figs

  13. Learning and Technology in Alberta (1975 to 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's education system is a leader in the use of technology in teaching and learning. New information technologies create options for how teachers teach, how students learn, and how classrooms look and operate. This document chronicles the history of computer technology in Alberta from 1975-2009. The information is arranged in a tabulated…

  14. Circle of Courage Infusion into the Alberta Indigenous Games 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Dawn Marie

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of indigenous people from across North America came to the Enoch Cree Nation for the Alberta Indigenous Games, six days of sport, education, and cultural awakening. The vision of the Alberta Indigenous Games is to recognize the value and potential of Indigenous culture and the young people. Activities include sports, indigenous arts,…

  15. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  16. Alberta petroleum equipment and services directory, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A directory is presented of Alberta companies that provide equipment and services to the oil industry. In the main section, companies are listed alphabetically by name, along with their addresses, phone/fax numbers, contact personnel, and lists of products and/or services. A separate alphabetical name index and a product/service index are included. A section covering provincial and territorial government agencies and non-governmental associations and institutes is appended, giving name, address, phone/fax number, leading personnel, and a summary of activities

  17. Worldwide market developments : lessons for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percival, J.F. [KWM U.K. Ltd., Worcester, (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    A review of competitive retail electricity markets in Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and California were discussed, highlighting lessons for Alberta policy makers, market designers and electricity retailers. Some of the emerging strategies in the retail electricity marketplace such as horizontal integration, generation retailing, defensive retailing and virtual vertical integration were explored. Emphasis was on showing that electricity retailing is not an easy business. It is a business for large and existing players, and although horizontal and vertical integration have growth and profit potential, there are also risks.

  18. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 57 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as neutron radiography using a research reactor, measurement of Zr/Hf ratio in zirconium, interstitial germanium atoms in thermal neutron irradiation study, measurement of induced radioactivity due to neutrons in Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings, properties of semiconductor electrons in radiation study, induction of mutation in crops by neutron irradiation and utilization for breeding, thermal fluorescence mechanism of alkali halide and MgO single crystals, atomic configuration in PZT rhombohedron phase, modulated structure of Cu-Co alloys, excitation of nuclei by positron annihilation and others. (Kako, I.)

  19. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 61 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as radioactivation analysis of trace elements in rocks and minerals, anodic oxidation films of GaAs and structure, measurement of yield of uranium isotopes produced by reactor neutron irradiation of thorium, geochemical study of trace elements in hydrosphere by radio-activation analysis, various diseases and variation of elements in rat furs, Moessbauer spectroscopic study of gold compounds with singular coupling by Au-197, measurement of grass-eating quantity and rate of digestion of cows using Au and Eu, sickness biochemical study of trace elements in hair samples of patients and others. (Kako, I.)

  20. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  1. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Radioisotope radiotherapy research and achievements at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) along with various other departments of the University of Missouri have been involved for many years in developing new means of internal radioisotopic therapy for cancer. These efforts have centered on methods of targeting radioisotopes such as brachytherapy, embolization of liver tumors with radioactive microspheres, small molecule-labeled chelate guidance for the treatment of bone cancer, and various means of radioimmunotherapy or labeled receptor agent targeting. All of this medical research and practical application of radioisotope therapy has been built on MURR's high neutron flux and outstanding reliability of operation, as well as MURR's flexibility in meeting the needs of researchers and the radiopharmaceutical industry. For many years MURR has produced Au-198 and Ir-192 wires for subsequent fabrication into brachytherapy sources for treatment of isolated tumors. An extension of this approach is embodied in Y-90 TheraSphere, which consists of Y-89-containing glass microspheres which are activated to contain Y-90 and injected in the blood supply of liver tumors. This approach leads to embolisation and very high radiation doses to tumor with minimal side effects, and is currently in use at six centers in the U.S. MURR has been instrumental in the development of bone agents such as Re-186 HEDP and Sm-153 Quadramet, the latter of which is now an approved drug for palliation of the pain from metastatic bone cancer. A related development is MURR's participation in trials using Ho-166 DOP to ablate diseased bone marrow in patients afflicted with multiple myeloma prior to reinfusion of cleansed, autologous marrow. This procedure has passed Phase I and II trials in the U.S., achieving approx. 50% complete remissions in multiple myeloma patients. MURR is currently upgrading its facilities to meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) requirements for Phase III of this

  3. Vision 20/20 : saving for the future Alberta advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Alberta Vision 20/20 project, Alberta's past and present spending patterns on natural resources and choices for the future were examined. Trust funds in Alberta, Alaska, and Norway were also compared, in order to learn from other jurisdictions. This report presented findings from Phase 3 of Vision 2020. The objectives of the study were to provide insight on what Alberta's economic, social and policy landscape might look like in the coming decades given expected demographic changes; benchmark Alberta's performance on key economic and social indicators and analyze government performance in related policy areas; supply useful, accessible information and possible solutions to Albertans about some of the challenges that demographic change is likely to bring; encourage discussion of issues among Albertans, including legislators and the media; and, where appropriate, encourage actions to mitigate or alleviate foreseeable problems. The guiding principles of the Vision 20/20 were first presented. Alberta's fiscal context and labyrinth of savings funds were examined. A detailed explanation and literature review of resource trust funds in Norway, Alaska, and Alberta were then provided followed by a comparison of the Alberta, Alaska, and Norway funds. Last, the report presented Alberta's options and discussion as well as recommendations. It was recommended that Alberta's annual per capita spending should not exceed population growth and inflation; the province should consider transfers of additional resource revenue into the Heritage Fund in the manner of the state of Alaska; and the province should deposit between 30 per cent and 40 per cent of all nonrenewable resource revenues in the Heritage Fund annually. 38 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs., 4 appendices

  4. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  5. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  6. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Kansas (Docket No. 50-148)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Kansas (KU) for a renewal of Operating License R-78 to continue to operate the KU 250-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Kansas and is located on the KU campus in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by KU without endangering the health and safety of the public. 17 references, 11 figures, 4 tables

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Florida. Docket No. 50-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Florida (UF) for a renewal of Operating License R-56 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Florida and is located on the UF campus in Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by UF without endangering the health and safety of the public

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Washington State University TRIGA reactor. Docket No. 50-27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Washington State University (WSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-76 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Washington State University and is located on the WSU campus in Pullman, Whitman County, Washington. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by WSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Cornell University TRIGA Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Cornell University for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Cornell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Renewal of the Operating License for the TRIGA Training and Research Reactor at the University of Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations

    1985-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can conti...

  11. Contribution to international safeguards and security by a small university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In recent years international safeguards and security of radioactive sources has become an increasing concern to countries, to the public and to international organisations. The main target of all international efforts is to prevent the spread and the illicit trafficking of special nuclear materials or radioactive sources. The development of highly specialised instruments being hand-held, portable or fixed installed is performed in cooperation with the IAEA mainly in the USA and in Europe. However even small research institutions such as the Atom institute in Vienna can contribute significantly to the improvement both of hardware and software as well as to the practical test in different radiation fields under laboratory conditions. The Atom institute belongs to the Technical University of Vienna and operates a 250 kW TRIGA type reactor mainly for education and training of students in the nuclear field. All relevant information can be found in the homepage www.ati.ac.at. One advantage of the Atom Institute is the proximity to the IAEA, in fact it is the closest nuclear facility to the IAEA headquarters. In the past years the Atom Institute co-operated very closely with several divisions in the IAEA to test soft- and hardware of newly developed nuclear instruments under variable environmental conditions. Following are some typical examples of recent research programmes: One field of research and investigations was the behaviour of various types of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors in different radiation fields. These types of detectors are room temperature semiconductor detectors with a resolution between HP Ge detectors and NaJ detectors. They have the advantage of being very small and rugged and therefore easy to be transported and applied in the field. However their resolution as a function of their geometric configuration has to be tested in mixed radiation fields, also the evaluation software has to be improved. Starting in 1996 two CZT detectors have been

  12. Proceedings: The Alberta Soil Science Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    A total of 46 papers were presented at this two-day conference dealing with all aspects of soil science. Some topics discussed included: Soil fertility; Soil testing; Emissions from fertilizer and manure in agricultural fields; Environmental farm plans; Wetland law and policy in Alberta; Feedlot manure composting; Knowledge gaps in agricultural greenhouse gas research; Effects of cattle manure applications on soil properties; Nitrogen and phosphorus losses through surface runoff from manured soils; Modeling carbon balance of barley-fallow systems; Salt movement in capped composite tailings; Evaluation of soil structures in reclaimed oil sands soils; Scoping key soil issues for the Suncor Voyageur oil sands project; Regulatory considerations in remediation of salt-impacted soil and groundwater at upstream oil and gas facilities; Development of as method to estimate potential N mineralization across Alberta; Restorative capacity of topsoil replacement depths and organic amendments on decommissioned wellsites; Effects of compost application on the level of soil carbon dioxide concentration and the growth of Cinnamomum camphora seedlings; and others. Abstracts of all papers available on the Internet at http://www.soilsworkshop.ab.ca.abstract.

  13. Alberta's transmission development policy : review and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta's Department of Energy (ADOE) released a policy paper in November 2003 regarding power transmission development for the province. The transmission development policy (TDP) is intended to promote economic growth in Alberta while ensuring consumers with reliable, reasonably priced electricity. This presentation reviewed the main features of the policy and then focused on the allocation of costs to generation customers. The author argued that the proposed changes would result in a sub-optimal development of generation and higher total electricity bills for consumers. He argued that the policy will spare generation customers of any obligation to pay wire-related costs other than local interconnection costs. This would weaken a long-standing ADOE policy which requires generators to pay costs that depend on their location on the transmission system. With the new proposal, generators would not be responsible for ancillary service costs even when they provide direct benefits, and they would pay for system losses on a zonal basis. The author recommended that location charges should be large enough to influence the siting decisions of generators. He also recommended that generators should pay their fare share of transmission use-of-system charges, including ancillary services that provide benefits to generators in the form of a stable, reliable transmission system. 2 tabs., 2 figs

  14. A review of research activities at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in view of research publication information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database of research publication was constructed for the purpose of grasping all of the research activities at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The database named KURRIP collects all of the research publications of the Institute by not only its own staff but also visiting scientists. The publications are in the form of original papers, review papers, papers in proceedings, short notes and letters, synopses over 3 pages presented orally at scientific meeting, books and doctoral theses. At present, the KURRIP database contains the information on 6,210 items which have been published for 30 years since the Institute was established as an interuniversity research institute for joint use of a research reactor and other related large facilities in 1963. By utilizing the KURRIP database, the analyses have been done: (1) affiliation of the authors, (2) kind of publications, (3) classification of publishers, (4) research fields, and (5) experimental facilities. The KURRIP database is now stored in the Data Processing Center of Kyoto University and can be utilized through a computer center at one of the main national universities in Japan. (author)

  15. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Iowa State University (Docket No. 50-116)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Iowa State University (ISU) for a renewal of the Class 104 Operating License R-59 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Iowa State University, and is located on the ISU campus in Ames, Story County, Iowa. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by ISU without endangering the health and safety of the public. The principal matters reviewed are: design, testing, and performance of the reactor components and systems; the expected consequences of credible accidents; the licensee's management organization; the method used for the control of radiological effluents; the licensee's technical specifications; financial data and information; the physical protection program; procedures for training reactor operators; and emergency plans. 11 references, 15 figures, 13 tables

  16. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Brooklyn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron flux distributions of the entire reactor core and to compare it with the measured flux focusing at the irradiation ports. Integration of all these analysis provided the updated comprehensive neutron-gamma flux maps of the existing irradiation facilities of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor.

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to NUREG-1135, ''Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Construction Permit and Operating License for the Research Reactor at the University of Texas'' (SER) May 1985. The reactor facility is owned by The University of Texas at Austin (UT, the applicant) and is located at the University's Balcones Research Center in Austin, Texas. This supplement to the SER (SSER) describes the changes to the reactor facility design from the description in the SER. The SER and SSER together reflect the facility as built. The SSER also documents the reviews that the NRC has completed regarding the applicant's emergency plan, security plan, and technical specifications that were identified as open in the SER

  18. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in latter half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 69 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  19. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in first half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 54 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  20. Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present TLÜ Akadeemilises Raamatukogus / Sander Jürisson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikooli Akadeemilises Raamatukogus on üleval näitus "Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present", mis annab ülevaate Kanada Alberta provintsi eestlaste loost. Näitus valmis Alberta Eesti Kultuuripärandi Seltsi koostöös Alberta Provintsi Arhiivi Kultuuripärandi Osakonnaga Edmontonis

  1. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the first year of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta was presented. The way in which electricity is bought and sold in Ontario and throughout North America is changing. Costs are no longer fixed and regulated. Electricity is becoming a commodity with high levels of price volatility. The paper presented hedging options for Alberta consumers, contracting lessons, market issues and lessons for Ontario. A comparison of Alberta's deregulation schedule with that of Ontario's was included. One year after market opening in Alberta, power prices have dropped significantly. There is a greater than expected demand side response, increased development in power generation, and a decrease in natural gas prices. Issues that still need to be addressed in Alberta include billing and load settlement issues, invoicing/billing standards, the lack of competition at the retail level, and future balancing of pool charges. Energy Advantage Inc. (EA) does not foresee the same drastic increase in price as seen in Alberta market opening, but suggests that uncertainty and volatility will exist in Ontario. In Alberta, customers who did nothing and stayed on default were the ones who benefited, but took a great risk. EA suggests that customers must understand how and when they use electricity, how much is used during on- and off-peak hours, and in the summer versus the winter. When electricity is priced hourly, it is important to know consumption patterns. 7 figs

  2. Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity report to the Alberta Minister of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the deliberations of the Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity regarding the restructuring of the electric power industry in the province of Alberta. Strategic issues affecting restructuring over the long term were considered with particular attention to small consumers. The long term vision (Vision 2012) for electric power restructuring is to promote efficient and competitive markets attracting investment and innovation that will result in fair and equitable prices for consumers. It was noted that while the restructuring system is currently in place, progress has not been even across the system. It is expected that it will take several years before a restructured electricity industry is fully functioning. Recommendations were presented to establish a plan to address issues regarding restructuring within power generation, transmission, distribution and export/import policies. The issue of market power, competitiveness and consumer education was also discussed. It was also noted that there are many external forces that impact the electricity system, many of which come from outside Alberta. These include fluctuations in gas prices, electricity demand, changes in the United States, regulatory decisions in other jurisdictions and unexpected business events. It was emphasized that a strong, liquid and competitive wholesale market is vital to achieving Vision 2012. Key factors for a competitive wholesale market include adequate generation, transmission capability and export/import capacity. The report presents the following 3 scenarios: business as usual, managed transition, and freedom 2012. A review of restructuring in several other jurisdictions around the world was also provided. 1 tab., 1 fig

  3. Clean air strategy for Alberta: Background project reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a background to the development of a clean air strategy for Alberta, reports are presented which cover the definition of what clean air is, the applicability of full cost accounting to this strategy, market-based approaches to managing Alberta air emissions, gas and electric utility incentives programs for energy efficiency, energy efficiency legislation in Alberta and other jurisdictions, initiatives which address emissions reduction in the transportation sector, coordination of science and technology relevant to clean air issues, and initiatives in energy and environmental education

  4. Canada's first competitive electricity market: the Alberta experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restructuring of the electric power industry as experienced in the province of Alberta was discussed. Alberta's electric industry structure today is comprised of a power pool and open access transmission. The forces for change, the evolution of the new structure, the new Electric Utilities Act that defined restructuring, features of the restructured industry, the organization and functions of the Alberta Power Pool and the Transmission Administrator, the day-to-day functioning of the Power Pool, the price setting mechanism, access to the transmission system, the legislated financial hedges, the timeline for the retirement of the existing generation system, and anticipated future developments were described

  5. COMMIX-1C code estimation for the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA MARK-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the COMMIX-1C code is used to investigate the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University (ITU)TRIGA MARK-II reactor by simulating the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the reactor pool as a function of core design parameters and pool configuration. COMMIX-1C is multi-purpose, three-dimensional. transient, single-phase, thermal-hydraulics computer code. For the mass, momentum and energy equations, it uses a porous-medium formulation, a finite-volume algorithm, a flow modulated skew-upwind discretization scheme to reduce numerical diffusion and k-ε two-equation turbulence model. Its implementation for the particular system requires geometric and physical modelling decisions. ITU TRIGA MARK-II reactor pool is considered partly as continuum and partly as porous medium. All the major pool components are explicitly modelled in the simulation. Shape of the pool structure and computational cells are accounted for using the concept of directional surface permeability, volume porosity, distributed resistance, and distributed heat source or sink. The results are compared to the results of the computer codes TRISTAN, TRIGATH and TRIGATH-R

  6. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee's annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Dry reloading and packaging of spent fuel at TRIGA MARK I reactor of Medical University Hanover (MHH), Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    which is protected against contamination spreading and provided with a conventional driven by a floor conveyor trolley. 4. Mobile Reloading Station placed directly on the shipping cask, containing adapter to each type of shipping cask, shielded sliding plates and provided with a loading plate for positioning of six packs into the shipping cask. 5. Auxiliary systems including: - cask lid lifting device; - video monitoring device for the shipping cask lids and loads; - air film gliders for transport of shipping casks. Finally one concludes: the dry reloading station for spent fuel packaging into the shipping casks has successfully operated for TRIGA MARK I reactor at Medical University Hanover as well as at the VKTA - Research Reactor in Rossendorf, Germany. It is available as a proven technique for the dry reloading of spent fuels into the shipping casks. (author)

  8. 250 MW windplant proposed for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal to develop a $1.5 billion wind project at Pincher Creek, in the foothills of Alberta, was discussed. In an effort to reduce provincial carbon dioxide emissions, the developers, York WindPower of Montreal, Wind Power Inc. of Pincher Creek and the German turbine maker Enercon, have sought help from the oil and gas industry and also from the provincial utilities which rely on coal-fuelled generation. Project sponsors have claimed that the cost of wind energy would compare favourably to the cost of electricity from a new natural gas-fuelled plant, and that it would be a good opportunity for fossil fuel industry and the renewable energy industry to work together

  9. Guide to Alberta's competitive electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A crucial point was reached at the beginning of 2001 in the process of competitive electricity market in Alberta, when record high prices were reached in both the natural gas and electricity markets. In this document, the intent was to present, in a non-technical way, the new electricity market. It was designed to cover issues as they flow, from generator to consumer. Therefore, it began with a market model illustration going through each step of the process. Frequently asked questions, developed using the input from 160,000 Albertans, were answered in each section. The first section of the document dealt with a competitive market. In section 2, the electricity supply was discussed, followed by section 3 and the wholesale electricity market. In section, 4, the reader was invited to explore customer choice, and consumer information was provided in section 5. tabs., figs

  10. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 65 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as Moessbauer spectroscopic study of ferrocene and its derivative iodides by I-129, decomposition of cadmium telluride during heat treatment, element distribution in resource living things and environmental substances produced in northern ocean, radioactivation analysis of trace elements in blood of tumor-bearing animals, radioactivation analysis of noble metal elements in geochemical samples, relaxation phenomena by gamma-gamma perturbation angle correlation, separation of components in Allende meteorite and their radioactivation analysis, measurement of cross section of Pa-231 (n, gamma) reaction and others. (Kako, I.)

  11. Did you know? Petroleum industry fast facts : Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief summary of Alberta's petroleum industry is provided. In 1997, capital expenditures from the petroleum industry into Alberta's economy were more than $13 billion. The province is the largest crude oil and natural gas producer in Canada, employing some 215,000 people across the province. Of these 165,00 are directly, or indirectly employed in upstream activities, and about 50,000 in downstream activities, including pipeline transportation. The industry utilizes an extensive pipeline network with nearly 260,000 kilometres of pipeline serving local, national and international markets. The Alberta oil sands have more than 300 billion barrels of potential recoverable deposits, comparable to the proven reserves in Saudi Arabia. Crude oil and natural gas make up nearly 56 per cent of Alberta's exports. In 1997, the province supplied almost 12 per cent of the U.S. natural gas consumption. 3 figs

  12. CAPP's technical review of the Alberta Royalty Panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provided a response to the Alberta Royalty Review Panel's report to the Alberta government concerning royalty payment requirements. The paper suggested that the panel did not meet the government's objective to find a balance between a reasonable royalty system and a sustainable oil and gas industry. Areas of concern outlined in the paper included flawed data; incorrect costs; and incorrect activity assumptions. It was also suggested that the panel did not adequately consider returns on investments, Alberta's small discovery size, or low production data for wells. The panel also did not account for the higher costs that producers face when compared to other oil-producing regions. Revenues from lease sales were not accounted for. Recommendations and a set of fundamental decision-making principles were provided. It was concluded that policy decisions made as a result of the panel's finding will have a significant impact on Alberta's economic future. 8 refs., 13 figs

  13. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride. Report on session 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities over the 1982-3 session are reviewed and all the research projects listed. These include reactor related activities (physics and radiochemistry, health physics and nuclear medicine and engineering), those of the isotope geology unit and NERC radiocarbon laboratory, the computing department and the teaching programme. The demand for irradiations, particularly for activation analysis has continued. There was no major maintenance shut-down in the year. (U.K.)

  14. Ohio State University reactor sharing program. Progress report, September 1, 1980-April 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of the OSURR and GRSS by colleges and universities is summarized. Two student laboratory exercises were developed during this period and are included: control rod calibration and approach to critical

  15. Development of control rod driving mechanism for high neutron flux reactor in Kyoto University (KUHFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KUHFR is a coupling type reactor of 30 MW power output, which have two light-water-moderated and cooled cores inside the heavy water reflector. There are six sets of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) in each core, each set driving one control rod. The newly developed driving system for CRDM is a unique one not employed in any other reactor. The main specifications required are as follows: Drive length 650 mm, driving speed 100 mm/min; control rod magnet deenergizing time 0.3 sec or less, control rod falling time to 90% stroke 1 sec or less, finished O.D. 190 mm or less. There were difficulties in selecting the driving system, because various control rod driving systems adopted in power and research reactors have both merits and demerits. As a result of investigation, three systems have been produced for trial, experimented and compared, and the moving coil type CRDM has been employed because it is suitable in many points, e.g. it allows continuous motion of control rods. The construction of moving coil type CRDM is explained. In the progress of development from No. 1 to No. 3 system is described, starting at the magnetic circuit calculation. As the running performance of the CRDM, the relationship between the plunger shift in a coil and upward force, and the differential linear running performance, following properties and stopping characteristics of control rods for coil movement are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    OpenAIRE

    Babitz Philip; Choe Dongok; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much mor...

  17. Evaluating the role of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing long-term carbon control strategies is important in energy intensive industries such as the oil sands operations in Alberta. We examine the use of cogeneration to satisfy the energy demands of oil sands operations in Alberta in the context of carbon management. This paper evaluates the role of cogeneration in meeting Provincial carbon management goals and discusses the arbitrary characteristics of facility- and product-based carbon emissions control regulations. We model an oil sands operation that operates with and without incorporated cogeneration. We compare CO2 emissions and associated costs under different carbon emissions control regulations, including the present carbon emissions control regulation of Alberta. The results suggest that incorporating cogeneration into the growing oil sands industry could contribute in the near-term to reducing CO2 emissions in Alberta. This analysis also shows that the different accounting methods and calculations of electricity offsets could lead to very different levels of incentives for cogeneration. Regulations that attempt to manage emissions on a product and facility basis may become arbitrary and complex as regulators attempt to approximate the effect of an economy-wide carbon price. - Highlights: ► We assess the effectiveness of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta. ► Cogeneration can offset a significant portion of Alberta's high carbon electricity. ► CO2 reduction potential of cogeneration may be higher if installed immediately. ► Product based policies should approximate the effect of an economy-wide policy.

  18. The contribution of a small triga university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27 A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL will be mentioned. The second topic treated in this paper shows the international co-operation in the field of superconductors. This research work is carried out under two European TMR-Network programs. The third topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development. (orig.)

  19. The contribution of a small TRIGA university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL are mentioned. The second topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development

  20. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Zero-Power Reactor at Cornell University, Docket No. 50-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Cornell University (CU) for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a zero-power reactor (ZPR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the ZPR facility can continue to be operated by CU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  1. Is the restructuring of Alberta's power market on the right track? Evaluating Alberta's first two years of deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of Alberta's restructured electricity market was evaluated since its move to wholesale competition in January 2001. This paper presents the following eight conclusions that the authors arrived at following the evaluation: (1) To meet growing demand, the electricity prices in Alberta would have increased regardless of the type of environment (regulated or not). Capacity investment was required, and it was believed that moving to competition was the best way to attract investors. (2) Success in attracting private investment was attained as a result of Alberta's open market. It has restored reliability of supply and moderated prices. (3) Price comparisons must take into account what the prices would have been if the market had remained regulated. Due to unique generation costs and regulatory environments, comparisons with other regulated jurisdictions is inappropriate. (4) Convergence with other energy rates that would have been seen under regulation is being noted with respect to Alberta's market prices. (5) Under deregulation, prices increase according to the need for new investment and fall after the investment is made. Alberta has been on a path toward continued reduction in wholesale prices since 2001. (6) The non-price benefits of restructuring include improved generation efficiency, captured residual value from regulated assets, and shifting investment risk of new capacity additions from consumers to generators. (7) Downward pressure on prices was noted as a result of deregulation, as expected. (8) Significant value for consumers was captured through Alberta's restructuring process. 7 tabs., 7 figs

  2. Recently-developed neutron activation analysis techniques utilizing the University of California at Irvine TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of California at Irvine (UCI) 250 kW TRIGA Mark I reactor is used extensively for neutron activation analysis (NAA) studies. These particularly include basic technique studies and application studies in the fields of environmental pollution, crime investigation, archaeology, oceanography, and geochemistry. In recent NAA studies at UCI, a number of techniques have been developed which considerably improve the usefulness of such a research reactor for NAA work, and which should be of interest and use to others. Six of these techniques will be described in further detail in the full paper. They are as follows: development and use of (1) an automated high-precision rapid transfer system for instrumental NAA measurements with induced activities having half lives as short as 0.5 second, (2) an automated measurement system and computer program for making accurate dead-time corrections under conditions where the Ge(Li) spectrometer deadtime is changing rapidly during the counting period, (3) a technique to minimize the loss of mercury from samples during reactor irradiation via the use of dry-ice-packed, vented TRIGA rotary rack tubes, (4) a technique for compacting powdered samples, by pre-irradiation treatment with a solution of paraffin in carbon disulfide, to provide reproducible irradiation and counting geometries, (5) a method utilizing hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) as a pre-irradiation treatment material for removal of sodium from aqueous and wet-ashed samples, and (6) a computerized system for predicting in advance of activation, from approximate known elemental compositions, the total counting rate, deadtime, spectrum shape, principal photopeaks, and approximate actual lower limits of instrumental NAA detection of designated elements for any selected irradiation and decay times. (author)

  3. Using Monte Carlo transport to accurately predict isotope production and activation analysis rates at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5) model of the University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) has been developed. The ability of the model to accurately predict isotope production rates was verified by comparing measured and calculated neutron- capture reaction rates for numerous isotopes. In addition to thermal (1/v) monitors, the benchmarking included a number of isotopes whose (n, γ) reaction rates are very sensitive to the epithermal portion of the neutron spectrum. Using the most recent neutron libraries (ENDF/ B-VII.0), the model was able to accurately predict the measured reaction rates in all cases. The model was then combined with ORIGEN 2.2, via MONTEBURNS 2.0, to calculate production of 99Mo from fission of low-enriched uranium foils. The model was used to investigate both annular and plate LEU foil targets in a variety of arrangements in a graphite irradiation wedge to optimize the production of 99Mo. (author)

  4. Initial test results of the Omron face cue entry system at the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor facility is testing, in collaboration with Omron Transaction Systems, Inc., the Omron Face Cue facial recognition system for access control to its restricted area. The installation of this system is the first of its kind at a security-relevant facility in the U.S. and within the research reactor community. The Face Cue is an on-demand device based on facial recognition and storage technology. The image processing methodology is as follows: (1) facial position detection, (2) background elimination, (3) facial features discrimination via application of a wavelet transform. The extracted facial feature values are compared to the data archived in its database and access is provided upon meeting the authorization criteria. The current test phase consisted of assessing the functionality of the Face Cue during daily use and in terms of its robustness (flexibility) as a function of the following physical parameters: (1) subject's distance away from the Face Cue, (2) ambient lighting conditions, (3) subject's facial orientation, (4) subject's facial expression and (5) peripheral facial features/modifications. The system has operated at nearly 100% reliability during several test intervals with approximately 7,000 entry attempts to date. (author)

  5. Results from Accelerator Driven TRIGA Reactor Experiments at The University of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator Driven Transmutation of High-Level Waste (ATW) is one possible solution to the fuel reprocessing back-end problem for the disposal of high level waste such as minor actinides (Am, Np or Cm) and long-lived fission products. International programs continue to support research towards the eventual construction and operation of a proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source coupled to a subcritical 'neutron amplifier' for more efficient HLW transmutation. This project was performed under DOE AFCI Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE). A 20 MeV Electron Linac was installed in the BP no 5 cave placing neutron source adjacent to an offset reactor core to maximize neutron coupling with available systems. Asymmetric neutron injection 'wasted' neutrons due to high leakage but sufficient neutrons were available to raise reactor power to ∼100 watts. The Linac provided approximately 100 mA but only 50% reached target. The Linac cooling system could not prevent overheating at frequencies over 200 Hz. The Linac electron beam had harmonics of primary frequency and periodic low frequency pulse intensity changes. Neutron detection using fission chambers in current mode eliminated saturation dead time and produced better sensitivity. The Operation of 'dual shielded' fission chambers reduced electron noise from linac. Benchmark criticality calculation using start-up data showed that the MCNPX model overestimates reactivity. TRIGA core was loaded to just slightly supercritical by adding graphite elements and measuring reactivity of $0.037. MCNPX modeled TRIGA core with and without graphite to arrive at 'true' measured subcritical multiplication of 0.998733± 0.00069. Thus, Alpha for the UT-RACE TRIGA core was approximately 155.99 s-1. The Stochastic Feynman-Alpha Method (SFM) accuracy was evaluated during transients and reactivity changes. SFM was shown to be a potential real-time method of reactivity determination in future ADSS but requires stable

  6. Annual compensation for pipelines in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Surface Rights Board (SRB) in Alberta held a hearing in November 2007 to address three issues involving a pipeline for Enbridge Pipelines (Athabasca) Inc. as well as several land owner issues in Townships 66-68 and Ranges 17-19, all west of the 4th Meridian. The issues the SRB examined were the appropriate amount (i.e. magnitude) of compensation payable under right of entry orders under consideration; the appropriate structure of the compensation award; and to whom the compensation was payable. This document presented a review by the Farmer's Advocate Office (FAO) of the published decision of the SRB. The verbatim decision and rationale used by the SRB to award annual compensation for loss and/or ongoing nuisance and inconvenience was presented. The document could be useful to landowners as they determine their negotiation strategy when faced with considering future pipeline access agreements. The document included a discussion of the context for the decision and a case review. Specific topics that were covered included the rationale for the decision; long term effects of pipeline arguments and SRB commentary; the award and determination; and what still needs to be done. It was concluded that the SRB requires evidence in order to answer several questions regarding the magnitude of any losses, and to what degree, if any, had the nuisance, inconvenience, and loss of rights already been anticipated and factored into the operator's final offer

  7. A retailer's perspective on generation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several reasons for a retailer to invest in power generation. This investment acts as a risk management hedge against fixed price retail load, while improving competitiveness in illiquid wholesale markets. Investing in power generation leverages the retailer's wholesale trading capabilities. It also provides appropriate returns. Some of the factors that ensure the success of a retailer investing in power generation are low cost structure, low risk, strong forward commodity market, owners with large healthy balance sheets, and willingness to finance projects entirely with equity. A cost comparison was presented for different generation technologies. ENMAX chose to invest in wind power since the costs were comparable to that of other technologies. In addition, green credits will lower the cost of wind power. With low environmental impacts and no fuel risk, wind energy fitted ENMAX's retail strategy. Green power at ENMAX (GREENMAX) was the first to implement a Green Power Residential program in 1998, followed by the Green Power Commercial program in 2000. The author discussed the McBride Lake Wind Farm located near Fort MacLeod, Alberta. figs

  8. Alberta Reclamation Research annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reclamation Research Technical Advisory Committee (RRTAC) was appointed by the Alberta Land Conservation and Reclamation Council to assist in technical matters related to the development and administration of the Council's research program. RRTAC develops reclamation research under four major program areas, and activities in these areas during the year are described in this report. The Plains Coal Reclamation Research Program addresses questions relating to groundwater and soil reconstruction in plains coal mining zones. The Mountain and Foothills Reclamation Research Program focuses on water management, soil reconstruction, reforestation, and wildlife habitat development, with objectives including control of erosion on a variety of disturbances such as coal mines and ash pits. The Oil Sands Reclamation Research Program is attempting to develop techniques to establish self-sustaining, erosion-free cover on oil sand tailings pond dikes, and to return tailings sand storage and overburden dumps to productive forests. The Oil and Gas Reclamation Research Program is concerned with disposal of drilling wastes and reclamation of lands disturbed by oil and gas activities. Under each program, the objectives, basic problems investigated, and research approach are presented, followed by description of specific projects involving such subjects as hydrology, revegetation, soil-water interactions, landscape and watershed design, soil reconstruction and amendment, and soil compaction. A list of research reports is included. 69 refs., 8 figs

  9. Alberta Reclamation Research annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reclamation Research Technical Advisory Committee (RRTAC) was appointed by the Alberta Land Conservation and Reclamation Council to assist in technical matters related to the development and administration of the Council's research program. RRTAC develops reclamation research under four major program areas, and activities in these areas during the year are described in this report. The Plains Coal Reclamation Research Program addresses questions relating to groundwater and soil reconstruction in plains coal mining zones. The Mountain and Foothills Reclamation Research Program focuses on water management, soil reconstruction, reforestation, and wildlife habitat development, with objectives including control of erosion on a variety of disturbances such as coal mines and ash pits. The Oil Sands Reclamation Research Program is attempting to develop techniques to establish self-sustaining, erosion-free cover on oil sand tailings pond dikes, and to return tailings sand storage and overburden dumps to productive forests. The Oil and Gas Reclamation Research Program is concerned with disposal of drilling wastes and reclamation of lands disturbed by oil and gas activities. Under each program, the objectives, basic problems investigated, and research approach are presented, followed by description of specific projects involving such subjects as hydrology, revegetation, soil-water interactions, tailings dewatering, drilling waste landfarming, landscape and watershed design, soil reconstruction and amendment, and soil compaction. An annotated list of research reports is included. 76 refs., 7 figs

  10. The potential for coalbed methane (CBM) development in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents fiscal and regulatory recommendations of the coalbed methane (CBM) Advisory Committee which consists of representatives from Alberta's oil and gas industry who participated in a study to determine the potential for coalbed methane development in the province. CBM is a natural gas produced as a by-product of the coal formation process. This study examined the CBM reserve base in Alberta along with the necessary steps and strategies required to develop it. There is increased interest in natural gas from Alberta's coal resources because of the forecast for reasonable natural gas prices coupled with an increase in energy demand. The remaining established natural gas reserves are estimated at 43 trillion cubic feet and unconventional supplies of natural gas will be needed by 2008 to meet this increasing demand. The recoverable reserves of CBM are estimated to be between 0 and 135 trillion cubic feet. This report discussed the following mitigation strategies suggested by industry that may applicable to CBM development in Alberta: (1) potential technical mitigation strategies, (2) potential land access and tenure strategies, (3) potential water disposal and diversion mitigation strategies, (4) potential non-technical mitigation strategies, and (5) potential economic mitigation strategies. The study concluded that since no two CBM basins are the same, it is necessary to have good baseline resource inventory data. It was also noted that evolving management, drilling and completion techniques will continue to enhance the economic understanding of Alberta's extensive coal beds. It was suggested that lessons from CBM development in the United States can be useful for development in Alberta since there are currently no publicly recognized commercial production of CBM in Alberta. 24 refs., 6 tabs., 25 figs

  11. Alberta's current market structure and future vision : transmission, critical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta's ongoing economic growth depends on reliable electricity, particularly as the province becomes the supplier of energy for North America. This paper addressed issues regarding Alberta's need for a robust power transmission system to ensure a quality electricity supply and to facilitate competitive market and investment in new supply. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) facilitates a fair and open competitive and sustainable market for electricity and provides for the economic operation of the Alberta Interconnected Electric System. The AESO suggested that more than $3 billion may be needed in new transmission in the next 10 to 15 years. A first 500 kV line from Edmonton to Calgary is critical for ongoing reliability and to connect new supply in the Wabamun Lake area. The importance of strengthening interties with neighbouring jurisdictions was also discussed. A review of Alberta's electricity load and supply revealed that more than 3,000 MW of new generation have been added since 2001. A 10-year outlook (2007 to 2016) revealed an expected 3 per cent average annual growth rate in energy and peak demand, with a need for 3,800 MW of new generation by 2016. Since Alberta depends on a competitive market to provide a sufficient supply of electricity, confidence in market structure and operation is crucial. The AESO is working on developing and implementing a set of market and regulatory stability objectives in consultation with stakeholders in order to guide the evolution of the electricity market. The AESO has plans to interface Alberta's framework with the Electric Reliability Organization and to implement mandatory reliability standards. It also has plans to harmonize the AESO's tariff, market rules, and participant contracts to ensure consistency. tabs., figs

  12. Automated three dimensional depletion capability for the Pennsylvania State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the new depletion calculation capability for the Pennsylvania State Univ. research reactor (PSBR). The calculation scheme employs the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4C coupled with the versatile nuclear depletion code ORIGEN2.2 via the recently developed interface code, TRIGSIM. The main functions of the TRIGSIM code are automatic generation of MCNP and ORIGEN inputs from one TRIGSIM input and interfacing the data exchange between the two codes. The PSBR core loading 1, core loading 2 and core loading 3 were modeled using TRIGSIM code. The excess reactivity results from the core calculations have shown reasonable agreement compared to the measured excess reactivity from the operational log book. (authors)

  13. The Contribution to International Safeguards and Security by a Small University Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the proximity of the Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten to the IAEA, many research projects have been carried out and completed successfully during the past years, especially in the field of nuclear safeguards and security, some of them have just started recently. In the paper, a survey on selected cooperation projects is given to show how a small university institute can contribute significantly to international safeguards and security research. Small university laboratories have the advantage of low cost but highly qualified personnel who can concentrate on investigation and test series which would largely exceed the possibilities of international organizations and are, therefore, a typical example of successful outsourcing for the benefit of both partners. (author)

  14. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  15. Heating up in Alberta : climate change, energy development and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and disadvantages of energy sources for the future have been discussed in Alberta for several years. The heavy reliance of the province's economy on extracting oil, gas and bitumen has led politicians and industrialists to support these activities, despite the environmental cost. However, a large percentage of Alberta's citizens would like to see a switch to an economy based on cleaner, less environmentally damaging sources of energy. This report discussed Alberta's climate change challenge with particular reference to greenhouse gas emissions, changing precipitation, and water use for energy production in Alberta. The report discussed water use for electricity production, such as coal-fired electricity generation; electricity from gas; nuclear energy; hydroelectricity and run-of-river hydro; and other types of renewable energy. Water use for gas and oil production was examined. This included well development; natural gas production; conventional oil production; oil from bitumen; and future water demands for the oil and gas sector. The report concluded with a discussion of implications for Alberta's energy production and recommendations. The report also recommended that efforts should be increased to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and practical steps should be taken to reduce fresh water use. 349 refs., 2 tabs., 22 figs

  16. Harmonization of industrial and oilfield waste management issues in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an ongoing discussion concerning the harmonization of waste management requirements within Alberta between the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environment (AENV), with the ultimate goal of publishing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that will lay out the division of responsibilities between the two authorities on this matter. An overview is included of waste management in Alberta and of the harmonization agreements attained to date, with a stress on oil field waste issues. The EUB and AENV developed a MOE on the harmonization of waste management in Alberta, and a discussion is made of the concept of equivalency, which is used in the development of 'EUB guide 58: oilfield waste management requirements for the upstream petroleum industry' and will be a guiding principle for the MOU. Although the EUB's processes for waste management will not be exactly the same as AENV's, the EUB has made the commitment that, as a minimum, the requirements will provide the same level of environmental protection and public safety equivalent to that provided by AENV

  17. Power Pool of Alberta annual report 2000 : building a market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of January 1, 2001, deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta became a reality, and was accompanied by steady growth in demand for electricity combined with other factors that pushed the price of electricity upward. The Power Pool of Alberta ensures that market operations are open and fair. Its mandate, under the Electric Utilities Act, is the overall market surveillance in Alberta's electric industry. It is accomplished by working closely with industry and seeking feedback through four standing committees: Human Resources, Operations, Finance and Audit, and Balancing Pool. The goal for the coming years is to build confidence in the market, whereby consumers are confident about the fairness of the market price for electricity in Alberta, the choices available, and the continued reliability of the electric system in Alberta. The Energy Trading System was explained with information about system control and customer service, and details provided on the consultation and collaboration processes. The financial analysis of the year 2000 was provided, as well as a statement of operation, a balance sheet, and a statement of cash flows. tabs., figs

  18. Alberta euthanasia survey: 1. Physicians' opinions about the morality and legalization of active euthanasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsella, T D; Verhoef, M J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the opinions of a sample of Alberta physicians about the morality and legalization of active euthanasia, the determinants of these opinions and the frequency and sources of requests for assistance in active euthanasia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of Alberta physicians, grouped by site and type of practice. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2002 (46%) of the licensed physicians in Alberta were mailed a 38-item questionnaire in May through ...

  19. Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund : 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund as it operated under the new investment framework established in 1997 was presented. The new statutory mission of the Fund is to provide stewardship of the savings from Alberta's non-renewable resources by providing the greatest financial returns on those savings for current and future generations of Albertans. In 1998, the Fund earned $947 million in income with nearly $25 million of income being retained to ensure that the value of the Fund grows to off-set the effects of inflation. Net assets of the Fund on March 31, 1998 was $ 12.3 billion. Operation of the Fund, the accounting method used, and details about the Transition Portfolio and the Endowment Portfolio are provided. An assessment of Alberta's economic climate accompanies the auditor's report and the detailed financial statements of the Fund. tabs

  20. Feasibility study of the underwater neutron radiography facility using the University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor provides usable neutron yields for neutron radiography. Currently, UUTR reactor has three irradiators (Central, Pneumatic, and Thermal irradiators) and one Fast neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF). These irradiators are very small so they are not suitable for neutron radiography. UUTR has three beam ports but they are not available due to the structure of the core. All sides of the core are occupied by FNIF, Thermal Irradiator, and three ion chambers. The only available position for underwater vertical beam port is on the top of the FNIF. There are two factors necessary to fulfill to be able to realize vertical underwater beam port: noninterruption to other facilities and radiation shielding. Designing the vertical beam port as movable ensures good access to the core and pool, while still providing a good neutron radiography environment. Keeping the top of the beam port below the surface of the pool the water represents biological shield. Neutron radiographs, with a simple setup of efficient neutron converters and digital camera systems, can produce acceptable resolution with an exposure time as short as a few minutes. It is important to validate the design with calculations before constructing the beam port. The design of the beam port is modeled using the MCNP5 transport code. A minimum of 105 neutrons/cm2-sec thermal neutron flux is required for high resolution neutron radiography. Currently, the UUTRIGA is in the process of upgrading its power from 100 kW to 250 kW. Upon the completion of the upgrading, the maximum neutron flux in the core will be ∼7x1012 neutrons/cm2-sec. This paper discusses a modeling and evaluation of capability for a neutron radiography facility. (author)

  1. Development of a practical Monte Carlo based fuel management system for the Penn State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A practical fuel management system for the he Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR) based on the advanced Monte Carlo methodology was developed from the existing fuel management tool in this research. Several modeling improvements were implemented to the old system. The improved fuel management system can now utilize the burnup dependent cross section libraries generated specifically for PSBR fuel and it is also able to update the cross sections of these libraries by the Monte Carlo calculation automatically. Considerations were given to balance the computation time and the accuracy of the cross section update. Thus, certain types of a limited number of isotopes, which are considered 'important', are calculated and updated by the scheme. Moreover, the depletion algorithm of the existing fuel management tool was replaced from the predictor only to the predictor-corrector depletion scheme to account for burnup spectrum changes during the burnup step more accurately. An intermediate verification of the fuel management system was performed to assess the correctness of the newly implemented schemes against HELIOS. It was found that the agreement of both codes is good when the same energy released per fission (Q values) is used. Furthermore, to be able to model the reactor at various temperatures, the fuel management tool is able to utilize automatically the continuous cross sections generated at different temperatures. Other additional useful capabilities were also added to the fuel management tool to make it easy to use and be practical. As part of the development, a hybrid nodal diffusion/Monte Carlo calculation was devised to speed up the Monte Carlo calculation by providing more converged initial source distribution for the Monte Carlo calculation from the nodal diffusion calculation. Finally, the fuel management system was validated against the measured data using several actual PSBR core loadings. The agreement of the predicted core

  2. Should upgrading and refining be enhanced in Alberta?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although world oil prices are rising, the price of bitumen remains stable. It was noted that surplus refinery capacity is disappearing and that skilled labour, infrastructure, transportation systems, environmental management and technology development are among some of the challenges facing heavy hydrocarbon development. Pie charts indicating global reserves of crude oil and heavy crude oil showed that although the Middle East leads in world proven oil reserves, nearly half of the heavy crude oil and natural bitumen deposits are in Canada. As a global energy leader, Alberta is using its' world class expertise to develop the vast energy resources of the province and to market these resources and abilities to the world. This presentation summarized processing activities in Alberta and outlined the markets for petrochemicals. A graph representing North American petroleum supply and demand from 2001 to 2019 was also presented along with a review of Alberta's upgrading and refining capacity and infrastructure opportunities for crude oil, natural gas, petrochemicals and electricity. Alberta's crude oil markets by 2020 are likely to be the Far East, California, Heredity's, Wyoming, Chicago, Cushing, United States Gulf Coast, and the East Coast. The benefits of upgrading in Alberta include inexpensive feedstock, existing upgrader and petrochemical sites and low transportation costs. In addition, more refining capacity in the province would provide market diversification for bitumen products; higher investment and value-added in Alberta; opportunity to provide feedstock to petrochemicals; production of synthetic diluent in the province; and, smaller environmental footprint and greater energy efficiency. The cumulative impact of oil sands development on government revenues was discussed along with the challenge of addressing the issue of a skilled labour shortage, infrastructure needs, and developing a business case for a carbon dioxide pipeline. tabs., figs

  3. The Design and Construction of a Cold Neutron Source for Use in the Cornell University Triga Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lydia Jane

    A cold neutron source has been designed and constructed for insertion into the 6"-radial beam port of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor for use with a neutron guide tube system. The main differences between this cold source and other existing sources are the use of heat conduction as the method of cooling and the use of mesitylene (1,3,5 -trimethylbenzene; melting point, 228(DEGREES)K; boiling point, 437(DEGREES)K) as the moderating material. This thesis describes the design and construction details of the cold neutron source, discusses its safety aspects, and presents its cryogenic performance curves and also the results of a test of its neutron moderating ability. A closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator, located outside the reactor shielding, cools the 500 cm('3) moderator chamber and its surrounding heat shield by heat conduction through two meters of copper and rod tubing. Moderator temperatures of 23 (+OR-) 3(DEGREES)K have been achieved. Mesitylene, a hydrocarbon, is an effective cold moderator because even at low temperatures the weakly hindered rotational motions of its methyl groups enable the absorption of small amounts of energy ((LESSTHEQ) 0.005 eV) from neutrons. The use of mesitylene simplifies the cold source design because it is a liquid at room temperature and thus, the usual design safeguards required for sources using gaseous moderators are not necessary. Moreover, the flammability of mesitylene is much smaller than that of hydrogen and methane, which are the commonly used cold moderators. A method of transferring and handling the mesitylene, a carcinogen, was devised to ensure minimal contact with this substance. To test the neutron moderating ability of the cold neutron source, an out-of-reactor neutron transmission experiment was performed with the moderator chamber first at room temperature and then at about 23(DEGREES)K. The results indicate that the neutron energy spectrum is strongly shifted to lower energies when the chamber is cold

  4. 77 FR 10502 - MATL LLP; Montana Alberta Tie, Ltd; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission MATL LLP; Montana Alberta Tie, Ltd; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on February 13, 2012, MATL LLP (MATL) and Montana Alberta Tie Ltd (Montana Alberta...

  5. Alberta oil and gas industry annual statistics for 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of statistical data from Alberta's oil and gas industry was presented to provide energy analysts and economists a single source of consistent energy-related data. Alberta is Canada's largest crude oil and natural gas producer. This report provides current monthly and historical annual energy data covering the last decade. Data is organized by energy type including butane, ethane, natural gas, natural gas liquids, oil, propane and sulphur. This CD-Rom also included statistical data on energy supply, energy production, disposition, and prices. tabs

  6. Training the next generation of Space and Earth Science Engineers and Scientists through student design and development of an Earth Observation Nanosatellite, AlbertaSat-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B. A.; Bottoms, J.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation addresses the design and developmental process of a Nanosatellite by an interdisciplinary team of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Alberta. The Satellite, AlbertaSat-1, is the University of Alberta's entry in the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge (CDSC); an initiative to entice Canadian students to contribute to space and earth observation technologies and research. The province of Alberta, while home to a few companies, is very limited in its space industry capacity. The University of Alberta reflects this fact, where one of the major unifying foci of the University is oil, the provinces greatest resource. For students at the U of A, this lack of focus on astronautical, aerospace and space/earth observational research limits their education in these industries/disciplines. A fully student operated project such as AlbertaSat-1 provides this integral experience to almost every discipline. The AlbertaSat-1 team is comprised of students from engineering, physics, chemistry, earth and atmospheric science, business, and computer science. While diverse in discipline, the team is also diverse in experience, spanning all levels from 1st year undergraduate to experienced PhD. Many skill sets are required and the diverse group sees that this is covered and all opinions voiced. Through immersion in the project, students learn quickly and efficiently. The necessity for a flawless product ensures that only the highest quality of work is presented. Students participating must research and understand their own subsystem as well as all others. This overall system view provides the best educational tool, as students are able to see the real impacts of their work on other subsystems. As the project is completely student organized, the participants gain not only technical engineering, space and earth observational education, but experience in operations and financial management. The direct exposure to all aspects of the space and earth

  7. The Implementation of an Integrated Management System for TRIGA Research Reactor at LENA (Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy) - University of Pavia (Italy) -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy ('LENA') is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operate, among other facilities, a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor. The reactor is at the disposal of researchers from Pavia University and of other users, both public and private, for research activities, training and education and other services. The Centre itself carries out research and training activities and provides services for private enterprises, encouraging the transfer of the results of nuclear technology research to the production system, including the education and training of specialists in nuclear technology. The prerequisite for the management of the reactor is the satisfaction of all stakeholders requirements, among which safety constraints, efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of the services. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of reactor management and the accomplishment of the stakeholder requirements, LENA decided to implement an Integrated Management System in accordance with International Standard ISO 9001:2008. This choice allowed to satisfy both national and international compulsory requirements (i.e. safe reactor operation and maintenance) and typical ISO 9001 requirements (as e.g. continuous improvement, users/stakeholders care and satisfaction). In addition, through this systematic and graded approach, that led to the standardization of all processes involved in reactor operation and maintenance, all the aspects of the reactor management mentioned in the IAEA publication The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3) were also satisfied. This publication, in facts, provides a guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a management system for facilities and activities that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic elements. (author)

  8. The Implementation of an Integrated Management System for TRIGA Research Reactor at LENA (Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy) - University of Pavia (Italy) -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagnazzo, M.; Tigliole, A. Borio Di; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A. [Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA), University of Pavia (Italy); Giordano, M. [Innovation and Management Systems Division, University of Pavia (Italy); Boogaard, J.P.; Bradley, E.; Vincze, P. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy ('LENA') is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operate, among other facilities, a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor. The reactor is at the disposal of researchers from Pavia University and of other users, both public and private, for research activities, training and education and other services. The Centre itself carries out research and training activities and provides services for private enterprises, encouraging the transfer of the results of nuclear technology research to the production system, including the education and training of specialists in nuclear technology. The prerequisite for the management of the reactor is the satisfaction of all stakeholders requirements, among which safety constraints, efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of the services. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of reactor management and the accomplishment of the stakeholder requirements, LENA decided to implement an Integrated Management System in accordance with International Standard ISO 9001:2008. This choice allowed to satisfy both national and international compulsory requirements (i.e. safe reactor operation and maintenance) and typical ISO 9001 requirements (as e.g. continuous improvement, users/stakeholders care and satisfaction). In addition, through this systematic and graded approach, that led to the standardization of all processes involved in reactor operation and maintenance, all the aspects of the reactor management mentioned in the IAEA publication The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3) were also satisfied. This publication, in facts, provides a guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a management system for facilities and activities that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic elements. (author)

  9. Governance in Transformation: Alberta School Board Chairs’ Perspectives on Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Gibbons

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available School boards are typically removed from nonprofit sector analyses because they are part of the “MUSH” set of organizations (municipalities, universities, schools, and hospitals that both stand outside of the more typical nonprofit sector and tend to be closely affiliated with government. Nevertheless, school boards offer a unique opportunity to examine the governance of a large system of regulated activity that affects millions of citizens. How such systems should be governed has been a matter of concern for nearly 40 years. This study presents data from Alberta school board chairs regarding their perception of governance transformation being brought about by legislative changes. Five dimensions of governance are proposed as defining the current and anticipated governance domain within which school boards operate. Tensions within and between these dimensions signify symbolic boundary constructions that need to be scrutinized in anticipation of the governance transformation and boundary spanning activities of school boards required by the new legislation. / Les conseils scolaires sont généralement retirés des analyses du secteur communautaire parce qu’ils font partie de l’ensemble d’organisations « MUSH » (les municipalités, les universités, les écoles et les hôpitaux; ces organisations se distinguent du secteur communautaire typique et ont tendance à être étroitement associées au gouvernement. Néanmoins, les conseils scolaires offrent une occasion unique d’observer la gouvernance d’un vaste système d’activités réglementées qui affecte des millions de citoyens. La façon dont de tels systèmes devraient être gérés fait l’objet de préoccupations depuis presque 40 ans. Cette étude présente les perceptions de présidents de conseils scolaires de l’Alberta en ce qui a trait à la transformation de la gouvernance apportée par des modifications à la loi. Cinq dimensions de la gouvernance sont propos

  10. Universality

    OpenAIRE

    Marinchev, Emil

    2002-01-01

    This article is an attempt for a new vision of the basics of Physics, and of Relativity, in particular. A new generalized principle of inertia is proposed, as an universal principle, based on universality of the conservation laws, not depending on the metric geometry used. The second and the third principles of Newton's mechanics are interpreted as logical consequences. The generalization of the classical principle of relativity made by Einstein as the most basic postulate in the Relativity i...

  11. Threshold Considerations and Wetland Reclamation in Alberta's Mineable Oil Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Foote

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oil sand extraction in Alberta, Canada is a multibillion dollar industry operating over 143 km² of open pit mining and 4600 km² of other bitumen strata in northern boreal forests. Oil production contributes to Canada-wide GDP, creates socio-cultural problems, provides energy exports and employment, and carries environmental risks regarding long-term reclamation uncertainties. Of particular concern are the implications for wetlands and water supply management. Mining of oil sands is very attractive because proven reserves of known quality occur in an accessible, politically stable environment with existing infrastructure and an estimated 5.5 billion extractable barrels to be mined over the next five decades. Extraction occurs under a set of limiting factors or thresholds including: limited social tolerance at local to international levels for externalities of oil sand production; water demands > availability; limited natural gas supplies for oil processing leading to proposals for hydroelectric dams and nuclear reactors to be constructed; difficulties in reclaiming sufficient habitat area to replace those lost. Replacement of the 85 km² of peat-forming wetlands forecast to be destroyed appears unlikely. Over 840 billion liters of toxic fluid byproducts are currently held in 170 km² of open reservoirs without any known process to purify this water in meaningful time frames even as some of it leaches into adjacent lands and rivers. Costs for wetland reclamation are high with estimates of $4 to $13 billion, or about 6% of the net profits generated from mining those sites. This raises a social equity question of how much reclamation is appropriate. Time frames for economic, political, and ecological actions are not well aligned. Local people on or near mine sites have had to change their area use for decades and have been affected by industrial development. Examining mining effects to estimate thresholds of biophysical realities, time scales

  12. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 · s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy·cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nepi, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power

  13. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, first half of 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 56 brief reports of studies carried out at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. These reports deal with 'Neutron Transmutation Doping on Compound Semiconductor', 'Study on the Influence of the Neutron Irradiation on the Low Temperature Strength of Various Welded Joint of Dissimilar Materials', 'Low Temperature Irradiation Effect on Iron-Alloys and Ceramics', 'Luminescent Phenomena from Some Kinds of Rock and Mineral Slices Accompanied with Gamma-irradiation', 'Study of Irradiation Effects on Simulated Waste Glass Irradiated Using 10B(n,γ)7Li Reaction', 'Neutron Spectrometry with CR-39 Track Detector', 'Performance Study on Superconducting Magnet Materials in Thermonuclear Fusion Conditions', 'Fast Neutron Radiography with KUR-Linac', 'Study of Photo-Excited Metastable State and Their Relaxation of Irradiation Defects in Silicon and Diamond by Using a SQUID Magnetometer', 'Moessbauer Study on Radiation Damage of Metals and Alloys', 'Radiation Damages in Super Ionic Conductors', 'Basic Study on 74As Production by (γ,n) Reaction', etc. (N.K.)

  14. MAPLE: a Canadian multipurpose reactor concept for national nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, following an investigation of Canadian and international needs and world-market prospects for research reactors, has developed a new multipurpose concept, called MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental). The MAPLE concept combines H2O- and D2O-moderated lattices within a D2O calandria tank in order to achieve the flux advantages of a basic H2O-cooled and moderated core along with the flexibility and space of a D2O-moderated core. The SUGAR (Slowpoke Uprated for General Applied Research) MAPLE version of the conept provides a range of utilization that is well suited to the needs of countries with nuclear programs at an early stage. The higher power MAPLE version furnishes high neutron flux levels and the variety of irradiation facilities that are appropriate for more advanced nuclear programs

  15. Development of an interactive model for planning the care workforce for Alberta: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloom Judy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In common with other jurisdictions, Alberta faces challenges in ensuring a balance in health worker supply and demand. As the provider organization with province-wide responsibility, Alberta Health Services needed to develop a forecasting tool to inform its position on key workforce parameters, in the first instance focused on modeling the situation for Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses and health care aides. This case study describes the development of the model, highlighting the choices involved in model development. Case description A workforce planning model was developed to test the effect of different assumptions (for instance about vacancy rates or retirement and different policy choices (for example about the size of intakes into universities and colleges, different composition of the workforce. This case study describes the choices involved in designing the model. The workforce planning model was used as part of a consultation process and to develop six scenarios (based on different policy choices. Discussion and evaluation The model outputs highlighted the problems with continuation of current workforce strategies and the impact of key policy choices on workforce parameters. Conclusions Models which allow for transparency of the underlying assumptions, and the ability to assess the sensitivity of assumptions and the impact of policy choices are required for effective workforce planning.

  16. Issues and strategies for large power buyers in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    America's leading commodity risk management company, Enron has 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2000. It operates EnronOnline, the largest e-commerce site in the world. With some corporate profile information on Enron and Enron Canada and its involvement in the Alberta electricity market, the author proceeded to discuss risk management issues and program development. It was stated that Enron believes that future outcomes can be changed, and risk management is a dynamic and iterative process used as a tool to decrease uncertainty. The risk appetite is defined and electricity risks clarified, then a review of physical operation characteristics is conducted. The risk management program and policy are defined, as well as the controls and reporting. The tools and tactics are defined and one is now ready for the implementation phase. The next section was devoted to credit and contracting issues before moving to the Alberta electricity market fundamentals and pricing and some insight provided on questions such as import/export in Alberta, regulatory issues, prices in Alberta. The last section of the presentation touched on EnronOnline which is a free, Internet-based global transaction system where one can view real time prices. tabs., figs

  17. Framing a New Standard for Teaching in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John E.

    2013-01-01

    A research panel asked to frame the discussion for a new Teaching Quality Standard in Alberta assumes this task requires a paradigm shift away from the status quo efficiency movement. As a member of the panel, the author provides an analysis of paradigm shifts in education and recounts important lessons to be learned. The author challenges the…

  18. Essential Inclusive Education-Related Outcomes for Alberta Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreman, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the knowledge, skills, and attributes (KSAs) that Alberta preservice teachers need to develop over the course of their teacher preparation programs in order to work effectively in inclusive classrooms. Inclusive classrooms are those where all students regardless of diversity learn in the same contexts. These KSAs are…

  19. Alberta High School, College Elevate Learning with Rare Joint Venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    The refusal by a group of parents in Olds, Alberta, in 2003 to accept a provincial grant to renovate their high school set in motion a remarkable collaboration that spawned an innovative learning campus for an entire community and beyond. The new Olds High School, which opened in 2010, is part of a new Community Learning Campus (CLC), a joint…

  20. Alberta Consumers' Valuation of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Red Meat Attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo; Gao, Fei; Unterschultz, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes Alberta consumers’ perceptions toward extrinsic and intrinsic attributes of bison and beef steaks. In contrast to published Canadian consumer studies on bison meat that were undertaken prior to May 2003, before the first BSE case of Canadian origin was identified in beef cattl...

  1. School Identity in the Context of Alberta Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Merlin; Gereluk, Dianne; Kowch, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The central tenet of this investigation is that educational institutions possess their own school identity. Acknowledging that school identity is influenced by institutional mechanisms and personal dynamics, we examine school identity in the context of 13 Alberta charter schools. Narratives of 73 educational stakeholders across the network of…

  2. Locating Leadership: The Blind Spot in Alberta's Technology Policy Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Charmaine

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, technology and education policy discourse in Alberta, Canada has been philosophically polarized and dominated by value-neutral ways of thinking about technology (Brooks, 2011). While technology policy implementation has significant ramifications for schools and systems, for much of this time, system leaders, specifically…

  3. Supporting Positive Behaviour in Alberta Schools: A Classroom Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaya-Moore, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on current research and best practices, this second part of the three-part resource, "Supporting Positive Behaviour in Alberta Schools," provides information and strategies for systematically teaching, supporting and reinforcing positive behaviour in the classroom. A proactive approach to classroom management is designed to provide…

  4. Review of the Alberta Electric Energy Marketing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Energy Marketing (EEM) Program was created by the Alberta government in 1982 in order to establish fair and equal wholesale electricity rates for Albertans by averaging utility generation and transmission costs. Secondary objectives of the EEM Program included efficient power generation, reductions in the rate of increase in electric energy costs, provision for electric energy imports, minimal interference in utility operations, and encouragement of a more balanced economic growth within Alberta. A review is presented of the extent to which the EEM Program has fulfilled these objectives. The program covers electricity generated by Alberta's three major utilities: Alberta Power, Edmonton Power, and Trans Alta. These utilities' costs are currently ca 75%, 80%, and 120% respectively of what they would be without EEM transfers. Total government payments, rebates, and direct EEM agency costs to date are ca $2 billion. Wholesale unit costs in 1991 across the three utilities were exactly equal in the residential sector; in the general service and large industrial sectors, rates varied according to differences in load factors. The impact of the EEM Program as seen in the wholesale costs is reflected in the retail price of electricity, subject to variations due to factors including timing of rate changes, differences in municipal taxes and profits, investment policies, rate design, and customer load characteristics. 5 figs., 18 tabs

  5. A Review of School Board Cyberbullying Policies in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Nicole; Rinaldi, Christina

    2012-01-01

    An online search for school board cyberbullying/bullying policies in Alberta was conducted. The results showed that while only five school boards had a bullying policy, many schools had technology or Internet use guidelines. The online search included an assessment of one extensive school board cyberbullying policy as well as Internet use…

  6. As good as it gets : Alberta economic profile and forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This economic profile and forecast report for the province of Alberta revealed that nearly every sector of the economy is operating at full, or near full capacity. Alberta's strong economy is a result of high energy prices, rapid population growth and rising employment. Increased provincial government spending along with tax reductions for businesses also contribute to a strong economy. However, the the province still faces some economic challenges, including a general labour shortage. Forestry and agriculture are under pressure of low commodity prices and high input costs, and the province has not articulated a long-term strategy for managing non-renewable natural resource revenue. In addition, the provincial economy is highly dependent upon volatile energy prices. Despite these challenges, the report states that the momentum is on the side of continued economic growth in Alberta. The Canada West Foundation is forecasting real growth in the gross domestic product of 5.2 per cent for 2006 and 4.7 per cent for 2007. The strong energy sector is largely responsible for much of Alberta's economic growth. An estimated 20,000 wells will be drilled in the province in 2006, and high oil prices will lead to record drilling and oil sands investment. This report also highlighted the economic activity in other sectors, including manufacturing, tourism, international exports, hi-tech, forestry, agriculture, and construction. Information regarding interprovincial migration and population growth was included along with public finances. 16 figs

  7. The Saskatchewan-Alberta large acceptance detector for photonuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD) is a 4π detector designed and built for studies of photonuclear reactions with a tagged photon beam. The design and performance of the detector are described. Its characteristics have been studied by examining p-p elastic scattering with a proton beam at TRIUMF. (orig.)

  8. Issues and strategies for large power buyers in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D. [ENRON Canada Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    America's leading commodity risk management company, Enron has 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2000. It operates EnronOnline, the largest e-commerce site in the world. With some corporate profile information on Enron and Enron Canada and its involvement in the Alberta electricity market, the author proceeded to discuss risk management issues and program development. It was stated that Enron believes that future outcomes can be changed, and risk management is a dynamic and iterative process used as a tool to decrease uncertainty. The risk appetite is defined and electricity risks clarified, then a review of physical operation characteristics is conducted. The risk management program and policy are defined, as well as the controls and reporting. The tools and tactics are defined and one is now ready for the implementation phase. The next section was devoted to credit and contracting issues before moving to the Alberta electricity market fundamentals and pricing and some insight provided on questions such as import/export in Alberta, regulatory issues, prices in Alberta. The last section of the presentation touched on EnronOnline which is a free, Internet-based global transaction system where one can view real time prices. tabs., figs.

  9. Alberta Energy Minister swings to virtuoso of limited government

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, G.

    1997-05-01

    The views of the newly appointed energy minister of Alberta, Steven West (nicknamed Stevie Wonder) concerning the role of government in business and industry were discussed. Summed up, the minister believes that governments should confine themselves to co-ordinate services and programs that are more advantageously provided on a collective basis, i.e. health care, education, law and order, and safety and protection measures. Specifically, in the case of the Alberta energy industry, government`s role should be directed to foster an `Alberta advantage`, comprising minimal taxes to effect the services and infrastructure required, minimum regulations to protect the environment and the resource itself, maximize sustainability and the return on natural resources of the province to the people of Alberta. According to the minister, natural resources such as oil and gas are a public trust rather than private property. He also expressed his vision of the petroleum industry`s role not only as one of the `main pillars` of the economy, but also as the supplier of raw materials for a wider strategy of economic diversification for the province.

  10. Market making vs. market manipulation : an Alberta perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Stock Exchange's (ASE's) filing and disclosure requirements for market making and promotion contracts are outlined. The discussion focuses on the differences between market making and market manipulation, acceptable and unacceptable methods of market making and promotion and common trading and securities legislation violations associated with these types of activities

  11. Experimental Measurement and MCNP5 Model of the Gamma Dose Distribution in the University of Utah TRIGA Reactor Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma doses for the University of Utah TRIGA Reactor (UUTR) are estimated based on the MCNP5 model, and by measurements based on the thermo luminescent detectors (TLDs). In the experiment the gamma dose rate above the UUTR core was obtained by placing TLD-400s every 10 cm from the core top up to 150 cm measured from the surface of the UUTR core, and then every 50 cm up to 300 cm. The dose rate was also obtained at the pool surface level using a Ludlum model 19-survey meter. The measurements are obtained at a steady state thermal power of 90 kW. The MCNP5 model closely followed the experimental setup. The MCNP5 values of the dose immediately above the core were just under 30 percent difference compared to the measured values, which is within the TLD response of ± 30 percent. The TLD error is observed to remain fairly constant at around 5% of the mean. As the gamma dose approaches the lower limit for the TLDs (1 rem), the error rises almost exponentially reaching 80%. The difference between the simulated and measured gamma doses increases as the distance from the core increases. This difference at the surface of the UUTR pool is around 90 percent (the experimental gamma dose being 90% higher). The main source of the difference is due to statistical error of the MCNP5 calculation. The larger the size of the geometry, the more computational time is required to reduce the statistical error. Another source of error is the contribution of nitrogen-16 that is generated from (n, p) reaction with oxygen in the reactor pool water. The (n, p) reaction was not considered in our current MCNP5 model. Therefore, the MCNP5 model can be improved as follows: taking into account the fuel burn up that will correlate more accurately dose estimates near the surface of the pool due to the gamma emission from fission fragments, and taking into a consideration a production and transport of nitrogen-16 that will improve the dose estimates especially at the surface of the UUTR core. (author)

  12. Status report about the works for the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor at the Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After two years of works at the Cordoba National University for the new start-up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor, the results obtained are herein presented. Starting with practically null infrastructure at the beginning, specially in human resources and instrumentation of the reactor, the objectives can be considered satisfactory. The training in work of the future operational staff, the design and the construction of the instrumentation and the fitting of the installations are the principal items described in this paper. An special attention is devoted to the insertion of this type of installation in the university organization, usually not prepared for the quality and control activities, which is necessarily considered in these type of works. (Author)

  13. Economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the international media recognized Alberta's oil sands as part of the global oil reserves, thereby establishing Canada as second to Saudi Arabia as potential oil producing nations. The economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands industry on economies were assessed at regional, provincial and international levels for the 2000 to 2020 period. A customized input-output model was used to assess economic impacts, which were measured in terms of changes in gross domestic product; employment and labour income; and, government revenues. Cumulative impacts on employment by sector and by jurisdiction were also presented. An investment of $100 billion is expected through 2020, resulting in production of crude bitumen and synthetic crude oil outputs valued at about $531 billion. The impact of the oil sands industry on local employment was also evaluated. It was shown that activities in the oil sands industry will lead to significant economic impact in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the rest of Canada. Alberta's local economy would be the main beneficiary of oil sands activities with nearly 3.6 million person years employment created in Alberta during the 2000 to 2020. Another 3 million person years employment would be created in other Canadian provinces and outside Canada during the same time period. A sensitivity analysis on the responsiveness to oil prices and the removal of various constraints incorporated in the main analysis was also presented. The federal government will be the largest recipient of revenues generated to to oil sands activities. The results of the study were compared with that of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies. This first volume revealed the results of the study while the second volume includes the data and detailed results. 48 refs., 57 tabs., 28 figs

  14. Recent rubber crumb asphalt pavement projects in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleyman, H.R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Pulles, B.C.M.; Treleaven, L.B. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Several countries around the world have been using rubber crumb (RC) for pavement applications for more than 20 years. The performance of asphalt pavements is enhanced by the use of recycled tires, which has the added advantage of solving the problem of tire disposal. In 2002, the Tire Recycling Management Association of Alberta (TRMA) and Alberta Transportation (AT) evaluated the feasibility and performance of an overlay using asphalt rubber (AR) pavement in Alberta. A partnership in the project was formed by AT, the City of Calgary, the City of Edmonton, and Strathcona County, where each one paved one section of a road with AR in conjunction with a section using conventional or other asphalt mixture types. The roads selected were: (1) 112 Avenue North West in Calgary, (2) 17 Street and Baseline Road in Strathcona County, (3) 137 Avenue in Edmonton, and (4) highway 630 in the vicinity of North Cooking Lake (Alberta Transportation). Two different AR pavement thicknesses were used to study the effects of overlay thicknesses on the performance of the overlay. The structural and functional factors were monitored before, during and after the construction of all sections. The preliminary evaluation of the application of AR in Alberta was presented, along with a summary of test results and performances of AR pavement sections. A full freeze-thaw cycle is required (Spring 2003) before the results of the analysis of the testing are known. The reduced thickness AR sections performed in a similar manner to those with full thickness AC sections. 10 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs.

  15. The regulatory context of gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legislative and regulatory regime regarding gas flaring in Alberta was reviewed. The issue of gas flaring has received much attention from petroleum industry regulators in Alberta. Residents living in the vicinity of flares have identified them as sources of odour, smoke, noise and air quality-related health concerns. Sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide emissions from the flare stacks may contribute to acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The Strosher Report, released by the Alberta Research Council in 1996, has also identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other products of incomplete combustion. The public opposition to solution gas flaring has caused regulators to consider new options designed to reduce the adverse economic and environmental impacts that may be associated with gas flaring. This paper discusses the roles of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection in administering legislation that impacts on gas flaring. In March 1999, the EUB released a guide containing the following five major points regarding gas flaring: (1) implementation of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance's (CASA's) recommendations to eventually eliminate flaring, by starting immediately to reduce flaring, and improve the efficiency of flares, (2) adoption of the CASA schedule of reduction targets for solution gas flaring, (3) conducting a review of the current approval process for small-scale electrical generation systems to encourage co-generation as a productive use of solution gas that is being flared, (4) creating better public notification requirements for new and existing facilities, and (5) discussing conflict resolution between operators and landowners. 26 refs

  16. The Alberta electricity market : an analysis and price forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electric power industry in Alberta is undergoing major regulatory changes. The industry will have completed the move from regulated to competitive markets by the beginning of 2001, creating new risks for industry participants. This study was undertaken to develop a long-term price forecast for the Alberta electricity market. With open competition, market forces will drive the wholesale market. The first part of this report presents a historical review of the power industry in Alberta and provides an understanding of the basic economics of power markets. The second part is more analytical, examining the supply and demand issues of electricity. Historic peak demands were illustrated and a peak demand outlook was presented. The supply of electricity to Alberta was also examined in terms of the resources that provide the existing capacity, imports and proposed electric power projects. A confidential survey of independent power projects was conducted and the results were used to examine in detail any new and proposed projects. It was concluded that market prices in the next few years will depend on excess energy, new capacity additions, and the behaviour of market participants. Over the long term, prices in Alberta will fluctuate as the power market progresses through the different stages of the business cycle. Excess generating capacity relative to demand will lower prices, while tight capacity relative to demand will increase prices. On average, it is expected that prices will reflect the all-in costs of new incremental generating capacity. Wholesale prices will probably range between $40 and $50/MWh if gas-fired capacity remains the choice for new power generating facilities. 11 refs., 36 tabs., 44 figs

  17. A nuclear reactor for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years. In the northern hemisphere, many countries consume in excess of 25 percent of their primary energy supply for building heating. Satisfying this need, within the constraints now being acknowledged for sustainable global development, provides an important opportunity for district heating. Fuel-use flexibility, energy and resource conservation, and reduced atmospheric pollution from acid gases and greenhouse gases, are important features offered by district heating systems. Among the major fuel options, only hydro-electricity and nuclear heat completely avoid emissions of combustion gases. To fill the need for an economical nuclear heat source, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has designed a 10 MW plant that is suitable as a heat source within a network or as the main supply to large individual users. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees C, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on AECL's successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype for the commercial unit is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba. With capital costs of $7 million (Canadian), unit energy costs are projected to be $0.02/kWh for a 10 MW unit operating in a heating grid over a 30-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees C, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Research Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Docket No. 50-57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the State University of New York at Buffalo for a renewal of Operating License R-77 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the State University of New York and is located on the campus in Buffalo, New York. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  19. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  20. Innovations and enhancements in neutronic analysis of the Big-10 university research and training reactors based on the AGENT code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. This paper summarizes salient aspects of the 'virtual' reactor system developed at Purdue Univ. emphasizing efficient neutronic modeling through AGENT (Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport) a deterministic neutron transport code. DOE's Big-10 Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Consortium was launched in 2002 to enhance scholarship activities pertaining to university research and training reactors (URTRs). Existing and next generation URTRs are powerful campus tools for nuclear engineering as well as a number of disciplines that include, but are not limited to, medicine, biology, material science, and food science. Advancing new computational environments for the analysis and configuration of URTRs is an important Big-10 INIE aim. Specifically, Big-10 INIE has pursued development of a 'virtual' reactor, an advanced computational environment to serve as a platform on which to build operations, utilization (research and education), and systemic analysis of URTRs physics. The 'virtual' reactor computational system will integrate computational tools addressing the URTR core and near core physics (transport, dynamics, fuel management and fuel configuration); thermal-hydraulics; beam line, in-core and near-core experiments; instrumentation and controls; confinement/containment and security issues. Such integrated computational environment does not currently exist. The 'virtual' reactor is designed to allow researchers and educators to configure and analyze their systems to optimize experiments, fuel locations for flux shaping, as well as detector selection and configuration. (authors)

  1. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  2. Asthma-related productivity losses in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen X Thanh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nguyen X Thanh, Arto Ohinmaa, Charles YanInstitute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaObjectives: To estimate the number and cost of asthma-related productivity loss days due to absenteeism and presenteeism (at work but not fully functioning in Alberta in 2005.Methods: Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study focused on people of working age (18–64 years, who reported having an asthma diagnosis. Total asthma-related disability days, including in-bed days and activity-restricted days, were estimated by multiplying the difference in the means of total disability days between asthmatics and nonasthmatics adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and other health conditions by a multiple linear regression, with the number of asthmatics in the population. Number of productivity loss days was a sum between the number of in-bed days (absenteeism and the number of activity-restricted days multiplied by a reduction in functional level (presenteeism, adjusted for five working days per week. Other data from Alberta or Canadian published literature, such as a reduction in functional level of 20%–30%, a labor participation rate of 73%, and an average wage of $158 per day in 2005, were also used for analyses.Results: The prevalence of asthma was estimated at 8.5% among approximately 2.1 million people of working age in Alberta in 2005. The difference in the means of total disability days between asthmatics and nonasthmatics was 0.487 (95% CI: 0.286–0.688 in a period of two weeks or 12.7 (7.5–17.9 in one year. With the reduction in functional level of 20%–30%, the number of asthma-related productivity loss days was estimated from 442 (259–624 to 533 (313–753 thousand, respectively. The corresponding cost was from $70 ($41–$99 to $84 ($49–$119 million. Of these, the presenteeism accounted for 42% to 52%.Conclusions: The results suggest that an improvement in the controlling of asthma could have a

  3. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help

  4. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  5. Neutronics calculation of an heterogeneous compact and thermal core by means of deterministic and stochastic transport theory. Application to the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to create, validate theoretically and experimentally a calculation route for a thermal irradiation reactor. This is the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg, which presents all of characteristics of this reactor-type: compact and heterogeneous core, slab-type fuel with a high 235-uranium enrichment. This calculation route is based on the first use of the following two modern transport methods: the TDT method and the Monte Carlo method. The former, programmed within the APOLLO2 code, is a two dimensional collision probabilities method. The later, used by the TRIPOLI4 code, is a stochastic method. Both can be applied to complex geometries. After a few theoretical reminders about transport codes, a set of integral experiments is described which have been realized within the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg. One of them has been performed for this study. At the beginning of the theoretical part, significant errors are apparent due to the use of calculation route based on homogenization, condensation and the diffusion approximation. An extensive comparison between the discrete ordinates method and the TDT method carries out that the use of the TDT method is relevant for the studied reactor. The treatment of axial leakage with this method is the only disadvantage. Therefore, the use of the code TRIPOLI4 is recommended for a more accurate study of leakage within a reflector. By means of the experimental data, the ability of our calculation route is confirmed for essential neutronics questions such as the critical mass determination, the power distribution and the fuel management. (author)

  6. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization; Dante en Alberta: chroniques d'une civilisation droguee au petrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Belkaid

    2010-07-01

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  7. Proceedings of the 8. annual conference of the Independent Power Producers' Society of Alberta : Alberta's electricity market : best in the class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference provided a forum for participants in North America's electric power industry to share their perspectives regarding the deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta and the impacts felt by consumers and power producers. Events that led to deregulation were reviewed. Many papers dealt with the development of power generation and power transmission projects, wholesale and retail pricing, features of the Alberta power pool, and the impact of increased competition. The conference was divided into seven sessions entitled: (1) Alberta's electricity market in 2011, (2) the evolving role of the balancing pool, (3) the north and south of transmission issues, (4) project development in Alberta, (5) evolution of customer choice, (6) Alberta's electricity retailers, and (7) wholesale markets and prices. More than 30 presentations were presented at the conference, of which 10 have been indexed separately for inclusion in the database. tabs., figs

  8. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These fifteen papers were presented by students in nuclear engineering from the Universities of Toronto and Manitoba, the Royal Military College, Ecole Polytechnique, McMaster University, and Trent University. They cover the areas of CANDU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE reactor systems and fuel, applied nucleonics, and simulation theory and thermalhydraulics. (L.L.)

  9. Geothermal gradients in the steen river area of Northwestern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. W.; Lam, H. L.

    1984-03-01

    A total of 6540 bottom-hole temperature values from 1879 petroleum exploration wells in northwestern Alberta in the region 57°N-60°N and 114°W-120°W have been used to estimate temperature gradients there. A thermal gradient contour map constructed for the region shows a number of local high geothermal gradient areas. Comparison with available aeromagnetic and gravity maps indicates that a high geothermal gradient near Steen River is probably associated with an igneous intrusion and that nearby high geothermal gradient areas may be due to the transport of heat away from the basement by upward and lateral water motion. Also, it is noted that, in this region of Alberta, oil field locations appear to coincide with areas of low geothermal gradient, whereas gas fields appear to coincide with high geothermal gradients.

  10. Proceedings of the 44. annual Alberta Soil Science Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Soil Science Workshop is held annually in order to provide a forum for the discussion of issues related to soil sciences in Alberta. Attendees at the conference discussed a wide range of subjects related to soil sciences and measuring the environmental impacts of oil and gas activities in the province. The role of soil science in sustainable forest management was also examined. Issues related to acid deposition were reviewed, and recent developments in soil chemistry analysis for agricultural practices were discussed. Other topics included wildland soil analysis methods; the long-term impacts of sulphate deposition from industrial activities; and water chemistry in soils, lakes and river in the Boreal regions. Projects initiated to assess cumulative land use impacts on rangeland ecosystems were outlined along with a review of tools developed to optimize soil analysis techniques. One of the 46 presentations featured at this conference has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Management of routine solution gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta's Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) shares decision-making responsibilities with the Government of Alberta for strategic aspects of air quality. In 1997, the Alliance established the Flaring Project Team to develop recommendations that address potential and observed impacts associated with flaring, with particular focus on 'upstream solution gas' flaring. The upstream industry explores for, acquires, develops, produces and markets crude oil and natural gas. Essentially, solution gas at upstream sites is 'co-produced' during crude oil production. The project team was established to collect and summarize information on flaring and its impacts and to develop recommendations for short-term actions to minimize the practice of routine flaring of solution gas. Another goal of the team is to develop a research strategy to better understand flaring emissions and their effects on human, animal and environmental health. The team is working on developing long-term strategies for actions to address the gas flaring issue. 5 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  12. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  13. Transportation of radioactive materials from TRIGA reactors - operational considerations and regulatory problems: The situation at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General information regarding transportation of radioactive materials is presented with the idea that not everyone in our audience is fully conversant with the complexities and impact of current transportation requirements. Certain considerations and problems associated with OSU's program for the transportation of radioactive materials are briefly described. The roundtable discussion entitled: 'Transportation of Radioactive Materials from TRIGA Reactors - Operational Considerations and Regulatory Problems', at the Sixth TRIGA Owner's Conference, Corvallis, Oregon, February 27 to March 1, 1978 is attached

  14. Biodiversity offsets and caribou conservation in Alberta: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Christine B. Robichaud; Knopff, Kyle H.

    2015-01-01

    The federal recovery strategy for boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) sets a goal of self-sustaining populations for all caribou ranges across Canada. All caribou herds in Alberta are currently designated as not self-sustaining and the recovery strategy requires an action plan to achieve self-sustaining status. At the same time, continued natural resource extraction in caribou ranges may be worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Some regulatory bodies have recognized an opport...

  15. School Grades: Identifying Alberta's Best Schools, an Update

    OpenAIRE

    David Johnson

    2010-01-01

    This study compares student outcomes at Alberta elementary schools where students come from similar socio-economic backgrounds, thus revealing “good” schools where principals, teachers and staff are making a positive difference in student performance. The study screens out the influence of socio-economic factors on how a school’s students perform on Alberta’s Provincial Achievement Tests for grades 3, 6 and 9. This identifies those schools that perform better or worse than other schools with ...

  16. Nutrition Education Practices and Opinions of Alberta Family Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, S. Ann; Joffres, Michel R

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 532 members of the Alberta Chapter of the College of Family Physicians in order to assess the role of physicians in providing nutrition education to their patients. Of the 255 respondents (53% response rate), over 97% agreed that “educating patients about nutrition is an important role for physicians.” Physicians most often gave nutrition information on obesity, constipation, heart disease and hypertension, alcohol, coffee, infant feeding, oste...

  17. Public health preparedness in Alberta: a systems-level study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noseworthy Tom

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent international and national events have brought critical attention to the Canadian public health system and how prepared the system is to respond to various types of contemporary public health threats. This article describes the study design and methods being used to conduct a systems-level analysis of public health preparedness in the province of Alberta, Canada. The project is being funded under the Health Research Fund, Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research. Methods/Design We use an embedded, multiple-case study design, integrating qualitative and quantitative methods to measure empirically the degree of inter-organizational coordination existing among public health agencies in Alberta, Canada. We situate our measures of inter-organizational network ties within a systems-level framework to assess the relative influence of inter-organizational ties, individual organizational attributes, and institutional environmental features on public health preparedness. The relative contribution of each component is examined for two potential public health threats: pandemic influenza and West Nile virus. Discussion The organizational dimensions of public health preparedness depend on a complex mix of individual organizational characteristics, inter-agency relationships, and institutional environmental factors. Our study is designed to discriminate among these different system components and assess the independent influence of each on the other, as well as the overall level of public health preparedness in Alberta. While all agree that competent organizations and functioning networks are important components of public health preparedness, this study is one of the first to use formal network analysis to study the role of inter-agency networks in the development of prepared public health systems.

  18. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome: Report of Four Alberta Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ameeta E; Werker, Denise H; Boychuk, Lesia R; Miedzinski, Lilly J

    1995-01-01

    Four Alberta cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome are reported. Three cases required intensive care, with one experiencing a fulminant course resulting in death. A fourth case with milder illness was identified after epidemiological investigations. Ribavirin was used in one patient who experienced a successful outcome. A recent open label trial has not supported the efficacy of this drug. The epidemiology of Peromyscus maniculatus, the primary rodent host, and the clinical features of this ...

  19. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitz Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much more pronounced at higher power levels with vortex shedding also occurring. A departure from nucleate boiling analysis showed that while nucleate boiling begins near 210 kW it remains in this state and does not approach the critical heat flux at powers up to 500 kW. Based on these studies, two upgrades are proposed for extended operation and possibly higher reactor power level. Together with the findings from Part I studies, we conclude that increase of the reactor power is highly feasible yet dependable on its purpose and associated investments.

  20. Measurements and calculations for determination the activity inventory and dose rates of the TRIGA Reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation to dismantle the TRIGA reactor of the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) samples were taken from a graphite element (graphite), the reactor tank (aluminum), the top grid plate (aluminum), a screw in the top grid plate (stainless steel) and the biological shield (baryt concrete and reinforcement irons). The chemical and radiological analyses of the samples were carried out at VKTA Rossendorf and MHH. To establish the radiological condition of the facility in detail the activation and dose rates of components in the reactor tank and the biological shield were measured and calculated. The calculations were done by the Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) on the basis of the density of the neutron flux at the location of its installation, the composition of its materials and the power history of the TRIGA reactor. The neutron flux was calculated by means of a two dimensional (2D) neutron transport model (DORT) for the symmetrical parts and the three dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo calculations for non-symmetrical locations. The application ORIGEN-2 was used for calculating the specific activities and dose rates. (author)

  1. Imports, exports, and Alberta's transmission system impact on price fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles, responsibilities and objectives of ESBI, a private for-profit company, appointed by the Alberta Government to be the Independent Transmission Administrator in the province, is sketched, prior to a discussion of price volatility in electricity, Alberta interconnections, intertie issues, the economic theory and the reality impact on prices. Given that imports and exports constitute a relatively small proportion of total generation or load in Alberta, price volatility is considered to have been only minimally affected by imports/exports. In contrast, transmission constraints, i.e. the limits on physical capacity of the existing transmission system to accommodate all desired transactions, have significant impact on imports/exports. Factors underlying constraints and price volatility such as uncertainty of generation dispatch, leading to reduced interest to invest, which in turn leads to scarce capacity for imports/exports, and the actions required to reduce uncertainty and address other issues such as congestion management, tariff design and the creation of regional transmission organizations, are also discussed to provide further clarification of the issues. It is suggested that these and other related issues need to be resolved to provide the clarity around transmission access and the tools required to manage price fluctuations

  2. Biodiversity offsets and caribou conservation in Alberta: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine B. Robichaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal recovery strategy for boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou sets a goal of self-sustaining populations for all caribou ranges across Canada. All caribou herds in Alberta are currently designated as not self-sustaining and the recovery strategy requires an action plan to achieve self-sustaining status. At the same time, continued natural resource extraction in caribou ranges may be worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Some regulatory bodies have recognized an opportunity for biodiversity offsets to help meet the caribou recovery strategy’s goals while still permitting economic benefits of development. In this review, we evaluate offset opportunities for caribou in Alberta and practical impediments for implementation. We conclude that a number of actions to offset impacts of development and achieve no net loss or net positive impact for caribou are theoretically feasible (i.e., if implemented they should work, including habitat restoration and manipulations of the large mammal predator-prey system. However, implementation challenges are substantial and include a lack of mechanisms for setting aside some resources for long periods of time, public opposition to predator control, and uncertainty associated with loss-gain calculations. A framework and related policy for offsets are currently lacking in Alberta and their development is urgently needed to guide successful design and implementation of offsets for caribou.

  3. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig

  4. CBM resource potential in the Plains area of Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical and economic assessment of the coalbed methane potential of the Plains area of Alberta was estimated in response to the National Energy Board's forecast that unconventional gas will be required to meet Canadian demand by the year 2008 and that unconventional gas could constitute up to 65 per cent of supply by 2025. The estimate based on coal depth and thickness and the potential for development stands at 187 Tcf of gas-in-place for the main prospective coal horizons of Cretaceous to Early Tertiary. These parameters and technical constraints to assess the magnitude of the potential developable coalbed methane resource were input into a reservoir simulation model to develop gas and water production forecasts. These forecasts, combined with finding and development costs estimates, the resource distribution and an acceptable rate of return on investment were included in the model to develop a coalbed methane cost supply curve for future coalbed methane development, and to provide some insight into the gas prices that will be required to meet the National Energy Board's projected supply deficiency. The result is a cost supply curve indicating that at a constant price of $ 2.50 per Mcf, approximately 10 Tcf of coalbed methane gas reserve potential could be developed. With constant price of $ 3.00 per Mcf, the potential for the Alberta Plains increases to 15 Tcf. Similar reserve potential is indicated for the Alberta Foothills and British Columbia. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  5. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta's energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB's position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board's efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs

  6. Project SKEG : re-establishing peatlands in Alberta boreal forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, C. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-04-01

    Scientific protocols for oil and gas remediation projects in the peatlands region of Alberta's boreal forests were discussed. Peatlands in Alberta occupy an estimated 103,000 km{sup 2} of the province, and act as water storage reservoirs in addition to filtering precipitation as its moves into groundwater. While providing a habitat for a variety of animals, peatlands are a significant carbon sink. The gravel roads and well site pads placed in Alberta's peatlands are having an impact on the peatland ecosystem, and in some cases oil and gas activities have reduced the carbon sink capacity of peatlands by 50 per cent. This paper provided details of a project planned by Shell Canada to reclaim peatlands disturbed by oil and gas activities. The project aimed to re-establish major species after a period of 3 years while establishing a ground layer mat over a period of 10 years with peatland flora similar to its surroundings. Optimal levels of the well pads will be identified, and pH level and water flow into the pad will be monitored and controlled. Appropriate plants will be selected for the paludifying reclamation process. Amendments for enhancing the plant establishment and organic matter accumulation will also be investigated. It was concluded that the project is expected to take place in 2008. 1 fig.

  7. CO2 in Alberta - a vision of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential to develop a province-wide infrastructure for carbon dioxide (CO2) collection and transmission was discussed. The petroleum industry's original interest in CO2 was its potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) for Alberta's depleted oil fields. However, new interest has stemmed from its perceived role in global climate change and the potentially negative business and economic implications of emitting CO2 into the atmosphere. It was suggested that the development of a province wide infrastructure to collect CO2 would address both interests. A simple screening of the reservoirs was carried out to determine if Alberta has the right oil reservoirs and sufficient CO2 supplies to support a large-scale CO2 infrastructure. The proposed infrastructure would consist of CO2 supplies from electrical power generation plants, CO2 trunklines, feeder pipelines to deliver CO2 from the trunklines to the field and the oil reservoirs where the CO2 would be injected. Such infrastructures already exist in Texas and Mexico where more than 1 billion scf per day of CO2 is used for EOR. This study compared the factors leading to a large-scale CO2 industry with factors in place during the 1970s and 1980s, when most of the hydrocarbon miscible floods were initiated in Alberta. It was concluded that the preliminary economics suggest that the concept has merit. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  8. Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2006 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (30th, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Jun 3-7, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  9. Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis in Alberta: Two years of experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lilley, Margaret; Christian, Susan; Hume, Stacey; Scott, Patrick; Montgomery, Mark; Semple, Lisa; Zuberbuhler, Peter; Tabak, Joan; Bamforth, Fiona; Somerville, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    On April 1, 2007, Alberta became the first province in Canada to introduce cystic fibrosis (CF) to its newborn screening program. The Alberta protocol involves a two-tier algorithm involving an immunoreactive trypsinogen measurement followed by molecular analysis using a CF panel for 39 mutations. Positive screens are followed up with sweat chloride testing and an assessment by a CF specialist. Of the 99,408 newborns screened in Alberta during the first two years of the program, 221 had a pos...

  10. Conversion and Evaluation of the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor From High-Enriched To Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for converting the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel began in 1988. Several years of design reviews, computational modeling, and thermal hydraulic analyses resulted in a preliminary reference core design and configuration based on 20 standard, MTR-type, flat-plate, 19.75% enriched, uranium silicide (u3Si2) fuel elements. A final safety analysis for the fuel conversion was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1993. The NRC made two additional requests for additional information and supplements were submitted in 1994 and 1997. The new UMLRR Reactor Supervisor initiated an effort to change the LEU reference core configuration to eliminate a complicated control rod modification needed for the smaller core

  11. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.;

    2010-01-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative...... neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC...... simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also speculate on sensitizing alanine to thermal neutrons by adding boron compounds....

  12. Materials chemical compatibility for the fabrication of small inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous nuclear fuels offer a unique set of characteristics for homogeneous reactor nuclear applications. Their advantages include high nuclear stability and inherent safety, high power density, high burn-up, simple preparation and reprocessing, easy fuel handling, high neutron economy, and simple control system leading to simple mechanical designs. The major disadvantages are corrosion, limited uranium concentration, and radiation decomposition of water. Likewise, organic coolants offer certain properties that are conducive for small reactor applications. These include reduced corrosion and activation, and low vapour pressures with good heat-transfer capabilities. Their major disadvantages are decomposition, fouling and flammability. A particular organic coolant, HB-40, has been extensively studied in Canada and was used for nineteen years in the 60-MWt organic-cooled WR-1 reactor at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE) of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry in the nineteen years of operation in the WR-1 reactor kept the coolant aspects related to decomposition, fouling and flammability to acceptable levels. For small reactor applications, organic coolants are potentially superior to heavy water in terms of overall cost. The purpose of this thesis work was, through a literature review, to select the most suitable aqueous fuel and materials of construction for two proposed small inherently safe reactors, the QH-1 reactor and the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor under design at the Royal Military College of Canada.

  13. Woodland caribou management in Alberta: historical perspectives and future opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston H. Dzus

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou conservation has been the topic of much debate for the past few decades. By the late 1970s there was growing concern about declining woodland caribou populations and the interaction between industrial activities and woodland caribou. Initial concerns led to the closure of the licensed hunting season in 1981. Early confrontation between government and industry in the late 1980s transformed into a series of evolving collaborative ventures. Improving our understanding of the basic ecology of woodland caribou in Alberta was at the center of early research efforts; more recent studies have examined the effects of industrial activities on caribou and effectiveness of various mitigation factors. Despite having amassed an impressive body of information from a research and monitoring perspective, progress on implementing effective management actions has been less dramatic. Industry has endured significant costs implementing a variety of perceived conservation initiatives, but caribou populations continued to decline through the last few decades. While some parties feel more research is needed, there is growing consensus that changes to habitat as induced by human activities are important factors influencing current caribou declines. Predation is a proximate cause of most caribou mortality. Climate change mediated alterations to habitat and predator-prey interactions remain a key source of uncertainty relative to future caribou population trends. Management actions will need to deal with long term habitat changes associated with human land use and short term implications of increased predation. In 2005, the provincial minister responsible for caribou conservation responded to the draft 2004 recovery plan and created the Alberta Caribou Committee (ACC. The goal of the ACC is to maintain and recover woodland caribou in Alberta’s forest ecosystems while providing opportunities for resource development, following guidance provided by the

  14. Advantage or illusion: is Alberta's progress sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anielski, M. [Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2001-08-01

    A new indicator of economic and environmental well-being, the Genuine Progress Indicators, of GPI, is discussed as part of an attempt to gauge the state of health of Alberta's economy, and to establish whether the tremendous apparent economic progress made by the province in recent decades is real or illusory. The GPI, an accounting system by which nations can measure real progress and real wealth, was developed by the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development of Alberta. It combines 51 indicators of economic, social and environmental measures, and is consistent with international efforts to find new measures of well-being and human development. Based on a study using the GPI system, real disposable income of Albertans was 5.5 per cent lower in 1999 than in 1982, despite a 36.3 per cent rise in Alberta's GDP per capita. This finding suggests that not all people are sharing in the the economic good times. Personal and household debt has also risen substantially and now exceeds real disposable income for the first time in history. Ability to save has been squeezed, resulting in protracted decline in personal savings, while Albertans pay 500 per cent more taxes in real dollars since 1961. Social and human health indicators highlight signs of social stress, such as rising levels of divorce, problem gambling and falling voter participation. Other indicators raise concerns about the condition of Alberta's natural capital, such as forests, agricultural soils, air and water quality, fish, wildlife and protected areas. Environmental GPIs show that Albertans have the fourth-highest ecological footprint in the world, exceeded only by the Arab Emirates, Singapore and the United States. The bigger the footprint the more is someone else on the planet shortchanged. The Pembina Institute report concludes that the development of Alberta's fossil fuel energy resources has come with a tremendous ecological price tag. It also shows that conventional crude oil

  15. The thermal column. A new irradiation position for fission-track dating in the University of Pavia Triga Mark II nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper a new irradiation position arranged for fission-track dating in the Triga Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia is described. Fluence values determined using the NIST glass standard SRM 962a for fission-track dating and the traditional metal foils are compared. Relatively high neutron thermalization (cadmium ratio of 85.3 for gold and 643 for cobalt) and lack of significant fluence spatial gradients are very favorable factors for fission-track dating. Finally, international age standards (or putative age standards) irradiated in this new position yielded results consistent with independent reference ages. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Study on remodeling the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University reactor for neutron capture therapy from the concept of neutron energy spectrum control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1988, there was heavy water leakage from the thermocouple guide pipe of the heavy water tank adjacent to the core of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The need for a fundamental reexamination of the Heavy Water Thermal Neutron Facility (HWTNF) has been recognized since the guide pipe was repaired. Clinical irradiation was restarted in February 1990, and as of September 1, 1992, 24 clinical treatments had been carried out. Some improvements for the clinical treatment have been requested by clinicians and other users, especially the ability to use the facility while the reactor is in continuous operations. From the viewpoints of reactor engineering and medical physics, there are four goals for remodeling the present HWTNF: (1) to simplify and secure maintenance, overhaul, and repair, (2) to enable the facility to be used during continuous operation of the KUR, (3) to improve the performances of the irradiation field of thermal neutrons for biomedical uses, and (4) to control neutron energy spectrum. In this paper, an outline for the redesign of the facility is reported

  17. Utilization of MIT research reactor by Boston-area universities. Final report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guest institutions which used the MITR reactor during 1978-1979 are listed. The participation during previous years since the program began at MIT is also indicated. A summary of the type and amount of participation by local institutions is given

  18. Potential for enhanced geothermal systems in Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The province of Alberta has a high demand of thermal energy for both industrial and residential applications. Currently, the vast majority of the heat used in these applications is obtained by burning natural gas. Geothermal energy production from deep aquifer systems in the sedimentary basin could provide an alternative sustainable source of heat that would significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To date there has been no geothermal field development in Alberta because the average geothermal gradient was considered to be too low for economic geothermal energy generation. However, with new technologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), it may be possible to develop geothermal resources from the sedimentary rocks in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). A numerical feasibility study based on a regional geological model and existing and newly gained data was conducted to identify scenarios for geothermal energy production in the region. In central Alberta, three Devonian carbonate formations (Cooking Lake, Nisku, Wabamun) and the Cambrian Basal Sandstone Unit were identified as the highest geothermal potential zones. Thermal-hydraulic reservoir simulations for a 5 km × 5 km site in the city of Edmonton were performed to evaluate reservoir development concepts for these four potential target formations; therefore, hydraulic fracturing treatments were also simulated. Different utilization concepts are presented for possible applications of geothermal energy generation in residential, industrial and agricultural areas. The Cooking Lake formation and the Basal Sandstone Unit are potentially the most promising reservoirs because the most heat can be extracted and the applications for the heat are widespread although the costs are higher than utilizing the shallower formations. Reservoir stimulation considerably improves the economics in all formations

  19. Maintaining the Momentum. Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    Alberta's apprenticeship system offers training in 50 designated trades and 4 designated occupations and includes 40,398 registered apprentices and 11,1984 employers. The main components of Alberta's apprenticeship and training system are as follows: (1) a network of local and provincial apprenticeship committees in the designated occupations; (2)…

  20. Recommendations and final report on the Alberta transmission administrator function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1995, the Electric Utilities Act (EUA) was passed formalizing the Alberta government's policy of electric industry restructuring. The Act established two new important market entities: a power pool and a transmission administrator (TA). Combined, these two entities create the open access required to enable competition in generation. Functionally, the TA acts as a single transmission service agent for all transmission wire owners. The TA leases the wires from owners then provides a province-wide tariff schedule for transmission services to recover the required revenue. Customers can only purchase transmission service from the TA. Both the lease wire cost and the TA tariff schedule must be approved by the regulator

  1. Alberta's economic development of the Athabasca oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Michael

    This dissertation examines the 61-year evolution of public policies pertaining to development of Alberta's non-conventional source of crude oil. The Athabasca oil sands contain an estimated 1.5 trillion barrels and provide for a safe continental supply. The Provincial Government first sponsored this undertaking in 1943. The period from then to 1971 was one of a transition from a wheat economy to a natural-resource economic base. A stable government emerged and was able to negotiate viable development policies. A second period, 1971 to 1986, was marked by unstable world conditions that afforded the Alberta government the ability to set terms of development with multi-national oil firms. A 50% profit-sharing plan was implemented, and basic 1973 terms lasted until 1996. However, 1986 was a critical year because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) reduced prices, causing the Alberta economy to lapse into recession. During a third period, 1986 to 1996, the Alberta Government was unable to adapt quickly to world conditions. A new leadership structure in 1996 made major changes to create ongoing fiscal and development policies. That history provides answers to two primary research questions: How do public policies affect the behaviors of the modern corporation and visa versa? What are the implications for development theory? Two sources of information were used for this study. First, it was possible to review the Premier's files located in the Provincial Archives. Materials from various government libraries were also examined. Some 7,000 documents were used to show the evolution of government policymaking. Second, interviews with leaders of oil companies and federal research facilities were important. Findings support the thesis that, to facilitate oil sands development, government and the private sector have closely collaborated. In particular, revenue policies have allowed for effective R&D organization. Relying on intensive technological

  2. Le Canada au miroir de l’Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Boily, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    L’exploitation du pétrole des sables bitumineux, qui s’est intensifiée depuis quelques années dans le nord de la province albertaine, a amené le premier ministre Stephen Harper à décrire le Canada comme étant une « super puissance énergétique » en émergence. Cet article se propose de montrer comment la province de l’Alberta est devenue, en raison des impacts environnementaux ainsi que ceux sur les populations autochtones, l’enjeu principal quant à l’image, plus souvent négative que positive, ...

  3. Proceedings of the buying and pricing power in Alberta 2001 conference : making informed decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changing landscape of energy pricing and buying in Alberta provided the impetus for this conference, where a wide range of topics were covered. The presenters reflected on the importance of having comprehensive information in order to make a decision in this field. The eleven speakers represented power distribution companies and discussed: the new challenges in buying and selling power in Alberta; the evolving electricity market managing and energy portfolio; pricing of power in the new market; the impact on industrial/commercial customers; allocation of risk in power purchase agreements; paying for the transmission system; marketing under the changing rules of the game; forward markets in Alberta; new product and service offerings; alternatives to the grid: distributed generation, energy strategies; uncertainty and opportunity in Alberta's deregulated market, load allocation and financial settlement. The conference was an opportunity for all interested parties to exchange views and ideas pertaining to the marketing and the pricing of energy in Alberta. refs., tabs., figs

  4. Cooling and radiation features after modification of low temperature at the Kyoto University reactor (KUR-LTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As KUR-LTL was carried out a renewal of helium gas freezer and compressor on 1974 fiscal year among 30 years since its construction on 1967 fiscal year, its irradiation duct (cryostat portion) has been continued to use at its first state. However, the duct mounted at proximity of the reactor core portion was formed some deterioration in its strength because of its laying under much amounts of neutron beam irradiation, especially even some phenomena such as deterioration of cooling feature, vacuum deterioration at heat insulation vacuum layer, and so forth. Then, a modification of the LTL was decided to carry out on 1998 fiscal year at a part of a fire years program on research reactor preparation of the Research Reactor Institute. Through this modification, it was planned to approach to users' needs as much as possible by making radiation temperature possible to cool nearly to 10 K from conventional about 20 K, and by upgrading high speed neutron flux to more than 1.3 times. Here were described on outlines of the modification and on cooling and radiation features after the modification. (G.K.)

  5. Did you know? Petroleum industry fast facts: Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part of a series of brochures published by the Petroleum Communication Foundation, a non-profit society established in 1975. The foundation's objective is to stimulate public awareness and understanding of Canada's petroleum industry and its contribution to the economy of each of the provinces where the industry's presence and impact is substantial. This brochure provides brief, but useful, information about Alberta, about its area (661,190 sq.km), capital (Edmonton), population (2.914,918 in 1998) major industries (petroleum and mining, chemical products, agriculture, food, manufacturing, construction), revenue from natural resources (an estimated $ 3.4 billion from oil and natural gas in 1999-2000, or about 15 per cent of total government revenues), some facts about the petroleum industry in Alberta, (production, employment, pipelines, etc.), major exports (petroleum and natural gas, manufactured goods, primary agricultural products, chemicals and chemical products), and upstream industry expenditures in the province (about $ 12 billion in 1998). map, pie-chart, figs

  6. Sage-grouse habitat selection during winter in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J.; Aldridge, C.; Boyce, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are dependent on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) for food and shelter during winter, yet few studies have assessed winter habitat selection, particularly at scales applicable to conservation planning. Small changes to availability of winter habitats have caused drastic reductions in some sage-grouse populations. We modeled winter habitat selection by sage-grouse in Alberta, Canada, by using a resource selection function. Our purpose was to 1) generate a robust winter habitat-selection model for Alberta sage-grouse; 2) spatially depict habitat suitability in a Geographic Information System to identify areas with a high probability of selection and thus, conservation importance; and 3) assess the relative influence of human development, including oil and gas wells, in landscape models of winter habitat selection. Terrain and vegetation characteristics, sagebrush cover, anthropogenic landscape features, and energy development were important in top Akaike's Information Criterionselected models. During winter, sage-grouse selected dense sagebrush cover and homogenous less rugged areas, and avoided energy development and 2-track truck trails. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development highlights the need for comprehensive management strategies that maintain suitable habitats across all seasons. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  7. Improving the competitiveness of Alberta's retail electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navigant Consulting Limited (Navigant) was commissioned by Alberta Energy to provide an independent review of the issues and recommendations contained in the Report of the Retail Issues Subcommittee, published in September 2001, on the Alberta Retail Electricity Markets. It was also asked to identify and other significant issues, and making recommendations pertaining to the issues. The principles of a well-functioning retail market followed an introduction to the document. A definition of a competitive market, according to that used by the Retail Issues Subcommittee (RIS) was provided, and a discussion of each of the elements of such a market was included. Highlights from the United Kingdom retail electricity market were provided. A detailed discussion of each of the major issues identified in the RIS report was presented, and recommendations on each topic areas from the RIS report included. The expected impact of the recommendations was explored. A summary of the recommendations and implementation considerations was provided in the last section of the document. tabs., figs

  8. The need for a marketing strategy for Alberta bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 15 years, government and industry have invested heavily in research and development of new technology for extracting bitumen from the Alberta oil sands. The results have been a dramatic increase in the fraction of oil sands deposits that could be economically exploited and a drop in production costs. However, no rapid increase in bitumen recovery has been achieved and most new bitumen production projects have been postponed or cancelled. This is the result of very variable prices for bitumen and the inadequacy of a marketing strategy which relies on the sale of raw bitumen. Options such as transport of bitumen to southern markets are limited by the need to reduce bitumen viscosity for pipelining and by the limited market for emulsified or diluted bitumen. Another possible strategy, conversion of the bitumen to synthetic crude oil, is limited by high costs, product characteristics (too much diesel and not enough gasoline), and a market limited to specialized refineries. A third strategy is to convert and refine bitumen to transportation fuels in Alberta, using inexpensive local natural gas, and transporting the products through existing pipeline facilities. 3 figs

  9. Atomic solution? The nuclear option is again touted for Alberta's oilsands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As early as the 1950s, nuclear blasts were considered as a potential way to unlock the huge potential contained in northern Alberta's tarsands deposits. A plan, which came close to receiving government sanction, was devised to detonate an atomic device underground to melt the bitumen. Today, public reaction would not permit any revival of such a plan, but a less explosive, modern-day solution is being considered. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) is promoting a new medium-sized nuclear reactor called the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) for use in the oilsands industry. AECL recently commissioned a$35,000 study into the economics of atomic energy compared to natural gas to produce large amounts of steam that is needed to separate oil from the sand. Preliminary results suggest that nuclear power may be a viable option for oilsand extraction, requiring much less energy than the currently used steam assisted gravity drainage process (SAGD). In addition, nuclear power could solve the problem of projected greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike natural gas-fired cogeneration facilities , nuclear energy does not emit GHGs. The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is examining the economics of nuclear energy for oilsand extraction. AECL claims the ACR-700 is competitive with the best-advanced gas-fired technology based on projections for 2010 and beyond. It will also move to light water from heavy water cooling by using slightly enriched uranium, thereby extending fuel life and reducing operating costs. Public perception, however, may be the biggest challenge. Opponents argue that storage and disposal of spent fuel rods still needs to be addressed. (author)

  10. Atomic solution? The nuclear option is again touted for Alberta's oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2003-03-01

    As early as the 1950s, nuclear blasts were considered as a potential way to unlock the huge potential contained in northern Alberta's tarsands deposits. A plan, which came close to receiving government sanction, was devised to detonate an atomic device underground to melt the bitumen. Today, public reaction would not permit any revival of such a plan, but a less explosive, modern-day solution is being considered. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is promoting a new medium-sized nuclear reactor called the Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) for use in the oilsands industry. AECL recently commissioned a $35,000 study into the economics of atomic energy compared to natural gas to produce large amounts of steam that is needed to separate oil from the sand. Preliminary results suggest that nuclear power may be a viable option for oilsand extraction, requiring much less energy than the currently used steam assisted gravity drainage process (SAGD). In addition, nuclear power could solve the problem of projected greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike natural gas-fired cogeneration facilities, nuclear energy does not emit GHGs. The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is examining the economics of nuclear energy for oilsand extraction. AECL claims the ACR-700 is competitive with the best-advanced gas-fired technology based on projections for 2010 and beyond. It will also move to light water from heavy water cooling by using slightly enriched uranium, thereby extending fuel life and reducing operating costs. Public perception, however, may be the biggest challenge. Opponents argue that storage and disposal of spent fuel rods still needs to be addressed. 1 fig.

  11. Alberta Oil Sands Equity annual report, 1992-93. Partnership and progress in Alberta's oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta Oil Sands Equity (AOSE) manages the Alberta government's equity investments in oil sands and heavy oil projects. AOSE is a 16.74% participant in the Syncrude Project, a 10% participant in the OSLO (Other Six Leases Operation) Commercial Project and the OSLO New Ventures project, and a 24.17% participant in the Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader. Syncrude produces ca 12% of Canadian crude oil requirements, and AOSE's share yielded $44 million profit for 1992/93, slightly higher than the the $43.3 million the previous year. The OSLO Commercial Project is a proposed commercial oil sands plant with a mine site and extraction plant to be located north of Fort McMurray, and an upgrading facility to be situated north of Edmonton. Work on this project was suspended in early 1992. The OSLO New Ventures project will handle the exploration and development of the remaining five oil sands leases plus the southern portion of Lease 31. As of March 31, 1993, the project owners were considering a commercial demonstration project utilizing dredging and cold-water extraction processes. Two of the owners are unable to provide funding and discussions are under way to resolve the matter and move the program forward. The Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader opened Noveber 20, 1992, and production has reached 41,000 bbl/d, or 89% of design capacity. The upgrader will increase the value of heavy crude oil and thereby increase its demand. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  12. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Pohl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This checklist documents the 2367 Lepidoptera species reported to occur in the province of Alberta, Canada, based on examination of the major public insect collections in Alberta and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes. Records from relevant literature sources published since 1950 and from selected older works are also included. The entry for each species includes the scientific name, the author and year of publication of the original description, occurrence status, provincial distribution (according to ecoclimatic region, and adult phenology. The most recent taxonomic references are given, and common names are listed for butterflies and conspicuous moth species. The sources of specimen- and literature-based records are provided for each species. An additional 138 species whose occurrence in Alberta is probable are appended to the list. For 1524 of the listed species and subspecies, annotations are given, with selected information on taxonomy, nomenclature, distribution, habitat, and biology. An additional section provides details on 171 species erroneously reported from Alberta in previous works. Introductory sections to the volume provide a general overview of the order Lepidoptera and review the natural regions of Alberta, the state of knowledge of their Lepidoptera faunas, and the history and current state of knowledge of Alberta Lepidoptera. Each of the 63 families (and selected subfamilies occurring in Alberta is briefly reviewed, with information on distinguishing features, general appearance, and general biology. A bibliography and an index of genus-level, species-level, and subspecies-level names are provided. The list is accompanied by an appendix of proposed nomenclature changes, consisting of revised status for 25 taxa raised from synonymy to species level, and new synonymy for 20 species-level and one genus-level taxa here considered to be subjective synonyms, with resultant revised synonymy for one

  13. Preliminary fingerprinting analysis of Alberta oil sands and related petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reported on a study that presented a preliminary quantitative chemical characterization of Alberta oil sands and many other related Alberta oils such as oil sand bitumen, Cold Lake bitumen, Albian heavy synthetic crude, and Alberta Mixed sweet blend. The rapid increase in production of the Alberta oil sands has resulted in unprecedented environmental concern. The mining, extraction and production of oil sands such resulted in huge consumption of water resources, huge emission of greenhouse gas and large number of tailings ponds. In addition, accidental spills in the transportation and usage of oil sands will potentially cause considerable impact on the environment. It is therefore essential to have the ability to characterize Alberta oil sands and their oil products. The specific chemical properties of the oil sands bitumen must be known. Therefore, this study collected quantitative data on the concentration and distribution profiles of target compounds in Alberta oil sands and its petroleum products. The chemical fingerprints of 5 Alberta oil sands and their related petroleum products were studied using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The characterized hydrocarbons were n-alkanes; target alkylated PAHs and other EPA priority PAHs; biomarker terpanes and steranes; and bicyclic sesquiterpanes. The information acquired during this study will provide the basis for oil-oil correlation and differentiation in future environmental applications relevant to oil sands. 24 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  14. Chromosomal mutation by fission neutrons and X-rays in higher plants. A review on results of the joint research program utilizing Kinki University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the efficiency of fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor of Kinki University (UTR-KINKI) and X-rays to chromosomes of higher plants for over 20 years. In this review, we described the development of bio-dosimeter using hyper-sensibility of germinating onion roots for irradiation, the analysis of chromosome structure in Haplopappus gracilis (Asteraceae), with the special reference of latent centromeres and survived telomeres throughout chromosomal evolution, the experimental studies on the induction of chromosomal rearrangement in Zebrina pendula (Commelinaceae), the behavior of chromosome fragments with non-localized centromeres in Carex and Eleocharis (Cyperaceae), and the possibility as a bio-dosimeter of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae) for the detection of low-dose radiation. (author)

  15. EURACOS II facility in the modified thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia LENA Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EURACOS II (Enriched Uranium Converter Source) project foresees the installation of an U--Al alloy converter plate at the end of the thermal column in the Pavia University LENA reactor. The incident thermal flux on the 5 Kg of 235U generates a fast neutron source whose power is 0.4 kW. The fast flux near the center exceeds 109 neutrons/cm2-sec. The fission plate is cooled by a forced air flow of 500 m3/h; the use of air instead of water reduces to a minimum the initial spectrum deformation of source neutrons. An irradiation chamber of 3.75 x 1.5 x 1.8 m3 is placed in front of the source and contains the mock-up under investigation. The facility is principally intended for benchmark-and mock-up-experiments in the reactor shielding field, but irradiations to different types and materials not directly related to shielding can be extended. The modification of the TRIGA thermal column, the characteristics of the EURACOS II facility, and the experiments now in preparation are described. The source intensity allows the study of neutron attenuation factor of 105 for fast, and 108 for thermal neutrons. The neutron spectra are investigated with the sandwich technique in the epithermal range, and with threshold detectors, organic and telescopic spectrometers in the fast energy range. (U.S.)

  16. A detailed neutronics comparison of the university of Florida training reactor (UFTR) current HEU and proposed LEU cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over 35 years, the UFTR highly-enriched core has been safely operated. As part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the core is currently being converted to low-enriched uranium fuel. The analyses presented in this paper were performed to verify that, from a neutronic perspective, a proposed low-enriched core can be operated as safely and as effectively as the highly-enriched core. Detailed Monte Carlo criticality calculations are performed to determine: i) Excess reactivity for different core configurations, ii) Individual integral blade worth and shutdown margin, iii) Reactivity coefficients and kinetic parameters, and iv) Flux profiles and core six-factor formula parameters. (authors)

  17. Sustainable water management in Alberta's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Bill; Usher, Robyn; Roach, Andrea [CH2M HILL, Englewood, CO (United States); Lambert, Gord; Kotecha, Prit [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers forecast published in 2011 predicts that oil production from oil sands will increase by 50% in the next 3 years and double by 2020. This rate of growth will result in significant pressure on water resources; water use per barrel of oil sands production is comparable to other energy resources - about 2.5 barrels of fresh water per barrel of oil produced are used by mining operations and 0.5 barrels by in-situ operations. Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) was the first company to develop the oil sands in northern Alberta and holds one of the largest oil sands positions in Canada. In 2010, Suncor announced plans to increase production to more than 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day by 2020, which it plans to achieve through oil sands production growth of approximately 10% per year. Because water supply and potential impacts to water quality are critical to its future growth, in 2010-2011 Suncor conducted a risk assessment to identify water-related business risks related to its northern Alberta operations. The assessment identified more than 20 high level business risks in strategic water risk areas including water supply, water reuse, storm water management, groundwater, waste management and river water return. The risk assessment results prompted development of a strategic roadmap to guide water stewardship across Suncor's regional operations. The roadmap describes goals, objectives, and specific activities for each of six key water risk areas, and informs prioritization and selection of prospective water management activities. Suncor is not only exploring water within its own boundaries, but is also collaborating with other oil sands producers to explore ways of integrating its water systems through industry consortia; Suncor is a member of the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative and of the recently formed Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, among others. (author)

  18. Strategic Clinical Networks: Alberta's Response to Triple Aim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseworthy, Tom; Wasylak, Tracy; O'Neill, Blair J

    2016-01-01

    Verma and Bhatia make a compelling case for the Triple Aim to promote health system innovation and sustainability. We concur. Moreover, the authors offer a useful categorization of policies and actions to advance the Triple Aim under the "classic functions" of financing, stewardship and resource generation (Verma and Bhatia 2016). The argument is tendered that provincial governments should embrace the Triple Aim in the absence of federal government leadership, noting that, by international standards, we are at best mediocre and, more realistically, fighting for the bottom in comparative, annual cross-country surveys. Ignoring federal government participation in Medicare and resorting solely to provincial leadership seems to make sense for the purposes of this discourse; but, it makes no sense at all if we are attempting to achieve high performance in Canada's non-system (Canada Health Action: Building on the Legacy 1997; Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada 2002; Lewis 2015). As for enlisting provincial governments, we heartily agree. A great deal can be accomplished by the Council of the Federation of Canadian Premiers. But, the entire basis for this philosophy and the reference paper itself assumes a top-down approach to policy and practice. That is what we are trying to change in Alberta and we next discuss. Bottom-up clinically led change, driven by measurement and evidence, has to meet with the top-down approach being presented and widely practiced. While true for each category of financing, stewardship and resource generation, in no place is this truer than what is described and included in "health system stewardship." This commentary draws from Verma and Bhatia (2016) and demonstrates how Alberta, through the use of Strategic Clinical Networks (SCNs), is responding to the Triple Aim. We offer three examples of provincially scaled innovations, each representing one or more arms of the Triple Aim. PMID:27009587

  19. US Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University program in robotics for advanced reactors: Program plan, FY 1987-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of an advanced robotic system capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. This goal will be achieved through a team effort among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Combustion Engineering, Martin Marietta Baltimore Aerospace, Odetics, Remotec, and Telerobotics International. Each of the universities and ORNL have ongoing activities and corresponding facilities in areas of R and D related to robotics. This program is designed to take full advantage of these existing resources at the participating institutions

  20. The low power miniature neutron source reactors: Design, safety and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is a low power research reactor with maximum thermal neutron flux of 1 x 1012 n.cm-2.s-1 in one of its inner irradiation channels and thermal power of approximately 30kW. The MNSR is designed based on the Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor and is one of the smallest commercial research reactors presently available in the world. Its commercial versions currently in operation in China, Ghana, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan and Syria, is considered as an excellent tool for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), training of Scientist, and Engineers in nuclear science and technology and small scale radioisotope production. The paper highlights the basic design and theory of the commercial MNSR, its safety features, applications and advantages over the Chinese Prototype. The experimental flux characteristics determined in this work and in similar studies by other authors reveal that the commercial MNSR has more flux stability, longer life span, higher negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and low under-moderation compared to its prototype in China. The result shows that the facility is safe for reactor physics experiments, teaching and training of students and also ideal for application of NAA for the determination of elemental composition of biological and environmental samples. It can also be a useful tool for geochemical and soil fertility mapping. (author)

  1. MNR - the beginnings and innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the history of the slowpoke reactor which was built in 1959 at McMaster University. It outlines the history of medical isotope development and production. It produces half the world supply of I-125 used in treatment of prostate cancer and also produced Mo-99 three decades ago during an extended shutdown at Chalk River.

  2. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  3. The Epidemiology of Childhood Asthma in Red Deer and Medicine Hat, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Hessel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To document the prevalence of asthma among school-aged children in two Alberta communities, to understand host and indoor environmental factors associated with asthma, and to compare these factors between the two communities.

  4. Potential research money available from the Acid Deposition Program and Alberta Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is exceedingly difficult to demonstrate definitive long-term changes in animal health as a result of acid-forming emissions from sour gas wells. A summary is presented of current research in Alberta, followed by the potential for research funding by the Alberta Government/Industry Acid Deposition Program (ADRP). The Alberta Environment research budget consists of four programs in addition to the ADRP: acid deposition effects research in the Athabasca oil sands; western and northern Canada long-range transport of air pollutants; departmental monitoring; and inhalation toxicology and animal health. Animal health research, although a component of the acid deposition issue, is beyond the mandate of Alberta Environment, and the ADRP members committee does not forsee becoming involved in the long-term and complex research required to address the effects of acid-forming emissions on livestock. Funds for additional animal health research must come from other government departments and agencies whose mandate covers this area

  5. Waterfowl breeding pair survey for northern Alberta, northeastern British Columbia, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories: 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for northern Alberta, northeastern British Columbia, Yukon, and the Northwest...

  6. Alberta Oil Sands Equity annual report, 1991-92. Partnership and progress in Alberta's oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberta Oil Sands Equity (AOSE) manages the Alberta government's equity investments in oil sands and heavy oil projects. AOSE is a 16.74% participant in the Syncrude Project, a 10% participant in the OSLO (Other Six Leases Operation) Commercial Project and the OSLO New Ventures project, and a 24.17% participant in the Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader. Syncrude produces over 11% of Canadian crude oil requirements, and AOSE's share yielded $43.3 million profit for 1991/92, down significantly from the $82.1 million the previous year due to lower oil prices. The OSLO Commercial Project is a proposed commercial oil sands plant with a mine site and extraction plant to be located north of Fort McMurray, and an upgrading facility to be situated north of Edmonton. Work on this project was suspended in early 1992. The OSLO New Ventures project will handle the exploration and development of the remaining five oil sands leases plus the southern portion of Lease 31. As of March 31, 1992, the project owners were considering a commercial demonstration project utilizing dredging and cold-water extraction processes. Two of the owners are unable to provide funding and discussions are under way to resolve the matter and move the program forward. The Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader was nearly 90% complete in March 1992 and full startup is expected in November 1992; engineering work was completed in March 1991. The upgrader will increase the value of heavy crude oil and thereby increase its demand. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Preferences of Residents in Four Northern Alberta Communities Regarding Local Post-Secondary Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The western Canadian province of Alberta has used some of the proceeds from exploitation of its extraordinary natural resources to make available a range of post-secondary training and education opportunities to residents. While these provisions appear comprehensive, this study examined how well they actually suit the express needs of the residents of remote, Northern areas of the province, many of them Aboriginal. The literature shows that while Aboriginal people are underrepresented in Canada in university enrollments, they are no longer underrepresented in college or other institutions, suggesting that gains have been made for some residents of rural and remote parts of Canada. Further, when Northern residents (especially Aboriginal males complete advanced training, Statistics Canada reports they are highly successful in employment and income. Access is the pivotal issue, however: leaving the local community to attend training programs elsewhere is often disruptive and unsuccessful. As will be seen, the issue of access arose in this study’s findings with direct implications for distance delivery and support.This study was conducted as part of Athabasca University’s Learning Communities Project (LCP, which sought information about the views and experiences of a broad range of northern Alberta residents concerning their present post-secondary training and education opportunities. The study addresses an acknowledged gap in such information in relation to Canada in comparison with other OECD countries.Results are based on input from 165 individuals, obtained through written surveys (some completed by the researchers in face-to-face exchanges with the respondents, interviews, discussions, and observations, conducted with full-time or part-time residents of the study communities during 2007 and 2008. The four northern Alberta communities studied were Wabasca, Fox Lake, Ft. McKay (sometimes MacKay, and Ft. Chipewyan, totaling just over 6

  8. Career paths of academic administrators in Alberta colleges: travelling the highway or fording a stream?

    OpenAIRE

    Goates, Robin Christine

    2007-01-01

    Over the next several years it is assumed that there will be a large turnover in academic administrators in the Alberta public college system with many current administrators reaching retirement age. Looking at career paths of current academic administrators may help better prepare future academic administrators. The research questions this study asks are what are the career paths of current academic administrators in Alberta public colleges, and how can these paths inform us about preparing ...

  9. Study design and methods for the Breast Cancer and Exercise Trial in Alberta (BETA)

    OpenAIRE

    Friedenreich, Christine M; MacLaughlin, Sarah; Neilson, Heather K.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Yasui, Yutaka; Duha, Aalo; Lynch, Brigid M; Kallal, Ciara; Courneya, Kerry S

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise has favorable effects on biomarkers associated with a lower risk of breast cancer, however it is unclear if higher doses of exercise provide additional effects. No clinical trial has systematically examined how different exercise volumes influence the mechanisms underlying breast cancer etiology. The Breast Cancer and Exercise Trial in Alberta (BETA) - a follow-up study to the Alberta Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Prevention (ALPHA) Trial - is examining how a one-yea...

  10. Wetland habitat selection by woodland caribou as characterized using the Alberta Wetland Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    W. Kent Brown; W. James Rettie; Bob Wynes; Kim Morton

    2011-01-01

    We examined habitat selection by woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in northwestern Alberta based on a wetland classification system developed for the Alberta Vegetation Inventory. Our two objectives were to describe caribou habitat use, and to assess the utility of the wetland classification system in land-use planning on caribou range. We used a geographical information system to overlay the locations of radio-collared caribou on the habitat map. Using a "moving-window" analysis o...

  11. The vitamin A and vitamin E status of horses raised in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    OpenAIRE

    Blakley, B R; Bell, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine normal baseline levels of vitamin A and vitamin E in clinically normal horses under typical field conditions in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Heparinized blood samples were collected from approximately 400 clinically healthy horses selected from 24 locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan during a two-year period. For each horse, historical information including feed type, vitamin supplementation, time of year, sex, and age were recorded. From each blood sam...

  12. Canadian Library Human Resources Short‐Term Supply and Demand Crisis Is Averted, But a Significant Long‐Term Crisis Must Be Addressed. A review of: 8Rs Research Team. The Future of Human Resources in Canadian Libraries February 2005. Edmonton, AB: University of Alberta. 21 February 2007 .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie McKenna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine the human resources environment in Canadian libraries in order to assess readiness to accommodate change and to identify opportunities for human resources planning. The “8Rs” of the study were defined as recruitment, retirement, retention, remuneration, repatriation, rejuvenation, re‐accreditation, and restructuring.Design – This study was undertaken in three phases over nearly three years through the use a variety of methods including literature review, analyses of existing data (Statistics Canada and library school graduate data, telephone interviews (with senior library administrators, focus groups (with representatives from Canadian Association of Research Libraries, Canadian Urban Libraries Council and Alberta Association of Library Technicians, print surveys (library institutions and web‐based surveys (of professional librarians and paraprofessional library staff.Setting – Canadian libraries that are not component branches of a system, and that employ professional librarians.Subjects – Stage I: 17 senior library administrators participated in telephone interviews and three focus groups were conducted. Stage II: Surveyed library administrators representing institutions. A multi‐stage stratified random sampling technique was used to ensure geographical representation from each of Canada’s provinces and territories. Full census participation was conducted for members of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries and the Canadian Urban Libraries Council. The print survey instrument was distributed to 1,357 subjects; 461 completed surveys were returned (response rate of 34% with results for the total sample accurate within plus or minus 3.8 per centage points, 95 times out of 100. Stage III: Surveyed professional librarians and paraprofessional staff. Multi‐stage random sampling was used to ensure representation of library staff from all library sectors and sufficient sub‐sample sizes. Of the

  13. Successful and unsuccessful attempts to resolve caribou management and timber harvesting issues in west central Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hervieux

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Research studies of woodland caribou in west central Alberta began in 1979 in response to proposed timber harvesting on their winter ranges. Using results from initial studies, timber harvest guidelines were developed. A recent review of these guidelines, and the assumptions on which they were based, has resulted in a renegotiation by government and industry of timber harvesting on caribou range in west central Alberta. Caribou range in west central Alberta overlaps many jurisdictional boundaries: federal and provincial lands, four Forest Management Agreement Areas, three Alberta Land and Forest Service Regions and two Alberta Fish and Wildlife Service Regions. This jurisdictional complexity in combination with other factors such as total allocation of the timber resources, high levels of petroleum, natural gas and coal extraction activities, a high level of concern by public groups for caribou conservation and recent understanding of woodland caribou needs for abundant space has made resolution of caribou/timber harvest conflicts exceedingly slow and often relatively unproductive. This paper reviews 10 years of trying to resolve conflicts between timber harvesting and caribou conservation through meetings, committees, integrated resource planning, policy papers and public consultation. We describe what might be learned by other jurisdictions that are trying to resolve similar caribou/timber harvesting issues. We conclude with an overview of recent timber harvest planning initiatives on caribou range in west central Alberta.

  14. Competing in a deregulated market : what are we learning from the Alberta experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the deregulation schedule in Alberta was presented. The spot market in the province opened in January 1996. What Albertans wanted from deregulation was a competitive power generation market, a liquid spot market, a liquid forward market, competitive retail market, a clear transmission policy, transparent pricing, and innovation. They got a competitive power generation market and a liquid spot market, but with few buyers and an unclear transmission policy with only medium transparency in prices. Innovation was seen in the form of small power and distributed generation such as wind energy. In 2001, the Alberta government stepped in to subsidize consumers because wholesale prices were trading at record highs. In 2002 wholesale prices collapsed. It was shown that prices have declined in Alberta as supply and demand came into balance. The Keephills Generating Plants 3 and 4 will have a large impact on the market in 2005. It was emphasized that new transmission would unlock additional potential market for Alberta generation. The paper presented viewgraphs showing existing generation capacity and the high Alberta prices following deregulation. It was noted that commodity cycles dominate growth plans in the electric power industry. The four generation markets in Alberta were identified. The lesson learned from past experience is that price signals will attract new generators to the market and that government leadership must be consistent. 4 tabs., 6 figs

  15. Alberta's energy reserves 2007 and supply/demand outlook 2008-2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) was realigned into two separate regulatory bodies in January 2008, namely the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) which regulates the oil and gas industry, and the Alberta Utilities Commission (AUC) which regulates the utilities industry. The ERCB issues a yearly report providing stakeholders with independent and comprehensive information on the state of reserves, supply, and demand for Alberta's diverse energy resources, including crude bitumen, crude oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids, coal, and sulphur. This report presented Alberta's energy reserves for 2007 as well as a supply and demand outlook for Alberta energy reserves for 2008 to 2017. The report provided estimates of initial reserves, remaining established reserves, and ultimate potential (reserves that have already been discovered plus those that have yet to be discovered). The report also included a 10-year supply and demand forecast for Alberta's energy resources. In order to better understand supply and price relationships, some historical trends on selected commodities were also provided. tabs., figs., appendices

  16. Artificial radioactivity in the vicinity of St. Marianna University School of Medicine after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, rain water and atomospheric dust were monitored for their possible contamination by artificial radionuclides on the roof of the building of our medical school from April 30 through June 8, 1986. Radiological monitoring was also performed on cabbages obtained from a nearby field, city water, cow's milk produced in Kanagawa Prefecture and human milk obtained from a volunteer living in Kawasaki. Our campus and the nearby area were exposed to 131I from May 2 through 22 by rainfall and from May 1 through 15 by atomospheric dust. In particular, rain water on May 4 and May 5 contained 7600 pCi (282 Bq)/l and 6000 pCi (222 Bq)/l, respectively. The cabbage specimen obtained on May 7 was contaminated by 131I with 808 pCi/kg wet weight, but another specimen obtained on June 6 was not contaminated by any detectable amounts of 131I. No radioactivity was detected in city water during the period monitored. Cow's milk and human milk contained, as a total of β-radioactivity, 1412 pCi (52 Bq)/l and 915 pCi (34 Bq)/l, respectively. However, parallel determinations on their potassium concentrations revealed that these radioactivities were due entirely to natural 40K. The degree of radiological contamination in and around our campus following the Chernobyl accident was mostly below the action levels above which the governments of several countries involving Japan would take preventive measures against possible radiation damages. Although 131I radioactivities contained in the rain water of the first week of May, 1986 significantly exceeded the action level for this radionuclide, their effects on human health were considered negligible and undetectable in the vicinity of our school. (author)

  17. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -II. 7. Redesign of the University of Texas Thermal Neutron Imaging Facility Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal neutron imaging facility (TNIF) was developed at the University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory from 1994 to 1998 using a 1-MW TRIGA reactor. Currently, neutron radiography is being investigated as a method to detect flaws in large carbon composite flywheels using the TNIF. Thermal neutrons have successfully been used to detect flaws in thin carbon composites (60% of the neutrons that enter the shield walls are reflected back into the experimental area. MCNP calculations indicate that the addition of a 1.25-cm Boral liner on the inner wall is sufficient to lower the external dose to acceptable levels and reduce the percentage of neutrons reflected back into the experimental area to <2%. MCNP simulations have been a valuable tool to test shielding configurations before construction. The redesigned shutter is composed of aluminum, lead, and boron carbide. MCNP simulations for the external shielding have shown that the addition of a Boral liner on the inner shield wall is sufficient to reduce external radiation exposure to acceptable levels. The Boral liner also greatly reduces the amount of neutrons reflected back into the experimental region. The implementation of the redesigned neutron shutter and external shielding should greatly enhance the TNIF capabilities and overall usability. The new neutron shutter will allow work to be performed inside the shielding cave while the reactor is at power. The improved external shielding will enable radiographs to be taken at higher flux levels, which will be beneficial when imaging thick carbon composites. The reduction of neutron scattering within the experimental area will also enhance image quality and improve the TNIF resolution. (authors)

  18. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: (1) The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. (2) The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. (3) Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW

  19. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  20. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  1. Different Policies for Different Peoples? : A Comparative Analysis of Norway and Alberta on the Choice of Fund Saving

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This thesis looks to explain why Norway and Alberta differ in their choices of natural resource revenue allocation. Norway saves most revenues in a government owned fund abroad, while Alberta leaves more revenue to be handled by the market and spends government derived rents on running provincial costs. Both cases keep vast amounts of oil and gas and production volumes of these resources are about equal for the two. Alberta and Norway also display similarities on several other independent var...

  2. Summary of dose plan system for boron neutron capture therapy 'SERA' and it's application at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult for epithermal neutron irradiation to measure doses of thermal and fast neutron at near the surface of body in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Dose plan system for the BNCT, 'SERA' (Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications) was developed by the groups of INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory) and MSU (Montana State University) in USA. The SERA system consists of seven modules in which contain image data of CT or MRI, three dimensional image data, two or three dimensional calculation, Monte Carlo simulation calculation, plan of irradiation conditions including boron concentration, one dimensional dose distribution and dose-volume histogram, and two dimensional dose distribution each. The BNCT using epithermal neutron irradiation and the SERA system was carried out to eight patients of tumor, six persons of oral tumor and two persons of brain tumor, in the KUR during Dec. 2001 - Oct. 2002. Thermal neutron flux, epithermal neutron flux and gamma ray doses are measured by phantom experiments. The calculated results of the SERA system give good agreement with the values obtained by the phantom experiments, within accuracy of 10%. (M. Suetake)

  3. Experience in the operation and maintenance of the L.E.N.A. 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia, 1966-1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in the operation and maintenance of the L.E.N.A. 250 Kw TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia - Italy is described. First the Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata (L.E.N.A.) is presented including some historical notes, administration and personnel. Reactor operation since 1966 is reported together with the cost of a recent one year period. Some minor operational difficulties such as a crack in the biological shield and fuel element elongations are described in detail. The activity of the health physics group is also presented. (author)

  4. Where's the water : with an ambitious program underway to map Alberta's water resources, researchers hope to ensure there's enough to meet increasing industrial, agricultural, and municipal demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers at Natural Resources Canada's Earth Sciences Sector are currently studying the impact of climate change on water resources and groundwater in relation to energy development in Alberta, as well as to assess whether there is sufficient supply to aid in the production of oil sands. The project includes mapping of major regional aquifers to improve an understanding of groundwater resources. The aim of the project is to characterize formations, and understand natural controls of quality, availability and sustainability for long-term use. The project aims to characterize the physical makeup of rocks that form the aquifer, as well as to develop hydrological models of how water moves through systems. The University of Calgary is leading a project to analyze the chemical, isotopic state and composition of shallow groundwater in order to establish a baseline of its chemical makeup. The aim of the project is to provide an overview of groundwater as compared to produced water that occurs as a result of coalbed methane (CBM) drilling activities. Methane produced from CBM has a different isotopic signature than naturally occurring methane in groundwater. Researchers at the university are analyzing water from more than 75 production wells, as well as an additional 300 monitoring wells. It is hoped that all of the groundwater projects will help to improve Alberta's water preservation record. The intense energy production in the province means that no other location contributes as significantly as Alberta to global warming. It was concluded that improvements in energy technologies and environmental protection in the province will benefit people around the world. 4 figs

  5. Operation maintenance and utilization of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia in the time period July 1978 - June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two years the reactor was operated 1653 hours at steady - state full power (250 kW). During the same period, July 1978 - June 1980, 680 applications for reactor use were submitted. Total reactor time utilized (6843 hours) is increased in comparison with the previous two years period. Some modernization to the equipment is also made

  6. Clean air strategy for Alberta: Report to the ministers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a response to continuing discussions on the impact of fossil fuels on global warming, acid deposition, and smog, a clean air strategy consultation program was announced by Alberta's Ministers of Energy and Environment to encourage public discussion on air emissions resulting from the production and use of energy. The consultation program had three objectives: to help identify and clarify the most important issues associated with energy production and use which need to be addressed in developing a clean air strategy; to outline practical and achievable actions which can be taken to reduce emissions; and to develop program and policy recommendations to the provincial government. The consultation program included workshops and regional sessions, as well as background research. The discussions, findings, and conclusions from the program are summarized. Several air quality management challenges were identified, including the need for a more comprehensive system for managing air quality; the priority of local air quality issues and problems; the need to address cumulative regional emissions and impacts; and scientific and economic uncertainties. A number of goals have been developed to address these challenges, such as implementation of a comprehensive air quality management system, identification of cost-effective energy conservation and efficiency opportunities, development of innovative and targeted solutions to manage cumulative emissions, and improvement of the gathering and application of scientific and technical knowledge regarding atmospheric processes and effects. A glossary of terms is included. 12 figs., 17 tabs

  7. An Alberta firm dives into deep coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkau, R.

    2009-06-15

    A synfuel plant in Calgary is now planning to gasify coal deposits located more than 1000 meters underground, and at the same time pump up a synthetic gas made of methane and hydrogen that is less greenhouse gas (GHG) intensive than natural gas. The plant will be the first in a series of commercial projects that will use carbon capture and storage to prevent air emissions from in situ coal gasification processes. The demonstration project will showcase the gasification technology, which subjects coal to heat and pressure in order to cause a series of chemical reactions that convert the feedstock into syngas. A pair of wells is drilled into the coal seam. Oxygen and water is then injected to support a limited amount of combustion. The combined effect of the high temperatures, steam, and natural in situ pressure create the right conditions for the coal to undergo gasification. The process is less expensive than surface gasification. Slag and ash byproducts also remain underground. Water used in the process is recycled and re-used, and the process does not contaminate fresh water supplies. It was concluded that a significant portion of Alberta's 600 billion tonnes of deep coal reserves are amenable to the gasification process. 3 figs.

  8. Precambrian metamorphic conditions and crustal evolution, northeastern Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex of Precambrian polymetamorphic gneisses and granitoids of the Churchill structural province, northeastern Alberta, Canada has been examined structurally, petrographically, chemically and geochronologically. An Archean basement gneiss complex is indicated by Rb-Sr dating of pegmatites which cut both gneisses and granitoids (2470 +- 26 Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7030 +- 0.0008). A high pressure granulite facies (M1) mineral assemblage and older structures (D1) are assigned to the Archean. A moderate-pressure granulite facies (Msub(2.1)), a low-pressure amphibolite facies (Msub(2.2)), a greenschist facies (Msub(2.3)), and younger structures (D2) are of Aphebian age. Formation of granitoids by anatexis of the pre-existing Archean basement complex during Msub(2.1) is indicated by their Aphebian ages (ca. 1900 Ma) and high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7100 +-0.0018). The path of retrograde metamorphism is linked with relatively slow rates of uplift and cooling. Late Aphebian sediments attained low-grade greenschist facies metamorphism only and are younger than the other metamorphic rocks. The tectonic evolution of this Precambrian mobile belt during the Aphebian contrasts with the stable Archean cratonic block in the Slave province to the north. (Auth.)

  9. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Sturgeon Lake field, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mederos, S.M. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela); Moslow, T.F. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    This study examines the sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy and reservoir characterization of the Lower Triassic Montney Formation in the Sturgeon Lake field located in west-central Alberta. The Montney Formation is grouped into two facies associations. Facies Association 1 is a siliciclastic upward-coarsening sequence deposited by storm, current and wave processes and is interpreted as a low energy progradational lower shoreface. Facies Association 2 is a carbonate shallowing upward sequence deposited in a wave dominated progradational shoreface. The contact between Facies Association 1 and 2 is marked by a major change in lithology and is erosive. Palynological analyses reveal two missing palynologic subzones between Facies Association 1 and Facies Association 2 suggesting a period of erosion and/or nondeposition. The boundary between the two facies association is defined as a sequence boundary which stratigraphically divides the Montney Formation into two sequences in the study area. The Lower Montney sequence is composed of eight retrogradational, aggradational and progradational parasequences and represent the Transgressive and the High-stand System Tract. The Upper Montney sequence is composed only of one parasequence and represents the Transgressive System Tract. The Sturgeon Lake Field has two types of reservoir with respect to lithology, porosity, permeability and geometry. The best reservoir facies is a brachiopod wackestone-packstone with permeabilities up to 8 Darcys. Siliciclastic reservoirs consist of very fine grained sandstones with permeabilities of 132 md when fractured.

  10. Electricity market reform failures: UK, Norway, Alberta and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of electricity market reforms already taken place in the UK, Norway, Alberta (Canada) and California (USA) leads to our overall conclusion that the introduction of a competitive generation market, of itself, has failed to deliver reliable service at low and stable prices. The market reform failures are attributed to market power abuse by few dominant sellers (especially at times of transmission congestion), poor market design that invites strategic bidding by suppliers, the lack of customer response to price spikes, capacity shortage caused by demand growth not matched by new capacity, and thin trading of forward and futures contracts that are critical for price discovery and risk management. The paper then explains why an electricity market reform can easily fail to deliver the promised gains of better service at lower and more stable prices. The policy implication is that an electric market reform can be extremely risky, and may lead to a disastrous outcome. Thus, it is imprudent to implement such a reform in countries with limited sites for new generation and no indigenous fuels (e.g., Israel and Hong Kong). These countries should therefore consider introducing performance-based regulation that can immediately benefit electricity consumers in terms of lower prices, more stable prices, improved reliability, more choices, while encouraging the electric sector to pursue efficient operation and investment. (Author)

  11. Electricity market reform failures: UK, Norway, Alberta and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of electricity market reforms already taken place in the UK, Norway, Alberta (Canada) and California (USA) leads to our overall conclusion that the introduction of a competitive generation market, of itself, has failed to deliver reliable service at low and stable prices. The market reform failures are attributed to market power abuse by few dominant sellers (especially at times of transmission congestion), poor market design that invites strategic bidding by suppliers, the lack of customer response to price spikes, capacity shortage caused by demand growth not matched by new capacity, and thin trading of forward and futures contracts that are critical for price discovery and risk management. The paper then explains why an electricity market reform can easily fail to deliver the promised gains of better service at lower and more stable prices. The policy implication is that an electric market reform can be extremely risky, and may lead to a disastrous outcome. Thus, it is imprudent to implement such a reform in countries with limited sites for new generation and no indigenous fuels (e.g., Israel and Hong Kong). These countries should therefore consider introducing performance-based regulation that can immediately benefit electricity consumers in terms of lower prices, more stable prices, improved reliability, more choices, while encouraging the electric sector to pursue efficient operation and investment

  12. Review of Alberta Crown Crude Oil Marketing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an independent evaluation of the operations of the private marketing agents that are currently marketing the Alberta Crown's share of royalty crude oil. The evaluation includes a review of pricing performance, working relationship, current issues and the overall performance of the marketing arrangements during the fiscal years of 1997 and 1998. Overall, the outsourcing of sales of Crown production to agents is judged to be successful. For example, it has been noted that agents are becoming more aggressive in maintaining and increasing their margins. On the other hand, the increased level of aggressiveness in marketing, while tending to maximize Crown revenues, is also creating a potential conflict on how margins should be shared between the Crown and its agents. Also, there has been evidence of some management issues between the agents and the Crown concerning the extent to which the Crown should share in any increased value which the agent generates by increased third party marketing activities. These differences need to be addressed in order to maintain the strong performance of the marketing program. The consultants also recommend additional guidelines on risk management issues that more clearly define the Crown's risk tolerance. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  13. The oil and gas industry in Alberta: drilling and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document outlined the impacts of drilling and production on the forest structure and integrity. The cumulative impact of all 11,898 wells drilled in 2000 in Alberta, coupled with previously drilled wells that is of primary concern. It is estimated that an 886 square kilometres area of the boreal forest has been cleared as a result of well drilling, based on an assumption of 1 hectare cleared per well site. No regulations govern the reforestation of the areas once the activities have been terminated, and nothing to regulate the cumulative road densities or pipeline densities. A progressive loss and fragmentation of habitat, increased access, and damage to aquatic systems are all consequences of the drilling and production activities. These activities also lead to the contamination of soil and water. Reductions in air quality are associated with drilling and production activities, mainly through the release of various gases in the atmosphere, such as sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, both responsible for acid rain deposition. Explicit limits on cumulative densities of well sites, pipelines and access roads are part of best practices that can result in a minimization of the negative environmental impacts. Integrated planning with the forest industry, the development and implementation of new operating practices, and a reduction in the pace of development would also go a long way toward the reduction of the ecological footprint

  14. Shell's Caroline gas project on track in southwest Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that western Canada's biggest sour natural gas, sulfur, and natural gas liquids development project in 2 decades is on target to start up late this year. Shell Canada Ltd.'s $950 million (Canadian) Caroline project will produce 2 tcf of gas and associated products from the Swan Hills member of the middle Devonian Beaverhill Lake group. The price tag will reach about $1 billion, including some start-up costs. The project is designed to process an average 300 MMcfd of gas. It will produce 17,500 b/d of pentanes plus, 4,100 metric tons/day of sulfur, 90 MMcfd of sales gas, and 28,000 b/d of NGL-ethane, propane, and butane. A labor force that is peaking at about 2,400 workers is completing a network of processing plants, about 143 miles of pipeline, three field compressors, and other facilities covering an area of 161 sq miles. Dilcon Constructors Ltd., an arm of Delta Catalytic Corp., Calgary, is the main contractor for the project. About 85% of the services and equipment for Caroline are coming from Alberta suppliers, 7% from suppliers elsewhere in Canada, and only 8% from non-Canadian Sources

  15. Environmental issues and creditor's rights in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A clarification of the ranking of environmentally related claims in bankruptcy and receivership proceedings, was presented. Also, the liability that a creditor assumes when taking control of a debtor's business or assets, particularly where environmental contaminants are concerned, was explained. The way that environmental law operates and the sorts of liability it imposes and upon whom, was also explained. Generally, environmental legislation imposes liability upon the owner of a contaminated property, whether or not the owner caused or created the problem. However, legislation also exists which imposes liability on the party in control and on the party which caused the contamination. A review of cases which deal with environmental legislation and their impact upon receivers in Saskatchewan and Alberta, was presented. Ways in which secured creditors can assess liability and minimize risks, were also described. The proposed amendments to the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) expand the current limited protection from personal liability for trustees in bankruptcy and extend it to receivers, trustees, monitors and agents

  16. Chemical and physical hydrogeology of coal, mixed coal-sandstone and sandstone aquifers from coal-bearing formations in the Alberta Plains region, Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the decline of conventional oil and gas reserves, natural gas from coal (NGC) is an unconventional gas resource that is receiving much attention from petroleum exploration and development companies in Alberta. Although the volume of the NGC resource is large, there are many challenges facing NGC development in Alberta, including technical and economic issues, land access, water disposal, water diversion and access to information. Exploration and development of NGC in Alberta is relatively new, therefore there is little baseline data on which to base regulatory strategies. Some important information gaps have been filled through water well sampling in coal, mixed coal-sandstone and sandstone aquifers throughout Alberta. Analyses focused on the chemical and physical characteristics aquifers in use for domestic or agricultural purposes. Aquifer depths were generally less than 100 metres. Samples collected from Paskapoo-Scollard Formation, Horseshoe Canyon Formation and Belly River Group aquifers exceed Canadian water quality guideline values with respect to pH, sodium, manganese, chloride, chromium, sulphate, phenols and total dissolved solids. Pump tests conducted within the aquifers indicate that the groundwater flow is complicated. Water quality will have to be carefully managed to ensure responsible disposal practices are followed. Future studies will focus on understanding the chemical and biological process that occur within the aquifers and the possible link between these processes and gas generation. Mitigation and disposal strategies for produced water will also be developed along with exploration strategies using information obtained from hydrogeologic studies. 254 refs., 182 tabs., 100 figs., 3 appendices

  17. The power of Alberta business : the impact of electricity deregulation on Alberta small and medium-sized business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deregulation of the electricity market came into effect on January 1, 2001 in Alberta. This deregulation affects the retail and generation fields of electricity. The intention was to introduce competition and apply downward pressure on electricity prices, but the reverse effect was witnessed: power prices increased. It resulted in a period of anxiety on the part of businesses, caused by the volatility of electricity prices. A survey of Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) members was conducted in May and June 2001 to better understand the impacts of electricity deregulation on small and medium-sized businesses. A broad range of businesses provided responses (951 responses) covering all sectors of industry and regions in Alberta. A large proportion of respondents were dissatisfied with deregulation, caused in part by the confusion created by the flurry of rebate and credit announcements designed to ease the transition. Small firms were faced with significant increases in electricity prices, and several could not estimate the size of the increase as it was too difficult to measure. Responses varied from a low of 5 per cent increase to a high of 400 per cent in power rates. Most respondents also indicated that the increases had an impact on their business. The impact of power rate increases by sector was examined. Another consequence of deregulation was the fact that billing moved from a single invoice received to the requirement to actively manage energy usage. It was discovered that a lack of information on electricity cost and consumption management impeded the the ability to make business decisions. The CFIB asked respondents to indicate the measures being considered to address management of electricity costs. Incorporating energy-saving devices and/or methods had been considered by slightly more than 40 per cent of respondents. Negotiating with power retailers represented another option under consideration by some. It was felt that government must

  18. Assessment of the National Research Universal Reactor Proposed New Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonio, Ernest J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling location for the National Research Universal reactor (NRU) complex exhaust stack, located in Chalk River, Ontario, Canada, with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Due to the age of the equipment in the existing monitoring system, and the increasing difficulty in acquiring replacement parts to maintain this equipment, a more up-to-date system is planned to replace the current effluent monitoring system, and a new monitoring location has been proposed. The new sampling probe should be located within the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task was 65167, Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. Chalk River Effluent Duct Flow Qualification. The testing described in this document was guided by the Test Plan: Testing of the NRU Stack Air Sampling Position (TP-STMON-032).

  19. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  20. Independent assessment team report to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board on implementing deregulation of electricity generation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particular aspect of deregulation of electricity generation in Alberta discussed is the economics of power purchase agreements (PPAs). There are various parameters associated with the PPAs that are emphasized including: technical characteristics; unit availability, capital costs and O and M costs; coal costs; gas costs; payment for flexible operation; hydro obligation amounts; income tax; property tax; and working capital, insurance and other costs. Chapter one of the Independent Assessment Team (IAT) report covers the report scope, and chapter two describes certain main principles underlying determination of PPAs. Chapter three discusses the IAT's determination of the PPA's forms and their main terms and conditions. Chapter four describes the IAT's determination of the underlying parameter values of the PPAs. Chapter five describes the ITA's determination of the allowed rate of return on equity and the capital structure of PPAs. An appendix covers a detailed description of the consultations carried out by the IAT; a report by HESI on the results of Pool modelling carried out to date (the HESI work was done to assist the IAT in determining PPAs, not the auction design); summary outputs of the IAT's financial model with indicative financial statements for each unit and company under the PPAs; and a document on shared services, common facilities and new units