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Sample records for alberta basin description

  1. Synthesis and model of formation-water flow, Alberta Basin, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachu, S. [Alberta Geological Survey (Canada)

    1995-08-01

    Based on a large amount of publicly available data, several studies have previously examined the flow of formation waters in different parts of the Alberta basin, offering various interpretations as to the causes of the observed pressure regime and flow pattern; however, there has been no synthesis of these diverse studies on a basin-wide basis. Accordingly, these studies are critically reviewed in this paper and synthesized in a new basin-scale model of the flow of formation waters in the Alberta basin. The proposed regional-scale model has significant implications for understanding hydrocarbon migration pathways, ore genesis, the geothermal regime, and deep waste disposal in the Alberta basin. Several flow systems, each one driven by a different mechanism, are identified, together with the main processes leading to the nonhydrostatic pressures observed in the basin. Two megahydrostratigraphic successions and associated flow systems are recognized. The first succession corresponds to the pre-Cretaceous passive-margin stage of basin development, and consists of thick, carbonate-dominated aquifer systems separated by shaly aquitards and evaporitic aquicludes. A northeastward basin-scale flow system is driven by basin topography, with recharge in Montana and discharge in northeastern Alberta. Southwest-to-northeast regional-scale flow adjacent to the fold and thrust belt is probably the result of past tectonic processes. As a result of salinity variations, flow-retarding buoyancy effects can be important. The second megahydrostratigraphic succession corresponds to the post-Jurassic foreland stage of basin evolution, and consists of thick, shaly aquitard systems and relatively thin sandstone aquifers.

  2. Hydrology of a Basin Fen Complex in Northeastern Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C. M.; Ketcheson, S. J.; Price, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Western Boreal Plains (WBP) landscape is a mosaic of wetlands, lakes, and forested uplands, of which wetlands comprise nearly half. Along wetland-forestland transitions, dynamic ground/surface water interactions can have a strong influence on the quantity and chemistry of runoff to downstream basins. In a region affected by large-scale industrial development, there exists the need to better understand the hydrology of wetland-forestland complexes and their interactions, particularly over the long-term in order to capture inter-year climate variability. Pauciflora Basin (750 masl) is a 43 ha basin comprised of a poor fen bordered by forested uplands located on a prominent topographic high ~40 km SE of Fort McMurray (250 masl). Over the four-year study (April-Sept), the basin received 67% more precipitation (P) per month on average compared to 30-year climate normals and an average of 100 mm more P per season than the nearby regional weather station (360 masl). Wetland-forestland connectivity was highly dynamic both spatially and temporally but typically followed a trend of (1) upland water tables (UWT) sloping towards the wetland during spring and early summer and (2) a steady decline in UWT as the season progressed leading to flow reversals and decoupling. Runoff generation from the catchment was typically greatest in the spring and early summer when wetland and forestlands were coupled. However, runoff remained sensitive to P throughout the season for most years due to frequent rain events in excess of 20 mm d-1. Inter-year variability in storage on UWT appeared to be driven by slope characteristics, and upland runoff to the fen was high when UWT was within the more hydrologically active soil layer, which may influence solute and runoff processes downstream. Headwater catchments with above average P and significant wetland-upland connectivity may represent an important water supply for downstream catchments in an otherwise subhumid climate.

  3. Fault and conduit controlled burial dolomitization of the Devonian west-central Alberta deep Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.G. [BP America, Houston, TX (United States); Mountjoy, E.W. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2005-06-01

    A semi-regional comparison of dolomites from 3 stratigraphic horizons were studied to better understand the geometry of dolomite bodies and the link between dolomites at different stratigraphic horizons. The timing, mechanisms and geochemistry of pervasive dolomites of the west-central Alberta deep basin were clarified along with the distribution and mechanisms of dolomitization in deep gas reservoirs. This study contributes to more efficient hydrocarbon exploration in the deep basin of western Alberta where pervasive dolomite occurs in the Devonian reservoirs in the Swan Hills, Leduc and Wabamun formations. This study showed that pervasive dolomite in the Swan Hills Formation is restricted to zones of primary porosity and permeability near the buildup margins that decrease quickly towards the interior of the buildups. Two petrographic types of dolomite exist in the study area. Type 1 is a fine crystalline planar dolomite, while type 2 is a more pervasive medium to coarse crystalline dolomite. The wide spread of oxygen isotope values for the two types of dolomites was discussed with reference to how these values were influenced by depositional history. The estimated temperatures of type 2 dolomite ranges from 45 to 75 degrees C, which is equivalent to burial depths of 700 to 1500 m. It was suggested that fault-controlled conduits may have controlled local and restricted dolomite occurrences in the Swan Hills and the middle Wabamun Formation as evidenced by seismic data, log marker correlations and fractured dolomite. It was also suggested that porous Leduc dolomites may have been connected via the underlying dolomitized part of the Lower Leduc platform. This formed a basin-wide channel system through which basin fluids flowed up along vertical faults and laterally updip until they reached a stratigraphically controlled conduit during early basin filling in the late Devonian to Carboniferous Orogeny or early Tertiary Orogeny. 52 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs.

  4. Geothermal investigation of Paleozoic formations in the Central Alberta Basin/Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weides, S.; Moeck, I.; Majorowicz, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study explores Paleozoic formations in the Central Alberta Basin with regard to their usability as geothermal reservoirs. The research area of this regional scale study is approx. 150 km * 200 km in size and located around the city of Edmonton. A 3D geological model is developed based on stratigraphic picks of more than 7000 wells from the Alberta general well data file. The model consists of 20 different geological units, of which 14 belong to the Paleozoic succession. Spatial distribution and thickness of formations is analysed with help of the 3D modelling study. Due to its depth and its distribution throughout the whole study area, the Cambrian Basal Sandstone formation is the most promising horizon for a geothermal development. Porosity and horizontal permeability of four Devonian carbonate formations - Cooking Lake, Leduc, Nisku and Wabamun - is mapped by reinvestigation of more than 50,000 core analyses from the Alberta general well data file. Average porosity of the Devonian ranges from 5.2 % (Nisku) to 10.4 % (Wabamun), average horizontal permeability is between 5 mD (Cooking Lake) and 142 mD (Leduc). In parts of the Devonian formations a vuggy porosity exists, as analysis of cores has shown. This locally high porosity and permeability zones are not fully covered by the core measurements. Since logging and core analysis data of the Cambrian Basal Sandstone are rare, properties of this formation are measured on core samples with probe permeametry, gas permeametry and helium pycnometry. First results show an average porosity of 11.1 % and an average horizontal permeability of 1.4 mD. Further investigation of the Cambrian Basal Sandstone in Central Alberta is planned, including analysis of thin sections and geomechanical testing. Surface temperatures of Cambrian and Devonian strata are calculated, based on a newly calculated geothermal gradient and the reservoir depth range derived from the 3D model. Temperature in the Cambrian Basal Sandstone

  5. Current and future water issues in the Oldman River Basin of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J; Kienzle, S; Johnson, D; Duke, G; Gannon, V; Selinger, B; Thomas, J

    2006-01-01

    Long-term trends in alpine and prairie snow pack accumulation and melt are affecting streamflow within the Oldman River Basin in southern Alberta, Canada. Unchecked rural and urban development also has contributed to changes in water quality, including enhanced microbial populations and increased waterborne pathogen occurrence. In this study we look at changing environment within the Oldman River Basin and its impact on water quality and quantity. The cumulative effects include a decline in net water supplies, and declining quality resulting in increased risk of disease. Our data indicates that decreases in the rate of flow of water can result in sedimentation of bacterial contaminants within the water column. Water for ecosystems, urban consumption, recreation and distribution through irrigation is often drawn from waterholding facilities such as dams and weirs, and concern must be expressed over the potential for contaminate build-up and disproportionate potential of these structures to pose a risk to human and animal health. With disruption of natural flow rates for water resulting from environmental change such as global warming and/or human intervention, increased attention needs to be paid to use of best management practices to protect source water supplies.

  6. Frasnian reef and basinal strata of West Central Alberta: A combined sedimentological and biostratigraphic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenberger, J.A.W. (Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1994-03-01

    The depositional history for the Frasnian in the Nordegg area is interpreted and illustrated on cross sections and paleogeographic maps. Carbonate deposition began with the flooding of the West Alberta Arch and the deposition of the upper Swan Hills Formation during the Lower asymmetrica Zone. Transgression in the Middle asymmetrica Zone initiated the basinal Cline Channel and Duvernay Formation shale deposition, while the time equivalent Cooking Lake Formation was deposited on the drowned Swan Hills platform. The overlying lower Leduc Formation shows backstepping and aggradational reef margin stacking patterns. Maximum relief from the carbonate platform to surrounding Duvernay Formation shale during the Upper asymmetrica Zone was 100 m. Aggradation and backstepping was repeated in the Ancyrognathus trianularis Zone, with syndepositional relief reaching 170 m at the Wapiabi Gap reef margin. Platfrom-margin profiles were controlled by physical factors such as dominant wind direction and currents. On the Ram Range the margin backstepped, but then aggraded at Cripple Creek. At Wapiabi Gap, to the north on the Bighorn Range, the margin was dominantly aggradational. Ireton Formation shale deposition was also influenced by currents. In the Lower gigas Zone, the Leduc carbonate platform reached a maximum syndepositional relief at 220 m. A change from dominantly biohermal to biostromal platform margins occurred. A prograding wedge of Ireton Formation shale filled much of the relief in the Cline Channel, while the upper Leduc platform was drowned. Finally, the progradational Nisku Formation was deposited during the Upper gigas Zone. 70 refs., 20 figs.

  7. Recognition of depositional sequences and stacking patterns, Late Devonian (Frasnian) carbonate platforms, Alberta basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.H.; Reeckmann, S.A.; Sarg, J.F.; Greenlee, S.M.

    1987-05-01

    Six depositional sequences bounded by regional unconformities or their correlative equivalents (sequence boundaries) have been recognized in Late Devonian (Frasnian) carbonate platforms in the Alberta basin. These sequences consist of a predictable vertical succession of smaller scale shoaling-upward cycles (parasequences). Parasequences are arranged in retrogradational, aggradational, and progradational stacking patterns that can be modeled as a sediment response to relative changes in sea level. Sequence boundaries are recognized by onlap onto underlying shelf or shelf margin strata. This onlap includes shelf margin wedges and deep marine onlap. In outcrop sections shelf margin wedges exhibit an abrupt juxtaposition of shallow water facies over deeper water deposits with no gradational facies changes at the boundaries. High on the platform, subaerial exposure fabrics may be present. The shelf margin wedges are interpreted to have formed during lowstands in sea level and typically exhibit an aggradational stacking pattern. On the platform, two types of sequences are recognized. A type 1 cycle occurs where the sequence boundary is overlain by a flooding surface and subsequent parasequences exhibit retrogradational stacking. In a type 2 cycle the sequence boundary is overlain by an aggradational package of shallow water parasequences, followed by a retrogradational package. These two types of sequences can be modeled using a sinusoidal eustatic sea level curve superimposed on thermo-tectonic subsidence.

  8. Diagenetic history of the Swan Hills Simonette Oil Reservoir (Givetian-Frasnian), deep basin of west-central Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, J.P.; Mountjoy, E.W. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1997-05-01

    The geology and diagenetic history of the Swan Hills Simonette oil field of west-central Alberta basin was described. Present-day burial depth is 3900 m; formation temperature is 93 degrees C. Highest porosites (20 per cent) occur in dolostones of the lagoon, ref, and fore-reef depositional environments but limestones still retain porosities up to five per cent. Hydrocarbons are present in saddle dolomite fluid inclusions. Oxygen isotopes for replacement dolomites and late calcite suggest that the carbonate-precipitating fluids were derived from the Precambrian basement or Paleozoic clastics sourced from the basement. Faults may have acted as vertical conduits for fluid migration.

  9. Similarities between the Tangent-Wabamun type play of the Alberta Basin and the Albion-Scipio type play of the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churcher, P.L. (Petroleum Recovery Inst., (Calgary, AB Canada)); Majid, A.H. (Inst. of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1989-06-01

    Devonian reservoirs in the Tangent area of Alberta have been found to display many features similar to some Ordovician reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, including structural control on dolomitization, seal mechanism, source type, and diagenetic sequence. These two reservoirs are compared and contrasted to demonstrate that these plays may have had a similar origin. Both reservoirs are hosted by texturally and lithologically similar limestone, and both are overlain by silty, organic-rich shales that may be the source rocks for the hydrocarbons. In the reservoirs of both basins, strucure plays a major role in localizing the development of the secondary porosity and permeability; productive dolomitized zones are restricted to an area within 400-500 m on either side of faults. Detailed structure contour data have revealed horst-graben systems in both areas. The most intriguing feature is the similarity between the type and sequence of diagenetic mineralization. The breccias and cavities in both reservoirs are lined or filled with dolomite crystals, which frequently have ferroan dolomite rims. This diagenetic event was followed by sulphide mineralization and the precipitation of late-stage anhydrite and calcite. Hydrocarbon migration likely preceded the precipitation of these minerals. The integration of information from both basins provides insight into the origin of this type of play and provides valuable clues necessary for exploration and exploitation, particularly in the Wabamun Formation of the Peace River Arch area in Alberta. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Descriptive epidemiology of stigma against depression in a general population sample in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JianLi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health illnesses, such as depression, are responsible for a growing disease burden worldwide. Unfortunately, effective treatment is often impeded by stigmatizing attitudes of other individuals, which have been found to lead to a number of negative consequences including reduced help-seeking behavior and increased social distance. Despite the high prevalence of depression in Canada, little research has been conducted to examine stigma against depression in the Canadian general population. Such information is crucial to understanding the current state of stigmatizing attitudes in the Canadian communities, and framing future stigma reduction initiatives. The objectives of this study were to estimate the percentages of various stigmatizing attitudes toward depression in a general population sample and to compare the percentages by demographics and socioeconomic characteristics. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey in Alberta, Canada, between February and June 2006. Random digit dialing was used to recruit participants who were aged 18-74 years old (n = 3047. Participants were presented a case vignette describing a depressed individual, and responded to a 9-item Personal Stigma questionnaire. The percentages of stigmatizing attitudes were estimated and compared by demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results Among the participants, 45.9% endorsed that depressed individuals were unpredictable and 21.9% held the view that people with depression were dangerous. Significant differences in stigmatizing attitudes were found by gender, age, education, and immigration status. A greater proportion of men than women held stigmatizing views on each stigma item. No consistent trend emerged by age in stigma against depression. Participants with higher levels of education reported less stigmatizing attitudes than those with less education. Participants who were not born in Canada were more likely to hold

  11. K Basin sludge treatment process description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

  12. In situ stress magnitudes in the Alberta Basin : regional coverage for petroleum engineers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.S. [Sigma H Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Bachu, S. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Reservoir engineering relies on the knowledge of stress regimes. Predicting and assessing the physical behaviour of subsurface rocks results in savings in production and drilling costs as well as enhanced reservoir performance. This paper presents stress magnitudes in Alberta and northeastern British Columbia at a regional scale. Overburden stresses and smaller horizontal principal stresses were mapped in the Viking Formation, Banff Formation and Wabamun Group. The resulting maps showed regional southwestward increases in stress magnitudes related to depth of present and past burial. Local variations such as low stress lineaments indicate potential sites of enhanced reservoir permeability. These preliminary results may be of value to petroleum engineers interested in borehole stability, reservoir development and subsurface gas injection. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  13. The sedimentology and ichnology of the Falher C and Notikewin members (Spirit River Formation), Deep Basin, west-central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, I.; Schmidt, G.; Pemberton, G. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ichnology Research Group, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    The importance of establishing detailed depositional models to successfully explore for and exploit gas from stratigraphic traps was discussed. In particular, the Falher and Notikewin Members of the Spirit River Formation of west-central Alberta was presented as an example because it demonstrates how gas can be trapped unconventionally downdip of groundwater within porous sandstone and conglomerate reservoirs. To date, several gas pools have been discovered in the area, but many more remain to be discovered. About 1000 wells penetrate the Spirit River Formation within the study area which covers the southwestern and northeastern portion of the Elmworth and Wapiti fields. The study involved detailed regional subsurface correlations of the Spirit River Formation and its Members which can be subdivided into vertical successions of eight upward cycles representing fluctuations in sea level. Facies within the Falher C and Notikewin Members vary from continental, marginal marine to fully marine settings. Continental lithologies consist mainly of carbonaceous shales and coal-rich beds. It appears that estuarine, wave-dominated shoreface and barrier bar paleoenvironments prograded toward the basin. Many fossil assemblages can also be found within the silty muds. 5 figs.

  14. Source rock contributions to the Lower Cretaceous heavy oil accumulations in Alberta: a basin modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbesi, Luiyin Alejandro; di Primio, Rolando; Anka, Zahie; Horsfield, Brian; Higley, Debra K.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the immense oil sand deposits in Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Western Canada sedimentary basin is still a matter of debate, specifically with respect to the original in-place volumes and contributing source rocks. In this study, the contributions from the main source rocks were addressed using a three-dimensional petroleum system model calibrated to well data. A sensitivity analysis of source rock definition was performed in the case of the two main contributors, which are the Lower Jurassic Gordondale Member of the Fernie Group and the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Exshaw Formation. This sensitivity analysis included variations of assigned total organic carbon and hydrogen index for both source intervals, and in the case of the Exshaw Formation, variations of thickness in areas beneath the Rocky Mountains were also considered. All of the modeled source rocks reached the early or main oil generation stages by 60 Ma, before the onset of the Laramide orogeny. Reconstructed oil accumulations were initially modest because of limited trapping efficiency. This was improved by defining lateral stratigraphic seals within the carrier system. An additional sealing effect by biodegraded oil may have hindered the migration of petroleum in the northern areas, but not to the east of Athabasca. In the latter case, the main trapping controls are dominantly stratigraphic and structural. Our model, based on available data, identifies the Gordondale source rock as the contributor of more than 54% of the oil in the Athabasca and Peace River accumulations, followed by minor amounts from Exshaw (15%) and other Devonian to Lower Jurassic source rocks. The proposed strong contribution of petroleum from the Exshaw Formation source rock to the Athabasca oil sands is only reproduced by assuming 25 m (82 ft) of mature Exshaw in the kitchen areas, with original total organic carbon of 9% or more.

  15. Reference curves for the Brazilian Alberta Infant Motor Scale: percentiles for clinical description and follow-up over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia C

    2012-01-01

    To compare Alberta Infant Motor Scale scores for Brazilian infants with the Canadian norm and to construct sex-specific reference curves and percentiles for motor development for a Brazilian population. This study recruited 795 children aged 0 to 18 months from a number of different towns in Brazil. Infants were assessed by an experienced researcher in a silent room using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Sex-specific percentiles (P5, P10, P25, P50, P75 and P90) were calculated and analyzed for each age in months from 0 to 18 months. No significant differences (p > 0.05) between boys and girls were observed for the majority of ages. The exception was 14 months, where the girls scored higher for overall motor performance (p = 0.015) and had a higher development percentile (0.021). It was observed that the development curves demonstrated a tendency to nonlinear development in both sexes and for both typical and atypical children. Variation in motor acquisition was minimal at the extremes of the age range: during the first two months of life and from 15 months onwards. Although the Alberta Infant Motor Scale is widely used in both research and clinical practice, it has certain limitations in terms of behavioral differentiation before 2 months and after 15 months. This reduced sensitivity at the extremes of the age range may be related to the number of motor items assessed at these ages and their difficulty. It is suggested that other screening instruments be employed for children over the age of 15 months.

  16. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

  17. Fan-delta and interdeltaic shoreline sediments of Middle Devonian Granite Wash and Keg River clastics, Red Earth field, north Alberta basin, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabry, H.

    1989-03-01

    A detailed sedimentological investigation of over 4000 ft of core and 500 well logs of the Middle Devonian granite wash and Keg River clastics in the Red Earth field, North Alberta basin, Canada, has led to the recognition of a granite wash subaerial fan-delta system that is laterally continuous with a Keg River subaqueous delta component along an eastern shoreline of the ancestral Peace River arch. The subaerial fan delta includes alluvial fan facies, sheet wash and mud flows, and playa lakes. The subaqueous delta component includes lower shoreface, upper shoreface, beach-foreshore, eolian sand dunes, lagoon, washover sands, tidal channels and flats, and supratidal carbonates and anhydrites. Within this system, six mappable units are defined. A conceptual depositional model for the sequence depicts four main events. (1) Erosion of Peach River arch uplifted fault blocks, which produced coarse-grained fan-delta sediments in an adjacent fault-bounded margin. Subsequent fluvial reworking resulted in the deposition of thick, lenticular, wedge-shaped alluvial fans of granite wash. (2) Progradation of alluvial fans seaward into the Keg River Sea. (3) Transgression by Middle Devonian seas from the east, which reworked alluvial fans and led to deposition of discontinuous linear sand bodies represented by the Keg River regressive shoreline sediments. (4) Restriction of the sea by the Presqu'ile barrier reef to the north, which deposited evaporites of the Muskeg Formation over the whole sequence. Modern analog to this fan-delta system is the coastal fans of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Red Earth field contains over 27 million bbl of recoverable oil, related to a combination structural-stratigraphic trap.

  18. A stochastic approach for the description of the water balance dynamics in a river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manfreda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces an analytical approach for the description of the soil water balance dynamics over a schematic river basin. The model is based on a stochastic differential equation where the rainfall forcing is interpreted as an additive noise in the soil water balance. This equation can be solved assuming known the spatial distribution of the soil moisture over the basin transforming the two-dimensional problem in space in a one dimensional one. This assumption is particularly true in the case of humid and semihumid environments, where spatial redistribution becomes dominant producing a well defined soil moisture pattern. The model allowed to derive the probability density function of the saturated portion of a basin and of its relative saturation. This theory is based on the assumption that the soil water storage capacity varies across the basin following a parabolic distribution and the basin has homogeneous soil texture and vegetation cover. The methodology outlined the role played by the soil water storage capacity distribution of the basin on soil water balance. In particular, the resulting probability density functions of the relative basin saturation were found to be strongly controlled by the maximum water storage capacity of the basin, while the probability density functions of the relative saturated portion of the basin are strongly influenced by the spatial heterogeneity of the soil water storage capacity. Moreover, the saturated areas reach their maximum variability when the mean rainfall rate is almost equal to the soil water loss coefficient given by the sum of the maximum rate of evapotranspiration and leakage loss in the soil water balance. The model was tested using the results of a continuous numerical simulation performed with a semi-distributed model in order to validate the proposed theoretical distributions.

  19. Feminization of Longnose Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae in the Oldman River, Alberta, (Canada Provides Evidence of Widespread Endocrine Disruption in an Agricultural Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce S. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We sampled an abundant, native minnow (Longnose dace—Rhinichthys cataractae throughout the Oldman River, Alberta, to determine physiological responses and possible population level consequences from exposure to compounds with hormone-like activity. Sex ratios varied between sites, were female-biased, and ranged from just over 50% to almost 90%. Histological examination of gonads revealed that at the sites with >60% females in the adult population, there was up to 38% occurrence of intersex gonads in fish identified through visual examination of the gonads as male. In the majority of intersex gonad cases, there was a large proportion (approx., 50% of oocytes within the testicular tissue. In male dace, vitellogenin mRNA expression generally increased with distance downstream. We analyzed river water for 28 endocrine disrupting compounds from eight functional classes, most with confirmed estrogen-like activity, including synthetic estrogens and hormone therapy drugs characteristic of municipal wastewater effluent, plus natural hormones and veterinary pharmaceuticals characteristic of livestock production. The spatial correlation between detected chemical residues and effects to dace physiology indicate that multiple land uses have a cumulative impact on dace in the Oldman River and effects range from altered gene regulation to severely female-biased sex ratios.

  20. Transmission issues in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levson, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlined the major issues and concerns facing users of the transmission system in Alberta. They include congestion management issues that make investors uncertain about power generation. It is necessary to know the difference between which transmission price signals will be faced by low cost cogeneration at Fort McMurray and Cold Lake coal-fired generation near Edmonton compared to combined cycle gas generation near Calgary. Import and export policy tariffs are another concern. Most new generation opportunities in Alberta require access to export markets, but transmission facilities for export need policy support and appropriate tariffs. It was noted that the past actions of Alberta's Transmission Administrator and balancing pool may be distorting market signals for ancillary service markets, and that loss studies and calculations need upgrading

  1. Surface water-quality assessment of the Kentucky River basin, Kentucky; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.D.; Smoot, J.L.; Jackson, J.K.; Choquette, Anne F.

    1987-01-01

    In April 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began the National Water Quality Assessment Program, which at present (1987) is in a pilot phase in which assessment concepts and approaches are being tested and modified to prepare for full implementation of the program in the future. Seven pilot projects (four surface water projects and three groundwater projects) have been started. The preliminary plans for the surface water quality assessment of the Kentucky River basin pilot project are described. The Kentucky River basin drains an area of approximately 7,000 sq mi in east central Kentucky and is underlain by rocks that range in composition from limestone to sandstone and shale. Because greater than 95% of the basin population relies on surface water, surface water quality is of great concern. Land use practices that affect the surface water quality in the basin include agriculture, forestry, oil and gas production, coal mining, and urbanization. Water quality concerns resulting from the various land uses include the effects of: oil and gas field brine discharges; agricultural chemicals; sedimentation caused by coal mining; and trace element impacts from industrial and urban environments. Assessment activity is designed to occur over a 9-year period of time. During the first 3-year period of the cycle, concentrated data acquisition and interpretation will occur. For the next 6 years, sample collection will occur at a much lower level of intensity to document the occurrence of any gross changes in water quality. This 9-year cycle will then be repeated. Historical data will be evaluated to provide, to the extent possible, a description of existing and past trends in water quality conditions and to develop conceptual models that relate the observed conditions to the sources and causes, both natural and human-controlled. New data will be collected to verify the water quality conditions documented by historic data, to track long-term trends in water quality, to intensify

  2. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Greg; Anweiler, Gary; Schmidt, Christian; Kondla, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    This checklist documents the 2367 Lepidoptera species reported to occur in the province of Alberta, Canada, based on examination of the major public insect collections in Alberta and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes. Records from relevant literature sources published since 1950 and from selected older works are also included. The entry for each species includes the scientific name, the author and year of publication of the original description, occurrence s...

  3. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, Canada, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Debra K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed a geoscience-based assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of provinces within the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin primarily comprises the (1) Alberta Basin Province of Alberta, eastern British Columbia, and the southwestern Northwest Territories; (2) the Williston Basin Province of Saskatchewan, southeastern Alberta, and southern Manitoba; and (3) the Rocky Mountain Deformed Belt Province of western Alberta and eastern British Columbia. This report is part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Resources Project assessment of priority geologic provinces of the world. The assessment was based on geoscience elements that define a total petroleum system (TPS) and associated assessment unit(s). These elements include petroleum source rocks (geochemical properties and petroleum generation, migration, and accumulation), reservoir description (reservoir presence, type, and quality), and petroleum traps (trap and seal types, and timing of trap and seal formation relative to petroleum migration). Using this framework, the Elk Point-Woodbend Composite TPS, Exshaw-Fernie-Mannville Composite TPS, and Middle through Upper Cretaceous Composite TPS were defined, and four conventional assessment units within the total petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered resources in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

  4. Alberta Essay Scales: Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Verner R.; Nyberg, Adell M.

    The Alberta Essay Scales were developed to assist teachers in the grading of essays. They represent a standard based on written compositions at the 12th grade level in 1964 to be compared with current composition writing achievement. A scale for mechanics in English and one for writing style and content are defined through model essays and…

  5. Whither Alberta's oil production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, R.A.; Dick, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated how a combination of old theory (decline methods and statistics) and new technology (computer graphics) can enhance decline-curve forecasts for multi-well groupings. Production and well-count forecasts are presented for four different sized groups of aggregate production. The four examples are: the small Manville pool; the Pembina Cardium, Alberta's largest oil pool; an aggregate of all reef pools of Keg River age; and an aggregate of all wells reporting conventional oil production in the province of Alberta. In each case graphical results show the historical and forecast trends for the statistical distribution of well rates, the median well rate, the aggregated rate, and the number of producing wells. It is concluded that well rate distributions for groups ranging from 15 wells in a single pool to thousands of wells in hundreds of pools are all approximately lognormal. Lognormal well rate distributions and Lorenz graphs provide qualitative and quantitative assessments of a resource base. Decline curves for the median well rate can reveal trends masked in the aggregated rate by changing well count, operating practice and degradation of the resource base. The number of producing wells in Alberta has grown from ca 9000 in 1970 to ca 24,000 in 1988, has remained constant from 1988-1990, and will start to decline as the number of suspended or abandoned wells exceeds the number of new completions. 3 refs., 13 figs., 4 figs

  6. Alberta propylene upgrading prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    A very significant byproduct recovery and purification scheme is at present being prepared by TransCanada Midstream (TCMS). Alberta Economic Development commissioned an independent study to identify propylene supply options while proceeding with the evaluation of various propylene derivatives with regard to their fit with the Alberta context. Identification of chemical companies with derivative interests was also accomplished. By 2005, it is estimated that 280 kilo-tonnes of propylene will be available on an annual basis from byproduct sources. Those sources are oil sands upgraders, ethylene plants and refineries. The ranges of impurities and supply costs vary between the different sources. An option being considered involves pipeline and rail receipt with a major central treating and distillation facility for the production of polymer grade (PG) propylene with propane and other smaller byproducts. Special consideration was given to three chemicals in this study, namely: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and acrylic acid (AA). Above average growth rates were identified for these chemicals: demand is growing at 6 to 7 per cent a year for both PP and ACN, while demand for AA grows at 8 per cent annually. Two other possibilities were identified, propylene oxide (PO) and phenol. The study led to the conclusion that low capital and operating costs and shipping costs to the Pacific Rim represent advantages to the development of propylene derivatives in the future in Alberta. 4 refs., 87 tabs., 7 figs

  7. Screening with Papanicolaou tests in Alberta: Are we Choosing Wisely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Christopher J; Chen, Wenxin; Rose, Marianne Sarah; Cooke, Lara J

    2018-01-01

    To describe the prevalence and geographic distribution of cervical cancer screening, as well as the age groups of those undergoing screening, in Alberta, and to determine if screening practices conform to current guidelines and follow Choosing Wisely Canada recommendations. Descriptive study using data from the Alberta Ministry of Health Analytics and Performance Reporting Branch. Alberta. Women who had 1 or more Papanicolaou tests between 2011 and 2013. Number of women aged 15 to 20 and those aged 70 and older who had 1 or more Pap tests in a 3-year period; year-to-year trends in screening rates for women in these 2 age groups; trends in screening rates in various geographic regions (ie, cities and zones) in Alberta; and the discipline of clinicians who ordered the Pap tests. Between 2011 and 2013, 805 632 women in the province of Alberta had 1 or more Pap tests for cervical cancer screening. Overall, 25 511 (17.5%) women aged 15 to 20 and 16 818 (10.3%) aged 70 and older were screened contrary to most existing guidelines. Screening rates varied markedly in different geographic regions of the province. Most Pap tests were ordered by family physicians or general practitioners. Within the geographic regions of Alberta, provincial, national, and international guidelines for screening with Pap tests are inconsistently followed. This strongly echoes the need for clinicians and patients to consider the Choosing Wisely Canada recommendations and current guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  8. The Alberta Electrical Grid: What to Expect in the Next Few Years in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Livingston

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Alberta government has stated that it wants to make significant changes to the supply of electricity to the current electrical grid for the province. These changes include the phasing out of coal generation by 2030, the supply of 30 per cent of electricity from renewables by 2030 and the introduction of a socalled capacity market in addition to the current electrical energy market. The achievement of these objectives will require a number of fundamental changes to the existing electrical grid. This paper provides an overall description of these changes. The paper first examines the current grid structure in which coal and gas provide the base load supply in the amount of 90 per cent of electricity demand, and renewables are a relatively small source of supply for the remaining 10 per cent. It then reviews the current simple energy market in Alberta that uses a single price auction to determine the wholesale price of electricity. The paper then notes that the achievement of these changes will require a large amount of investment in the next 15 years to create new generating capacity that currently does not exist. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO has forecast that by 2032, Alberta will need an additional 7,000 megawatts of gas generation, 5,000 megawatts of wind, 700 megawatts of solar and 350 megawatts of hydro. To put this in context, the Ontario grid currently has 4,213 megawatts of wind (11 per cent of total generating capacity and 380 megawatts of solar (one per cent of generating capacity. The Alberta government has made two fundamental changes in the electricity market to make this happen. First, it has introduced a Renewable Energy Program (REP to incent investment in renewables. They asked industry to bid on a 20 year contract for supply of electricity that offered a guaranteed fixed price that was independent of the existing wholesale market. The first round of bidding (REP 1 announced in December 2017 resulted in 600

  9. Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mades, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment program to (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation's surface- and ground-water resources; (2) define, where possible, trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both status and trends in water quality to natural factors and the history of land use and land- and waste-management activities. The program is presently in a pilot phase that will test and modify, as necessary, concepts and approaches in preparation for possible full implementation of the program in the future. The upper Illinois River basin is one of four basins selected to test the concepts and approaches of the surface-water-quality element of the national program. The basin drains 10,949 square miles of Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Three principal tributaries are the Kankakee and Des Plaines Rivers that join to form the Illinois River and the Fox River. Land use is predominantly agricultural; about 75 percent of the basin is cultivated primarily for production of corn and soybeans. About 13 percent of the basin is urban area, most of which is located in the Chicago metropolitan area. The population of the basin is about 7 million. About 6 million people live in the Des Plaines River basin. Many water-quality issues in the upper Illinois River basin are related to sediment, nutrients, potentially toxic inorganic and organic constituents, and to water-management practices. Occurrence of sediment and the chemical constituents in the rivers and lakes within the basin has the potential to adversely affect the water's suitability for aquatic life, recreation, or, through the consumption of fish, human health. The upper Illinois River basin project consists of five major activities. The first activity--analysis of existing information and preparation of a report that describes

  10. Description of Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Peruvian Amazon Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Roberto; Lopez, Victor; Cardenas, Roldan; Requena, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    A new species of sand fly, which we describe as Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., was collected in the northern Peruvian Amazon Basin. In this region of Peru, cutaneous leishmaniasis is transmitted primarily by anthropophilic sand flies; however, zoophilic sand flies of the subgenus Trichophoromyia may also be incriminated in disease transmission. Detection of Leishmania spp. in Lutzomyia auraensis Mangabeira captured in the southern Peruvian Amazon indicates the potential of thi...

  11. Insight conference proceedings : Alberta power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This conference addressed issues dealing with Alberta's restructured electric power industry and new policies from the perspective of Alberta's independent power industry. It covered lessons learned from electric industry restructuring, transmission strategies, transmission frameworks, competitive markets, power costs, energy prices, and power outages. Interconnected power systems between Alberta and British Columbia were also reviewed along with grid reinforcement requirements. Markets and restructuring efforts in other jurisdictions such as Quebec and Maritime Canada were briefly reviewed. The move to deregulate the industry has played an important role in restructuring a vertically integrated industry into power generation, transmission and distribution. High electricity prices eventually resulted in re regulation of the industry and a synergy between wholesale and retail markets. Five of the 17 papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs

  12. China joins Alberta oilsands research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that China's state oil company has bought a stake in an in situ oilsands research project in northern Alberta. China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC) will invest $6.5 million in the Underground Test Facility (UTF) operated by Alberta Oilsands Technology and Research Authority (Aostra) near Fort McMurray. It is the first foreign research investment for CNPC. The UTF is a joint venture by provincial agency Aostria, the Canadian federal government, and commercial partners in underground mining techniques to extract crude oil from bitumen. Alberta opened a trade office in Beijing in 1991 and now sells several hundred million dollars a year in petroleum equipment and services to China. A horizontal well in situ steam injection process is approaching the production stage at the UTF. It is to begin producing at a rate of 2,000 b/d this fall. The current project is a followup to a pilot project

  13. Educational Change in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F. Webber

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Alberta, Canada, is the site of large-scale educational change initiatives legislated by the provincial government. The mandates have sparked heated public debate over the appropriateness, wisdom, and utility of the reforms. This article summarizes the views of representatives of several educational interest groups and offers suggestions for making change more meaningful and successful.

  14. Alberta's oil sands fiscal system : historical context and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report described the fiscal system applied to Alberta's oil sands. It is the first technical report forming part of a series designed to provide information and to invite comment as part of the Government of Alberta's public review of the fiscal system applied to the province's oil and gas resources. Specifically, this report assessed the robustness of Alberta's oil sands fiscal system and assessed how the regime balanced the risks and rewards to both investors and Albertans across a range of expected and probable economic outcomes. The report provided an explanation of the history and context of Alberta's royalty regime and included a case-by-case approach. It also provided a discussion of the oil sands fiscal system description. Next, it described the methodology employed for the analysis of the oil sands fiscal system. It also provided the assumptions for 5 scenario cases and presented the fiscal map approach for assessing project economics and fiscal system performance. Last, summary observations were presented. It was found that the oil sands fiscal system is very flexible for adverse economic conditions and much less so for highly profitable conditions. tabs., figs

  15. Transmission infrastructure development in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbings, R.V. [EnVision Energy Consulting Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    Major power blackouts have resulted in greater attention to reliability. Changes in industry structure have placed unanticipated demands on transmission systems. Load growth has outstripped transmission investment, and there are major implications for infrastructure development due to the enactment of the new transmission regulation. This paper discusses several projects addressing new developments in the electric power industry, including details of an Edmonton-Calgary path upgrade in order to increase north-south transmission capacity. Proposed southwest Transmission upgrades were reviewed, including the construction of a double-circuit 240 kV line from Pincher Creek to Peigan or Mud Lake, in order to improve reliability and improve access to southern wind and hydro generation. Other possible projects include a High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) from Fort McMurray to Calgary and a Northern Lights Transmission project between Fort McMurray and the Pacific Northwest. Various investment drivers were reviewed, with oil sands processing providing steam hosts for cogeneration at Fort McMurray and Cold Lake generation as well as Lake Wabamun. Plans concerning Southwest Alberta generation were presented, including wind-powered generation, and load growth in southern Alberta. Various investment limiters include absorption of existing capacity; improved facility utilization; and distributed generation. Competition for investment funds were discussed, in addition to uncertainties over generation siting as well as regulatory difficulties and power flow pattern irregularities due to increasing market integration. Uncertain access to markets, locational marginal pricing and various southern Alberta generation incentives were reviewed. Market implications include generation mix; lower price volatility; reduced potential for market power abuse by generators; and increased export levels. The implications for British Columbia were highlighted, with particular reference to an

  16. The American Imprint on Alberta Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics assigned to America's classical liberal ideology--rugged individualism, market capitalism, egalitarianism in the sense of equality of opportunity, and fierce hostility toward centralized federalism and socialism--are particularly appropriate for fathoming Alberta's political culture. The author contends that Alberta's early…

  17. Section 1: Alberta Power Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothari, R.; Quinn, D.

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out to produce a compendium of electric and magnetic field levels that exist in Canada and to characterize and classify the sources of electric and magnetic fields. Alberta Power's contribution to this project was mainly to measure electric and magnetic fields produced by transmission lines in their service area in Alberta. Ten 240 kV transmission lines, ten 144 kV transmission lines, one 72 kV transmission line, two 25 kV distribution lines, two substations, and one residence were monitored for 60 Hz electric and magnetic field levels. For the 240 kV transmission lines, the electric field ranged from 0.4 kV/m to 1.9 kV/m and the magnetic field from 2.5 milligauss to 27 milligauss at the edge of the right-of-way. For 144 kV lines, the electric and magnetic fields ranged from 0.24-1.00 kV/m and 2.25-12.00 milligauss, respectively, at the edge of the right-of-way. 5 tabs

  18. Team effectiveness in primary care networks in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Peter; Jones, Brad; Norton, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Primary care networks (PCNs) are interdisciplinary programs in a geographical area that are designed to improve patient care, team collaboration and appropriate resource allocation. They are one of government's approaches to delivering quality healthcare with finite resources. The primary objective of this study was to explore the level of perceived team effectiveness in PCNs within three former health regions in Alberta. A descriptive, cross-sectional, exploratory, semi-structured questionnaire study design was employed. Respondents identified five themes for strategies to improve team effectiveness. Although many factors and strategies were identified, more work is needed to explore the study's findings.

  19. Design and reliability engineering of aquifer CO{sub 2} disposal in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, A.; Frimpong, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage or disposal options have been proposed as a means by which to deal with long-term CO{sub 2} emissions in Alberta. The option includes CO{sub 2} storage or disposal into geological sinks such as an aquifer, depleted oil reservoir, coal bed or the ocean. Currently, CO{sub 2} aquifer disposal is the most feasible option. Studies have shown that an appropriate Glauconitic aquifer exists in the Alberta Basin. A detailed review of the geology and stability of the land aquifers in the Alberta Basin has been carried out and the phase dynamics and the trapping mechanisms of CO{sub 2} in aquifers was examined along with the porosity, permeability and fracture pressure properties of the host aquifers. A model was developed which showed the technical feasibility of CO{sub 2} disposal systems. The model was validated using flue gas from the 546 MW Wabamun coal-fired power plant in Alberta. Analytical designs were created for the liquefaction-transportation-injection networks based on the reaction kinetics and phase dynamics of CO{sub 2} under various temperature and pressure conditions. Results shows that CO{sub 2} can be safely trapped in the aquifers by chemical and hydrodynamic trapping over a long geological period. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. Our petroleum legacy: The Alberta story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, R.

    1992-11-01

    Background information is presented on the importance of the petroleum industry in Alberta. Alberta holds over 70% of Canada's coal and natural gas reserves and, if bitumen is included, over 90% of Canada's established oil reserves. Alberta's major exports are dominated by crude oil and related products ($9.6 billion in 1990) and the oil and gas sector had $15.7 billion in revenues in 1991, over 4 times as much as the next most important sector, agriculture. About 140,000 Albertans are directly or indirectly employed in the oil and gas industry, about 11% of employed persons. The industry's capital spending in Alberta was $5.3 billion in 1991, and its total expenditures were about $15 billion, and during the 1980s the industry paid about $42 billion to the Alberta government in the form of taxes, royalties, and other fees. Other benefits of the oil and gas industry's presence in Alberta include those related to its employment of a skilled workforce, its advanced research capabilities, and economic spinoff effects from employment and technological development. The influence of recent events on the industry is outlined, including the effects of international energy commodity markets, deregulation, and higher exploration and development costs. The declining financial viability of the Alberta petroleum industry is noted and its future is discussed in the light of such factors as oil prices, markets, new technologies, environmental constraints, and the volume of new discoveries. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Zap... Alberta is jolted by electric deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Of all Canadian provinces, Alberta has travelled the furthest along the electric deregulation road. On January 1, 2001, full retail competition came into effect. Wholesale electricity prices are set by the province through an auction process. The bids from purchasers are made through the Power Pool of Alberta against supply offers. Power prices increased from being amongst the lowest in the world to being amongst the highest in North America as a result of deregulation. Changes to the Electric Utilities Act were made recently by the Alberta government to try to mitigate the factors affecting power price increases. RBC Dominion Securities is of the opinion that the changes will not significantly impact the Alberta Pool Price. It is expected that the trend for power price increases to continue, despite some relief from relatively low-cost electricity being felt by other Canadian provinces as a result of the energy crisis in North America. Based on the Electric Competition Unfolds in Alberta report dated June 2, 2001 prepared by RBC Dominion Securities, this document examines the factors at play in electric price increases, assess the sustainability of current power prices in Alberta, and identify Canadian companies believed to be best positioned in the pipeline and gas and electric sectors to benefit from the high power prices in Alberta. Those companies were ATCO, Canadian Utilities, Westcoast Energy and TransCanada PipeLines, and TransAlta. 5 tabs., 5 figs

  2. Big and Little Feet Provincial Profiles: Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dobson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This communiqué provides a summary of the production- and consumption-based greenhouse gas emissions accounts for Alberta, as well as their associated trade flows. It is part of a series of communiqués profiling the Canadian provinces and territories.1 In simplest terms, a production-based emissions account measures the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions produced in Alberta. In contrast, a consumption-based emissions account measures the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions generated during the production process for final goods and services that are consumed in Alberta through household purchases, investment by firms and government spending. Trade flows refer to the movement of emissions that are produced in Alberta but which support consumption in a different province, territory or country (and vice versa. For example, emissions associated with the production of Alberta crude oil that is exported to British Columbia for refining and sale as motor gasoline are recorded as a trade flow from Alberta to British Columbia. Moving in the opposite direction, emissions associated with the production of Saskatchewan crops that are exported to Alberta for processing and sale in Alberta grocery stores are recorded as a trade flow from Saskatchewan to Alberta. For further details on these results in a national context, the methodology for generating them and their policy implications, please see the companion papers to this communiqué series: (1 Fellows and Dobson (2017; and (2 Dobson and Fellows (2017. Additionally, the consumption emissions and trade flow data for each of the provinces and territories are available at: http://www.policyschool.ca/embodied-emissions-inputs-outputs-datatables-2004-2011/.

  3. Devonian lithofacies and reservoir styles in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, F.F.; Burrowes, O.G. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    This conference presented papers on the stratigraphy, paleogeography, and geologic history of Devonian lithofacies of the Wabamun, Winterburn, Woodbend, Beaverhill Lake, and Elk Point Groups in Alberta. Separate abstracts were prepared for twelve papers of this conference.

  4. Description of Thorichthys panchovillai sp. n., a new species of cichlid (Actinopterygii: Cichlidae from the River Coatzacoalcos Basin, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Del Moral-Flores

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Thorichthys panchovillai, new species, is described, from distinctive of the tributaries of the River Coatzacoalcos basin, Mexico. The new species is diagnosed by a set of characters: dorsal fin rays XVI, 8 – 9; anal fin rays VII, 6 – 7; pectoral fin rays, I, 11 – 12; total gill-rakers on the first branchial cleft 11 – 12; subopercular stain present although weakly intensified, it exposes a notable sexual dimorphism that distinguishes it from others: the female possess a black blotch between the fifth and sixth dorsal spine.

  5. TransCanada's Alberta hub : a great market for British Columbia natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation outlined commercial gas transmission activities along TransCanada Pipelines' wholly owned regulated pipelines in western Canada, including the Alberta System and the British Columbia (BC) System. TransCanada Pipelines owns and operates 41,000 km of pipeline that transport 11.5 billion cubic feet of gas per day. TransCanada's efforts to improve Alberta System economics were described along with the services it has developed to better connect supply and improve market access. This presentation included several illustrations depicting North American gas supply and demand; frontier resources in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB); pipelines that accommodate northern gas; Alberta gas demand; and, Pacific gas demand; The integration of the Gas Transmission Northwest (GTN) System in the energy grid of western North America was also discussed. It was determined that production from the WCSB remains stable and supply from BC will remain a key growth area for the WCSB. In addition, enhancements to the Alberta Hub, facilitated by TransCanada's Nova Inventory Transfer, will provides a great market for BC gas. figs

  6. Alberta's clean energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the future of clean energy in Alberta. With the present economic growth of the oil sands industry in Alberta, it is expected that there will be very considerable increases in job opportunities and GDP in both Canada and US. The challenges include high-energy demand and reduction of the carbon footprint. Alberta has adopted certain approaches to developing renewable and alternate forms of energy as well as to increasing the efficiency of present energy use and raising environmental consciousness in energy production. Three areas where the effects of clean energy will be felt are energy systems, climate change, and regional impacts, for instance on land, water, and wildlife. Alberta's regulatory process is shown by means of a flow chart. Aspects of oil sands environmental management include greenhouse gas targets, air quality assurance, and water quality monitoring, among others. Steps taken by Alberta to monitor and improve air quality and water management are listed. In conclusion, the paper notes that significant amounts of money are being pumped into research and development for greenhouse gas and water management projects.

  7. The Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Crewdson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Southern Alberta Information Resources (SAIR is a collaborative bibliography of published resources significant to southern Alberta. Objectives and progress with evolving methodology, technology, issues and challenges are explored within the context of the library field. We investigate a collaborative digital library that allows librarians and non-librarians alike to share information on specific topics through MARC records. An outcome of a collaborative digital library is how to create and sustain interest within the library community. Southern Alberta region was selected based on the authors’ familiarity with the region. Some issues and questions remain to be resolved. Digital formats present a number of challenges in terms of selection and presentation. Legal issues relating to technology such as linking and location information have emerged. Basic technical issues remain, such as, how best to update links.

  8. Description of a new species of Ituglanis (Siluriformes: Trichomycteridae from Serra dos Carajás, rio Tocantins basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolmar B. Wosiacki

    Full Text Available A new species of Ituglanis is described from the rio Tocantins basin, State of Pará, Brazil. Ituglanis ina, new species, is distinguished from its congeners by the presence of a dark vertical bar over the base of the caudal-fin rays (vs. no bars over caudal-fin base; and by the presence of a middle trunk line of tiny neuromasts extending along the flank until the vertical through the dorsal fin, or near the caudal-fin base (vs. no middle trunk line of tiny neuromasts. Ituglanis ina can be further distinguished by a combination of characters related to color pattern and morphology. Comments on the relationship between Ituglanis species are presented.

  9. Alberta industrial synergy CO2 programs initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, E.

    1998-01-01

    The various industrial sectors within Alberta produce about 350,000 tonnes of CO 2 per day. This presentation was concerned with how this large volume and high concentration of CO 2 can be used in industrial and agricultural applications, because every tonne of CO 2 used for such purposes is a tonne that does not end up in the atmosphere. There is a good potential for an industrial synergy between the producers and users of CO 2 . The Alberta Industrial Synergy CO 2 Programs Initiative was established to ultimately achieve a balance between the producers of CO 2 and the users of CO 2 by creating ways to use the massive quantities of CO 2 produced by Alberta's hydrocarbon-based economy. The Alberta CO 2 Research Steering Committee was created to initiate and support CO 2 programs such as: (1) CO 2 use in enhanced oil recovery, (2) creation of a CO 2 production inventory, (3) survey of CO 2 users and potential users, (4) investigation of process issues such as power generation, oil sands and cement manufacturing, and (5) biofixation by plants, (6) other disposal options (e.g. in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, in aquifers, in tailings ponds, in coal beds). The single most important challenge was identified as 'rationalizing the formation of the necessary infrastructure'. Failing to do that will greatly impede efforts directed towards CO 2 utilization

  10. Technical Report on Alberta Essay Scales: Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Verner R.; Nyberg, Adell M.

    The supplementary information on "Alberta Essay Scales: Models" presented here includes similar models to employ in grading essays, the background and development of the scales, and the rationale for developing two scales of English mechanics and style/content. A standard is presented for evaluating current writing achievement by…

  11. Reliability of the Alberta Essay Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, V. R.; Nyberg, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A respectable reliability of scoring twelfth-grade essays can be achieved through the use of essay models in the two Alberta Essay Scales (style-content and mechanics). The scales can assist classroom teachers in the day-to-day scoring of essays by providing a constant standard. (Author/SB)

  12. A Guide to Native Communities in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Native Affairs, Edmonton.

    Profiles of 83 Native communities, Indian bands, and Metis settlements in rural Alberta provide overviews of human and material resources. Included for each community are information on location, size, history, population, economic base, transportation, physical infrastructure, services, education, communications, local government, and community…

  13. Alberta air emissions : trends and projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This paper provided a summary of air emissions trends and projections for Alberta. Predicted regional distribution trends and industry sector emissions were presented. Historical and projected emissions included sulfur oxides (SO x ) nitrogen oxide (NO x ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and ammonia (NH 3 ). Results of the study indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were decreasing, while VOCs, NO x , SO x , PM 2.5 and NH 3 levels were increasing. Approximately 9 per cent of ammonia emissions were from point sources, while the majority of PM 2.5 emissions were attributed to unpaved roads and construction operations. Agricultural animal operations accounted for most of the VOC source emissions in the region. Increased development of the oil sands industry is contributing to increases in VOC emissions. Increases in NH 3 were attributed to growth in the agricultural sector and the increasing use of confined feeding operations in the region. Results of the study indicated that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Alberta will keep increasing as a result of Alberta's growing economy. It was concluded that emissions from other industrial sectors are also expected to increase. In 2005, Alberta's total GHG emissions were 233 megatonnes of CO 2 equivalent, of which 168 megatonnes were attributed to industry. Results were presented in both graph and tabular formats. 3 tabs., 25 figs

  14. Did you know? Petroleum industry fast facts : Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    A brief summary of Alberta`s petroleum industry is provided. In 1997, capital expenditures from the petroleum industry into Alberta`s economy were more than $13 billion. The province is the largest crude oil and natural gas producer in Canada, employing some 215,000 people across the province. Of these 165,00 are directly, or indirectly employed in upstream activities, and about 50,000 in downstream activities, including pipeline transportation. The industry utilizes an extensive pipeline network with nearly 260,000 kilometres of pipeline serving local, national and international markets. The Alberta oil sands have more than 300 billion barrels of potential recoverable deposits, comparable to the proven reserves in Saudi Arabia. Crude oil and natural gas make up nearly 56 per cent of Alberta`s exports. In 1997, the province supplied almost 12 per cent of the U.S. natural gas consumption. 3 figs.

  15. Genetic and stratigraphic significance of the Upper Devonian Frasnian Z Marker, west-central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendte, J. [Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada); Stoakes, F. [Stoakes Consulting Group Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bosman, M. [Canadian Hunter Exploration Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bernstein, L. [Talisman Energy Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1995-12-01

    The stratigraphic model from the west-central Alberta basin was provided. It defined the Z Marker as a distinctive and widespread wireline log marker within the thick Frasnian Ireton shale basin succession. The marker represents an interval of condensed sedimentation and corresponds to an abrupt change from a calcareous signature below to an argillaceous character above. Toward the shelf, in the West Pembina area, the Z Marker correlates to a level within a conformable succession of nodular lime wackestones and corresponds to the base of a depositional cycle near the middle of the Lobstick member of the Nisku Formation. Further shelfward, the Z Marker continues as a well-defined log marker until the Nisku shelf margin. The stratigraphic significance of the Z Marker in delineating various oil bearing formations in Alberta were explained in great detail. The correct recognition and correlation of this marker was claimed to permit an understanding of basin evolution beyond that discernable from the existing lithostratigraphic nomenclature alone. 17 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Suffield a cornucopia for Alberta energy company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Operations of the Alberta Energy Company's (AEC) Suffield properties in southern Alberta, the company's major production area, were reviewed. With a staff of just over 100, Suffield was said to produce an average of 180 million cubic feet of natural gas and more than 4100 barrels of oil per day. Suffield's remaining reserves were estimated to be 814 billion cubic feet of gas and 6.4 million barrels of oil. The field was expected to be in production for the next 20 years. A master plan to minimize normal field decline and control operating costs at Suffield was developed by AEC. Cloning gas storage plants was one of the methods used by for cost control. Designing and constructing identical gas plants was another means of producing major savings, especially in areas such as equipment purchase, and construction

  17. Alberta ambient air quality objectives : sulphur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) is a colourless, non-flammable gas with a pungent odour. Exposure to SO 2 can result in numerous effects to the pulmonary system. This paper outlined current Alberta ambient air quality objectives in relation to SO 2 . The 1-hour average Alberta ambient air quality objective for SO 2 is currently 450 μg per m 3 . Studies conducted with healthy humans showed increased airway resistance and bronchoconstriction, as well as decreased maximum expiratory flow. Exercise can increase the severity of response to SO 2 in healthy and asthmatic individuals. Long-term exposure to SO 2 levels can also impact the metabolic activity of vegetation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced their intention to reduce the 1-hour SO 2 standard to between 131 to 262 μg per m 3 . 7 refs.

  18. Ambient air quality trends in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This document provided an overview of ambient air pollutant trends in Alberta. The report discussed the following pollutants having effect on human and environmental health: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulphide (H2 S ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), ozone (O 3 ), fine particulate matter (PM 2 .5), benzene, and benzopyrene. Each of these pollutants was described. The report provided data on annual average concentration trends and annual 99th percentile concentration as an indicator of peak concentrations. A map illustrating air quality monitoring stations in 2006 was also provided. The findings revealed that mean annual CO levels were the lowest they have been since 1990; hydrogen sulphide concentrations have fluctuated in time since 1990; most Edmonton and Calgary area stations showed significant decreasing trends in annual average NO 2 levels since 1990; and higher SO 2 concentrations have been found in the industrial areas of Alberta, such as the Redwater and Scotford oil sands locations. tabs., figs

  19. Asian interests in Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, D.; Laureshen, C.

    2004-01-01

    The growing Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands and import opportunities was discussed along with the feasibility of marketing bitumen to Asia. Asia is an obvious new market for Canadian heavy oil and bitumen due to an increasing demand for petroleum products in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. This paper examined the following three criteria that will determine the success of any initiative to move Canadian crude oil to Asian-Pacific markets: (1) a sustainable supply from Alberta; a pipeline to transport the crude to a deepwater port on the west coast; and, a guaranteed market at the other end. The basis for Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands is the sustainable secure supply of oil for growing Asian markets; heavy dependence on supplies from the Middle East; the desire to diversify supply sources; and, opportunities to invest in oil sands developments. Examples of Asian (Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China) missions to Alberta were presented along with the challenges of getting products to market with reference to Enbridge's new market access plan, Terasen's staged capacity expansion for heavy crudes and refined products, and sea transport from Prince Rupert. The paper also included graphs depicting world GDP; incremental increase in world primary energy demand by fuel for 2000 to 2020; world oil demand by region; oil demand by region in Asia; oil demand and supply in northeast Asia (Japan, China, Korea) and dependence level on Middle Eastern oil; oil demand and supply in China; China's petroleum production and consumption; refined products market forecast for 2000 to 2020; 2002 crude oil imports to Asia; 2004 refining capacity; product quality comparisons; cost competitive study; and energy policy objectives for China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. 19 figs

  20. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  1. Inertial fusion energy - research at the University of Alberta and a proposed Alberta/Canada Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedosejevs, R.; Offenberger, A.A.; Singh, S.; Tsui, Y.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion Energy is being pursued internationally using a number of different approaches from magnetic confinement energy to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recently there has been significant advancement in inertial confinement fusion using laser drivers with the expectation of the demonstration of large fusion yield within the next year or two opening the path to engineering of fusion reactors based on high energy laser drivers. The Laser Plasma Research group at the University of Alberta has been involved in inertial fusion energy (IFE) research for the past few decades. The current status of IFE and the activities of the University of Alberta Research group in this area is reviewed. Funding of IFE related research in Canada has been very limited and Canada has fallen behind in this area. Given the major developments occurring internationally it is time to increase activities in Canada. A plan for an expanded Alberta/Canadian program in IFE in the near future is discussed. (author)

  2. Science, Technology, and Competitiveness in Alberta's Agriculture and Food Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Veeman, Terrence S.; Peng, Yanning; Fantino, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This project addresses several issues related to efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness in Alberta's agriculture and food sector, in both its primary agricultural sector and its secondary processing industry related to food and beverages. A major underlying theme of this work is that the competitiveness and economic sustainability of Alberta's agriculture and food sector is considerably driven by long run trends in productivity. Two emerging trends in Alberta's agriculture and food sec...

  3. Fire, Aim… Ready? Alberta's Big Bang Approach to Healthcare Disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Cam

    2010-08-01

    Alberta's abolition in 2008 of its health regions and the creation of Alberta Health Services (AHS) was a bold move, but the reasons for the change remain hazy. The stated goals were to "help make Alberta's … system more effective and efficient" and to "provide equitable access to health services and long-term sustainability." Data show, however, that Alberta's health regions were already performing well on these goals relative to other provinces, and where changes have since occurred, they cannot necessarily be attributed to AHS.

  4. Barriers to convergence: legislative, regulatory and policy issues in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyndman, R. [Alberta Energy and Natural Resources, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1997-02-01

    The restructuring of Alberta`s electric power industry has created potential for convergence with the natural gas industry. This presentation outlined some of the key issues dealing with convergence, including (1) the existing regulatory structures, (2) areas of convergence, (3) a comparison of the state of transition in Alberta of the electricity and natural gas to commodity markets in terms of supply, market, and legislative and regulatory jurisdiction, (4) price convergence and limiting factors, (5) key elements in the restructuring of the electric industry in Alberta, (6) the influence of restructuring on convergence, and (7) the barriers and limits to convergence. 37 figs.

  5. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Pohl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This checklist documents the 2367 Lepidoptera species reported to occur in the province of Alberta, Canada, based on examination of the major public insect collections in Alberta and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes. Records from relevant literature sources published since 1950 and from selected older works are also included. The entry for each species includes the scientific name, the author and year of publication of the original description, occurrence status, provincial distribution (according to ecoclimatic region, and adult phenology. The most recent taxonomic references are given, and common names are listed for butterflies and conspicuous moth species. The sources of specimen- and literature-based records are provided for each species. An additional 138 species whose occurrence in Alberta is probable are appended to the list. For 1524 of the listed species and subspecies, annotations are given, with selected information on taxonomy, nomenclature, distribution, habitat, and biology. An additional section provides details on 171 species erroneously reported from Alberta in previous works. Introductory sections to the volume provide a general overview of the order Lepidoptera and review the natural regions of Alberta, the state of knowledge of their Lepidoptera faunas, and the history and current state of knowledge of Alberta Lepidoptera. Each of the 63 families (and selected subfamilies occurring in Alberta is briefly reviewed, with information on distinguishing features, general appearance, and general biology. A bibliography and an index of genus-level, species-level, and subspecies-level names are provided. The list is accompanied by an appendix of proposed nomenclature changes, consisting of revised status for 25 taxa raised from synonymy to species level, and new synonymy for 20 species-level and one genus-level taxa here considered to be subjective synonyms, with resultant revised synonymy for one

  6. Sour-gas potential in Devonian of western Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podruski, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada is presently conducting an assessment of the undiscovered gas resources of the Western Canada sedimentary basin using the exploration play analysis technique. The first system being examined is the Devonian, which as been divided into four exploration districts based on differences in depositional and tectonic histories, hydrocarbon compositions, and exploration practices. The western Alberta sour gas district contains most of the Devonian gas reserves (10 trillion ft/sup 3/ of marketable gas) and potential in 12 exploration plays. Production in the Upper Devonian Swan Hills, Leduc, and Nisku formations is from the updip (northeast), basinward termination of carbonate shelves or large reef complexes and their associated patch and pinnacle reefs. Mapping the reef or shelf carbonate transition to basinal shale and carbonate delineates the play areas in these formations. Production in the Upper Devonian Wabamun Formation is from stratigraphic traps at shelf carbonate/shelf evaporite transitions and in structural-stratigraphic traps in dolomitized shelf carbonate. Pools in these plays typically contain from 50 to 500 billion ft/sup 3/ of marketable gas, have 10-30% H/sub 2/S, and occur at depths from 8000 to 15,000 ft. Potential in most plays is large, considering that between 90 and 99% of the play areas are unexplored. Present exploration is still concentrating on the conventional shelf margin or reef traps, such as in the area of the recent Caroline discovery. Subtle intrashelf traps are only beginning to be explored and could constitute a major resource target of the future, provided that economic conditions and improvements in seismic technology and geologic understanding will sustain the exploration effort in this district.

  7. Implementation of the clean air strategy for Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H.S.; Angle, R.P. [Alberta Dept. of Environmental Protection, Alberta (Canada); Kelly, M. [Clean Air Strategic Alliance, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Air quality and its effects on the environment and human health have received considerable attention during the last three decades in Alberta, Canada. Among the issues receiving a high priority are acid deposition, smog and global warming. There are various sources of emissions to Alberta`s atmosphere, many of which relate to the extraction, processing, and burning of fossil fuels; pulp and paper manufacture; and transportation. There are also natural sources of contaminants, such as particulates from forest fires and methane from bogs. The extraction, processing and combustion of fossil fuels play an important role in Alberta`s economy. The province produces over 80 % of the oil and natural gas in Canada, and nearly half the coal. Low sulphur coal is used in power plants to supply more than 90 % of the electricity used in this province by nearly three million people. As a result, Alberta is responsible for about 27 % of the CO{sub 2}, 23 % of the nitrogen oxides, and 16 % of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated in Canada. Alberta`s air quality is monitored by the Government of Alberta at nine continuous, eight intermittent, over 250 static, and 12 precipitation monitoring stations. Parameters such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide, particulates, and ion-content of precipitation are measured. Industry operates a large number of ambient and static SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S monitoring stations across Alberta, with monitoring costs estimated at 56-80 million USD annually. The unique features of the Clean Air Strategy for Alberta (CASA) have already been published elsewhere. This presentation discusses the mechanism and progress on its implementation. (author)

  8. Alberta electric industry annual statistics for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Tables containing data on electric energy generation and capacity for Alberta are provided for the following aspects: capacity and generation of power plants for 1998; capacity of power plants by type, unit, and energy resource for 1998; generating units approved for construction for 1998; generating units completed in 1998; transmission additions approved for construction and completed for 1998; net annual generating capacity and generation for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by plant for 1998; net annual generation by energy resource and type for 1988-1998; net monthly generation by energy resource and type for 1998; generation capacity reserve; relative capacity and generation by type of energy resource for 1998; capacity, generation and fuel consumption of isolated plants for 1998; other industrial on-site plant capacity and generation for 1998. Also listed are: energy resource consumption and energy conversion efficiency of thermal power plants for 1998; stack emissions from thermal generating plants for 1998; non-utility electric generators, wind and hydro for 1998; and hydroelectric energy utilization and conversion efficiency for 1998. Tables contain information on electric energy generation and capacity for hydroelectric energy stored in reservoirs in 1998; details of non-coincident net peak generation and load by utility operators for the Alberta electric system for 1998; and Alberta electric system generation and load at peak load hour for 1998. Further tables cover electric energy distribution for interchange and distribution for 1998 and 1981-1998; annual energy distribution to ultimate customers for 1988-1998 and to ultimate customers for 1998; and the number of electric utility customers in 1998. Final tables cover the transmission and distribution systems with data on: circuit km of such lines for 1988-1998; total circuit km of such lines by major electric utility for 1998 and number of rural electric utility customers for 1998

  9. Worldwide market developments : lessons for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    A review of competitive retail electricity markets in Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and California were discussed, highlighting lessons for Alberta policy makers, market designers and electricity retailers. Some of the emerging strategies in the retail electricity marketplace such as horizontal integration, generation retailing, defensive retailing and virtual vertical integration were explored. Emphasis was on showing that electricity retailing is not an easy business. It is a business for large and existing players, and although horizontal and vertical integration have growth and profit potential, there are also risks

  10. Education in Alberta: Some Major Societal Trends. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Planning and Policy Secretariat.

    The major societal trends happening in Alberta, Canada, have an impact on educational effectiveness in the region. Statistics are provided in the areas of demographics, family and society, Alberta's youth, labor force, and advances in science and technology. The section on demographics includes data on population growth, births, fertility rates,…

  11. Education Reform in Alberta: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda L.; Webber, Charles F.

    This paper discusses what educational leadership might look like at the start of the 21st century, specifically within the context of Alberta. It also provides a brief synopsis of some of Alberta's major reforms of the past decade, and it presents some of the key findings and recommendations of a 1998 study entitled "An Analysis of Attitudes…

  12. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, Belkaid

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  13. Circle of Courage Infusion into the Alberta Indigenous Games 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Dawn Marie

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of indigenous people from across North America came to the Enoch Cree Nation for the Alberta Indigenous Games, six days of sport, education, and cultural awakening. The vision of the Alberta Indigenous Games is to recognize the value and potential of Indigenous culture and the young people. Activities include sports, indigenous arts,…

  14. Learning and Technology in Alberta (1975 to 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's education system is a leader in the use of technology in teaching and learning. New information technologies create options for how teachers teach, how students learn, and how classrooms look and operate. This document chronicles the history of computer technology in Alberta from 1975-2009. The information is arranged in a tabulated…

  15. Evolving Nature of School Psychology in Alberta: Politics and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Coranne; Zwiers, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the practice of school psychology in the province of Alberta reflects the entrenchment of assessment with the emerging possibility of a broader service provider role. This article articulates the influence that politics and government has had on the role of school psychologists in Alberta schools as special education…

  16. Predicting lodgepole pine site index from climatic parameters in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Monserud; Shongming Huang; Yuqing. Yang

    2006-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the impact of climatic variables on site productivity of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) for the province of Alberta. Climatic data were obtained from the Alberta Climate Model, which is based on 30-year normals from the provincial weather station network. Mapping methods were based...

  17. [Comparing the perspectives of primary care doctors in the Canary Islands and Alberta (Canada)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani-Chugani, Vinita; López-Hijazo, Asunción; Manca, Donna; Sanz-Alvarez, Emilio

    2012-05-01

    To examine the advantages and disadvantages of two different Health Care Systems from the perspective of Primary Care (PC) physicians. Qualitative research based on the analysis of documents written as diaries for the study. Primary Care in the Canary Islands (Spain) and Alberta (Canada) CONTEXT AND PARTICIPANTS: Intentional sample to identify different profiles of physicians. Participants were asked to write a document describing their work activities, including the impact of the organisational system and on their personal life. Two representatives of the health care system were asked to write a detailed description about how PC is organised in their country. Nine diaries were collected (5 from the Canary Islands and 4 from Alberta). Ritchie & Spencer framework was used for the analysis. In Alberta, physicians have access to more complementary tests; they can offer hospital care; they have to sort out administrative work; they can choose were to work; and can specialise in different types of health care services. In the Canary Islands physicians can have paid holidays and the administrative issues do not depend on them, patients have a physician assigned and seem to have more institutional support. The results of this study allow us to constructively analyse the role of PC physicians, assess the advantages and re-think the disadvantages related to how we work in order to learn from other health care systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Vision 20/20 : saving for the future Alberta advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milke, M.

    2006-03-01

    As part of the Alberta Vision 20/20 project, Alberta's past and present spending patterns on natural resources and choices for the future were examined. Trust funds in Alberta, Alaska, and Norway were also compared, in order to learn from other jurisdictions. This report presented findings from Phase 3 of Vision 2020. The objectives of the study were to provide insight on what Alberta's economic, social and policy landscape might look like in the coming decades given expected demographic changes; benchmark Alberta's performance on key economic and social indicators and analyze government performance in related policy areas; supply useful, accessible information and possible solutions to Albertans about some of the challenges that demographic change is likely to bring; encourage discussion of issues among Albertans, including legislators and the media; and, where appropriate, encourage actions to mitigate or alleviate foreseeable problems. The guiding principles of the Vision 20/20 were first presented. Alberta's fiscal context and labyrinth of savings funds were examined. A detailed explanation and literature review of resource trust funds in Norway, Alaska, and Alberta were then provided followed by a comparison of the Alberta, Alaska, and Norway funds. Last, the report presented Alberta's options and discussion as well as recommendations. It was recommended that Alberta's annual per capita spending should not exceed population growth and inflation; the province should consider transfers of additional resource revenue into the Heritage Fund in the manner of the state of Alaska; and the province should deposit between 30 per cent and 40 per cent of all nonrenewable resource revenues in the Heritage Fund annually. 38 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs., 4 appendices

  19. New production techniques for alberta oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, M A

    1986-12-19

    Low world oil prices represent a serious threat to expanded commercial development of the Canadian oil sands in the near term, as they do to all of the higher cost alternatives to crude oil such as oil shales and coal liquefaction. Nonetheless, research and field testing of new technology for production of oil from oil sands are being pursued by industry and government in Alberta. New production technology is being developed in Canada to produce synthetic oil from the vast resources of bitumen trapped in the oil sands and bituminous carbonates of northern Alberta. This technology includes improved methods of mining, extraction, and upgrading of bitumen from near-surface deposits as well as new drilling and production techniques for thermal production of bitumen from the more deeply buried reservoirs. Of particular interest are the cluster drilling methods designed to reduce surface disturbance and the techniques for horizontal drilling of wells from underground tunnels to increase the contact of injection fluids with the reservoir.

  20. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kerry; Pankratz, Al; Mooney, Curtis; Fleetham, Kelly

    2018-02-01

    A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS). Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018) at datamart" target="_blank">http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  1. The Alberta smoke plume observation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anderson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A field project was conducted to observe and measure smoke plumes from wildland fires in Alberta. This study used handheld inclinometer measurements and photos taken at lookout towers in the province. Observations of 222 plumes were collected from 21 lookout towers over a 6-year period from 2010 to 2015. Observers reported the equilibrium and maximum plume heights based on the plumes' final levelling heights and the maximum lofting heights, respectively. Observations were tabulated at the end of each year and matched to reported fires. Fire sizes at assessment times and forest fuel types were reported by the province. Fire weather conditions were obtained from the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS. Assessed fire sizes were adjusted to the appropriate size at plume observation time using elliptical fire-growth projections. Though a logical method to collect plume observations in principle, many unanticipated issues were uncovered as the project developed. Instrument limitations and environmental conditions presented challenges to the investigators, whereas human error and the subjectivity of observations affected data quality. Despite these problems, the data set showed that responses to fire behaviour conditions were consistent with the physical processes leading to plume rise. The Alberta smoke plume observation study data can be found on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System datamart (Natural Resources Canada, 2018 at http://cwfis.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/datamart.

  2. New Alberta sulfur deliveries to US Gulf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Christopher E. [Oil and Gas Journal (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents a review of the new perspectives for Alberta sulphur deliveries to the US Gulf. The sulphur market is growing, both globally and in Canada (Alberta) and there is a need for more transport facilities and capacity to ensure the future of this industry. Sulphur is a by-product of bitumen refining and is in great demand in the US Gulf area. One concept for promoting sulphur would be to move bitumen by rail to create new markets, especially in the U.S. Rail capacity at the present time is 6,000b/d and the railway serves Chicago, Toledo/ Detroit, the Lower Mississippi and Puget Sound. The rail timeline for sulphur deliveries is to achieve 60,000 b/d by 2015, this includes deliveries within Canada as well as to the US market. A second way to transport sulphur to the US Gulf would be by pipeline. Many pipeline projects are expected to be be completed by 2015, adding more than one million barrels per day of capacity.

  3. Positive year for Alberta power pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid-Carlson, D.

    1997-01-01

    The electricity power pool in Alberta completed its first year under deregulation. Results to date indicate that the competitive market has operated as intended. The effects of electricity pricing on the oil industry following deregulation were described, given the fact that electricity prices represent the second largest cost item to the oil industry after labour. The peculiarities of the mechanism of electricity pricing (based on hourly matching of supply offers to demand bids) were explained, highlighting the opportunities and risks to the oil industry caused by the hourly price variations and the difficulties involved in accurately forecasting on-peak and off-peak prices a full year in advance. In 1996 predicted average price was $14 to $17/MWh. The actual average price was $13.40/MWh. The general conclusion was that Alberta continues to have a surplus of electricity generation and is well positioned to to take advantage of its low generating costs, at least over the longer term. Short term bidding practices, however, may results in slightly higher system marginal prices

  4. Groundwater and underground coal gasification in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluszka, A.; MacMillan, G.; Maev, S.

    2010-01-01

    Underground coal gasification has potential in Alberta. This presentation provided background information on underground coal gasification and discussed groundwater and the Laurus Energy demonstration project. A multi-disciplined approach to project assessment was described with particular reference to geologic and hydrogeologic setting; geologic mapping; and a hydrogeologic numerical model. Underground coal gasification involves the conversion of coal into synthesis gas or syngas. It can be applied to mined coal at the surface or applied to non-mined coal seams using injection and production wells. Underground coal gasification can effect groundwater as the rate of water influx into the coal seams influences the quality and composition of the syngas. Byproducts created include heat as well as water with dissolved concentrations of ammonia, phenols, salts, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and liquid organic products from the pyrolysis of coal. A process overview of underground coal gasification was also illustrated. It was concluded that underground coal gasification has the potential in Alberta and risks to groundwater could be minimized by a properly designed project. refs., figs.

  5. Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present TLÜ Akadeemilises Raamatukogus / Sander Jürisson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Tallinna Ülikooli Akadeemilises Raamatukogus on üleval näitus "Alberta's Estonians 1899 - Present", mis annab ülevaate Kanada Alberta provintsi eestlaste loost. Näitus valmis Alberta Eesti Kultuuripärandi Seltsi koostöös Alberta Provintsi Arhiivi Kultuuripärandi Osakonnaga Edmontonis

  6. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrochers, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the first year of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta was presented. The way in which electricity is bought and sold in Ontario and throughout North America is changing. Costs are no longer fixed and regulated. Electricity is becoming a commodity with high levels of price volatility. The paper presented hedging options for Alberta consumers, contracting lessons, market issues and lessons for Ontario. A comparison of Alberta's deregulation schedule with that of Ontario's was included. One year after market opening in Alberta, power prices have dropped significantly. There is a greater than expected demand side response, increased development in power generation, and a decrease in natural gas prices. Issues that still need to be addressed in Alberta include billing and load settlement issues, invoicing/billing standards, the lack of competition at the retail level, and future balancing of pool charges. Energy Advantage Inc. (EA) does not foresee the same drastic increase in price as seen in Alberta market opening, but suggests that uncertainty and volatility will exist in Ontario. In Alberta, customers who did nothing and stayed on default were the ones who benefited, but took a great risk. EA suggests that customers must understand how and when they use electricity, how much is used during on- and off-peak hours, and in the summer versus the winter. When electricity is priced hourly, it is important to know consumption patterns. 7 figs

  7. Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity report to the Alberta Minister of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Alberta Advisory Council on Electricity regarding the restructuring of the electric power industry in the province of Alberta. Strategic issues affecting restructuring over the long term were considered with particular attention to small consumers. The long term vision (Vision 2012) for electric power restructuring is to promote efficient and competitive markets attracting investment and innovation that will result in fair and equitable prices for consumers. It was noted that while the restructuring system is currently in place, progress has not been even across the system. It is expected that it will take several years before a restructured electricity industry is fully functioning. Recommendations were presented to establish a plan to address issues regarding restructuring within power generation, transmission, distribution and export/import policies. The issue of market power, competitiveness and consumer education was also discussed. It was also noted that there are many external forces that impact the electricity system, many of which come from outside Alberta. These include fluctuations in gas prices, electricity demand, changes in the United States, regulatory decisions in other jurisdictions and unexpected business events. It was emphasized that a strong, liquid and competitive wholesale market is vital to achieving Vision 2012. Key factors for a competitive wholesale market include adequate generation, transmission capability and export/import capacity. The report presents the following 3 scenarios: business as usual, managed transition, and freedom 2012. A review of restructuring in several other jurisdictions around the world was also provided. 1 tab., 1 fig

  8. Independent assessment team report to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board on implementing deregulation of electricity generation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The particular aspect of deregulation of electricity generation in Alberta discussed is the economics of power purchase agreements (PPAs). There are various parameters associated with the PPAs that are emphasized including: technical characteristics; unit availability, capital costs and O and M costs; coal costs; gas costs; payment for flexible operation; hydro obligation amounts; income tax; property tax; and working capital, insurance and other costs. Chapter one of the Independent Assessment Team (IAT) report covers the report scope, and chapter two describes certain main principles underlying determination of PPAs. Chapter three discusses the IAT's determination of the PPA's forms and their main terms and conditions. Chapter four describes the IAT's determination of the underlying parameter values of the PPAs. Chapter five describes the ITA's determination of the allowed rate of return on equity and the capital structure of PPAs. An appendix covers a detailed description of the consultations carried out by the IAT; a report by HESI on the results of Pool modelling carried out to date (the HESI work was done to assist the IAT in determining PPAs, not the auction design); summary outputs of the IAT's financial model with indicative financial statements for each unit and company under the PPAs; and a document on shared services, common facilities and new units

  9. Getting the Foundations Right: Alberta's Approach to Healthcare Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Duckett, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Alberta's abolition of its health regions and the creation of Alberta Health Services in 2008 has integrated previously disparate providers of healthcare services. The long-term benefits of this “second-wave” approach to health systems structuring include lower administrative costs, greater equity of access, improved intraprovincial learning and economies of scale. Some benefits have begun to be realized but, as with any merger, performance should be judged over a multi-year time frame.

  10. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dallas; Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  11. Motor development of preterm infants assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: systematic review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia do N. Fuentefria

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Premature newborns are considered at risk for motor development deficits, leading to the need for monitoring in early life. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature about gross motor development of preterm infants, assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS to identify the main outcomes in development. Data source: Systematic review of studies published from 2006 to 2015, indexed in Pubmed, Scielo, Lilacs, and Medline databases in English and Portuguese. The search strategy included the keywords: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, prematurity, preterm, motor development, postural control, and follow-up. Data summary: A total of 101 articles were identified and 23 were selected, according to the inclusion criteria. The ages of the children assessed in the studies varied, including the first 6 months up to 15 or 18 months of corrected age. The percentage variation in motor delay was identified in the motor outcome descriptions of ten studies, ranging from 4% to 53%, depending on the age when the infant was assessed. The studies show significant differences in the motor development of preterm and full-term infants, with a description of lower gross scores in the AIMS results of preterm infants. Conclusions: It is essential that the follow-up services of at-risk infants have assessment strategies and monitoring of gross motor development of preterm infants; AIMS is an assessment tool indicated to identify atypical motor development in this population.

  12. Motor development of preterm infants assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: systematic review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentefria, Rubia do N; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    Premature newborns are considered at risk for motor development deficits, leading to the need for monitoring in early life. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature about gross motor development of preterm infants, assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) to identify the main outcomes in development. Systematic review of studies published from 2006 to 2015, indexed in Pubmed, Scielo, Lilacs, and Medline databases in English and Portuguese. The search strategy included the keywords: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, prematurity, preterm, motor development, postural control, and follow-up. A total of 101 articles were identified and 23 were selected, according to the inclusion criteria. The ages of the children assessed in the studies varied, including the first 6 months up to 15 or 18 months of corrected age. The percentage variation in motor delay was identified in the motor outcome descriptions of ten studies, ranging from 4% to 53%, depending on the age when the infant was assessed. The studies show significant differences in the motor development of preterm and full-term infants, with a description of lower gross scores in the AIMS results of preterm infants. It is essential that the follow-up services of at-risk infants have assessment strategies and monitoring of gross motor development of preterm infants; AIMS is an assessment tool indicated to identify atypical motor development in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  13. Long-term reliability of the Athabasca River (Alberta, Canada) as the water source for oil sands mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jacques, J. M.; Sauchyn, D.; Luckman, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Exploitation of the Alberta oil sands, the world's third largest crude oil reserve, requires fresh water from the Athabasca River, an allocation of 4.4% of the mean annual flow. This allocation takes into account seasonal fluctuations but not long-term climatic variability and change. This paper examines the decadal-scale variability in river discharge in the Athabasca River Basin (ARB) with 1) a generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression analysis of the trend and variability in gauged flow, and 2) a 900-year tree-ring reconstruction of the water-year flow of the Athabasca River at Athabasca, Alberta. The GLS analysis removes confounding transient trends related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Pacific North American mode (PNA). It shows long-term declining flows throughout the ARB. The tree-ring record reveals a larger range of flows and severity of hydrologic deficits than those captured by the instrumental records that are the basis for surface water allocation. It includes periods of sustained low flow of multiple decades in duration, suggesting the influence of the PDO and PNA teleconnections. These results together demonstrate that low-frequency variability must be considered in ARB water allocation, which has not been the case. We show that the current and projected surface water allocations from the Athabasca River for the exploitation of the Alberta oil sands are based on an untenable assumption of the representativeness of the short instrumental record.

  14. Is the restructuring of Alberta's power market on the right track? Evaluating Alberta's first two years of deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellenius, K.; Adamson, S.

    2003-07-01

    The performance of Alberta's restructured electricity market was evaluated since its move to wholesale competition in January 2001. This paper presents the following eight conclusions that the authors arrived at following the evaluation: (1) To meet growing demand, the electricity prices in Alberta would have increased regardless of the type of environment (regulated or not). Capacity investment was required, and it was believed that moving to competition was the best way to attract investors. (2) Success in attracting private investment was attained as a result of Alberta's open market. It has restored reliability of supply and moderated prices. (3) Price comparisons must take into account what the prices would have been if the market had remained regulated. Due to unique generation costs and regulatory environments, comparisons with other regulated jurisdictions is inappropriate. (4) Convergence with other energy rates that would have been seen under regulation is being noted with respect to Alberta's market prices. (5) Under deregulation, prices increase according to the need for new investment and fall after the investment is made. Alberta has been on a path toward continued reduction in wholesale prices since 2001. (6) The non-price benefits of restructuring include improved generation efficiency, captured residual value from regulated assets, and shifting investment risk of new capacity additions from consumers to generators. (7) Downward pressure on prices was noted as a result of deregulation, as expected. (8) Significant value for consumers was captured through Alberta's restructuring process. 7 tabs., 7 figs

  15. Annual compensation for pipelines in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The Surface Rights Board (SRB) in Alberta held a hearing in November 2007 to address three issues involving a pipeline for Enbridge Pipelines (Athabasca) Inc. as well as several land owner issues in Townships 66-68 and Ranges 17-19, all west of the 4th Meridian. The issues the SRB examined were the appropriate amount (i.e. magnitude) of compensation payable under right of entry orders under consideration; the appropriate structure of the compensation award; and to whom the compensation was payable. This document presented a review by the Farmer's Advocate Office (FAO) of the published decision of the SRB. The verbatim decision and rationale used by the SRB to award annual compensation for loss and/or ongoing nuisance and inconvenience was presented. The document could be useful to landowners as they determine their negotiation strategy when faced with considering future pipeline access agreements. The document included a discussion of the context for the decision and a case review. Specific topics that were covered included the rationale for the decision; long term effects of pipeline arguments and SRB commentary; the award and determination; and what still needs to be done. It was concluded that the SRB requires evidence in order to answer several questions regarding the magnitude of any losses, and to what degree, if any, had the nuisance, inconvenience, and loss of rights already been anticipated and factored into the operator's final offer

  16. A retailer's perspective on generation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willerton, K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several reasons for a retailer to invest in power generation. This investment acts as a risk management hedge against fixed price retail load, while improving competitiveness in illiquid wholesale markets. Investing in power generation leverages the retailer's wholesale trading capabilities. It also provides appropriate returns. Some of the factors that ensure the success of a retailer investing in power generation are low cost structure, low risk, strong forward commodity market, owners with large healthy balance sheets, and willingness to finance projects entirely with equity. A cost comparison was presented for different generation technologies. ENMAX chose to invest in wind power since the costs were comparable to that of other technologies. In addition, green credits will lower the cost of wind power. With low environmental impacts and no fuel risk, wind energy fitted ENMAX's retail strategy. Green power at ENMAX (GREENMAX) was the first to implement a Green Power Residential program in 1998, followed by the Green Power Commercial program in 2000. The author discussed the McBride Lake Wind Farm located near Fort MacLeod, Alberta. figs

  17. Alberta books big revenues in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, R.

    1996-01-01

    A 17.9 per cent increase over 1995 in oil and gas revenues were reported for Alberta through August 1996. Revenues from crude oil were up 12.6 per cent and from natural gas 30.7 per cent. The level of increase in revenues is expected to hold for the remainder of the year, save for the prospects of Iraq re-entering the market in force. This would cause a steep decline in prices and some panic trading in energy stocks. Nevertheless, producers are well positioned for the year ahead, as capital spending and drilling activity are based on lower price forecasts. Oil production over 1995 was down slightly through August. Light and medium crude production was down 4.5 per cent. Synthetic production fell by 0.8 per cent. Natural gas production will have a record year. Through August output was up 4.6 per cent over 1995, sales were up 19.3 per cent, and exports were ahead by just under one per cent. Natural gas liquids were the biggest revenue booster, increasing by 46.3 per cent over 1995

  18. Refining the focus: Alberta's international marketing strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This strategic plan is the key initiative established under 'Alberta's Framework for International Strategies'. Its objective is to ensure the wellbeing of Albertans, sustaining Alberta's environment, and economic growth through successfully taking advantage of Alberta's many opportunities for marketing its goods, products, and services. It is predicated on industry and government continuing to work together to sustain a strong market-driven economy, strengthen Alberta's economic advantages and build an economic environment conducive to investment and growth in quality jobs. At present more than 150 foreign markets buy Alberta's goods and services, but the obvious focus of any strategy must be those regions and sectors of industry that offer the greatest possibilities for new and expanded opportunities for Alberta business. Accordingly, this strategy identifies priorities, selects the best initiatives and develops activities to achieve economic growth. Adding value to Albertan commodities before they are being shipped to export markets is a particular objective of the plan. An equally important consideration is to achieve growth through expansion of existing investments, attract new investment to the province, and to increase exports in response to international market and investment opportunities for Alberta's goods and services. Major topics discussed in the document include a discussion of the importance of trade and investment, a thorough analysis of the marketing priorities, the strategic framework, and priority market profiles for the United States, Japan,China, other Asia-Pacific markets, the European Union, Mexico, the Middle East and South Asia, and South America.

  19. Prescribing by pharmacists in Alberta and its relation to culture and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Meagen M; Houle, Sherilyn K D; Eberhart, Greg; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2015-01-01

    As evidence for the efficacy of pharmacists' interventions, governments worldwide are developing legislation to formalize new practice approaches, including independent prescribing by pharmacists. Pharmacists in Alberta became the first in Canada availed of this opportunity; however, uptake of such has been slow. One approach to understanding this problem is through an examination of pharmacists who have already gained this ability. The primary objective of this study was to gain descriptive insight into the culture and personality traits of innovator, and early adopter, Alberta pharmacists with Additional Prescribing Authorization using the Organizational Culture Profile and Big Five Inventory. The study was a cross-sectional online survey of Alberta pharmacists who obtained Additional Prescribing Authorization (independent prescribing authority), in the fall of 2012. The survey contained three sections; the first contained basic demographic, background and practice questions; the second section contained the Organizational Culture Profile; and the third section contained the Big Five Inventory. Sixty-five survey instruments were returned, for a response rate of 39%. Respondents' mean age was 40 (SD 10) years. The top reason cited by respondents for applying for prescribing authority was to improve patient care. The majority of respondents perceived greater value in the cultural factors of competitiveness, social responsibility, supportiveness, performance orientation and stability, and may be more likely to exhibit behavior in line with the personality traits of extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness. Inferential statistical analysis revealed a significant linear relationship between Organizational Culture Profile responses to cultural factors of social responsibility and competitiveness and the number of prescription adaptations provided. This insight into the experiences of innovators and early adopter pharmacist prescribers can be used to

  20. Spatial and temporal occurrence of bacterial pathogens in rural water supplies, Southern Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, V.; Graham, T. A.; Read, S.; Ziebell, K.; Muckle, A.; Thomas, J.; Selinger, B.; Kienzle, S.; Lapp, S. L.; Townshend, I.; Byrne, J.

    2002-12-01

    Southern Alberta has the highest rate of gastrointestinal illness in the province, and some of the highest infection rates in Canada. The region has extensive field crop irrigation system supporting a rapidly expanding animal agriculture industry. Recently, there has been much public concern about the safety and quality of water in this region, particularly with respect to drinking water supplies for farm residences and rural communities, where water treatment may be less than optimal. We have tested raw river and irrigation water in the Oldman River Basin in southern Alberta for the presence of bacterial pathogens (E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp ) as well as made counts of total and faecal coliforms over the last two years (2000-2001). E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. isolations and coliform counts peak in raw water from this system during the summer months. E. coli O157:H7 was only isolated from 27/1624 (1.7%) and Salmonella was isolated from 158/1624 (9.7%) of raw water samples over the two year period. Certain sites had multiple pathogen isolations and high indicator bacteria counts in the same year and from year to year. Certain sites had multiple pathogen isolations and high indicator bacteria counts in the same year and from year to year. S. Rublislaw was the most common Salmonella serovar isolated in both years. While this serovar is rarely associated with human or animal disease in Alberta, other Salmonella serovars isolated, such as Typhimurium, are commonly disease-associated. This poster presents initial analyses of the spatial and temporal properties of pathogen occurrences in the Oldman Basin in 2000 and 2001. Seasonal variability in the occurrence of pathogens is particularly interesting and of concern. Early results demonstrate the pathogen occurrences peak during the height of the summer recreation season; posing a substantial infection risk for the public and tourism populations. Human consumption of inadequately treated water in this

  1. Alberta Chamber of Resources : 1997 resources guide and directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources (ACR) is composed of 140 member companies from the oil and gas industry, forestry, pulp and paper, mining, oil sands, utilities, contractors, suppliers, consultants, banking and other service groups, as well as representatives from universities and governments. ACR's activities during 1996 were reviewed. These included supporting or sponsoring a careers forum, and various other networking and information sharing opportunities, a study of the potential for Alberta's minerals industry, and exploring opportunities for research in the forestry sector and the further development of Alberta's oil sands. Studies of the transportation and infrastructures strategies for Alberta's resources, royalty regimes, tenure and compensation issues associated with oil sands reservoirs that are 'capped' by natural gas reservoirs, taxation issues related to oil sands development, mineral rights tenure, and toll design and royalty issues affecting Alberta's natural gas sector rounded out the Chamber's activities. The annual review also profiled a number of ACR member companies, among them Koch Oil Company Ltd., Pardee Equipment Ltd., Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Clearwater Welding and Fabricating Ltd., and Weldwood of Canada. A listing of all ACR members was also provided

  2. Power Pool of Alberta annual report 2000 : building a market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As of January 1, 2001, deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta became a reality, and was accompanied by steady growth in demand for electricity combined with other factors that pushed the price of electricity upward. The Power Pool of Alberta ensures that market operations are open and fair. Its mandate, under the Electric Utilities Act, is the overall market surveillance in Alberta's electric industry. It is accomplished by working closely with industry and seeking feedback through four standing committees: Human Resources, Operations, Finance and Audit, and Balancing Pool. The goal for the coming years is to build confidence in the market, whereby consumers are confident about the fairness of the market price for electricity in Alberta, the choices available, and the continued reliability of the electric system in Alberta. The Energy Trading System was explained with information about system control and customer service, and details provided on the consultation and collaboration processes. The financial analysis of the year 2000 was provided, as well as a statement of operation, a balance sheet, and a statement of cash flows. tabs., figs

  3. Heating up in Alberta : climate change, energy development and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Woynillowicz

    2009-02-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of energy sources for the future have been discussed in Alberta for several years. The heavy reliance of the province's economy on extracting oil, gas and bitumen has led politicians and industrialists to support these activities, despite the environmental cost. However, a large percentage of Alberta's citizens would like to see a switch to an economy based on cleaner, less environmentally damaging sources of energy. This report discussed Alberta's climate change challenge with particular reference to greenhouse gas emissions, changing precipitation, and water use for energy production in Alberta. The report discussed water use for electricity production, such as coal-fired electricity generation; electricity from gas; nuclear energy; hydroelectricity and run-of-river hydro; and other types of renewable energy. Water use for gas and oil production was examined. This included well development; natural gas production; conventional oil production; oil from bitumen; and future water demands for the oil and gas sector. The report concluded with a discussion of implications for Alberta's energy production and recommendations. The report also recommended that efforts should be increased to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and practical steps should be taken to reduce fresh water use. 349 refs., 2 tabs., 22 figs

  4. Providing geoscience information for geoexchange technology implementation in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grobe, M. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Earth Systems Section

    2007-07-01

    The mission of the Alberta Geological Survey (AGS) is to provide, data, information, knowledge, and advice about the geology of Alberta needed by government, industry, and the public for earth-resource stewardship and sustainable development in Alberta. This presentation discussed the provision of geoscience information for geoexchange technology implementation in Alberta. Surficial and bedrock geology influences the selection, installation cost and performance of geoexchange systems. The AGS is currently examining the feasibility of transforming geological maps to geothermal property maps for geoexchange design purposes and decision making by policy makers and industry. Shallow or ground-source geothermal energy in Alberta and the role of geoscience information were presented. The role of the AGS and its activities were outlined. The presentation also identified a project approach to two studies, notably a geoscience needs and utilities assessment as well as a pilot study in the Edmonton area. Data compilation and maps of the pilot study were presented. Last, the presentation discussed drilling, sampling and thermal testing in an area of thick drift over bedrock. It was determined that quality geoscience information is an important factor for site assessment and proper geoexchange design and decision making. The sharing data and experience for better decision making was found to be an important benefit. tabs., figs.

  5. Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund : 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A review of the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund as it operated under the new investment framework established in 1997 was presented. The new statutory mission of the Fund is to provide stewardship of the savings from Alberta's non-renewable resources by providing the greatest financial returns on those savings for current and future generations of Albertans. In 1998, the Fund earned $947 million in income with nearly $25 million of income being retained to ensure that the value of the Fund grows to off-set the effects of inflation. Net assets of the Fund on March 31, 1998 was $ 12.3 billion. Operation of the Fund, the accounting method used, and details about the Transition Portfolio and the Endowment Portfolio are provided. An assessment of Alberta's economic climate accompanies the auditor's report and the detailed financial statements of the Fund. tabs

  6. Should upgrading and refining be enhanced in Alberta?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgarpour, S.

    2006-01-01

    Although world oil prices are rising, the price of bitumen remains stable. It was noted that surplus refinery capacity is disappearing and that skilled labour, infrastructure, transportation systems, environmental management and technology development are among some of the challenges facing heavy hydrocarbon development. Pie charts indicating global reserves of crude oil and heavy crude oil showed that although the Middle East leads in world proven oil reserves, nearly half of the heavy crude oil and natural bitumen deposits are in Canada. As a global energy leader, Alberta is using its' world class expertise to develop the vast energy resources of the province and to market these resources and abilities to the world. This presentation summarized processing activities in Alberta and outlined the markets for petrochemicals. A graph representing North American petroleum supply and demand from 2001 to 2019 was also presented along with a review of Alberta's upgrading and refining capacity and infrastructure opportunities for crude oil, natural gas, petrochemicals and electricity. Alberta's crude oil markets by 2020 are likely to be the Far East, California, Heredity's, Wyoming, Chicago, Cushing, United States Gulf Coast, and the East Coast. The benefits of upgrading in Alberta include inexpensive feedstock, existing upgrader and petrochemical sites and low transportation costs. In addition, more refining capacity in the province would provide market diversification for bitumen products; higher investment and value-added in Alberta; opportunity to provide feedstock to petrochemicals; production of synthetic diluent in the province; and, smaller environmental footprint and greater energy efficiency. The cumulative impact of oil sands development on government revenues was discussed along with the challenge of addressing the issue of a skilled labour shortage, infrastructure needs, and developing a business case for a carbon dioxide pipeline. tabs., figs

  7. Alberta interconnected electric system transmission development plan 2002 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-13

    Alberta's independent Transmission Administrator, ESBI Alberta Ltd., has committed to publish annually an updated 10-year plan for the development of the Alberta Interconnected Electric System transmission grid. This report is its fourth annual publication which provides valuable information for those wishing to enter the power generation market or for those interested in competing for the provision of new transmission facilities. From 2002-2011, peak demand is projected to increase from 8,000 MW to nearly 10,000 MW. Full competition in power generation came into effect in Alberta in 2001. This stimulated interest in developing new generation in the province, particularly in Lake Wabamun, Fort McMurray, and Southern Alberta. It was noted that the existing transmission infrastructure has performed well, but since there has been no major investment since 1985, it is time to seriously consider new major investments into the system in order to continue to provide secure, reliable service. In 2001 ESBI conducted a conceptual study of the transmission infrastructure that would be needed if Alberta were to export its power. This study is being expanded to include power generation additions. The variables are the location of generation additions and the amount of surplus generation available for export. In 2001, more than $200 M worth of transmission reinforcement projects were initiated. The same level of investment is expected in 2002. Close cooperation between the Transmission Administrator and project developers, regulators and government is needed now more than ever because of the deregulation in power generation. The role of ESBI is to continue the stakeholder consultation process that helps to ensure excellence in power transmission in the province. This report reviews 500 kV, 240 kV and 138/144 kV transmission system reinforcements. It presented an economic outlook for Alberta with reference to underlying economic assumptions, oil and natural gas prices, and

  8. Observations on sediment sources in the Lower Athabasca River basin: implications of natural hydrocarbons inputs from oil sands deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conly, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    Government, industry and public concern exists over the environmental consequences of the development of the oil sand deposits in the McMurray Formation in the lower Athabasca River basin, Alberta. The impact of this development is unclear and is undergoing investigation. Investigations to date have focussed on the nature of the effluent produced by the extraction industry and its effect on biotic systems, and on the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants associated with deposited fluvial sediments. Natural hydrocarbon outcrops may be responsible for observed biomarker responses in areas not exposed to industrial effluent. Given this source of hydrocarbons and doubt concerning its environmental impact, it is difficult to ascertain the impact of oil extraction activities within a fluvial system. A study was conducted to determine the nature and extent of natural hydrocarbon releases within the context of the sediment regime of the lower Athabasca River basin. A description is included of observations from the field and a context is set up for assessing sediment-bound hydrocarbon contaminants in the lower Athabasca River basin. Abstract only included

  9. Framing a New Standard for Teaching in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John E.

    2013-01-01

    A research panel asked to frame the discussion for a new Teaching Quality Standard in Alberta assumes this task requires a paradigm shift away from the status quo efficiency movement. As a member of the panel, the author provides an analysis of paradigm shifts in education and recounts important lessons to be learned. The author challenges the…

  10. School Identity in the Context of Alberta Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Merlin; Gereluk, Dianne; Kowch, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The central tenet of this investigation is that educational institutions possess their own school identity. Acknowledging that school identity is influenced by institutional mechanisms and personal dynamics, we examine school identity in the context of 13 Alberta charter schools. Narratives of 73 educational stakeholders across the network of…

  11. The Saskatchewan-Alberta large acceptance detector for photonuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.B.; Cameron, J.; Choi, W.C.; Fielding, H.W.; Green, P.W.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Hackett, E.D.; Holm, L.; Kolb, N.R.; Korkmaz, E.; Langill, P.P.; McDonald, W.J.; Mack, D.; Olsen, W.C.; Peterson, B.A.; Rodning, N.L.; Soukup, J.; Zhu, J. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AL (Canada). Centre for Subatomic Research); Hutcheon, D. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Caplan, H.S.; Pywell, R.E.; Skopik, D.M.; Vogt, J.M. (Saskatchewan Accelerator Lab., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)); Van Heerden, I.J. (Western Cape Univ., Bellville (South Africa))

    1992-09-15

    The Saskatchewan-Alberta Large Acceptance Detector (SALAD) is a 4[pi] detector designed and built for studies of photonuclear reactions with a tagged photon beam. The design and performance of the detector are described. Its characteristics have been studied by examining p-p elastic scattering with a proton beam at TRIUMF. (orig.).

  12. Quality Assurance of University Education in Alberta and Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the introduction of degree granting institutions, Alberta and Kenya have persistently made efforts to manage and improve the quality of university education. While contexts, stakeholders, and quality assurance regimes have changed over time, debate on academic quality in both jurisdictions has continued bringing to ...

  13. Market making vs. market manipulation : an Alberta perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Alberta Stock Exchange's (ASE's) filing and disclosure requirements for market making and promotion contracts are outlined. The discussion focuses on the differences between market making and market manipulation, acceptable and unacceptable methods of market making and promotion and common trading and securities legislation violations associated with these types of activities

  14. Tourism and recreation system planning in Alberta provincial parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F.J. Eagles; Angela M. Gilmore; Luis X. Huang; Denise A. Keltie; Kimberley Rae; Hong Sun; Amy K. Thede; Meagan L. Wilson; Jennifer A. Woronuk; Ge Yujin

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, system planning in parks and protected areas concentrated on biogeographical concepts, while neglecting tourism and recreation. The existing system plan for parks and protected areas in Alberta, Canada, divides the province into six natural regions based on a geographic classifi cation system (Grassland, Parkland, Foothills, Rocky Mountains, Boreal...

  15. Biomass and biomass change in lodgepole pine stands in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Monserud; Shongming Huang; Yuqing Yang

    2006-01-01

    We describe methods and results for broad-scale estimation and mapping of forest biomass for the Canadian province of Alberta. Differences over successive decades provided an estimate of biomass change. Over 1500 permanent sample plots (PSP) were analyzed from across the range of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm...

  16. Issues and strategies for large power buyers in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D. [ENRON Canada Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    America's leading commodity risk management company, Enron has 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2000. It operates EnronOnline, the largest e-commerce site in the world. With some corporate profile information on Enron and Enron Canada and its involvement in the Alberta electricity market, the author proceeded to discuss risk management issues and program development. It was stated that Enron believes that future outcomes can be changed, and risk management is a dynamic and iterative process used as a tool to decrease uncertainty. The risk appetite is defined and electricity risks clarified, then a review of physical operation characteristics is conducted. The risk management program and policy are defined, as well as the controls and reporting. The tools and tactics are defined and one is now ready for the implementation phase. The next section was devoted to credit and contracting issues before moving to the Alberta electricity market fundamentals and pricing and some insight provided on questions such as import/export in Alberta, regulatory issues, prices in Alberta. The last section of the presentation touched on EnronOnline which is a free, Internet-based global transaction system where one can view real time prices. tabs., figs.

  17. Incidence of melanoma in organ transplant recipients in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mimi; Sander, Megan; Ravani, Pietro; Mydlarski, P Régine

    2016-10-01

    Many studies have documented the increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancers in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). However, the incidence of melanoma is less well defined. To date, there have been no studies on the incidence of melanoma in Canadian OTRs. Herein, we determine the incidence and clinical features of melanoma in a cohort of OTRs in Southern Alberta, Canada. We used the Southern Alberta Transplant database to identify kidney and liver transplant recipients between the years 2000 and 2012. This population was cross-referenced with the Alberta Cancer Registry for a diagnosis of melanoma. The clinical features of all cases were obtained, and the standardized incidence rate was calculated. We identified 993 OTR patients, representing 5955 person-years. Only one patient developed a melanoma post-transplant, and this was a nodular melanoma. The age-standardized incidence rate was 11 per 100 000 (0.6 per 5955), compared to 13.4 per 100 000 in the general Alberta population (incidence rate ratio of 1.29, with 95% confidence interval of 0.17 to 9.82). This is the first Canadian study to investigate the association between organ transplantation and melanoma. Our study did not identify an increased risk of developing a de novo melanoma post-transplant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. As good as it gets : Alberta economic profile and forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, T.

    2006-04-01

    This economic profile and forecast report for the province of Alberta revealed that nearly every sector of the economy is operating at full, or near full capacity. Alberta's strong economy is a result of high energy prices, rapid population growth and rising employment. Increased provincial government spending along with tax reductions for businesses also contribute to a strong economy. However, the the province still faces some economic challenges, including a general labour shortage. Forestry and agriculture are under pressure of low commodity prices and high input costs, and the province has not articulated a long-term strategy for managing non-renewable natural resource revenue. In addition, the provincial economy is highly dependent upon volatile energy prices. Despite these challenges, the report states that the momentum is on the side of continued economic growth in Alberta. The Canada West Foundation is forecasting real growth in the gross domestic product of 5.2 per cent for 2006 and 4.7 per cent for 2007. The strong energy sector is largely responsible for much of Alberta's economic growth. An estimated 20,000 wells will be drilled in the province in 2006, and high oil prices will lead to record drilling and oil sands investment. This report also highlighted the economic activity in other sectors, including manufacturing, tourism, international exports, hi-tech, forestry, agriculture, and construction. Information regarding interprovincial migration and population growth was included along with public finances. 16 figs

  19. A Review of School Board Cyberbullying Policies in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Nicole; Rinaldi, Christina

    2012-01-01

    An online search for school board cyberbullying/bullying policies in Alberta was conducted. The results showed that while only five school boards had a bullying policy, many schools had technology or Internet use guidelines. The online search included an assessment of one extensive school board cyberbullying policy as well as Internet use…

  20. Alberta's air quality index : facts at your fingertip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Alberta Environment measures the airborne concentrations of carbon dioxide, fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and sulphur dioxide on a continuous basis at air quality monitoring stations in Edmonton, Calgary, Red Deer and Beaverlodge. Every hour, the readings are converted to an Air Quality Index (AQI) number to report on Alberta's outdoor air quality as either good, fair, poor or very poor. The categories relate to guidelines under Alberta's Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act and reflect the maximum acceptable levels specified by the National Ambient Air Quality Objectives. Current air quality conditions are available to the public through Alberta Environment's web site or by phoning a toll free number. Both Edmonton and Calgary report good air quality at least 90 per cent of the time. Occasionally, air quality in the two cities may reach the fair category, but it is seldom poor. Fair, poor or very poor air quality occurs with strong temperature inversion and light winds. Under these conditions, air pollutants, usually from automobiles, are trapped in a layer of stagnant air. Fair and poor air quality can also be caused by summer heat when photochemical smog forms by chemical reactions with oxides of nitrogen and volatile hydrocarbons. 1 ref., 1 tab., 1 fig

  1. Alberta High School, College Elevate Learning with Rare Joint Venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    The refusal by a group of parents in Olds, Alberta, in 2003 to accept a provincial grant to renovate their high school set in motion a remarkable collaboration that spawned an innovative learning campus for an entire community and beyond. The new Olds High School, which opened in 2010, is part of a new Community Learning Campus (CLC), a joint…

  2. Authigenic Carbonate Fans from Lower Jurassic Marine Shales (Alberta, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, R. C.; Them, T. R., II; Gill, B. C.; Knoll, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Authigenic aragonite seafloor fans are a common occurrence in Archean and Paleoproterozoic carbonates, as well as Neoproterozoic cap carbonates. Similar carbonate fans are rare in Phanerozoic strata, with the exception of two mass extinction events; during the Permo-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic boundaries, carbonate fans formed at the sediment-water interface and within the sediment, respectively. These crystal fans have been linked to carbon cycle perturbations at the end of the Permian and Triassic periods driven by rapid flood volcanism. The Early Jurassic Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event (T-OAE) is also correlated with the emplacement of a large igneous province, but biological consequences were more modest. We have identified broadly comparable fibrous calcite layers (2-10 cm thick) in Pliensbachian-Toarcian cores from Alberta, Canada. This work focuses on the geochemical and petrographic description of these fans and surrounding sediment in the context of the T-OAE. At the macroscale, carbonates exhibit a fan-like (occasionally cone-in-cone) structure and displace the sediment around them as they grew. At the microscale, the carbonate crystals (pseudomorphs of aragonite) often initiate on condensed horizons or shells. Although they grow in multiple directions (growth within the sediment), the predominant crystal growth direction is towards the sediment-water interface. Resedimentation of broken fans is evidence that crystal growth was penecontemporaneous with sedimentation. The carbon isotope composition of the fans (transects up bladed crystals) and elemental abundances within the layers support shallow subsurface, microbially mediated growth. The resemblance of these Early Jurassic fibrous calcite layers to those found at the end-Triassic and their paucity in the Phanerozoic record suggest that analogous processes occurred at both events. Nevertheless, the Pliensbachian-Toarcian carbonate fans occur at multiple horizons and while some are within the T

  3. Description of two new species of Hisonotus Eigenmann & Eigenmann, 1889 (Ostariophysi, Loricariidae from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Roxo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Hisonotus are described from the rio Paraná-Paraguay basin in Brazil. The most remarkable features of the new species are the odontodes forming longitudinally aligned rows (one odontode after the other, but not necessarily forming parallel series on the head and trunk (vs. odontodes not forming longitudinally aligned rows, a pair of rostral plates at the tip of the snout (vs. a single rostral plate, the functional v-shaped spinelet (vs. spinelet non-functional, square-shaped, or absent. These features suggest close phylogenetic relationships with Hisonotus bockmanni, H. insperatus, H. luteofrenatus and H. piracanjuba. Additionally, both new species are distinguished from their congeners by characters related to head length and depth, orbital diameter, suborbital depth, caudal peduncle depth, pectoral-fin spine length, snout length and counts of teeth. Hisonotus paresi sp. n. further differs from its congeners bycontrasting dark geometric spots on the anterodorsal region of the body, a character lacking in H.oliveirai sp. n. The variation in number and shape of the rostral plate, posterior rostrum plates, infraorbitals and the preopercle in both new species and in H. insperatus are discussed.

  4. New Brazilian developmental curves and reference values for the Alberta infant motor scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia Cristina; Pereira, Keila R G

    2016-11-01

    The lack of Brazilian norms restrains the use of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) to precisely categorize infant motor development and discriminate infants with motor difficulties from typically developing infants. This study investigated reference values for the AIMS for Brazilian infants. Descriptive, cross-sectional study of infants from birth-to-18 months old. Trained professionals assessed infants in daycares, homes, and governmental health centers. Results showed increases in raw scores across age groups from 0- to 15-months of age. The stability of raw scores was observed after 16 months of age. Brazilian infants demonstrated lower scores in specific ages compared to the Canadian sample. Canadian and Brazilian children showed differences in motor performance scores across age and norms were established for Brazilian infants. This study highlights the importance to establish reference values for AIMS of infants across cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-cultural analysis of the motor development of Brazilian, Greek and Canadian infants assessed with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia Cristina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the motor development of infants from three population samples (Brazil, Canada and Greece), to investigate differences in the percentile curves of motor development in these samples, and to investigate the prevalence of motor delays in Brazilian children. METHODS: Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with 795 Brazilian infants from zero to 18 months of age, assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) at day care centers, nurseries, basic health unit...

  6. MCO Monitoring activity description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description

  7. Source Apportionment of VOCs in Edmonton, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Brown, S. G.; Aklilu, Y.; Lyder, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Regional emissions at Edmonton, Alberta, are complex, containing emissions from (1) transportation sources, such as cars, trucks, buses, and rail; (2) industrial sources, such as petroleum refining, light manufacturing, and fugitive emissions from holding tanks or petroleum terminals; and (3) miscellaneous sources, such as biogenic emissions and natural gas use and processing. From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central) and the industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model was used to apportion ambient concentration measurements of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions source categories. Factors of VOCs identified in the final eleven-factor solution include transportation sources (both gasoline and diesel vehicles), industrial sources, a biogenic source, and a natural-gas-related source. Transportation sources accounted for more mass at the Central site than at the East site; this was expected because Central is in a core urban area where transportation emissions are concentrated. Transportation sources accounted for nearly half of the VOC mass at the Central site, but only 6% of the mass at the East site. Encouragingly, mass from transportation sources has declined by about 4% a year in this area; this trend is similar to the decline found throughout the United States, and is likely due to fleet turnover as older, more highly polluting cars are replaced with newer, cleaner cars. In contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more VOC mass at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for most of the total VOC mass observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production

  8. Economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timilsina, G.R.; LeBlanc, N.; Walden, T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the international media recognized Alberta's oil sands as part of the global oil reserves, thereby establishing Canada as second to Saudi Arabia as potential oil producing nations. The economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands industry on economies were assessed at regional, provincial and international levels for the 2000 to 2020 period. A customized input-output model was used to assess economic impacts, which were measured in terms of changes in gross domestic product; employment and labour income; and, government revenues. Cumulative impacts on employment by sector and by jurisdiction were also presented. An investment of $100 billion is expected through 2020, resulting in production of crude bitumen and synthetic crude oil outputs valued at about $531 billion. The impact of the oil sands industry on local employment was also evaluated. It was shown that activities in the oil sands industry will lead to significant economic impact in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the rest of Canada. Alberta's local economy would be the main beneficiary of oil sands activities with nearly 3.6 million person years employment created in Alberta during the 2000 to 2020. Another 3 million person years employment would be created in other Canadian provinces and outside Canada during the same time period. A sensitivity analysis on the responsiveness to oil prices and the removal of various constraints incorporated in the main analysis was also presented. The federal government will be the largest recipient of revenues generated to to oil sands activities. The results of the study were compared with that of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies. This first volume revealed the results of the study while the second volume includes the data and detailed results. 48 refs., 57 tabs., 28 figs

  9. Adverse events following HPV vaccination, Alberta 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfang C; Bell, Christopher A; Simmonds, Kimberley A; Svenson, Lawrence W; Russell, Margaret L

    2016-04-04

    In Canada, private purchase of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines has been possible since 2006. In Alberta, Canada, a publicly funded quadrivalent HPV vaccine program began in the 2008/2009 school year. There have been concerns about adverse events, including venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with HPV vaccines. We describe the frequencies of adverse events following HPV vaccination among Alberta females aged 9 years or older and look at VTE following HPV vaccination. We used the Alberta Immunization and Adverse Reaction to Immunization (Imm/ARI) repository (publicly funded vaccine), the population-based Pharmaceutical Information Network (PIN) information system (dispensing of a vaccine), and the Alberta Morbidity and Ambulatory Care Abstract reporting system (MACAR) for June 1, 2006-November 19, 2014. Deterministic data linkage used unique personal identifiers. We identified all reported adverse events following immunization (AEFI) and all emergency department (ED) utilization or hospitalizations within 42 days of immunization. We calculated the frequency of AEFI by type, rates per 100,000 doses of HPV vaccine administered and the frequencies of ICD-10-CA codes for hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Over the period 195,270 females received 528,913 doses of HPV vaccine. Of those receiving at least one dose, 192 reported one or more AEFI events (198 AEFI events), i.e., 37.4/100,000 doses administered (95% CI 32.5-43.0). None were consistent with VTE. Of the women who received HPV vaccine 958 were hospitalized and 19,351 had an ED visit within 42 days of immunization. Four women who had an ED visit and hospitalization event were diagnosed with VTE. Three of these had other diagnoses known to be associated with VTE; the fourth woman had VTE among ED diagnoses but not among those for the hospitalization. Rates of AEFI after HPV immunization in Alberta are low and consistent with types of events seen elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 The Authors

  10. The regulatory context of gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, B.S.; Cook, C.

    1999-01-01

    The legislative and regulatory regime regarding gas flaring in Alberta was reviewed. The issue of gas flaring has received much attention from petroleum industry regulators in Alberta. Residents living in the vicinity of flares have identified them as sources of odour, smoke, noise and air quality-related health concerns. Sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide emissions from the flare stacks may contribute to acid rain and the greenhouse effect. The Strosher Report, released by the Alberta Research Council in 1996, has also identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other products of incomplete combustion. The public opposition to solution gas flaring has caused regulators to consider new options designed to reduce the adverse economic and environmental impacts that may be associated with gas flaring. This paper discusses the roles of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection in administering legislation that impacts on gas flaring. In March 1999, the EUB released a guide containing the following five major points regarding gas flaring: (1) implementation of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance's (CASA's) recommendations to eventually eliminate flaring, by starting immediately to reduce flaring, and improve the efficiency of flares, (2) adoption of the CASA schedule of reduction targets for solution gas flaring, (3) conducting a review of the current approval process for small-scale electrical generation systems to encourage co-generation as a productive use of solution gas that is being flared, (4) creating better public notification requirements for new and existing facilities, and (5) discussing conflict resolution between operators and landowners. 26 refs

  11. Hydrogeology of the Swan Hill area, Alberta: Evaluation for deep waste injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchon, B.; Sauveplane, C.M.; Bachu, S.; Koster, E.H.; Lytriak, A.T.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed hydrogeologicial study was carried out in a region of 15,760 sq km centered on the deep waste injection site of the Alberta Special Waste Management Corp. The objective was the selection of aquifers for environmentally safe disposal of waste water from treatment processes. The approach included identification of the major hydrogeological and economic constraints, analysis of the natural flow system for all hydrostratigraphic units between the Lower Cretaceous Viking aquifer and the Precambrian basement, numerical simulation of the flow in the entire Phanerozoic succession to obtain conformance with the natural flow system, and steady-state perturbation of the system at an injection rate of 225 m{sup 3}/d in 2 potential injection aquifers to evaluate the importance of the hydraulic head buildups at a theoretically infinite time of injection. The study was based on examination and interpretation of stratigraphic information from 3,276 wells, and on 635 drillstem tests, 3,477 core analyses, and 645 formation water analyses, all from the files of the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, using specialized software developed by the Basin Analysis Group, and the 3-dimensional finite element groundwater model FE3DGW. The preferred injection aquifer is the basal portion of the Wabamun-Winterburn aquifer system. The Basal Cambrian aquifer was selected as a less desirable backup injection aquifer. After completing this study, a well was drilled to the top of the Ireton aquifer and successfully tested and completed in the Wabamun-Winterburn aquifer system. 104 refs., 40 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Allegheny County Basin Outlines Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This basins dataset was created to initiate regional watershed approaches with respect to sewer rehabilitation. If viewing this description on the Western...

  13. Description of chronostratigraphic units preserved as channel deposits and geomorphic processes following a basin-scale disturbance by a wildfire in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.

    2017-10-11

    The consequence of a 1996 wildfire disturbance and a subsequent high-intensity summer convective rain storm (about 110 millimeters per hour) was the deposition of a sediment superslug in the Spring Creek basin (26.8 square kilometers) of the Front Range Mountains in Colorado. Spring Creek is a tributary to the South Platte River upstream from Strontia Springs Reservoir, which supplies domestic water for the cities of Denver and Aurora. Changes in a superslug were monitored over the course of 18 years (1996–2014) by repeat surveys at 18 channel cross sections spaced at nearly equal intervals along a 1,500-meter study reach and by a time series of photographs of each cross section. Surveys were not repeated at regular time intervals but after major changes caused by different geomorphic processes. The focus of this long-term study was to understand the evolution and internal alluvial architecture of chronostratigraphic units (defined as the volume of sediment deposited between two successive surveys), and the preservation or storage of these units in the superslug. The data are presented as a series of 18 narratives (one for each cross section) that summarize the changes, illustrate these changes with photographs, and provide a preservation plot showing the amount of each chronostratigraphic unit still remaining in June 2014.The most significant hydrologic change after the wildfire was an exponential decrease in peak discharge of flash floods caused by summer convective rain storms. In response to these hydrologic changes, all 18 locations went through an aggradation phase, an incision phase, and finally a stabilization phase. However, the architecture of the chronostratigraphic units differs from cross section to cross section, and units are characterized by either a laminar, fragmented, or hybrid alluvial architecture. In response to the decrease in peak-flood discharge and the increase in hillslope and riparian vegetation, Spring Creek abandoned many of the

  14. Organic petrology of an early Paleocene coal zone, Wabamun, Alberta: palynology, petrography and geochemistry. [Canada - Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchuk, T.; Cameron, A.R.; Hills, L.V. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (USA). Exploration Technical Services)

    1993-02-01

    An interdisciplinary investigation of a section through the early Paleocene Ardley coal zone at Wabamun, Alberta reveals that there are distinct vertical variations in the palynological, petrographical and geochemical properties reflecting changes in the original depositional environments. Coal petrography reveals that these coals are inertinite-rich. Thinner, stratigraphically lower seams at Wabamun (seams Nos. 6-3) consist predominantly of bright coal with high huminite contents. Palynofloral assemblages are comprised of [ital T. hiatus] with few abundances of other palynomorphs, suggesting that the original depositional environment was low-lying, dominated by taxodiaceous vegetation, and frequently flooded as evidenced by numerous shale partings, high ash contents and relatively high sulphur percentages. The thick No. 2 seams displays a distinct dulling-up petrographic profile resulting from increasing inertinite contents. The No. 1 seam consists of abundant fibrous (fusain-rich) coal. Modes of origin of this fibrous coal include extreme oxidation due to prolonged drought and possibly forest fires. Elevated ash contents within the Nos. 1 and 2 seams may be a result of this oxidation of organic matter and concentration of the inorganics, as well as airborne volcanic ash as evidenced by numerous bentonite bands within these coals. Sulphur contents are extremely low, as low as 0.05%, reflecting a terrestrial depositional environment. 46 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Dante in Alberta: chronicle of an oil addicted civilization; Dante en Alberta: chroniques d'une civilisation droguee au petrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Belkaid

    2010-07-01

    According to the author, Alberta, an heavenly province of Western Canada, is the theater of the biggest ecological crime of the moment in the form of oil exploitation. Alberta gathers all the aberrations and dramas that have been seen before in other oil producing countries, in particular in Africa, Middle-East and Asia: corruption, defiance of minority rights, terror threats, environment destruction etc

  16. Proceedings of the 44. annual Alberta Soil Science Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.; Shaw, C.

    2007-01-01

    The Alberta Soil Science Workshop is held annually in order to provide a forum for the discussion of issues related to soil sciences in Alberta. Attendees at the conference discussed a wide range of subjects related to soil sciences and measuring the environmental impacts of oil and gas activities in the province. The role of soil science in sustainable forest management was also examined. Issues related to acid deposition were reviewed, and recent developments in soil chemistry analysis for agricultural practices were discussed. Other topics included wildland soil analysis methods; the long-term impacts of sulphate deposition from industrial activities; and water chemistry in soils, lakes and river in the Boreal regions. Projects initiated to assess cumulative land use impacts on rangeland ecosystems were outlined along with a review of tools developed to optimize soil analysis techniques. One of the 46 presentations featured at this conference has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  17. Management of routine solution gas flaring in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Alberta's Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) shares decision-making responsibilities with the Government of Alberta for strategic aspects of air quality. In 1997, the Alliance established the Flaring Project Team to develop recommendations that address potential and observed impacts associated with flaring, with particular focus on 'upstream solution gas' flaring. The upstream industry explores for, acquires, develops, produces and markets crude oil and natural gas. Essentially, solution gas at upstream sites is 'co-produced' during crude oil production. The project team was established to collect and summarize information on flaring and its impacts and to develop recommendations for short-term actions to minimize the practice of routine flaring of solution gas. Another goal of the team is to develop a research strategy to better understand flaring emissions and their effects on human, animal and environmental health. The team is working on developing long-term strategies for actions to address the gas flaring issue. 5 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  18. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  19. Public health preparedness in Alberta: a systems-level study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noseworthy Tom

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent international and national events have brought critical attention to the Canadian public health system and how prepared the system is to respond to various types of contemporary public health threats. This article describes the study design and methods being used to conduct a systems-level analysis of public health preparedness in the province of Alberta, Canada. The project is being funded under the Health Research Fund, Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research. Methods/Design We use an embedded, multiple-case study design, integrating qualitative and quantitative methods to measure empirically the degree of inter-organizational coordination existing among public health agencies in Alberta, Canada. We situate our measures of inter-organizational network ties within a systems-level framework to assess the relative influence of inter-organizational ties, individual organizational attributes, and institutional environmental features on public health preparedness. The relative contribution of each component is examined for two potential public health threats: pandemic influenza and West Nile virus. Discussion The organizational dimensions of public health preparedness depend on a complex mix of individual organizational characteristics, inter-agency relationships, and institutional environmental factors. Our study is designed to discriminate among these different system components and assess the independent influence of each on the other, as well as the overall level of public health preparedness in Alberta. While all agree that competent organizations and functioning networks are important components of public health preparedness, this study is one of the first to use formal network analysis to study the role of inter-agency networks in the development of prepared public health systems.

  20. Consultation with First Nations stakeholders : an Alberta perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutwind, S. [Alberta Justice, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Aboriginal Law

    2005-07-01

    Aboriginal issues present risks and challenges to resource development in Alberta. This paper provided an overview of significant precedents and acts which may impact on oil and gas activities. The Constitution Act of 1982 acknowledged that existing Aboriginal and treaty rights of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada were recognized and confirmed. In the case of R v. Sparrow, justification was established where there was a valid legislative objective, such as conservation and resource management, and a precedent was set regarding the interpretation of disputes of section 35 subsection 1 concerning legal restriction of the exercise of treaty rights, such as hunting and fishing. In R v. Badger, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) advised that the framework applied to treaty rights as well as Aboriginal rights. The Natural Resources Transfer Agreement transferred powers over natural resources from Canada to Alberta in relation to hunting rights. Proof of rights issues were discussed in Taku River Tlingit First Nation v. Tulesequa Chief Mine Project, as well as in Haida Nation v. British Columbia, where it was concluded that an Aboriginal right need not be proven before a duty to consult arises. A review of Alberta's consultation practices was presented, as well as the Aboriginal issues and resource development initiative, which recognizes the importance of consultation with affected Aboriginal people and communities when regulatory and development activities infringe their existing treaty and other constitutional rights, such as the rights to hunt, fish and trap for food. Details of the Consultation Coordination Group were presented. A draft of the Government of Alberta's First Nations Consultation Policy on Land Management and Resource Development was also presented. tabs, figs.

  1. Misplaced generosity: extraordinary profits in Alberta's oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boychuk, R.

    2010-11-01

    This document gives a picture extended over a decade of the revenues, investment levels and profits of the Alberta's oil and gas industry. It also investigates on the distribution of those revenues and profits that were accrued to the provincial government through royalties and land sales. This document, tries to fill the information gaps left by the current government's achievement as Albertans' oil and gas trustee, pointing out the ongoing lack of responsibility in this province's most important economic sector.

  2. Proceedings of Alberta's environment conference 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference addressed issues regarding the sustainable management of Alberta's earth resources and the importance of balancing resource exploitation with environmental protection and satisfying societal needs. The conference featured 36 sessions dealing with a range of subjects such as regulatory tools; social science; flood events and water infrastructure; perspectives on oil sands region; forest ecology; climate change; innovative technologies; emerging issues on wildlife; working together for the preservation of Alberta parks; First Nations; integrated land management; innovations in waste management; innovative technologies associated with natural gas; human health and wastewater contaminants; focus on partnerships; building environmental stewards; focus on agriculture; coalbed methane challenges and opportunities; sustainable municipalities; focus on water; Lake Wabamun situation and response; focus on lakes science and stewardship; biodiversity and geology; focus on water supply; focus on energy development; Alberta's environment industry; shared governance of the environment; irrigation; and, focus on water management. Five of the 135 presentations have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  3. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spearman, C.

    2002-01-01

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig

  4. Asian-Pacific markets : a new strategy for Alberta oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureshen, C.J.; Du Plessis, D.; Xu, C.M.; Chung, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Alberta's oil sands contain an estimated crude bitumen-in-place of nearly 2.5 trillion barrels. Production has increased to the point where it has overtaken non-conventional sources, and is expected to reach more than 2 million barrels per day by 2012, and over 5 million barrels per day by 2030. Although it is assumed that most of this production will be marketed in the United States, the industry is facing many constraints that could affect potential crude oil production and existing market share. The Asian-Pacific region is an obvious new market for Canadian heavy oil and bitumen due to an increasing demand for petroleum products in that region and the potential for reaching the California market with the same pipeline. This paper examined the following three criteria that will determine the success of any initiative to move Canadian crude oil to Asian-Pacific markets: (1) a sustainable supply of crude from Alberta; a pipeline to transport the crude to a deepwater port on the west coast; and, a guaranteed market at the other end. The feasibility of marketing Alberta heavy oil and bitumen to Asia was also discussed. 12 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  5. CO2 in Alberta - a vision of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, K.

    1999-01-01

    The potential to develop a province-wide infrastructure for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) collection and transmission was discussed. The petroleum industry's original interest in CO 2 was its potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) for Alberta's depleted oil fields. However, new interest has stemmed from its perceived role in global climate change and the potentially negative business and economic implications of emitting CO 2 into the atmosphere. It was suggested that the development of a province wide infrastructure to collect CO 2 would address both interests. A simple screening of the reservoirs was carried out to determine if Alberta has the right oil reservoirs and sufficient CO 2 supplies to support a large-scale CO 2 infrastructure. The proposed infrastructure would consist of CO 2 supplies from electrical power generation plants, CO 2 trunklines, feeder pipelines to deliver CO 2 from the trunklines to the field and the oil reservoirs where the CO 2 would be injected. Such infrastructures already exist in Texas and Mexico where more than 1 billion scf per day of CO 2 is used for EOR. This study compared the factors leading to a large-scale CO 2 industry with factors in place during the 1970s and 1980s, when most of the hydrocarbon miscible floods were initiated in Alberta. It was concluded that the preliminary economics suggest that the concept has merit. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  6. Natural gas from coal : the community consultation process in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    2005-01-01

    The community consultation process was examined with reference to natural gas from coal (NGC) development in Alberta. It was suggested that NGC has a huge potential in Canada, and can be developed in an environmentally responsible manner which considers all stakeholders. However, water supply shortages and the effects of development on groundwater remain key stakeholder concerns in Alberta. Issues concerning water protection and handling were discussed, along with issues concerning surface disruption during resource development activities. An outline of road needs and pipeline corridors was presented. An outline of a typical NGC compressor station were given. Issues concerning public anxiety over air quality were discussed with reference to flaring and landowner complaints. It was noted NGC is not sour and contains no liquid hydrocarbons or foreign contaminants. A review of government regulations and best practices was presented with regards to flaring. Multi-stakeholder advisory committee practices were reviewed. It was concluded that Alberta is currently using a variety of consultation processes to enable better communications between industry and stakeholders. figs

  7. Mental health services costs within the Alberta criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Philip; Moffatt, Jessica; Dewa, Carolyn S; Nguyen, Thanh; Zhang, Ting; Lesage, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness has been widely cited as a driver of costs in the criminal justice system. The objective of this paper is to estimate the additional mental health service costs incurred within the criminal justice system that are incurred because of people with mental illnesses who go through the system. Our focus is on costs in Alberta. We set up a model of the flow of all persons through the criminal justice system, including police, court, and corrections components, and for mental health diversion, review, and forensic services. We estimate the transitional probabilities and costs that accrue as persons who have been charged move through the system. Costs are estimated for the Alberta criminal justice system as a whole, and for the mental illness component. Public expenditures for each person diverted or charged in Alberta in the criminal justice system, including mental health costs, were $16,138. The 95% range of this estimate was from $14,530 to $19,580. Of these costs, 87% were for criminal justice services and 13% were for mental illness-related services. Hospitalization for people with mental illness who were reviewed represented the greatest additional cost associated with mental illnesses. Treatment costs stemming from mental illnesses directly add about 13% onto those in the criminal justice system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Imports, exports, and Alberta's transmission system impact on price fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.

    2002-01-01

    The roles, responsibilities and objectives of ESBI, a private for-profit company, appointed by the Alberta Government to be the Independent Transmission Administrator in the province, is sketched, prior to a discussion of price volatility in electricity, Alberta interconnections, intertie issues, the economic theory and the reality impact on prices. Given that imports and exports constitute a relatively small proportion of total generation or load in Alberta, price volatility is considered to have been only minimally affected by imports/exports. In contrast, transmission constraints, i.e. the limits on physical capacity of the existing transmission system to accommodate all desired transactions, have significant impact on imports/exports. Factors underlying constraints and price volatility such as uncertainty of generation dispatch, leading to reduced interest to invest, which in turn leads to scarce capacity for imports/exports, and the actions required to reduce uncertainty and address other issues such as congestion management, tariff design and the creation of regional transmission organizations, are also discussed to provide further clarification of the issues. It is suggested that these and other related issues need to be resolved to provide the clarity around transmission access and the tools required to manage price fluctuations

  9. Alberta bitumen strategies and royalties delivered in kind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, Mike [Alberta Department of Energy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With North America's growing energy demands, Alberta's oil sands will provide a secure source of energy, especially considering the region's bitumen production growth potential for years to come. The Government of Alberta's provincial energy strategy is a guiding document for resource development, which includes bitumen production. Bitumen production policies developed under the strategy aim to support clean energy development, wise energy use, and sustained economic prosperity. Such policies include reducing CO2 emissions through carbon capture and storage projects, and improved monitoring, aligned regulations and efficient enforcement in the industry though a regulatory enhancement project. Bitumen Royalty in Kind (BRIK) has been one tool used to implement some aspects of the trategy, such as fostering value-added oil sands development, enhancing the bitumen market in Alberta, and sharing in the gains while working to mitigate the risks from processing bitumen into further value added products. Work continues on many policies and strategies involving BRIK that will impact bitumen development and markets.

  10. Alberta's conventional oil supply: How much? How long?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, M.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the future conventional crude oil supply potential in Alberta, a modelling system was designed with the capacity to determine the fraction of existing and potential reserves which could prove technically, economically and/or commercially viable over time. The reference case analysis described assumed constant real oil prices and fiscal burdens, capital and operating costs. Reserve additions from new pool discoveries were summed with reserves from existing pools to arrive at an estimate of the potential supply of established reserves in each play area. The established reserves from all plays were then totalled to provide the provincial conventional oil resource potential. Alberta's recoverable conventional crude oil reserves were shown to be declining at about 2 percent per year. However, even with declining recoverable reserves and relatively low prices, the results of the study indicated that the conventional oil industry remained a major revenue generator for the province and would continue to be so over the next 15 to 20 years. Improved operating efficiencies, cost reductions, reasonable prices and cooperation between industry and government were shown to be necessary to assure the continued viability of Alberta's conventional oil industry. figs., tabs., 11 refs

  11. Discrimination of Earthquake and Blast Seismicity in Western Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, N.; Law, A.; Yenier, E.; Reynen, A.; Baturan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recorded seismicity in western Alberta is caused by natural and induced earthquakes or blast events from mining and quarry operations. Accurate discrimination of earthquakes from blast events is crucial for evaluating recent seismicity with respect to the historical catalog and for assessing seismic hazards associated with naturally occurring or induced seismicity. In general, blast events are discriminated from earthquakes based on their proximity to active mines and quarries in addition to day-of-week and time-of-day timing patterns. In some parts of western Alberta, however, seismicity originates in regions with active mines, historical earthquake seismicity, and hydraulic fracturing operations. Based on timing patterns or event locations alone, natural or induced seismicity may be misidentified as mining activity. Several studies report that relative differences in Fourier or response spectra can be used to discriminate blast and earthquake events. Other studies report that the relative timing and amplitude of seismic phases may provide useful metrics for classifying blast events. Here we propose an alternative method that accounts for both differences in phase spectra and phase timing and amplitude. In particular, we evaluate the normalized time integral for characteristic functions of particle motion from confirmed blast and earthquake events recorded by regional Alberta seismic networks. We then use these time-integral profiles to re-classify events that are initially categorized as suspected blasts based on timing pattern and event location indicators.

  12. Depositional environments and stratigraphic architecture of the Late Cretaceous Milk River and Eagle formations, southern Alberta and north-central Montana: relationships to shallow biogenic gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payenberg, T. H. D. [Adelaide University, National Centre for Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, SA (Australia); Braman, D. R. [Royal Tyrell Museum of Palaeontology, Drumheller, AB (Canada); Miall, A. D. [Toronto University, Dept. of Geology, ON (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    The Milk River and Eagle formations in southern Alberta and north-central Montana form the core of the first Upper Cretaceous clastic wedge in this part of the Western Interior Foreland Basin. The wedge is a host for shallow biogenic gas in both Canada and the United States. Through a series of detailed sedimentology, palynology and facies models, this paper interprets the depositional environments and stratigraphic architecture during the Santonian and Campanian along the paleo shoreline in these two regions. Seven areas were chosen for study; one in southern Alberta in and around Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, and six in north-central Montana along the Missouri River and its tributaries. Borehole data were used to get an overall sense of the thickness of the formations in each area. To obtain sub-surface data five cores from the Bearpaw Mountains area were logged, and wireline logs from 2760 wells were integrated into the study. Results of the study are discussed in considerable detail, providing justification for predicting the potential existence for more unconventional reservoirs between the Bearpaw Mountains and the southern Alberta Milk River Gas Pool. 44 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Social-Ecological Thresholds in a Changing Boreal Landscape: Insights from Cree Knowledge of the Lesser Slave Lake Region of Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L. Parlee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK of the Lesser Slave Lake Cree, this paper shares understanding of how resource development has affected water, fish, forests, and wildlife as well as the well-being of Cree communities in the Lesser Slave Lake region of Alberta, Canada. In addition to descriptive observations of change, the narratives point to social-ecological thresholds or tipping points in the relationship of Cree harvesters to local lands and resources. Specifically, the study speaks to the echoing effects of ecological loss and degradation on traditional livelihood practices over the last 100 years highlighting the complexity of cumulative effects as well as the challenges of balancing resource development in the region with alternative land uses including those valued by Alberta's Aboriginal peoples.

  14. Woodland caribou management in Alberta: historical perspectives and future opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston H. Dzus

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou conservation has been the topic of much debate for the past few decades. By the late 1970s there was growing concern about declining woodland caribou populations and the interaction between industrial activities and woodland caribou. Initial concerns led to the closure of the licensed hunting season in 1981. Early confrontation between government and industry in the late 1980s transformed into a series of evolving collaborative ventures. Improving our understanding of the basic ecology of woodland caribou in Alberta was at the center of early research efforts; more recent studies have examined the effects of industrial activities on caribou and effectiveness of various mitigation factors. Despite having amassed an impressive body of information from a research and monitoring perspective, progress on implementing effective management actions has been less dramatic. Industry has endured significant costs implementing a variety of perceived conservation initiatives, but caribou populations continued to decline through the last few decades. While some parties feel more research is needed, there is growing consensus that changes to habitat as induced by human activities are important factors influencing current caribou declines. Predation is a proximate cause of most caribou mortality. Climate change mediated alterations to habitat and predator-prey interactions remain a key source of uncertainty relative to future caribou population trends. Management actions will need to deal with long term habitat changes associated with human land use and short term implications of increased predation. In 2005, the provincial minister responsible for caribou conservation responded to the draft 2004 recovery plan and created the Alberta Caribou Committee (ACC. The goal of the ACC is to maintain and recover woodland caribou in Alberta’s forest ecosystems while providing opportunities for resource development, following guidance provided by the

  15. Enhancing the Alberta Tax Advantage with a Harmonized Sales Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bazel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberta enjoys a reputation as a fiercely competitive jurisdiction when it comes to tax rates. But the reality is that the province can do better with a tax mix that has greater emphasis on consumption, rather than income tax levies. While Alberta has a personal tax advantage compared to other Canadian jurisdictions — but not the United States — it relies most heavily on income taxes and non-resource revenues that impinges on investment and saving. Taxes on new investment in Alberta’s non-resource sectors are no better than average, compared to other countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD, so it is not exceptionally attractive to many different kinds of investors. And Alberta’s corporate income tax rate is not much more competitive than the world average for manufacturing and service companies. By introducing the Harmonized Sales Tax with a provincial rate of 8 per cent (in addition to the federal 5 per cent rate, Alberta has the ability to make its tax system more competitive. An HST would even allow the province to entirely eliminate income tax for the majority of families. And because the HST would be easily administered using the same collection mechanisms that already exist for the GST, implementing a new Alberta HST could be done relatively smoothly and with minimal additional administration costs. Adopting an Alberta HST is the simplest, most efficient and fairest way to reform the provincial tax system, and will deliver noticeable benefits to Albertans, most visibly in the form of significant income tax relief. It would enable the province to raise the income-tax exemption from $17,593 to $57,250, making it possible for couples to earn up to $114,500 free of any provincial income taxes. In addition, the province could lower income tax rates for income over that amount from 10 to nine per cent. And with the revenue from the HST, Alberta would have the capacity to lower its general corporate

  16. Advantage or illusion: is Alberta's progress sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anielski, M. [Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2001-08-01

    A new indicator of economic and environmental well-being, the Genuine Progress Indicators, of GPI, is discussed as part of an attempt to gauge the state of health of Alberta's economy, and to establish whether the tremendous apparent economic progress made by the province in recent decades is real or illusory. The GPI, an accounting system by which nations can measure real progress and real wealth, was developed by the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development of Alberta. It combines 51 indicators of economic, social and environmental measures, and is consistent with international efforts to find new measures of well-being and human development. Based on a study using the GPI system, real disposable income of Albertans was 5.5 per cent lower in 1999 than in 1982, despite a 36.3 per cent rise in Alberta's GDP per capita. This finding suggests that not all people are sharing in the the economic good times. Personal and household debt has also risen substantially and now exceeds real disposable income for the first time in history. Ability to save has been squeezed, resulting in protracted decline in personal savings, while Albertans pay 500 per cent more taxes in real dollars since 1961. Social and human health indicators highlight signs of social stress, such as rising levels of divorce, problem gambling and falling voter participation. Other indicators raise concerns about the condition of Alberta's natural capital, such as forests, agricultural soils, air and water quality, fish, wildlife and protected areas. Environmental GPIs show that Albertans have the fourth-highest ecological footprint in the world, exceeded only by the Arab Emirates, Singapore and the United States. The bigger the footprint the more is someone else on the planet shortchanged. The Pembina Institute report concludes that the development of Alberta's fossil fuel energy resources has come with a tremendous ecological price tag. It also shows that conventional crude oil

  17. Hydraulic, water quality, and isotopic characterization of Late Cretaceous-Tertiary Ardley coal waters in a key test-well, Pembina-Warburg exploration area, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, S.M.; Gentzis, T.; Payne, M. [CDX Canada Co., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    A detailed evaluation of the hydraulic parameters and formation fluids of a key test-well completed in the uppermost Ardley coal was undertaken in the Pembina-Warburg exploration area, Alberta Basin, Alberta, Canada. Measurements showed a build-up of fluid (water) pressure within the coal to approximately 1,470 kPa. Detailed analyses of the formation waters showed that dissolved and total trace metal concentrations fall within Canadian drinking water quality standards with the exception of iron and manganese. Organic compounds including monocyclic aromatics (Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl-benzene, Xylene, BTEX) were not detected, with the exception of trace toluene concentrations. Anomalously high bicarbonate concentrations of up to 1650 mg/L and dissolved methane concentrations of up to 36 mg/L point to the presence of secondary biogenic gas. Formation waters are non-tritiated; {delta} {sup 18}O and {delta} {sup 2}H values plot along the local groundwater line for Edmonton, Alberta indicating a meteoric origin. Data from the test-well suggest that depressurization (i.e., diversion of fluids) of the coal zone is necessary for gas production. If depressurization is contained to within the coalbeds, relatively small quantities of produced fluids would be anticipated. Although most of the groundwater for consumption within the immediate area of the test well is obtained from shallower parts of the flow systems in the uppermost parts of the Paskapoo Formation, under the current regulatory framework a Preliminary Groundwater Assessment as defined by the Alberta Environment and the EUB (2004) would be necessary prior to diversion.

  18. Upper Devonian (Frasnian) non-calcified, algae, Alberta: Geological relevance to Leduc platforms and petroleum source rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dix, G.R. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    Several types of non-calcified fossil algae comparable to extant brown and green benithic macrophytes occur abundantly on two bedding planes in drill core from argillaceous slope carbonates of the Ireton Formation in northern Alberta. Fossiliferous strata abruptly overlie part of a stepped-back margin of the Sturgeon Lake carbonate platform (Leduc Formation), southeast of the Peace River Arch. Fossils are flattened organic fragments, some representing nearly complete specimens. Tentative comparisons are made with some Paleozoic algae; some of the Sturgeon Lake flora may be new species or genera. Preliminary examination of selected cores from the Ireton Formation and organic-rich Duvernay Formation in central Alberta indicates a widespread distribution of algal-derived organic matter within Upper Devonian basinal strata. The geological relevance of non-calcified algae to Devonian carbonate platforms and basins is postulated in three cases. Their presence in slope sediments may indicate that algal lawns flourished in muddy, upper slope environments. Fossils accumulated either in situ, or were ripped up and quickly buried within downshope resedimented deposits. All or some algal fragments may have been swept from the adjacent carbonate platform during storms. Prolific shallow water algal growth may have occurred simultaneously with oceanic crises when shallow water carbonate production either decreased or was shut down. The present position of fossil algae, therefore, would mark a bedding surface that is stratigraphically equivalent to an intraplatform disconformity. Regardless of the original environment, a sufficient accumulation of non-calcified algae in slope strata represents a viable petroleum source proximal to carbonate platforms. 46 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Effects of an oil spill on the regrowth of emergent vegetation in a northern Alberta Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernick, Barbara G; deBruyn, Adrian M H; Patterson, Luanne; Chapman, Peter M

    2009-11-01

    Following a train derailment in August 2005, Wabamun Lake (Alberta, Canada) was exposed to approximately 149,500 L of bunker "C" oil, much of which became entrained in the abundant Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani (= Scirpus validus) beds in the eastern basin of the lake. We assessed the regrowth of emergent macrophytes during the subsequent two growing seasons. Postspill measures of productivity, including transect length, total cover, and biomass were within the variability of prespill data collected in 2001, with the exception of a few specific areas in which biomass appeared to be affected. We conclude that exposure to oil during the late growing season in August 2005 and through the winter senescent period and regrowth in the summers of 2006 and 2007 did not cause large-scale changes to S. tabernaemontani communities. Physical factors such as cleanup activities and vegetation management appeared to be responsible for the reduced regrowth observed at some locations. Few previous studies have been published on the effects of oil spilled into freshwater on macrophyte communities; thus, the results of this study are expected to provide useful information for the assessment of future freshwater oil spills.

  20. Asynchronous onset of eutrophication among shallow prairie lakes of the Northern Great Plains, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheaux, Heather; Leavitt, Peter R; Jackson, Leland J

    2016-01-01

    Coherent timing of agricultural expansion, fertilizer application, atmospheric nutrient deposition, and accelerated global warming is expected to promote synchronous fertilization of regional surface waters and coherent development of algal blooms and lake eutrophication. While broad-scale cyanobacterial expansion is evident in global meta-analyses, little is known of whether lakes in discrete catchments within a common lake district also exhibit coherent water quality degradation through anthropogenic forcing. Consequently, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether agricultural development since ca. 1900, accelerated use of fertilizer since 1960, atmospheric deposition of reactive N, or regional climate warming has resulted in coherent patterns of eutrophication of surface waters in southern Alberta, Canada. Unexpectedly, analysis of sedimentary pigments as an index of changes in total algal abundance since ca. 1850 revealed that while total algal abundance (as β-carotene, pheophytin a) increased in nine of 10 lakes over 150 years, the onset of eutrophication varied by a century and was asynchronous across basins. Similarly, analysis of temporal sequences with least-squares regression revealed that the relative abundance of cyanobacteria (echinenone) either decreased or did not change significantly in eight of the lakes since ca. 1850, whereas purple sulfur bacteria (as okenone) increased significantly in seven study sites. These patterns are consistent with the catchment filter hypothesis, which posits that lakes exhibit unique responses to common forcing associated with the influx of mass as water, nutrients, or particles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Carbon Isotope Environmental Forensics: Fingerprinting Gas From Domestic Water Wells From petroleum Fields of Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Tilley, B.

    2008-12-01

    Sixty years of petroleum development has resulted in over 500,000 petroleum wells drilled in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, many in agricultural areas that rely on groundwater (GW). The impact on GW quality by petroleum development is increasingly becoming a societal and regulatory concern triggered by intensive, recent CBM development. To protect GW the production tubing of a resource well is encased by a larger diameter surface casing (SCV) that is set deeper than the depth of potable water. Because of poor cementing the SCVs and soils near the wells often contain gas heightening concern for integrity of GW. Carbon isotope analyses of thousands of SCV gases shows them only rarely to be sourced from the target zone of the resource well, but rather from an intermediate depth. It has long been known that many water wells produce methane and traces of ethane and it needs to be determined if the water wells have been impacted. Alberta now requires all water wells to be tested prior to drilling of nearby resource wells. Carbon isotope analyses are mandated on a proportion of all gases produced by water wells and many hundreds of gas analyses will be placed in a public data base. Carbon isotope values of gases vary within the basin and can be used to quantify natural gas contamination of GW. Two case studies will be presented where landowners have filed complaints about gas contamination of their water wells. Attributing specific contaminant sources to a given resource well has proven to be difficult in areas where there is ongoing CBM development. However, in one area, the problem gas can be attributed to previous conventional petroleum development rather than the current CBM drilling and production. Carbon isotope analyses of water wells in another area suggest a few per cent of CBM contamination in water wells. Unfortunately, lack of pre-drilling background water data prevents reliable quantification of the contamination.

  2. The use of composite fingerprints to quantify sediment sources in a wildfire impacted landscape, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M; Collins, A L; Silins, U; Emelko, M B; Zhang, Y S

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing global concern regarding the impacts of large scale land disturbance by wildfire on a wide range of water and related ecological services. This study explores the impact of the 2003 Lost Creek wildfire in the Crowsnest River basin, Alberta, Canada on regional scale sediment sources using a tracing approach. A composite geochemical fingerprinting procedure was used to apportion the sediment efflux among three key spatial sediment sources: 1) unburned (reference) 2) burned and 3) burned sub-basins that were subsequently salvage logged. Spatial sediment sources were characterized by collecting time-integrated suspended sediment samples using passive devices during the entire ice free periods in 2009 and 2010. The tracing procedure combines the Kruskal-Wallis H-test, principal component analysis and genetic-algorithm driven discriminant function analysis for source discrimination. Source apportionment was based on a numerical mass balance model deployed within a Monte Carlo framework incorporating both local optimization and global (genetic algorithm) optimization. The mean relative frequency-weighted average median inputs from the three spatial source units were estimated to be 17% (inter-quartile uncertainty range 0-32%) from the reference areas, 45% (inter-quartile uncertainty range 25-65%) from the burned areas and 38% (inter-quartile uncertainty range 14-59%) from the burned-salvage logged areas. High sediment inputs from burned and the burned-salvage logged areas, representing spatial source units 2 and 3, reflect the lasting effects of forest canopy and forest floor organic matter disturbance during the 2003 wildfire including increased runoff and sediment availability related to high terrestrial erosion, streamside mass wasting and river bank collapse. The results demonstrate the impact of wildfire and incremental pressures associated with salvage logging on catchment spatial sediment sources in higher elevation Montane regions where forest

  3. Reserve growth in oil pools of Alberta: Model and forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, M.; Cook, T.

    2010-01-01

    Reserve growth is recognized as a major component of additions to reserves in most oil provinces around the world, particularly in mature provinces. It takes place as a result of the discovery of new pools/reservoirs and extensions of known pools within existing fields, improved knowledge of reservoirs over time leading to a change in estimates of original oil-in-place, and improvement in recovery factor through the application of new technology, such as enhanced oil recovery methods, horizontal/multilateral drilling, and 4D seismic. A reserve growth study was conducted on oil pools in Alberta, Canada, with the following objectives: 1) evaluate historical oil reserve data in order to assess the potential for future reserve growth; 2) develop reserve growth models/ functions to help forecast hydrocarbon volumes; 3) study reserve growth sensitivity to various parameters (for example, pool size, porosity, and oil gravity); and 4) compare reserve growth in oil pools and fields in Alberta with those from other large petroleum provinces around the world. The reported known recoverable oil exclusive of Athabasca oil sands in Alberta increased from 4.5 billion barrels of oil (BBO) in 1960 to 17 BBO in 2005. Some of the pools that were included in the existing database were excluded from the present study for lack of adequate data. Therefore, the known recoverable oil increased from 4.2 to 13.9 BBO over the period from 1960 through 2005, with new discoveries contributing 3.7 BBO and reserve growth adding 6 BBO. This reserve growth took place mostly in pools with more than 125,000 barrels of known recoverable oil. Pools with light oil accounted for most of the total known oil volume, therefore reflecting the overall pool growth. Smaller pools, in contrast, shrank in their total recoverable volumes over the years. Pools with heavy oil (gravity less than 20o API) make up only a small share (3.8 percent) of the total recoverable oil; they showed a 23-fold growth compared to

  4. Sulphur recovery guidelines for sour gas plants in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the decision of Alberta Environment (AE) and the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) on sulfur recovery guidelines for sour gas plants in Alberta. The report also includes a summary of the review process and the recommendations and views of the participants. AE and ERCB agree that generally, the sour gas industry operates well within Alberta's stringent standards for ambient air sulfur dioxide concentrations, and that there is no evidence to date that demonstrates that sulfur emissions from that industry have had a deleterioius effect on local health or environment. However, in the view that the long term objective must be to limit atmospheric loading of pollutants to the extent that is practical, AE and ERCB have concluded that some upward adjustment to the requirements would be in the public interest, particularly where the technlogy appears to be available and the cost is not prohibitive. Effective immediately, new plants sized at 2,000 tonnes/d or larger will be subject to sulfur recovery requirements which have increased from 99 to 99.8%, with lower requirements for plants of lower sizes. It is important to note that for individual plants, AE and ERCB would consider requiring sulfur recovery levels higher than set out in the guidelines if a site-specific need were shown to exist. In addition, it is believed that some degree of sulfur recovery should be required for plants in the 1 to 10 tonne/d range, at which sulfur recovery is not now required. The new requirements apply to all new plants, to existing plants with substantial capacity expansion or process modification, or in cases where substantial new sour gas volumes, not in the original plant approval, have occurred. 3 figs.

  5. Alberta's economic development of the Athabasca oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Michael

    This dissertation examines the 61-year evolution of public policies pertaining to development of Alberta's non-conventional source of crude oil. The Athabasca oil sands contain an estimated 1.5 trillion barrels and provide for a safe continental supply. The Provincial Government first sponsored this undertaking in 1943. The period from then to 1971 was one of a transition from a wheat economy to a natural-resource economic base. A stable government emerged and was able to negotiate viable development policies. A second period, 1971 to 1986, was marked by unstable world conditions that afforded the Alberta government the ability to set terms of development with multi-national oil firms. A 50% profit-sharing plan was implemented, and basic 1973 terms lasted until 1996. However, 1986 was a critical year because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) reduced prices, causing the Alberta economy to lapse into recession. During a third period, 1986 to 1996, the Alberta Government was unable to adapt quickly to world conditions. A new leadership structure in 1996 made major changes to create ongoing fiscal and development policies. That history provides answers to two primary research questions: How do public policies affect the behaviors of the modern corporation and visa versa? What are the implications for development theory? Two sources of information were used for this study. First, it was possible to review the Premier's files located in the Provincial Archives. Materials from various government libraries were also examined. Some 7,000 documents were used to show the evolution of government policymaking. Second, interviews with leaders of oil companies and federal research facilities were important. Findings support the thesis that, to facilitate oil sands development, government and the private sector have closely collaborated. In particular, revenue policies have allowed for effective R&D organization. Relying on intensive technological

  6. Recommendations and final report on the Alberta transmission administrator function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinton, R.; Wallace, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1995, the Electric Utilities Act (EUA) was passed formalizing the Alberta government's policy of electric industry restructuring. The Act established two new important market entities: a power pool and a transmission administrator (TA). Combined, these two entities create the open access required to enable competition in generation. Functionally, the TA acts as a single transmission service agent for all transmission wire owners. The TA leases the wires from owners then provides a province-wide tariff schedule for transmission services to recover the required revenue. Customers can only purchase transmission service from the TA. Both the lease wire cost and the TA tariff schedule must be approved by the regulator

  7. Alberta Consumers' Valuation of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Red Meat Attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo; Gao, Fei; Unterschultz, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes Alberta consumers’ perceptions toward extrinsic and intrinsic attributes of bison and beef steaks. In contrast to published Canadian consumer studies on bison meat that were undertaken prior to May 2003, before the first BSE case of Canadian origin was identified in beef cattle......, this study provides a “post-BSE” assessment of consumer perceptions toward selected bison meat attributes. The results from an attribute-based choice experiment provide little support that simple traceability assurance schemes have value to consumers of bison and beef steaks, thus confirming similar findings...

  8. Preventing Domestic Violence in Alberta: A Cost Savings Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Wells

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that Alberta has the fifth highest rate of police reported intimate partner violence and the second highest rate of self reported spousal violence in Canada, and despite a 2.3 percent decline over the last decade, the province’s rate of self-reported domestic violence has stubbornly remained among the highest in Canada; rates of violence against women alone are 2.3 percentage points higher than the national average. In fact, every hour of every day, a woman in Alberta will undergo some form of interpersonal violence from an ex-partner or ex-spouse. Besides the devastating toll that domestic violence has on victims and their families, the ongoing cost to Albertans is significant. In the past five years alone it is estimated that over $600 million will have been spent on the provision of a few basic health and non health supports and that the majority of this cost ($521 million is coming out of the pockets of Albertans in the form of tax dollars directed at the provision of services. Fortunately, investment in quality prevention and intervention initiatives can be very cost effective, returning as much as $20 for every dollar invested. Recent research on preventative programming in the context of domestic violence shows promising results in reducing incidents of self-reported domestic violence. The economic analysis of this preventative programming suggests that the benefits of providing the various types of programming outweighed the costs by as much as 6:1. The potential cost savings for the Alberta context are significant; the implementation of these preventative programs has been estimated to be approximately $9.6 million while generating net cost-benefits of over $54 million. Domestic violence is a persistent blight, and continues to have a significant impact on individuals and families in Alberta, but potent tools exist to fight it. This brief paper offers a cogent summary of its costs, and the benefits that could be

  9. Government Policy and Postsecondary Education in Alberta: A "Field Theory" Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaus, David; Wimmer, Randolph

    2013-01-01

    While the landscape of postsecondary education in Alberta continues to expand and diversify, there seems to be very little written about the organization of postsecondary education in the province over the past 15 to 20 years (Wimmer & Schmaus, 2010). This paper provides an analysis of postsecondary education in Alberta over the past 15 to 20…

  10. Comparative analysis of fiscal terms for Alberta oil sands and international heavy and conventional oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    There are considerable differences between international heavy oil and Alberta oil sands projects, notably the high viscosity of the bitumen in the oil sands reservoirs. The oil sands bitumen do not flow to wells without heating the bitumen, thereby adding to the already high cost of Alberta oil sand operations. This report provided an economic comparison of Alberta oil sands and international heavy oil projects. It also included a brief scoping review to compare with conventional oil regimes. Full exploration costs including the costs of dry holes were allocated to conventional oil operations in order to obtain a proper comparison. This investigation included the costs of dry holes. The report was a follow up to an earlier study released on April 12, 2007 on the preliminary fiscal evaluation of Alberta oil sand terms. The report provided an economic framework and described project selection. It then provided a discussion of production, costs and price data. Four adjusted projects were presented and compared with Alberta. The Venezuelan royalty formula was also discussed. Last, the report provided a detailed fiscal analysis. Comparisons were offered with Cold Lake and Athabasca Mine. A review of some other fiscal systems applicable to conventional oil were also outlined. It was concluded that Alberta oil sands developments are very competitive. It would be possible to modestly increase government revenues, without affecting the international competitive position of Alberta with respect to conventional oil. There is also some possibility to increase the base royalty on the Alberta oil sands without losing competitiveness. tabs., figs

  11. Potential change in lodgepole pine site index and distribution under climatic change in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Monserud; Yuqing Yang; Shongming Huang; Nadja Tchebakova

    2008-01-01

    We estimated the impact of global climate change on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex. Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) site productivity in Alberta based on the Alberta Climate Model and the A2 SRES climate change scenario projections from three global circulation models (CGCM2, HADCM3, and ECHAM4). Considerable warming is...

  12. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  13. Laboratory based surveillance of travel-related Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri in Alberta from 2002 to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrato Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Between 2002 and 2007, travel related cases of Shigella sonnei and S. flexneri in Alberta, Canada were acquired from Central America, the Indian subcontinent and North America. Of this group, resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid was identified in isolates from patients who had travelled to the Indian subcontinent. This study provides a Canadian perspective to a growing body of literature linking ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid resistance to travel to the Indian subcontinent. Shigella is a common cause of diarrheal illness in North America with a rate of 2.0 per 100,000 in Canada 1 and a rate of 3.2 per 100,000 in the United States 23. Imported cases of Shigella infections have been reported in developed countries following travel to a foreign or developing country 45 and may be impacted by factors including socio-economic factors 6, food distribution networks 5 and microbiologic factors 7. Across multiple geographic regions, high rates of antimicrobial resistance to multiple agents (e.g. sulfonamides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole have limited the choices for empiric antimicrobial therapy required to manage Shigella infections and reduce fecal excretion of the bacteria 8910 with descriptions of shifting species dominance and changes in antimicrobial susceptibility 1011. Generally, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei are the dominant species and are heavily impacted by changes in antimicrobial susceptibility 1213. This study identifies the global regions associated with travel-related cases of S. flexneri and S. sonnei in Alberta, Canada and compares antibiotic resistance patterns of these isolates for 2002 to 2007 inclusive. Specimens collected 2002-2007 (inclusive from S. flexneri and S. sonnei infections in Alberta, Canada were included for study. Data collected at time of specimen submission included: date of specimen collection, outbreak association if present, travel

  14. A case study in Gantt charts as historiophoty: A century of psychology at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Michael R W

    2013-05-01

    History is typically presented as historiography, where historians communicate via the written word. However, some historians have suggested alternative formats for communicating and thinking about historical information. One such format is known as historiophoty, which involves using a variety of visual images to represent history. The current article proposes that a particular type of graph, known as a Gantt chart, is well suited for conducting historiophoty. When used to represent history, Gantt charts provide a tremendous amount of information. Furthermore, the spatial nature of Gantt charts permits other kinds of spatial operations to be performed on them. This is illustrated with a case study of the history of a particular psychology department. The academic year 2009-2010 marked the centennial of psychology at the University of Alberta. This centennial was marked by compiling a list of its full-time faculty members for each year of its history. This historiography was converted into historiophoty by using it as the source for the creation of a Gantt chart. The current article shows how the history of psychology at the University of Alberta is revealed by examining this Gantt chart in a variety of different ways. This includes computing simple descriptive statistics from the chart, creating smaller versions of the Gantt to explore departmental demographics, and using image processing methods to provide measures of departmental stability throughout its history. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Long-term outlook for Alberta's primary petrochemical industry : panel discussion : sustainability, feedstocks, infrastructure, transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauzon, D.

    1997-01-01

    The long-term outlook for Dow Chemical's involvement in Alberta's petrochemical industry was discussed. Dow Chemical Canada is a company with annual sales of more than $20 billion that manufactures and supplies chemicals, plastics, energy, agricultural products, consumer goods and environmental services in 157 countries in the world. Alberta is the centre of growth and development for the Canadian petrochemical industry because of the proximity to feedstocks. Alberta is seen as a good, long-term source of ethane. Dow Chemical intends to continue being a major player in the further development of the industry in Alberta. As proof of that confidence, there are 11 capital projects in progress at Dow's Western Canada Operation, totaling $600 million. An important ingredient of the continuing success of the petrochemical industry in Alberta will be the willingness and ability of the federal and provincial governments to work in partnership with industry to develop support infrastructure and policies

  16. Frasnian-Famennian boundary near Jasper, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldsetzer, H.; Goodfellow, W.D.; McLaren, D.; Orchard, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The extinction event at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary cannot be associated with a first-order event, whether impact, volcanic or other. However, data from Alberta and western Australia suggest a sudden flooding of cratonic areas by anoxic water as the immediate or second-order cause. In the Rocky Mountains near Jasper, Alberta abrupt sedimentological, geochemical and faunal changes occur between bioturbated dolomitic siltstones below and thinly laminated, very pyritic, argillaceous lime mudstones above. The siltstones which overlie thick subtidal sediments that infilled Middle Frasnian reef topography, were deposited in shallow, well oxygenated water and contain a Frasnian gigas Zone conodont fauna. In contrast, the overlying lime mudstones which pass upward into beds with Famennian triangularis Zone conodonts, represent deposition under strongly anoxic conditions; the contained pyrite has anomalously high delta/sup 34/S values suggesting prolonged bacterial reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The abrupt change to anoxic conditions could have been triggered by an ocean turn-over event as a result of which cratonic areas were flooded with anoxic water. This in turn would have caused a sharp reduction of the biomass and large-scale faunal extinctions.

  17. Improving the competitiveness of Alberta's retail electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    Navigant Consulting Limited (Navigant) was commissioned by Alberta Energy to provide an independent review of the issues and recommendations contained in the Report of the Retail Issues Subcommittee, published in September 2001, on the Alberta Retail Electricity Markets. It was also asked to identify and other significant issues, and making recommendations pertaining to the issues. The principles of a well-functioning retail market followed an introduction to the document. A definition of a competitive market, according to that used by the Retail Issues Subcommittee (RIS) was provided, and a discussion of each of the elements of such a market was included. Highlights from the United Kingdom retail electricity market were provided. A detailed discussion of each of the major issues identified in the RIS report was presented, and recommendations on each topic areas from the RIS report included. The expected impact of the recommendations was explored. A summary of the recommendations and implementation considerations was provided in the last section of the document. tabs., figs

  18. The need for a marketing strategy for Alberta bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redford, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, government and industry have invested heavily in research and development of new technology for extracting bitumen from the Alberta oil sands. The results have been a dramatic increase in the fraction of oil sands deposits that could be economically exploited and a drop in production costs. However, no rapid increase in bitumen recovery has been achieved and most new bitumen production projects have been postponed or cancelled. This is the result of very variable prices for bitumen and the inadequacy of a marketing strategy which relies on the sale of raw bitumen. Options such as transport of bitumen to southern markets are limited by the need to reduce bitumen viscosity for pipelining and by the limited market for emulsified or diluted bitumen. Another possible strategy, conversion of the bitumen to synthetic crude oil, is limited by high costs, product characteristics (too much diesel and not enough gasoline), and a market limited to specialized refineries. A third strategy is to convert and refine bitumen to transportation fuels in Alberta, using inexpensive local natural gas, and transporting the products through existing pipeline facilities. 3 figs

  19. The need for a marketing strategy for Alberta bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redford, D.A. (Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1993-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, government and industry have invested heavily in research and development of new technology for extracting bitumen from the Alberta oil sands. The results have been a dramatic increase in the fraction of oil sands deposits that could be economically exploited and a drop in production costs. However, no rapid increase in bitumen recovery has been achieved and most new bitumen production projects have been postponed or cancelled. This is the result of very variable prices for bitumen and the inadequacy of a marketing strategy which relies on the sale of raw bitumen. Options such as transport of bitumen to southern markets are limited by the need to reduce bitumen viscosity for pipelining and by the limited market for emulsified or diluted bitumen. Another possible strategy, conversion of the bitumen to synthetic crude oil, is limited by high costs, product characteristics (too much diesel and not enough gasoline), and a market limited to specialized refineries. A third strategy is to convert and refine bitumen to transportation fuels in Alberta, using inexpensive local natural gas, and transporting the products through existing pipeline facilities. 3 figs.

  20. Preliminary fiscal evaluation of Alberta oil sands terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of oil sands projects varies significantly. While costs have escalated considerably over the past few years, oil prices have gone significantly higher. This report provided an economic evaluation of the current fiscal terms applicable to Alberta oil sands. The analysis was done to evaluate the profitability of oil sand projects to investors under current conditions based on the generic royalty regime based on bitumen values. The objective of the royalty review was to determine whether Albertans received a fair share from their oil and gas resources. It discussed the wide variety of oil sands projects in Alberta using five case studies as examples. Cases involving steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations were assessed for both the Athabasca Mine and Cold Lake. The report provided a discussion of the economic assumptions including economic cases as well as production, costs and price data. It then provided the preliminary results of the economic-fiscal evaluation from the investor perspective including profitability indicators; international comparisons; internal rate of return; and net present value. The government perspective was also discussed with reference to attractiveness indicators; royalties as a percentage of bitumen values; and non-discounted and discounted government take. A royalty and tax feature analysis was also provided. Several issues for possible further review were also presented. tabs

  1. Sage-grouse habitat selection during winter in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jennifer L.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Boyce, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are dependent on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) for food and shelter during winter, yet few studies have assessed winter habitat selection, particularly at scales applicable to conservation planning. Small changes to availability of winter habitats have caused drastic reductions in some sage-grouse populations. We modeled winter habitat selection by sage-grouse in Alberta, Canada, by using a resource selection function. Our purpose was to 1) generate a robust winter habitat-selection model for Alberta sage-grouse; 2) spatially depict habitat suitability in a Geographic Information System to identify areas with a high probability of selection and thus, conservation importance; and 3) assess the relative influence of human development, including oil and gas wells, in landscape models of winter habitat selection. Terrain and vegetation characteristics, sagebrush cover, anthropogenic landscape features, and energy development were important in top Akaike's Information Criterionselected models. During winter, sage-grouse selected dense sagebrush cover and homogenous less rugged areas, and avoided energy development and 2-track truck trails. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development highlights the need for comprehensive management strategies that maintain suitable habitats across all seasons. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  2. Feasibility of ground source heat pumps in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Maynes, T.

    2008-03-15

    This paper examined the use of ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) in the heating and cooling of residential, industrial and commercial buildings in Alberta. GSHPs extract heat from the earth beneath the frost line or from a body of water and transfer it to buildings for heating in the winter or cooling in the summer. The economics of GSHPs were investigated as well as their potential for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The study showed that while GSHPs are becoming more economical for residential and small commercial and institutional applications, they are not as economical as conventional forced air gas furnaces and have higher associated GHG emissions in residential applications in Alberta. The higher cost was attributed to the current pricing structure of natural gas and electricity in the province. It was concluded that lower GHG emissions are associated with GSHPs when green power purchasing is also available. Higher natural gas costs will enhance the economics of the GSHPs. 3 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs.

  3. Grasping at Straws: Comments on the Alberta Pipeline Safety Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Winter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The release last month of the Alberta Pipeline Safety Review was meant to be a symbol of the province’s renewed commitment to environmental responsibility as it aims for new export markets. The report’s authors, Group 10 Engineering, submitted 17 recommendations covering public safety and pipeline incidents, pipeline integrity management and pipeline safety near bodies of water — and many of them run the gamut from the obvious to the unhelpful to the contradictory. That the energy regulator ought to be staffed to do its job should go without saying; in fact, staffing levels were never identified as an issue. The recommendation that record retention and transfer requirements be defined for mergers and acquisitions, sales and takeovers is moot. There is no reason a purchasing party would not want all relevant documents, and no real way to enforce transparency if the seller opts to withhold information. Harmonizing regulations between provinces could reduce companies’ cost of doing business, but could also prove challenging if different jurisdictions use performance-based regulations — which is what the Review recommended Alberta consider. This very brief paper pries apart the Review’s flaws and recommends that the province go back to the drawing board. Safety is a serious issue; a genuine statistical review linking pipeline characteristics to failures and risk-mitigation activities would be a better alternative by far.

  4. Our fair share : report of the Alberta Royalty Review Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, W.M.; Chrapko, E.; Dwarkin, J.; McKenzie, K.; Plourde, A.; Spanglet, S.

    2007-01-01

    This final report conducted by the Alberta Royalty Review Panel determined that Albertans are not currently receiving their fair share from energy developments within the province. Royalty rates have not kept pace with recent changes in resource development in the province or with changes in world energy markets. It was argued that since Albertans own their resources, the government of Alberta must alter the royalty and tax system in order to ensure that appropriate royalties are paid. An equitable and flexible administrative framework should be developed to maintain the province's competitive edge in the global energy market. It was recommended that total shares for Albertans from oil sands developments be increased from 47 per cent to 64 per cent; conventional oil shares should be increased from 44 per cent to 49 per cent; and shares for natural gas should be increased from 58 per cent to 63 per cent. Target rates were designed to close tax gaps between economic sectors. Simplified royalty frameworks were presented for natural gas and conventional oil categories, as well as for oil sands developments. Increases of $1.9 billion in provincial revenue are anticipated as a result of the increased royalties. 5 tabs., 31 figs

  5. The use of teleglaucoma at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Faazil; Amin, Samreen; Sogbesan, Enitan; Damji, Karim F

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the teleglaucoma service at the University of Alberta is to improve access for people in northern Alberta who have early-stage glaucoma or who are at risk for glaucoma. Two types of teleglaucoma service are offered: remote and in-house. A standardized approach is used to capture patient information (structured histories, examinations and fundus photographs) which is then sent to a tertiary care centre for grading and recommendations. Only one grader reads and makes management recommendations for each case. Reports are sent electronically. A total of 195 cases have been graded through the remote service since 2008. A total of 62 cases have been graded through the in-house service since 2011. The average reporting time for consultations in the in-house service was 7 days, and it was also 7 days for the remote service. We believe that the use of teleglaucoma can improve the way that patients are diagnosed and managed, both in industrialized and developing countries. Teleglaucoma is currently being used as a screening tool at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi with mobile units equipped with a fundus camera and a visual field machine.

  6. Descriptive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Descriptive research is described by Lathom-Radocy and Radocy (1995) to include Survey research, ex post facto research, case studies and developmental studies. Descriptive research also includes a review of the literature in order to provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence of the effect...... starts will allow effect size calculations to be made in order to evaluate effect over time. Given the difficulties in undertaking controlled experimental studies in the creative arts therapies, descriptive research methods offer a way of quantifying effect through descriptive statistical analysis...

  7. Alberta's economic performance and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyear, D. [Government of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Economic Development

    2000-07-01

    The economic climate in Alberta is characterized as being strong and vibrant, with an efficient and modern infrastructure, a young, skilled and productive workforce, a competitive business climate, the lowest overall taxes of any of the provinces, a culturally diverse province with a high quality of life and a fiscally responsible government. All of these attributes add up to the 'Alberta Advantage', the campaign slogan used by the Alberta Government to attract business to the province. Economic highlights from 1999 show that Alberta was the fastest growing province in the country, with 38,000 new jobs created, exports of $34.5 billion, the lowest unemployment rate in the country, and leading all provinces in per capita investment. Total GDP in 1998 amounted to $95.8 billion (up from $61.3 billion in 1985). Even more significant is the fact that only 18.5 per cent of GDP was generated from the energy sector in 1998, as opposed to 37.2 per cent in 1985. Real GDP growth in Alberta was 2.3 per cent in 1999, projected at 6.1 per cent for 2000 and 5.2 per cent for 2001. The corresponding figures for Canada as a whole are 4.1, 4.2 and 3.0 per cent, respectively. Except for agriculture and public administration, which declined by 11.9 per cent and 13.4 per cent respectively, all other sectors of the economy showed significant growth during the period of 1993 to 1999. Technology employment grew by six per cent between 1989 and 1999, fully 33 per cent higher than anywhere else in the country. Energy industry revenue increased by 35 per cent from 1998 to 1999 and industry reinvestment was high at 150 per cent of internal cash flow. Total investment in the province amounted to $31.3 billion in 1999; it is expected to top $34.0 billion in 2000. A list of current major investment projects shows a total of 810 projects in all sectors of the economy, with a total value of $61.14 billion dollars. Growth targets include 295,000 new jobs, value added exports to $26 billion

  8. The Case for a Carbon Tax in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dobson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Alberta demonstrated that it could be a leader in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by becoming the first North American jurisdiction to put a price on carbon. Given that the province had long been criticized for its central role in the carbon-based economy, Alberta’s move was important for its symbolism. Unfortunately, the emissions policy itself has delivered more in symbolism than it has in actually achieving meaningful reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (SGER, as the carbon-pricing system is formally called, has only helped Alberta achieve a three per cent reduction in total emissions, relative to what they would have been without the SGER. And emissions keep growing steadily, up by nearly 11 per cent between 2007 and 2014, with the SGER only slowing that growth by a marginal one percentage point. Alberta’s carbon-pricing policy simply fails to combat emissions growth; the province needs a new one. Lack of progress in reducing emissions appears to be partly attributable to the fact that many large emitters find it more economical to allow their emissions to rise beyond the provincially mandated threshold, and instead are purchasing amnesty at a lower cost through carbon offsets or by paying the levies that the SGER imposes on excess emissions. But it is also partly attributable to the fact that the SGER only applies to large emitters who annually produce 100,000 tonnes of CO2-equivalent all at one site: mainly oil sands operations and facilities that generate heat and electricity. This excludes operations that emit well over that threshold, but across diffuse locations. The transportation sector, which is typically spread out in just such a way, is the third-largest sector for emissions in Alberta. Its emissions are also growing faster than those of the mining and oil and gas sector, even as emissions in the electricity and heat generation sector are actually declining. And

  9. Alberta Oil Sands Equity annual report, 1992-93. Partnership and progress in Alberta's oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Alberta Oil Sands Equity (AOSE) manages the Alberta government's equity investments in oil sands and heavy oil projects. AOSE is a 16.74% participant in the Syncrude Project, a 10% participant in the OSLO (Other Six Leases Operation) Commercial Project and the OSLO New Ventures project, and a 24.17% participant in the Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader. Syncrude produces ca 12% of Canadian crude oil requirements, and AOSE's share yielded $44 million profit for 1992/93, slightly higher than the the $43.3 million the previous year. The OSLO Commercial Project is a proposed commercial oil sands plant with a mine site and extraction plant to be located north of Fort McMurray, and an upgrading facility to be situated north of Edmonton. Work on this project was suspended in early 1992. The OSLO New Ventures project will handle the exploration and development of the remaining five oil sands leases plus the southern portion of Lease 31. As of March 31, 1993, the project owners were considering a commercial demonstration project utilizing dredging and cold-water extraction processes. Two of the owners are unable to provide funding and discussions are under way to resolve the matter and move the program forward. The Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader opened Noveber 20, 1992, and production has reached 41,000 bbl/d, or 89% of design capacity. The upgrader will increase the value of heavy crude oil and thereby increase its demand. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Demographic response of black bears at Cold Lake, Alberta, to the removal of adult males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Glen A.; Ruff, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports described an increase in population density following the removal of 23 adult male black bears (Ursus americanus) from a 218-km2 study area near Cold Lake, Alberta (the CLSA). This finding plays a central role in continuing debates over population regulation in bears, but has recently been criticized because density estimates were based on assumptions that were not met. Moreover, subsequent discussion has been predicated on conjecture that human exploitation had minimal influence on population dynamics. Our reanalysis supports previous descriptions of trends in bear density at Cold Lake. However, survival records revealed heavier exploitation than previously suspected. An underlying assumption of previous interpretationsCthat the Cold Lake bear population was naturally regulated near carrying capacityCno longer seems reasonable. Adult males deterred bears in other sex-age groups from using the CLSA; however, we found no evidence that birth or death rates were affected. The observed increase in local density should not be construed as a density-dependent response. Abrupt changes in local density might not have occurred if males had been removed from a larger area encompassing the CLSA.

  11. Sulfur impacts on forest health in west-central Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, D.G.; Stadt, J.J.; Mallett, K.I.; Volney, W.J.A.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate forest health and tree growth in relation to sulfur deposition in mature and immature lodgepole pine and mature trembling aspen. Soil samples were taken in forests near two sour gas processing plants in west-central Alberta. The soil sample sites were classified into high, medium and low deposition classes. The impact of sulfur deposition on soil and foliar chemistry, tree growth, and forest health was evaluated. The analysis of tree growth, using radial increments, revealed no impact associated with the sulfur deposition class. The only indicators of extensive sulfur impacts on major forest communities detected to date are elevated sulfur concentrations in the surface organic horizon and foliage, the proportion of healthy lodgepole pines, and a depression in the annual specific volume increment. No evidence of widespread forest decline has been found. 42 refs., 35 tabs., 29 figs

  12. A Case Study of Anomalous Snowfall with an Alberta Clipper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Rochette

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An Alberta clipper moved over western New York state on 11-12 January 2004, producing snowfall amounts of up to 27 cm in portions of the region during a roughly 12-h period. In addition, lightning and thunder were reported. Such systems, known primarily for their fast motion and relatively dry nature, are not generally associated with significant snowfalls. A postmortem analysis of this event, following an ingredients-based methodology, revealed that as the weak low approached the lower Great Lakes, it came under the influence of coupled 300-hPa jets that produced enhanced divergence and significant upward vertical motion over western New York, resulting in the enhanced convective snowfall over the region for a limited time. Instability and possible enhancement via the Great Lakes are also investigated, which show that while there was at least modest instability over the region during the time of heavy snowfall, lake enhancement was unlikely.

  13. The Devonian Palliser Formation and its equivalents, southern Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijer Drees, N.C.; Johnston, D.I.; Richards, B.C.

    1993-10-01

    In southern Alberta, the Upper Devonian (Famennian) carbonates and interbedded evaporites form a well-defined, thick-bedded succession that overlies thin-bedded carbonates and is overlain by dark shale. In the Rocky Mountains near Banff, the carbonate succession is represented by the Palliser Formation, which includes five distinct lithologic units in the type area. In the subsurface of the Alberta plains, Famennian carbonates are mapped as the Wabamun Group and contain large amounts of sour gas. In the Palliser Formation, the vertical changes in lithology, sedimentary structures, and fossil content in the lowest three units (the Morro member) suggest a change in the environment during carbonate deposition from intertidal to shallow subtidal, to deeper subtidal above average wave-base, returning to shallow subtidal. The boundary between the Morro member and the upper two units (the Costigan member) is sharp and coincides with a change in the environment of deposition from subtidal to peritidal. The peritidal facies is characterized by laminated algal mat deposits, intraclast conglomerates, and dissolution breccia. The lower part of the Costigan member is sharply and erosionally overlain by fossiliferous limestones of the upper part, which contain an open marine fauna. It is possible that the erosional contact between the upper and lower parts coincides with a significant hiatus in the sedimentary record. In the subsurface, the Morro and the lower Costigan members correlate with the Stettler Formation and the upper Costigan correlates with the Big Valley Formation. It is postulated that the fossiliferous carbonates of the Big Valley and the upper Costigan represent the same basal transgressive deposit. 65 refs., 23 figs.

  14. Experience with embankment dam safety evaluation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, M.; Morgenstern, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    Following a rash of dam failures in the 1970s, many jurisdictions responded with the implementation of both legislation and regulations mandating dam safety evaluations. Almost all dams in Alberta are embankment dams, of which failures are mainly caused by: overtopping during flood discharge due to inadequate spillway capacity or non-functioning floodgates; internal erosion along the dam foundation interface; non-homogeneity in the foundation or dam, leading to foundation failure or erosion; large settlements in the foundation; cracks following settlement, with resultant piping; and liquefaction. Summaries are presented of a series of case histories of dam safety evaluations conducted in Alberta where the outcome was not routine. The case histories describe evaluations carried out at the following dams. The Bighorn hydroelectric development was completed in 1972, and measured seepage was found to be ten times greater than a recommended alert level. Dam safety evaluations concluded that the performance of the dam and concrete cutoff wall is satisfactory, but the owner reads all monitoring instrumentation on a regular basis and seeks on-going review from consultants. The Three Sisters Dam is a 21 m high homogeneous embankment hydroelectric dam. Very large seepage flows were found, and although remedial measures have been effective, extreme vigilence with an intensive inspection and monitoring program is required. Other case studies detail seepage monitoring at the St. Mary Dam, complex seepage patterns at Waterton Dam and Tavers Dam, and material durability studies at Hartung Dam and Murray Dam. The importance of good records and construction and performance histories is emphasized. 12 figs., 10 refs

  15. (Dahomey) Basin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    13 km maximum width in the onshore at the basin axis along Nigerian and Republic of Benin boundary. This narrows westwards and eastwards to about 5 km (Coker and Ejedawe, 1987; Coker,. 2002). Detailed geology, evolution, stratigraphy and hydrocarbon occurrence of the basin have been described by Jones and ...

  16. Magnetobiostratigraphy of the continental Paleocene upper Coalspur and Paskapoo formations near Hinton, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbekmo, J.F. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Sweet, A.R. [Natural Resources Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

    2008-06-15

    A chronology for Paleocene strata of the Hinton area of west-central Alberta was developed from the integration of a magnetostratigraphic and palynostratigraphic study of the upper Coalspur and middle to upper Paskapoo strata in the Coal Valley to Obed Mountain area. The study resulted in the compilation of a complete section of 1100 m of strata with a maximum sediment accumulation rate of 250 m/m.y. Four new informal biostratigraphic units were used to highlight stratigraphically useful bioevents not previously recognized in existing zonations. These strata range in age from magnetochron 29r to 24r and palynozones Wodehouseia spinata Zone, Aquilapollenites reticulatus Subzone through the Pistillipollenite mcgregorii Zone. The 3 intervals with the most rapid changes in the palynoflora were the earliest Paleocene; the transition from the early to middle Paleocene; and in the late Paleocene. Each coincides with critical times in basin development, notably the initiation of regionally extensive post-K-T boundary coal swamps; the early-middle Paleocene sequence boundary at the Coalspur-Paskapoo contact interval; and the culmination of environmental changes resulting in coal swamps of the Paskapoo Formation, Delehurst Member. Palynology offered a precise tool to support regional correlations. The stratigraphic relationships and changes with the Coalspur-Ardley coal zone were presented along with the initiation of pervasive sandstone units at the base of the Paskapoo formation. The regional complexity of the Scollard-Paskapoo discontinuity was also highlighted. The study provided a better understanding of the interface between lower Paleocene coalbed methane reservoirs and the overlying basal Paskapoo aquifers. 35 refs., 11 figs., 4 appendices.

  17. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  18. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel

  19. Alberta Oil Sands Equity annual report, 1991-92. Partnership and progress in Alberta's oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Alberta Oil Sands Equity (AOSE) manages the Alberta government's equity investments in oil sands and heavy oil projects. AOSE is a 16.74% participant in the Syncrude Project, a 10% participant in the OSLO (Other Six Leases Operation) Commercial Project and the OSLO New Ventures project, and a 24.17% participant in the Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader. Syncrude produces over 11% of Canadian crude oil requirements, and AOSE's share yielded $43.3 million profit for 1991/92, down significantly from the $82.1 million the previous year due to lower oil prices. The OSLO Commercial Project is a proposed commercial oil sands plant with a mine site and extraction plant to be located north of Fort McMurray, and an upgrading facility to be situated north of Edmonton. Work on this project was suspended in early 1992. The OSLO New Ventures project will handle the exploration and development of the remaining five oil sands leases plus the southern portion of Lease 31. As of March 31, 1992, the project owners were considering a commercial demonstration project utilizing dredging and cold-water extraction processes. Two of the owners are unable to provide funding and discussions are under way to resolve the matter and move the program forward. The Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader was nearly 90% complete in March 1992 and full startup is expected in November 1992; engineering work was completed in March 1991. The upgrader will increase the value of heavy crude oil and thereby increase its demand. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Erosion of the Alberta badlands produces highly variable and elevated heavy metal concentrations in the Red Deer River, Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jason G; Cooke, Colin A

    2017-10-15

    Erosion is important in the transport of heavy metals from terrestrial to fluvial environments. In this study, we investigated riverine heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb) dynamics in the Red Deer River (RDR) watershed at sites upstream (n=2) and downstream (n=7) of the Alberta badlands, an area of naturally high erosion. At sites draining the badlands, total water column Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb concentrations frequently exceeded guidelines for the protection of freshwater biota. Furthermore, peak concentrations of total Cd (9.8μgL -1 ), Cu (212μgL -1 ), Hg (649ngL -1 ) and Pb (361μgL -1 ) were higher than, or comparable to, values reported for rivers and streams heavily impacted by anthropogenic activities. Total suspended solids (TSS) explained a large proportion (r 2 =0.34-0.83) of the variation in total metal concentrations in the RDR and tributaries and metal fluxes were dominated by the particulate fraction (60-98%). Suspended sediment concentrations (C sed ) and metal to aluminum ratios were generally not indicative of substantial sediment enrichment. Rather, the highly variable and elevated metal concentrations in the RDR watershed were a function of the high and variable suspended sediment fluxes which characterize the river system. While the impact of this on aquatic biota requires further investigation, we suggest erosion in the Alberta badlands may be contributing to Hg-based fish consumption advisories in the RDR. Importantly, this highlights a broader need for information on contaminant dynamics in watersheds subject to elevated rates of erosion. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Epidemiology of Childhood Asthma in Red Deer and Medicine Hat, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Hessel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To document the prevalence of asthma among school-aged children in two Alberta communities, to understand host and indoor environmental factors associated with asthma, and to compare these factors between the two communities.

  2. Digital Preservation of the Quon Sang Lung Laundry Building, Fort Macleod, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.; Baradaran, F.; Jahraus, A.; Rubalcava, E.; Farrokhi, A.; Robinson, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the results of an emergency recording and archiving of a historic structure in Southern Alberta and explores the lessons learned. Digital recording of the Quon Sang Lung Laundry building in Fort Macleod, Alberta, was a joint initiative between Alberta Culture and Tourism and the University of Calgary. The Quon Sang Lung Laundry was a boomtown-style wood structure situated in the Fort Macleod Provincial Historic Area, Alberta. Built in the mid-1800s, the structure was one of the four buildings comprising Fort Macleod's Chinatown. Its association with Chinese immigration, settlement, and emergence of Chinese-owned businesses in early twentieth-century Alberta, made the Quon Sang Lung Laundry a unique and very significant historic resource. In recent years, a condition assessment of the structure indicated that the building was not safe and that the extent of the instability could lead to a sudden collapse. In response, Alberta Culture and Tourism engaged the Departments of Anthropology and Archaeology and Geomatics Engineering from the University of Calgary, to digitally preserve the laundry building. A complete survey including the laser scanning of all the remaining elements of the original structure, was undertaken. Through digital modeling, the work guarantees that a three-dimensional representation of the building is available for future use. This includes accurate 3D renders of the exterior and interior spaces and a collection of architectural drawings comprising floor plans, sections, and elevations.

  3. Competing in a deregulated market : what are we learning from the Alberta experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, D.

    2002-01-01

    A history of the deregulation schedule in Alberta was presented. The spot market in the province opened in January 1996. What Albertans wanted from deregulation was a competitive power generation market, a liquid spot market, a liquid forward market, competitive retail market, a clear transmission policy, transparent pricing, and innovation. They got a competitive power generation market and a liquid spot market, but with few buyers and an unclear transmission policy with only medium transparency in prices. Innovation was seen in the form of small power and distributed generation such as wind energy. In 2001, the Alberta government stepped in to subsidize consumers because wholesale prices were trading at record highs. In 2002 wholesale prices collapsed. It was shown that prices have declined in Alberta as supply and demand came into balance. The Keephills Generating Plants 3 and 4 will have a large impact on the market in 2005. It was emphasized that new transmission would unlock additional potential market for Alberta generation. The paper presented viewgraphs showing existing generation capacity and the high Alberta prices following deregulation. It was noted that commodity cycles dominate growth plans in the electric power industry. The four generation markets in Alberta were identified. The lesson learned from past experience is that price signals will attract new generators to the market and that government leadership must be consistent. 4 tabs., 6 figs

  4. Successful and unsuccessful attempts to resolve caribou management and timber harvesting issues in west central Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hervieux

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Research studies of woodland caribou in west central Alberta began in 1979 in response to proposed timber harvesting on their winter ranges. Using results from initial studies, timber harvest guidelines were developed. A recent review of these guidelines, and the assumptions on which they were based, has resulted in a renegotiation by government and industry of timber harvesting on caribou range in west central Alberta. Caribou range in west central Alberta overlaps many jurisdictional boundaries: federal and provincial lands, four Forest Management Agreement Areas, three Alberta Land and Forest Service Regions and two Alberta Fish and Wildlife Service Regions. This jurisdictional complexity in combination with other factors such as total allocation of the timber resources, high levels of petroleum, natural gas and coal extraction activities, a high level of concern by public groups for caribou conservation and recent understanding of woodland caribou needs for abundant space has made resolution of caribou/timber harvest conflicts exceedingly slow and often relatively unproductive. This paper reviews 10 years of trying to resolve conflicts between timber harvesting and caribou conservation through meetings, committees, integrated resource planning, policy papers and public consultation. We describe what might be learned by other jurisdictions that are trying to resolve similar caribou/timber harvesting issues. We conclude with an overview of recent timber harvest planning initiatives on caribou range in west central Alberta.

  5. A review of Alberta's environmental and emergency response capacity : learning the lessons and building change[Report of the Alberta Environmental Protection Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    Alberta's Environmental Commission was established in August 2005 following a train derailment and spill of Bunker C oil and pole treating oil into Lake Wabamun. Its role was to review and make recommendations on Alberta's ability to respond to environmental incidents. The Commission found that the problems and solutions to environmental protection go beyond the mandate of Alberta Environment. They lie within decisive and proactive emergency management and response systems. In light of growing industrial activity, as well as a growing population and economic base, the comprehensive response approach to an emergency must be world-class in order to minimize impacts on land, air, water, wildlife and people. The conclusions presented in this report refer to the overall system and the 5 frameworks that support it, including prevention and mitigation; preparedness; response; recovery; and research and knowledge. The Commission examined response systems in other provinces and jurisdiction and reviewed the current model in Alberta to assess its strength and weaknesses. Focus was on the following 6 objectives: recommend any changes needed to the Alberta government's capacity to respond to environmental incidents where industry cannot; review Alberta Environment's emergency response system in order to make recommendations to prevent, mitigate and respond to these incidents; review the provision of information needed in a report to Alberta Environment and the associated reporting process regarding the substances involved in spills; review potential high-risk situations affecting Alberta's lake and rivers as part of an overall risk management strategy; review best practices for preventing, mitigating and responding to incidents that can have a significant impact on the environment; and provide advice to the Ministries on safety and rail transportation issues to help them collaborate with the appropriate jurisdictions. It was concluded that action is

  6. Systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin, with description of two new ocellated species (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatiformes: Potamotrygonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Silva Loboda

    Full Text Available A systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin based on morphological characters was undertaken. Morphological systems analyzed include external morphology, coloration, dermal denticles, and spines, canals of the ventral lateral-line system, and skeletal components. Potamotrygon motoro is widely distributed in the Paraná-Paraguay basin and some of its diagnostic characters are: ocelli present on dorsal disc tricolored, well-defined and evenly distributed, with diameter similar or greater than eye-length; ventral coloration with relatively large whitish central region, with gray or brown area predominant on outer ventral disc margins; dermal denticles well-developed and star-shaped over central disc; labial grooves absent; monognathic heterodonty present in upper and lower jaws of adults. Potamotrygon pauckei Castex, 1963 and Potamotrygon labradori Castex, Maciel & Achenbach, 1963, are synonymized with P. motoro; Potamotrygon alba Castex, 1963, is a nomen dubium in accordance with previous authors. Additionally, two new ocellated species of Potamotrygon from the Paraná-Paraguay basin are described: Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. and Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. These are described and compared with P. motoro and other congeners. Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. is described from the northern Pantanal region; Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. is widespread in the Paraná-Paraguay basin.

  7. Opportunities for CANDU for the Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Bock, D.; Miller, A.; Kuran, S.; Keil, H.; Fiorino, L.; Hau, K.; Zhou, X.; Dunbar, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The Alberta oil sands bitumen deposits comprise of one of the largest sources hydrocarbon in the world, and have emerged as the fastest growing, soon to be dominant, source of crude oil in Canada. The oil industry has made great strides in improving the effectiveness of gathering this resource. In particular, alternatives to open-pit mining have been developed which enable in-site recovery of underground deposits with a minimum of environmental disruption. The main challenge that remains is the large quantity of energy needed in the process of extracting the oil and upgrading it to commercial levels. For a typical in-situ extraction project, about 18% of the energy content of the oil produced is used up in the extraction process, while a further 5% is used in generating hydrogen to upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Looking ahead, even as improvements in energy use efficiency, (and hydrocarbon use efficiency) counterbalance the increases in hydrocarbon demand from economic growth (particularly in the developing world), Canada and Alberta recognize that the oil sands resource will be needed, and both support the development of this resource in an environmentally responsible way. The large energy requirement for the oil sands extraction process represents a challenge with regard to both environmental impact and security of supply. The use of natural gas, the current energy supply, has impacts in terms of air quality (via NOX and other emissions) and also represents a large greenhouse gas emissions component. As the oil sands industry expands, the availability of natural gas also becomes a concern, as does price and price stability. With this background, the opportunity for nuclear reactors to provide an economical, reliable, virtually zero-emission source of energy for the oil sands becomes very important. Over the last few years, developments in oil sands extraction technology, and developments in CANDU technology through the Advanced CANDU Reactor, (ACR

  8. Isotopic signatures of anthropogenic CH4 sources in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M.; Sherwood, O. A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Kessler, R.; Giroux, L.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2017-09-01

    A mobile system was used for continuous ambient measurements of stable CH4 isotopes (12CH4 and 13CH4) and ethane (C2H6). This system was used during a winter mobile campaign to investigate the CH4 isotopic signatures and the C2H6/CH4 ratios of the main anthropogenic sources of CH4 in the Canadian province of Alberta. Individual signatures were derived from δ13CH4 and C2H6 measurements in plumes arriving from identifiable single sources. Methane emissions from beef cattle feedlots (n = 2) and landfill (n = 1) had δ13CH4 signatures of -66.7 ± 2.4‰ and -55.3 ± 0.2‰, respectively. The CH4 emissions associated with the oil or gas industry had distinct δ13CH4 signatures, depending on the formation process. Emissions from oil storage tanks (n = 5) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -54.9 ± 2.9‰ to -60.6 ± 0.6‰ and non-detectable C2H6, characteristic of secondary microbial methanogenesis in oil-bearing reservoirs. In contrast, CH4 emissions associated with natural gas facilities (n = 8) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -41.7 ± 0.7‰ to -49.7 ± 0.7‰ and C2H6/CH4 molar ratios of 0.10 for raw natural gas to 0.04 for processed/refined natural gas, consistent with thermogenic origins. These isotopic signatures and C2H6/CH4 ratios have been used for source discrimination in the weekly atmospheric measurements of stable CH4 isotopes over a two-month winter period at the Lac La Biche (LLB) measurement station, located in Alberta, approximately 200 km northeast of Edmonton. The average signature of -59.5 ± 1.4‰ observed at LLB is likely associated with transport of air after passing over oil industry sources located south of the station.

  9. Segundo registro de Sterrastrolepis brasiliensis Volkmer-Ribeiro & De Rosa-Barbosa (Demospongiae, Potamolepidae com descrição do habitat e de assembléia, Bacia do Rio Paraná, Brasil Second register of Sterrastrolepis brasiliensis Volkmer-Ribeiro & De Rosa-Barbosa (Demospongiae, Potamolepidae with description of the habitat and of assembly, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Volkmer-Ribeiro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A descoberta recente, no fundo rochoso do Rio Piquiri, Bacia do Paraná, Brasil, de Sterrastrolepis brasiliensis Volkmer-Ribeiro & De Rosa-Barbosa, 1978, uma espécie de esponja continental ameaçada, possibilitou o registro fotográfico de espécimes vivos, o aperfeiçoamento das ilustrações ao MEV e da descrição de algumas características, a descrição do habitat e o registro de uma assembléia de esponjas composta por S. brasiliensis, Oncosclera navicella (Carter, 1881 e Oncosclera tonolli (Bonetto & Ezcurra de Drago, 1968. Oncosclera tonolli tem seu primeiro registro para águas brasileiras e para a Bacia do Paraná. Gêmulas de O. navicella são tambem ilustradas ao MEV.The recent discovery of Sterrastrolepis brasiliensis Volkmer-Ribeiro & De Rosa-Barbosa, 1978, a brazilian endangered freshwater sponge, at the rocky bottom of River Piquiri, Paraná Basin, Brazil, enhanced the photographing of living specimens, the improving of SEM illustration and description for some characteristics, the description of the habitat and the register of an sponge assembly composed by S. brasiliensis, Oncosclera navicella (Carter, l881 and Oncosclera tonolli (Bonetto & Ezcurra de Drago, 1968. Oncosclera tonolli has its first register for Brazilian waters and for the Parana Basin. Gemmules of O. navicella are also SEM illustrated.

  10. Clean air strategy for Alberta: Report to the ministers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    As a response to continuing discussions on the impact of fossil fuels on global warming, acid deposition, and smog, a clean air strategy consultation program was announced by Alberta's Ministers of Energy and Environment to encourage public discussion on air emissions resulting from the production and use of energy. The consultation program had three objectives: to help identify and clarify the most important issues associated with energy production and use which need to be addressed in developing a clean air strategy; to outline practical and achievable actions which can be taken to reduce emissions; and to develop program and policy recommendations to the provincial government. The consultation program included workshops and regional sessions, as well as background research. The discussions, findings, and conclusions from the program are summarized. Several air quality management challenges were identified, including the need for a more comprehensive system for managing air quality; the priority of local air quality issues and problems; the need to address cumulative regional emissions and impacts; and scientific and economic uncertainties. A number of goals have been developed to address these challenges, such as implementation of a comprehensive air quality management system, identification of cost-effective energy conservation and efficiency opportunities, development of innovative and targeted solutions to manage cumulative emissions, and improvement of the gathering and application of scientific and technical knowledge regarding atmospheric processes and effects. A glossary of terms is included. 12 figs., 17 tabs

  11. Shell's Caroline gas project on track in southwest Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that western Canada's biggest sour natural gas, sulfur, and natural gas liquids development project in 2 decades is on target to start up late this year. Shell Canada Ltd.'s $950 million (Canadian) Caroline project will produce 2 tcf of gas and associated products from the Swan Hills member of the middle Devonian Beaverhill Lake group. The price tag will reach about $1 billion, including some start-up costs. The project is designed to process an average 300 MMcfd of gas. It will produce 17,500 b/d of pentanes plus, 4,100 metric tons/day of sulfur, 90 MMcfd of sales gas, and 28,000 b/d of NGL-ethane, propane, and butane. A labor force that is peaking at about 2,400 workers is completing a network of processing plants, about 143 miles of pipeline, three field compressors, and other facilities covering an area of 161 sq miles. Dilcon Constructors Ltd., an arm of Delta Catalytic Corp., Calgary, is the main contractor for the project. About 85% of the services and equipment for Caroline are coming from Alberta suppliers, 7% from suppliers elsewhere in Canada, and only 8% from non-Canadian Sources

  12. Brazilian validation of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Nadia Cristina; Saccani, Raquel

    2012-03-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is a well-known motor assessment tool used to identify potential delays in infants' motor development. Although Brazilian researchers and practitioners have used the AIMS in laboratories and clinical settings, its translation to Portuguese and validation for the Brazilian population is yet to be investigated. This study aimed to translate and validate all AIMS items with respect to internal consistency and content, criterion, and construct validity. A cross-sectional and longitudinal design was used. A cross-cultural translation was used to generate a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the AIMS. In addition, a validation process was conducted involving 22 professionals and 766 Brazilian infants (aged 0-18 months). The results demonstrated language clarity and internal consistency for the motor criteria (motor development score, α=.90; prone, α=.85; supine, α=.92; sitting, α=.84; and standing, α=.86). The analysis also revealed high discriminative power to identify typical and atypical development (motor development score, P<.001; percentile, P=.04; classification criterion, χ(2)=6.03; P=.05). Temporal stability (P=.07) (rho=.85, P<.001) was observed, and predictive power (P<.001) was limited to the group of infants aged from 3 months to 9 months. Limited predictive validity was observed, which may have been due to the restricted time that the groups were followed longitudinally. In sum, the translated version of AIMS presented adequate validity and reliability.

  13. Fruit and vegetable preferences and intake among children in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yen Li; Farmer, Anna; Fung, Christina; Kuhle, Stefan; Veugelers, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The association between preference for and intake of fruits and vegetables was examined among Albertan children. Data used were collected as part of a provincial population-based survey among grade 5 children in Alberta. Intake of two fruits and five vegetables was assessed using the Harvard food frequency questionnaire, and preference for individual fruit and vegetable items was rated using a three-point Likert-type scale. Random effects models with children nested within schools were used to test for associations between fruit and vegetable preference and intake. A total of 3398 children aged 10 to 11 years returned completed surveys. Children who reported a greater liking for fruits and vegetables also reported significantly (p<0.001) higher intake. On average, children who liked a food a lot ate 0.5 to 2.7 more weekly servings of the food than did children who did not like the food. These findings suggest that focusing on interventions designed to increase taste preference may lead to increased fruit and vegetable intake among children. Introducing children to unfamiliar fruits and vegetables through taste testing may be an effective and practical health promotion approach for improving dietary habits.

  14. Adoption of the Healthy Heart Kit by Alberta family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bize, Raphaël; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Scott, Shannon D; Karunamuni, Nandini; Rodgers, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy Heart Kit (HHK) is a risk management and patient education kit for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the promotion of CV health. There are currently no published data examining predictors of HHK use by physicians. The main objective of this study was to examine the association between physicians' characteristics (socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural) and the use of the HHK. All registered family physicians in Alberta (n=3068) were invited to participate in the "Healthy Heart Kit" Study. Consenting physicians (n=153) received the Kit and were requested to use it for two months. At the end of this period, a questionnaire collected data on the frequency of Kit use by physicians, as well as socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural variables pertaining to the physicians. The questionnaire was returned by 115 physicians (follow-up rate = 75%). On a scale ranging from 0 to 100, the mean score of Kit use was 61 [SD=26]. A multiple linear regression showed that "agreement with the Kit" and the degree of "confidence in using the Kit" was strongly associated with Kit use, explaining 46% of the variability for Kit use. Time since graduation was inversely associated with Kit use, and a trend was observed for smaller practices to be associated with lower use. Given these findings, future research and practice should explore innovative strategies to gain initial agreement among physicians to employ such clinical tools. Participation of older physicians and solo-practitioners in this process should be emphasized.

  15. Workplace violence in Alberta and British Columbia hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Kathryn L; Duncan, Susan M; Estabrooks, Carole A; Reimer, Marlene A; Giovannetti, Phyllis; Hyndman, Kathryn; Acorn, Sonia

    2003-03-01

    Workplace violence is a significant and widespread public health concern among health care workers, including nurses. With growing awareness of how practice environments influence patient outcomes and the retention of health professionals, it is timely to consider the impact of workplace violence in hospitals. Registered nurses in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada were surveyed on their experiences of violence in the workplace over the last five shifts. Our results suggest that nurses are experiencing many incidences of violence in a given work week, particularly in the emergency, psychiatric, and medical-surgical settings. Most violent acts are perpetrated by patients, but there is also a significant portion of violence and abuse committed by hospital co-workers, particularly emotional abuse and sexual harassment. Our results also indicate that the majority of workplace violence is not reported. We suggest that using the Broken Windows theory might be a useful tool to conceptualize why workplace violence occurs, and that this framework be used to begin to develop new violence prevention policies and strategies.

  16. Health status of refugees settled in Alberta: changes since arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Katerina; Krahn, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    This paper sought to examine which pre- and post-migration factors might be associated with changes in refugees' health status. Using linear regression, the associations between pre- and post-migration factors and changes in self-rated mental and physical health status were examined in 525 refugees from the 1998 Settlement Experiences of Refugees in Alberta study. Having spent time in a refugee camp and having held professional/managerial jobs in one's home country were associated with a greater decline in mental health status since arrival in Canada. Having completed a university degree in one's home country was associated with a greater decline in physical health status. Being employed was associated with greater improvements in mental health status. Perceived economic hardship was associated with greater declines in physical health status. A higher number of settlement services received during the first year in Canada was associated with greater improvements in both mental and physical health status. Longer residence in Canada was associated with greater declines in physical health status but not in mental health status. While little can be done to alter refugees' pre-migration experiences, public policies can affect many post-migration experiences in order to mitigate the negative health consequences associated with resettlement. Results of this study point to the need for continued provision of settlement services to assist refugees with job training, labour market access, and credential recognition, as well as counseling for refugees who experienced the trauma of living in a refugee camp.

  17. Controls on Mannville coalbed methane production in Fort Assiniboine, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, D.; Majcher, M. [Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    A horizontal well exploitation scheme is being used in the Fort Assiniboine field in central Alberta to produce coalbed methane (CBM) from the under-saturated coals of the Mannville Formation. The Mannville coal seams in this region are under-saturated. In order to improve permeability to gas within the fracture system and achieve economic gas production rates, the reservoir's ability to dewater the coal through the fracture fabric to establish a gas phase is key. Across the field, a wide range of production rates can be found. A study was conducted to collect field wide data from core, wells, geological and geophysical mapping and production data in order to determine the major controls on gas production rates. The paper discussed the compilation of wellbore parameters, including borehole orientation and length; wellbore configuration; and production data. It also discussed the characterization of reservoir parameters such as reservoir thickness; structure; stress; and reservoir quality. It was concluded that the main controls on Mannville CBM production in the Fort Assiniboine field are coal seam thickness, effective stress, coal quality and face cleat exposure. 5 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Pesticide Use and Asthma in Alberta Grain Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Nicola; Beach, Jeremy; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Burstyn, Igor

    2018-03-15

    A study of the respiratory health of grain farmers in Alberta, Canada was carried out in March 2002. Two populations were identified: members, in 1983, of a province-wide farm organisation, and grain farmers registered with the provincial agriculture department. A telephone interview addressed pesticide use (using pre-circulated trade names), chronic disease and respiratory symptoms. Pesticide ingredients were identified from provincial crop protection guides. Total years of use were calculated for seven chemical groups. Consent for linkage to administrative health records was obtained in 2009. A likelihood score (Lscore) is computed, relating symptoms to asthma diagnosis. Self-reported asthma and the Lscore are examined against duration of pesticide exposures. Of the 10,767 farmers listed, 2426 were still living, had farmed grain and were interviewed; 1371 were re-contacted and matched to health records. After allowance for confounders, years of exposure to phenoxy compounds are related to self-reported asthma and Lscore. Compared to no exposure, the adjusted odds ratios (95% Confidence Intervals for self-reported asthma for short, medium and long exposure to phenoxy compounds are 1.29 (0.66-2.52), 2.52 (1.25-5.09), and 3.18 (1.54-6.58), and for Lscore are 1.19 (0.91-1.55), 1.50 (1.13-1.99), and 1.58 (1.18-2.12). We conclude that lifetime exposure to phenoxy herbicides is associated with an increased risk of asthma.

  19. Review of Alberta Crown Crude Oil Marketing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G. R.; Kromm, R. B.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains an independent evaluation of the operations of the private marketing agents that are currently marketing the Alberta Crown's share of royalty crude oil. The evaluation includes a review of pricing performance, working relationship, current issues and the overall performance of the marketing arrangements during the fiscal years of 1997 and 1998. Overall, the outsourcing of sales of Crown production to agents is judged to be successful. For example, it has been noted that agents are becoming more aggressive in maintaining and increasing their margins. On the other hand, the increased level of aggressiveness in marketing, while tending to maximize Crown revenues, is also creating a potential conflict on how margins should be shared between the Crown and its agents. Also, there has been evidence of some management issues between the agents and the Crown concerning the extent to which the Crown should share in any increased value which the agent generates by increased third party marketing activities. These differences need to be addressed in order to maintain the strong performance of the marketing program. The consultants also recommend additional guidelines on risk management issues that more clearly define the Crown's risk tolerance. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  20. Electricity market reform failures: UK, Norway, Alberta and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikeung Woo; Lloyd, Debra; Tishler, Asher

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of electricity market reforms already taken place in the UK, Norway, Alberta (Canada) and California (USA) leads to our overall conclusion that the introduction of a competitive generation market, of itself, has failed to deliver reliable service at low and stable prices. The market reform failures are attributed to market power abuse by few dominant sellers (especially at times of transmission congestion), poor market design that invites strategic bidding by suppliers, the lack of customer response to price spikes, capacity shortage caused by demand growth not matched by new capacity, and thin trading of forward and futures contracts that are critical for price discovery and risk management. The paper then explains why an electricity market reform can easily fail to deliver the promised gains of better service at lower and more stable prices. The policy implication is that an electric market reform can be extremely risky, and may lead to a disastrous outcome. Thus, it is imprudent to implement such a reform in countries with limited sites for new generation and no indigenous fuels (e.g., Israel and Hong Kong). These countries should therefore consider introducing performance-based regulation that can immediately benefit electricity consumers in terms of lower prices, more stable prices, improved reliability, more choices, while encouraging the electric sector to pursue efficient operation and investment. (Author)

  1. Environmental issues and creditor's rights in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, P.T.; Lee, S.; Milani, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A clarification of the ranking of environmentally related claims in bankruptcy and receivership proceedings, was presented. Also, the liability that a creditor assumes when taking control of a debtor's business or assets, particularly where environmental contaminants are concerned, was explained. The way that environmental law operates and the sorts of liability it imposes and upon whom, was also explained. Generally, environmental legislation imposes liability upon the owner of a contaminated property, whether or not the owner caused or created the problem. However, legislation also exists which imposes liability on the party in control and on the party which caused the contamination. A review of cases which deal with environmental legislation and their impact upon receivers in Saskatchewan and Alberta, was presented. Ways in which secured creditors can assess liability and minimize risks, were also described. The proposed amendments to the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (BIA) expand the current limited protection from personal liability for trustees in bankruptcy and extend it to receivers, trustees, monitors and agents

  2. The power of Alberta business : the impact of electricity deregulation on Alberta small and medium-sized business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, C.; Kelly, D.

    2001-07-01

    Deregulation of the electricity market came into effect on January 1, 2001 in Alberta. This deregulation affects the retail and generation fields of electricity. The intention was to introduce competition and apply downward pressure on electricity prices, but the reverse effect was witnessed: power prices increased. It resulted in a period of anxiety on the part of businesses, caused by the volatility of electricity prices. A survey of Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) members was conducted in May and June 2001 to better understand the impacts of electricity deregulation on small and medium-sized businesses. A broad range of businesses provided responses (951 responses) covering all sectors of industry and regions in Alberta. A large proportion of respondents were dissatisfied with deregulation, caused in part by the confusion created by the flurry of rebate and credit announcements designed to ease the transition. Small firms were faced with significant increases in electricity prices, and several could not estimate the size of the increase as it was too difficult to measure. Responses varied from a low of 5 per cent increase to a high of 400 per cent in power rates. Most respondents also indicated that the increases had an impact on their business. The impact of power rate increases by sector was examined. Another consequence of deregulation was the fact that billing moved from a single invoice received to the requirement to actively manage energy usage. It was discovered that a lack of information on electricity cost and consumption management impeded the the ability to make business decisions. The CFIB asked respondents to indicate the measures being considered to address management of electricity costs. Incorporating energy-saving devices and/or methods had been considered by slightly more than 40 per cent of respondents. Negotiating with power retailers represented another option under consideration by some. It was felt that government must

  3. Chemical and physical hydrogeology of coal, mixed coal-sandstone and sandstone aquifers from coal-bearing formations in the Alberta Plains region, Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemay, T.G.

    2003-09-01

    With the decline of conventional oil and gas reserves, natural gas from coal (NGC) is an unconventional gas resource that is receiving much attention from petroleum exploration and development companies in Alberta. Although the volume of the NGC resource is large, there are many challenges facing NGC development in Alberta, including technical and economic issues, land access, water disposal, water diversion and access to information. Exploration and development of NGC in Alberta is relatively new, therefore there is little baseline data on which to base regulatory strategies. Some important information gaps have been filled through water well sampling in coal, mixed coal-sandstone and sandstone aquifers throughout Alberta. Analyses focused on the chemical and physical characteristics aquifers in use for domestic or agricultural purposes. Aquifer depths were generally less than 100 metres. Samples collected from Paskapoo-Scollard Formation, Horseshoe Canyon Formation and Belly River Group aquifers exceed Canadian water quality guideline values with respect to pH, sodium, manganese, chloride, chromium, sulphate, phenols and total dissolved solids. Pump tests conducted within the aquifers indicate that the groundwater flow is complicated. Water quality will have to be carefully managed to ensure responsible disposal practices are followed. Future studies will focus on understanding the chemical and biological process that occur within the aquifers and the possible link between these processes and gas generation. Mitigation and disposal strategies for produced water will also be developed along with exploration strategies using information obtained from hydrogeologic studies. 254 refs., 182 tabs., 100 figs., 3 appendices

  4. Alberta's current market structure and future vision : transmission, critical infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMaster, D. [Alberta Electric System Operator, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Alberta's ongoing economic growth depends on reliable electricity, particularly as the province becomes the supplier of energy for North America. This paper addressed issues regarding Alberta's need for a robust power transmission system to ensure a quality electricity supply and to facilitate competitive market and investment in new supply. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) facilitates a fair and open competitive and sustainable market for electricity and provides for the economic operation of the Alberta Interconnected Electric System. The AESO suggested that more than $3 billion may be needed in new transmission in the next 10 to 15 years. A first 500 kV line from Edmonton to Calgary is critical for ongoing reliability and to connect new supply in the Wabamun Lake area. The importance of strengthening interties with neighbouring jurisdictions was also discussed. A review of Alberta's electricity load and supply revealed that more than 3,000 MW of new generation have been added since 2001. A 10-year outlook (2007 to 2016) revealed an expected 3 per cent average annual growth rate in energy and peak demand, with a need for 3,800 MW of new generation by 2016. Since Alberta depends on a competitive market to provide a sufficient supply of electricity, confidence in market structure and operation is crucial. The AESO is working on developing and implementing a set of market and regulatory stability objectives in consultation with stakeholders in order to guide the evolution of the electricity market. The AESO has plans to interface Alberta's framework with the Electric Reliability Organization and to implement mandatory reliability standards. It also has plans to harmonize the AESO's tariff, market rules, and participant contracts to ensure consistency. tabs., figs.

  5. The Relationship Between Seismicity and the Oil and Gas Industry in Western Alberta and Eastern B.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.; Eaton, D. W. S.; Ghofrani, H.; Walker, D.; Cheadle, B.; Schultz, R.; Shcherbakov, R.; Tiampo, K. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Harrington, R. M.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Significantly increased production of hydrocarbons in North America is being driven by the development of unconventional resources whose commercial viability, in many cases, depends upon massive subsurface injection of fluids. Although relatively uncommon, elevated pore pressure from fluid injection of any kind can induce earthquake activity by activating slip on a proximal fault. In the western Canada sedimentary basin (which follows the Rocky Mountain foothills region and straddles the border between Alberta and B.C.), we find that hydraulic fracture treatment, wherein fluids are injected under high pressure in long laterally-drilled wells in order to induce localized fracturing of a rock formation, is the primary triggering mechanism of induced seismicity. This contrasts with the central U.S., where most induced seismicity has been attributed to large-scale wastewater injection into deep disposal wells. Our findings are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis of seismicity at the M≥3 level since 1985, along with a complete well database for the region, containing information on many thousands of oil and gas wells. Since 2010, most of the regional earthquakes of M≥3 are correlated in both time and space with hydraulic fracturing. Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the observed correlations are extremely unlikely (<<1%) to have been obtained by chance. Improved understanding of regional variability in fault activation processes, accounting for operational and geological factors, will aid in the development and validation of predictive models for the time-dependent hazards from induced earthquakes.

  6. Dolomitization of Mississippian carbonates in the Shell Waterton gas field, southwestern Alberta: insights from paleomagnetism. petrology,and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewchuk, M. T.; Al-Aaasm, I. I.; Symons, S. T. A. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada); Gillen, K. P. [Vox Terrae, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The process and timing of dolomitization and hydrocarbon migration in carbonates from the Mississippian Mount Head Formation of the Shell Waterton gas field in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta were examined using petrological, geochemical and paleomagnetic techniques. Plug samples were obtained from three unoriented drill cores and their azimuths were measured with respect to a master orientation line on fitted segments of each core. Dolomite and anhydrite from Well 44 yielded present Earth magnetic field (PEMF) directions between 150 degrees C and 300 degrees C. Geochemical analysis yielded values that are consistent with postulated Mississippian seawater values as petrographic evidence indicated little or no diagenetic alteration. Dolomite from wells 50 and 53 yielded PEMF directions also in the 150 degrees C and 300 degrees C range, but reversed Cretaceous magnetizations above 300 degrees C, especially in well 53. These dolomites also showed much more isotopic and petrographic variation, indicating significant diagenetic alteration. Paleomagnetic results suggests that these alterations occurred during basinal fluid flow associated with the Laramide deformation during the late Cretaceous to Paleocene. This deformation is believed to be the same event that was responsible for the accumulation of hydrocarbons. 46 refs., 4 tabs., 14 figs.

  7. Review of the application of sulphur recovery guidelines in Alberta: discussion paper for stakeholder consultation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board in cooperation with Alberta Environment has initiated a review of the application of Alberta sulphur recovery guidelines as currently described in Informational Letter 88-13 and the related report ERCB-AE 88-AA. The aim of the review is to clarify how the guidelines apply to older sour gas plants and to other facilities where sour or acid gases are handled. Such clarification is necessary for fair and consistent application of the existing guidelines. The specific objectives of the review are to clarify and/or update the sulphur recovery requirements for grandfathered sour gas plants, the application of the sulphur recovery guidelines to other facilities, and the proliferation guidelines for small gas plants and other facilities. The paper was prepared as part of an ongoing commitment by the Board and Alberta Environment to multi-stakeholder consultation. The discussion paper provides background on the issues, as well as a discussion of alternatives that could be considered. It is intended to assist public and industry stakeholders in providing input and recommendations to the Board and Alberta government.

  8. An inventory and risk-based prioritization of Steep Creek Fans in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Kris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2013, heavy rainfall caused flooding on most rivers in the province of Alberta, Canada, producing one of Canada’s most expensive natural disasters with about $6 billion (CDN in damage. Flooding inundated several municipalities including downtown Calgary, the fourth-largest city in Canada. Debris flows and debris floods caused extensive highway closures and damages to development on alluvial fans. Following these events, the Government of Alberta requested an inventory of all fans intersecting municipal development, major roads and highways in Alberta. Such fans may be subject to debris flow, debris flood (mud flows, and/or flood hazards. The study area spans the entirety of the Alberta Rocky Mountains, approximately 51,000 km2 (7% of Alberta. We characterize 710 fans in terms of hazard level and presence and types of elements at risk. We statistically analyse watershed attributes to predict the dominant fan hydrogeomorphic process types. All fans under provincial jurisdiction are assigned priority ratings based on hazard levels and the presence and value of elements at risk. The prioritization is risk-based as it considers both hazards and potential consequences. Of the fans prioritized, 13% intersected parcels containing land and residential developments with an assessed value of $2.4 billion (CDN, and the remainder were crossed by roads, pipelines or transmission lines. We present the study results on an interactive, searchable web application that can support ongoing hazard and risk assessments and risk reduction planning.

  9. Alberta biodiversity monitoring program - monitoring effectiveness of sustainable forest management planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadt, J John; Schieck, Jim; Stelfox, Harry A

    2006-10-01

    A conceptual model of sustainable forest management is described based on three connected and necessary components: Policy/Strategic Planning, Operational Planning, and Effectiveness Monitoring/Science. Alberta's proposed Forest Management Planning Standard is described as an example of operational planning. The standard utilizes coarse and fine filter approaches to conserving biodiversity and sets requirements for implementation monitoring. The Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Program (ABMP) is described as an example of effectiveness monitoring supporting Operational Planning. The ABMP is a rigorous science-based initiative that is being developed to monitor and report on biodiversity status and trends throughout the province of Alberta, Canada. The basic survey design consists of 1656 sites, 20 km apart, evenly spaced on a grid pattern across Alberta. Sites will be sampled over a five-year period at a rate of 350 sites/year. Standardized sampling protocols will be used to cover a broad range of species and habitat elements within terrestrial and aquatic environments, as well as broader landscape-level features. Trends and associations detected by ABMP products will be validated through cause-effect research. ABMP focuses research on critical issues and informs both operational planning and the development of policy and strategic-level plans. The Alberta Forest Management Planning Standard and the ABMP are described as key components to implementing resource planning based on ecosystem management principles.

  10. Fertility in Alberta in a Context of Rapid Economic Growth, 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Trovato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, birth rates in Alberta have followed closely the trajectory of change experienced by the other Canadian provinces. Its total fertility rate fell during the low point of the 1930s; it increased during the post-War baby boom in the 1950s and sixties, and thereafter fell to subreplacement levels beginning in the mid 1970s. In recent years, especially since the early 2000s, the birth rate in Alberta has unexpectedly increased, such that by 2007, it had reached 1.90 children per woman - not far from the 2.1 level needed for generational replacement in the long term. During this same period both national and provincial fertility rates fluctuated at levels below those of Alberta (except Saskatchewan and Manitoba, whose rates have been higher. In this study, I examine the historical pattern of fertility change in Alberta, noting similarities and differences with the other provinces. I then look at the association of selected macro level factors (marriage, unemployment, wages, female labour force participation with change in total and parity-specific birth rates between 1997 and 2007, a period of unprecedented economic growth in Alberta. The statistical results show that although marriage is not significantly correlated with change in fertility rates, male and female wages and female labour force participation all show associations consistent with a procyclical interpretation of fertility change - that is, periods of economic growth are conducive to fertility increase whereas bad economic times are associated with reduced fertility.

  11. Calgary, Edmonton and the University of Alberta: the extraordinary medical mobilization by Canada's newest province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cambra, Mark P; McAlister, Vivian C

    2017-09-01

    The Canadian contribution of medical services to the British Empire during the First World War was a national endeavour. Physicians from across the country enlisted in local regiments to join. No other region provided more physicians per capita than the newly formed province of Alberta. Largely organized through the Medical School of the University of Alberta, the No. 11 Canadian Field Ambulance out of Edmonton and the No. 8 Canadian Field Ambulance out of Calgary ultimately enlisted between one-third and half of the province's doctors to the war campaign. Many individuals from this region distinguished themselves, including LCol J.N. Gunn from Calgary, who commanded the No. 8 Canadian Field Ambulance; Maj Heber Moshier, one of the founders of the School of Pharmacy at the University of Alberta; and Dr. A.C. Rankin, who would go on to be the first Dean of Medicine at the University of Alberta. These Canadian heroes, and the many others like them who served with the No. 8 and 11 Field Ambulances, personify the sacrifice, strength and resilience of the medical community in Alberta and should not be forgotten.

  12. Governance in Transformation: Alberta School Board Chairs’ Perspectives on Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Gibbons

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available School boards are typically removed from nonprofit sector analyses because they are part of the “MUSH” set of organizations (municipalities, universities, schools, and hospitals that both stand outside of the more typical nonprofit sector and tend to be closely affiliated with government. Nevertheless, school boards offer a unique opportunity to examine the governance of a large system of regulated activity that affects millions of citizens. How such systems should be governed has been a matter of concern for nearly 40 years. This study presents data from Alberta school board chairs regarding their perception of governance transformation being brought about by legislative changes. Five dimensions of governance are proposed as defining the current and anticipated governance domain within which school boards operate. Tensions within and between these dimensions signify symbolic boundary constructions that need to be scrutinized in anticipation of the governance transformation and boundary spanning activities of school boards required by the new legislation. / Les conseils scolaires sont généralement retirés des analyses du secteur communautaire parce qu’ils font partie de l’ensemble d’organisations « MUSH » (les municipalités, les universités, les écoles et les hôpitaux; ces organisations se distinguent du secteur communautaire typique et ont tendance à être étroitement associées au gouvernement. Néanmoins, les conseils scolaires offrent une occasion unique d’observer la gouvernance d’un vaste système d’activités réglementées qui affecte des millions de citoyens. La façon dont de tels systèmes devraient être gérés fait l’objet de préoccupations depuis presque 40 ans. Cette étude présente les perceptions de présidents de conseils scolaires de l’Alberta en ce qui a trait à la transformation de la gouvernance apportée par des modifications à la loi. Cinq dimensions de la gouvernance sont propos

  13. Epidemiology of pertussis in Alberta, Canada 2004–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfang C. Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the epidemiology of pertussis in Alberta, Canada by person, place, and time between 2004 and 2015, identify outbreak years, and examine vaccination coverage and vaccination timeliness. Methods We used health data from Alberta’s Communicable Disease Registry System for the period of January 1, 2004 through August 31, 2015 to identify unique cases of pertussis. Unique cases were deterministically linked to data in Alberta’s immunization repository and health care insurance plan registry. Population estimates and vaccination coverage were extracted from Alberta’s online Interactive Health Data Application. We estimated pertussis incidence rates per 100,000 persons by year, age group, gender, and health zone. Outbreak years were identified using a one-sided cumulative sum (CUSUM analysis by comparing annual incidence rates to baseline rates. Results Over the period, 3510 cases of pertussis were confirmed by laboratory testing or epidemiological linkage. Incidence rates per 100,000 persons were highest in 2004 (20.5, 2005 (13.6, and 2015 (10.4 for all age groups. Incidence rates were highest among the youngest age groups and decreased as age groups increased. Based on CUSUM analysis, 2008 and 2012 met the criteria for outbreak years. Vaccination coverage was over 90% among the general population, however only 61% of cases received at least one dose. About 60% of cases were diagnosed 5+ years after receiving the vaccine. Approximately 87–91% of vaccinated cases did not receive the first three vaccine doses in a timely manner. Conclusion Pertussis incidence rates fluctuated over the period across all age groups. The majority of cases had no record of vaccination or were delayed in receiving vaccines. CUSUM analysis was an effective method for identifying outbreaks.

  14. Pesticide Use and Asthma in Alberta Grain Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Cherry

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of the respiratory health of grain farmers in Alberta, Canada was carried out in March 2002. Two populations were identified: members, in 1983, of a province-wide farm organisation, and grain farmers registered with the provincial agriculture department. A telephone interview addressed pesticide use (using pre-circulated trade names, chronic disease and respiratory symptoms. Pesticide ingredients were identified from provincial crop protection guides. Total years of use were calculated for seven chemical groups. Consent for linkage to administrative health records was obtained in 2009. A likelihood score (Lscore is computed, relating symptoms to asthma diagnosis. Self-reported asthma and the Lscore are examined against duration of pesticide exposures. Of the 10,767 farmers listed, 2426 were still living, had farmed grain and were interviewed; 1371 were re-contacted and matched to health records. After allowance for confounders, years of exposure to phenoxy compounds are related to self-reported asthma and Lscore. Compared to no exposure, the adjusted odds ratios (95% Confidence Intervals for self-reported asthma for short, medium and long exposure to phenoxy compounds are 1.29 (0.66–2.52, 2.52 (1.25–5.09, and 3.18 (1.54–6.58, and for Lscore are 1.19 (0.91–1.55, 1.50 (1.13–1.99, and 1.58 (1.18–2.12. We conclude that lifetime exposure to phenoxy herbicides is associated with an increased risk of asthma.

  15. Public health surveillance response following the southern Alberta floods, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vanita; Scott, Allison N; Beliveau, Marie; Varughese, Marie; Dover, Douglas C; Talbot, James

    2016-08-15

    In June of 2013, southern Alberta underwent flooding that affected approximately 100,000 people. We describe the process put in place for public health surveillance and assessment of the impacts on health. Public health surveillance was implemented for the six-week period after the flood to detect anticipated health events, including injuries, mental health problems and infectious diseases. Data sources were emergency departments (EDs) for presenting complaints, public health data on the post-exposure administration of tetanus vaccine/immunoglobulin, administrative data on prescription drugs, and reportable diseases. An increase in injuries was detected through ED visits among Calgary residents (rate ratio [RR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-1.43) and was supported by a 75% increase in the average weekly administration of post-exposure prophylaxis against tetanus. Mental health impacts in High River residents were observed among females through a 1.64-fold (95% CI: 1.11-2.43) and 2.32-fold (95% CI: 1.45-3.70) increase in new prescriptions for anti-anxiety medication and sleep aids respectively. An increase in sexual assaults presenting to EDs (RR 3.18, 95% CI: 1.29-7.84) was observed among Calgary residents. No increases in infectious gastrointestinal disease or respiratory illness were identified. Timely identification and communication of surveillance alerts allowed for messaging around the use of personal protective equipment and precautions for personal safety. Existing data sources were used for surveillance following an emergency situation. The information produced, though limited, was sufficiently timely to inform public health decision-making.

  16. Albedo of a hybrid poplar plantation in central Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. T.; Bernier, P. Y.; Orchansky, A.; Thomas, B.

    2012-04-01

    Canada's boreal forest resources are coming under increasing pressure from competing land-uses, including establishment of protected areas, and losses of harvestable forest to mining and oil and gas exploration. In the prairie region, concerns about lack of wood supply for pulpmills and potential opportunities for bioenergy production and carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation, have spurred interest in afforestation of marginal agricultural land, notably with fast-growing hybrid poplars (HP). However, global modelling studies suggest that a shift from grassland or crops to forest cover in temperate and boreal regions could result in reduced surface albedo, particularly in winter, causing an increase in radiative forcing and reducing any climate mitigation benefits due to net GHG removal. We report on seven growing seasons of measurements of short-wave canopy albedo using tower-mounted instruments, along with eddy covariance measurements of carbon, water and energy balance, at a site in central Alberta planted with HP cuttings in spring 2005. The data show little systematic change in average albedo as vegetation has changed from bare ground to a plantation of 6 m trees. Reasons for this include very wide (3 m) spacing between the trees, and snow cover which often persists for 4-5 months and is highly visible below the bare canopies during winter. While measurements should continue as the trees grow larger, we postulate that extensive afforestation with HP is unlikely to have major effects on regional-scale surface albedo compared to the agricultural systems they replace. Normal rotation lengths are 15-20 years, hence even if older plantations have significantly lower winter albedo, their contribution to the regional average would be relatively small because they will cover only a small fraction of the landscape (e.g., compared to forests of boreal conifers or temperate broadleaved species).

  17. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  18. A molecular approach to the genus Alburnoides using COI sequences data set and the description of a new species, A. damghani, from the Damghan River system (the Dasht-e Kavir Basin, Iran) (Actinopterygii, Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudbar, Arash Jouladeh; Eagderi, Soheil; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Coad, Brian W; Bogutskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The molecular status of nine species of the genus Alburnoides from different river drainages in Iran and additionally by seven species from Europe was assessed. mtDNA COI gene sequences from freshly collected specimens and available NCBI data revealed four major phylogenetic lineages. Based on the results, a distinct taxon from the Cheshmeh Ali (Ali Spring), a Damghan River tributary in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin, northern Iran, which is the closest sister to Alburnoides namaki (Namak Lake basin) + Alburnoides coadi (Nam River in the endorheic Dasht-e Kavir basin) is considered as a new species, Alburnoides damghani sp. n. It is distinguished from other Alburnoides species in Iran by a combination of character states including: a weakly-developed, variably-scaled, ventral keel from completely scaleless to completely scaled, a short snout with the tip of the mouth cleft on a level with the lower margin of the pupil or slightly lower, a small eye (eye horizontal diameter slightly to markedly less than interorbital width), commonly 8½ branched dorsal-fin rays, commonly 11-12½ branched anal-fin rays, 40-46(47) total lateral-line scales, 2.5-4.2 or 2.5-4.1 pharyngeal teeth, gill rakers short and widely spaced, 6-8 in total, 39-41 (commonly 40), total vertebrae, (19)20(21) abdominal vertebrae, 19-21 (most commonly 20) caudal vertebrae, abdominal vertebral region most commonly equal to or longer than caudal region, and most common vertebral formulae 20+20 and 21+19.

  19. A subtle diagenetic trap in the Cretaceous Glauconite Sandstone of Southwest Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshri, I.D.; Comer, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the long history of research which documents many studies involving extensive diagenesis, there are a few examples of a fully documented diagenetic trap. In the context of this paper, a trap is a hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir with a seal; because a reservoir without a seal acts as a carrier bed. The difficulty in the proper documentation of diagenetic traps is often due to the lack of: (a) extensive field records on the perforation and production histories, which assist in providing the depth of separation between hydrocarbon production and non-hydrocarbon or water production; and (b) the simultaneous availability of core data from these intervals, which could be studied for the extent and nature of diagenesis. This paper provides documentation for the existence of a diagenetic trap, based on perforation depths, production histories and petrologic data from the cored intervals, in the context of the geologic and stratigraphic setting. Cores from 15 wells and SP logs from 45 wells were carefully correlated and the data on perforated intervals was also acquired. Extensive petrographic work on the collected cores led to the elucidation of a diagenetic trap that separates water overlying and updip from gas downdip. Amoco's Berrymore-Lobstick-Bigoray fields, located near the northeastern edge of the Alberta Basin, are prolific gas producers. The gas is produced from reservoir rock consisting of delta platform deposits formed by coalescing distributary mouth bars. The overlying rock unit is composed of younger distributary channels; although it has a good reservoir quality, it contains and produces water only. The total thickness of the upper, water-bearing and lower gas-bearing sandstone is about 40 ft. The diagenetic seal is composed of a zone 2 to 6 ft thick, located at the base of distributary channels. This zone is cemented with 20-30% ankerite cement, which formed the gas migration and is also relatively early compared to other cements formed in the water

  20. Proceedings of the 7. Independent Power Producers' Society of Alberta annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This conference provided to the delegates from across North America a forum where a wide array of perspectives with regard to the new electric market place of Alberta could be discussed. Speakers covered a lot of ground in their examination of the deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta and the impacts felt by consumers and producers alike. The recent events that led to the deregulation were reviewed and an emphasis was also placed on the successful development of power generation projects, wholesale pricing options and independent retail strategies. Open energy markets were discussed in a series of speaker panels where representatives from private organizations added their views on the topic. The conference was divided into seven sessions entitled: (1) the operation of Alberta's market, (2) panel discussion: defending the market, (3) competitive hurdles to successful development, (4) alternative energy solutions, (5) mechanics of retail choice, (6) wholesale pricing options, and (7) independent retailer strategies. refs., tabs., figs

  1. Reflexive modernization at the source: local media coverage of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in rural Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Debra J; Bogdan, Eva

    2010-11-01

    The potential for reflexive modernization is defined by multiple factors, but the acknowledgment of risk is crucial, particularly among social groups that play a key role in risk minimization. This study offers an examination of the role of local media in response to the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in beef-producing communities in rural Alberta. BSE is one of several global risk issues that reflexive modernization theorists argue have the potential to trigger a transformation toward a critically reflexive society in which such risks are minimized. Content analysis of newspapers in beef-producing regions in Alberta, however, shows how local media framed BSE in a manner that maximized community cohesion and protection of local culture. This selective coverage of BSE in rural Alberta is quite likely to have contributed to, or at least reinforced, support for the current institutional structure of Canadian agriculture in beef-producing regions, through the constriction of discourse.

  2. Spatiotemporal variability and predictability of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rengui; Xie, Jiancang; He, Hailong; Kuo, Chun-Chao; Zhu, Jiwei; Yang, Mingxiang

    2016-09-01

    As one of the most popular vegetation indices to monitor terrestrial vegetation productivity, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been widely used to study the plant growth and vegetation productivity around the world, especially the dynamic response of vegetation to climate change in terms of precipitation and temperature. Alberta is the most important agricultural and forestry province and with the best climatic observation systems in Canada. However, few studies pertaining to climate change and vegetation productivity are found. The objectives of this paper therefore were to better understand impacts of climate change on vegetation productivity in Alberta using the NDVI and provide reference for policy makers and stakeholders. We investigated the following: (1) the variations of Alberta's smoothed NDVI (sNDVI, eliminated noise compared to NDVI) and two climatic variables (precipitation and temperature) using non-parametric Mann-Kendall monotonic test and Thiel-Sen's slope; (2) the relationships between sNDVI and climatic variables, and the potential predictability of sNDVI using climatic variables as predictors based on two predicted models; and (3) the use of a linear regression model and an artificial neural network calibrated by the genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) to estimate Alberta's sNDVI using precipitation and temperature as predictors. The results showed that (1) the monthly sNDVI has increased during the past 30 years and a lengthened growing season was detected; (2) vegetation productivity in northern Alberta was mainly temperature driven and the vegetation in southern Alberta was predominantly precipitation driven for the period of 1982-2011; and (3) better performances of the sNDVI-climate relationships were obtained by nonlinear model (ANN-GA) than using linear (regression) model. Similar results detected in both monthly and summer sNDVI prediction using climatic variables as predictors revealed the applicability of two models for

  3. Model-generated air quality statistics for application in vegetation response models in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVehil, G.E.; Nosal, M.

    1990-01-01

    To test and apply vegetation response models in Alberta, air pollution statistics representative of various parts of the Province are required. At this time, air quality monitoring data of the requisite accuracy and time resolution are not available for most parts of Alberta. Therefore, there exists a need to develop appropriate air quality statistics. The objectives of the work reported here were to determine the applicability of model generated air quality statistics and to develop by modelling, realistic and representative time series of hourly SO 2 concentrations that could be used to generate the statistics demanded by vegetation response models

  4. Deregulation and natural gas trade relationships: lessons from the Alberta-California experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Patrick Impero

    1997-01-01

    In 1978 the US government moved to deregulate the American natural gas industry. The market changes that resulted from this initial step took time to ripple their way out to regional and subnational gas trading relationships. This ripple effect required subnational governments (state and provincial regulators) to rethink their gas regulatory policies. This article examines the restructuring of the Alberta-California gas trade. It explores how changes in US policy forced California and Alberta regulators to recast their policies. It concludes with several lessons that can be drawn from this case about the complex challenge of restructuring international gas trading relationships. (author)

  5. Development and assessment of the Alberta Context Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdsell Judy M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of healthcare organizations such as hospitals is increasingly accepted as having the potential to influence the use of new knowledge. However, the mechanisms by which the organizational context influences evidence-based practices are not well understood. Current measures of organizational context lack a theory-informed approach, lack construct clarity and generally have modest psychometric properties. This paper presents the development and initial psychometric validation of the Alberta Context Tool (ACT, an eight dimension measure of organizational context for healthcare settings. Methods Three principles guided the development of the ACT: substantive theory, brevity, and modifiability. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS framework and related literature were used to guide selection of items in the ACT. The ACT was required to be brief enough to be tolerated in busy and resource stretched work settings and to assess concepts of organizational context that were potentially modifiable. The English version of the ACT was completed by 764 nurses (752 valid responses working in seven Canadian pediatric care hospitals as part of its initial validation. Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis, analysis of variance, and tests of association were used to assess instrument reliability and validity. Results Factor analysis indicated a 13-factor solution (accounting for 59.26% of the variance in 'organizational context'. The composition of the factors was similar to those originally conceptualized. Cronbach's alpha for the 13 factors ranged from .54 to .91 with 4 factors performing below the commonly accepted alpha cut off of .70. Bivariate associations between instrumental research utilization levels (which the ACT was developed to predict and the ACT's 13 factors were statistically significant at the 5% level for 12 of the 13 factors. Each factor also showed a trend of

  6. Observation and modelling of fog at Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Boudala, Faisal; Weng, Wensong; Taylor, Peter A.; Gultepe, Ismail; Isaac, George A.

    2017-04-01

    Climatological data indicate that the Cold Lake, Alberta airport location (CYOD, 54.4°N, 110.3°W) is often affected by various low cloud and fog conditions. In order to better understand these conditions, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), in cooperation with the Canadian Department of National Defense (DND), installed a number of specialized instruments. The ground based instruments include a Vaisala PWD22 present weather sensor, a multi-channel microwave profiling radiometer (MWR) and a Jenoptik CHM15k ceilometer. The focus here will be on understanding the micro-physical and dynamical conditions within the boundary layer, on the surface and aloft that lead to the occurrence of fog using a high resolution 1-D boundary-layer model, ground based measurements, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data and predictions from the Canadian 2.5 km resolution NWP model (HRDPS - High Resolution Deterministic Prediction System ). Details of the 1-D model will be presented. The condensation of water vapour into droplets and the formation of fog in the Earth's atmospheric boundary layer can involve a complex balance between vertical turbulent mixing of heat and water vapour, cloud micro-physical processes and radiative transfers of heat. It is a phenomenon which has been studied for many years in a variety of contexts. On land, surface cooling via long wave radiation at night is often the trigger and a number of 1-D (one dimensional, height and time dependent) radiative fog models have been developed. Our turbulence closure includes the turbulent kinetic energy equation but we prefer to specify a height, roughness Rossby number and local stability dependent, "master" length scale instead of somewhat empirical dissipation or similar equations. Results show that low cloud and fog can develop, depending on initial profiles of wind, temperature and mixing ratio, land surface interactions and solar radiation. Preliminary analysis of Cold Lake

  7. Threshold Considerations and Wetland Reclamation in Alberta's Mineable Oil Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Foote

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oil sand extraction in Alberta, Canada is a multibillion dollar industry operating over 143 km² of open pit mining and 4600 km² of other bitumen strata in northern boreal forests. Oil production contributes to Canada-wide GDP, creates socio-cultural problems, provides energy exports and employment, and carries environmental risks regarding long-term reclamation uncertainties. Of particular concern are the implications for wetlands and water supply management. Mining of oil sands is very attractive because proven reserves of known quality occur in an accessible, politically stable environment with existing infrastructure and an estimated 5.5 billion extractable barrels to be mined over the next five decades. Extraction occurs under a set of limiting factors or thresholds including: limited social tolerance at local to international levels for externalities of oil sand production; water demands > availability; limited natural gas supplies for oil processing leading to proposals for hydroelectric dams and nuclear reactors to be constructed; difficulties in reclaiming sufficient habitat area to replace those lost. Replacement of the 85 km² of peat-forming wetlands forecast to be destroyed appears unlikely. Over 840 billion liters of toxic fluid byproducts are currently held in 170 km² of open reservoirs without any known process to purify this water in meaningful time frames even as some of it leaches into adjacent lands and rivers. Costs for wetland reclamation are high with estimates of $4 to $13 billion, or about 6% of the net profits generated from mining those sites. This raises a social equity question of how much reclamation is appropriate. Time frames for economic, political, and ecological actions are not well aligned. Local people on or near mine sites have had to change their area use for decades and have been affected by industrial development. Examining mining effects to estimate thresholds of biophysical realities, time scales

  8. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  9. A comparative study of the trace element geochemistry in coals from Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentzis, T. [Alberta Research Council, Alberta (Canada); Goodarzi, F. [Geological Survey of Canada, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Alberta contains vast reserves (approximately 2185 megatonnes) of subbituminous and high-volatile bituminous coals, with an additional 1345 Mt considered as {open_quotes}indicated{close_quotes} and 3890 Mt as {open_quotes}inferred{close_quotes}. Virtually all of Canada`s subbituminous coal resources, which are suitable for mine-mouth power generation, are found in the Interior Plains of Alberta. In addition, low sulphur (< 1.0%), high-volatile bituminous, exportable thermal coals occur in the Outer Foothills region of the province. Almost 90% of Alberta`s power originates from six coal-fired generating stations. These are: (1) the 1987 MW Sundance station; (2) the 766 MW Keephills station; (3) the 570 MW Wabamun Lake station; (4) the 400 MW Genesee station; (5) the 735 MW Battle River station; and (6) the 760 MW Sheerness station. The first four stations are located approximately 70-100 kms to the west and southwest of Edmonton, the fifth 180 kms east of Edmonton and the sixth 160 kms northeast of Calgary. The main focus of this paper is on the concentration of selected trace elements with known toxicity when emitted by fossil-fuel power plants. The elements in coals from various mines will be classified and concentrations compared on a mine-by-mine basis.

  10. Status of social economy provision of wind electric energy in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, J. [Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    The development of cooperatives in Canada's energy sector has been mapped and studied through research performed by a doctoral candidate in Political Science at Simon Fraser University. This document has been prepared as part of the research program of the BC-Alberta Social Economy Research Alliance (BALTA). 34 refs.

  11. Sulphur recovery and sulphur emissions at Alberta sour gas plants : annual report for 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The sulphur recovery of Alberta's grandfathered sour gas plants is monitored by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board. This report provides an annual summary of industry performance for sulphur recovery at large acid gas flaring sour gas plants, and sulphur recovery at all acid gas injection sour gas plants. It follows Interim Directive (ID) 2001-3 which stipulates guidelines for sulphur recovery for the province of Alberta. It includes a list of grandfathered and non grandfathered plants in Alberta. Grandfathered sulphur recovery plants that exceed expectations have the option to file a sulphur emission performance credit report and can use the credits to meet some of their sulphur requirement in the future. Acid gas flaring plants face more stringent requirements and cannot earn credits. Several plants have degrandfathered in the past 5 years. Eleven have made upgrades, 4 have been relicensed to meet the requirements for new plants, and 4 have shut down. Forty-one grandfathered plants remain. Sulphur emissions have decreased 39 per cent for grandfathered acid gas flaring plants, and 28 per cent for grandfathered sulphur recovery plants. 10 tabs., 3 figs

  12. Interim directive ID 2001-3 : sulphur recovery guidelines for the province of Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    The regulatory responsibility for many of the facilities covered by sulphur recovery guidelines rest with the Alberta Energy Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environment (AENV). More stringent sulphur dioxide emission limits for specific facilities may be set by Alberta Environment. A review of the sulphur recovery guidelines for sour gas plants in Alberta was conducted, and this interim directive contains the guidelines and provides details on the implementation of the findings of the review by EUB and AENV. It details how the revised sulphur recovery guidelines will be applied to sour gas plants, other upstream petroleum facilities, and downstream petroleum operations such as refineries and heavy oil and bitumen upgraders. Effective January 1, 2002, these guidelines replace IL 88-13 : Sulphur recovery guidelines - gas processing operations. Some definitions are provided, before the details of the application of the guidelines are presented. The application of the guidelines to various grandfather approvals was presented. Variance of guidelines and enhanced performance credits are discussed. A chapter on enforcement was included, with a specific section dealing exclusively with AENV enforcement. 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study : Rationale and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaplan, B.J.; Giesbrecht, G.F.; Leung, B.M.; Field, C.J.; Dewey, D.; Bell, R.C.; Manca, D.P.; O'Beirne, M.; Johnston, D.W.; Pop, V.J.M.; Singhal, N.; Gagnon, L.; Bernier, F.P.; Eliasziw, M.; McCargar, L.J.; Kooistra, L.; Farmer, A.; Cantell, M.; Goonewardene, L.; Casey, L.M.; Letourneau, N.; Martin, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their

  14. The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study : rationale and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Giesbrecht, Gerald F.; Leung, Brenda M. Y.; Field, Catherine J.; Dewey, Deborah; Bell, Rhonda C.; Manca, Donna P.; O'Beirne, Maeve; Johnston, David W.; Pop, Victor J.; Singhal, Nalini; Gagnon, Lisa; Bernier, Francois P.; Eliasziw, Misha; McCargar, Linda J.; Kooistra, Libbe; Farmer, Anna; Cantell, Marja; Goonewardene, Laki; Casey, Linda M.; Letourneau, Nicole; Martin, Jonathan W.

    The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their

  15. Knowledge, Power, and Social Policy: John M. MacEachran and Alberta's 1928 Sexual Sterilization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puplampu, Korbla P.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how academic knowledge and power have shaped the discourse on human classification and how political authorities use academic knowledge producers to legitimize public policy. Specifically, the article draws on the role of John M. MacEachran, a former academic at the University of Alberta, in the implementation of the Alberta…

  16. Wolf, Canis lupus, avoidance behaviour of American Elk, Cervus elaphus, in Jasper National Park, Alberta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, D.; Slatter, G.

    2009-01-01

    An American Elk calf (Cervus elaphus) that was captured near human habitation in Jasper National Park, Alberta, was fitted with a radio-collar and released 40 km away in the park's main valley of the Athabasca River. The calf joined a local herd of elk, and its radio signal revealed that the elk, in

  17. WiFi in Schools, Electromagnetic Fields and Cell Phones: Alberta Health Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Wireless devices and the networks that support them are becoming more common in Alberta schools. WiFi is a wireless networking technology that allows computers and other devices to communicate over a wireless signal. Typically the signal is carried by radio waves over an area of up to 100 meters. Through the implementation of a WiFi network,…

  18. Generic market design issues highlighted: prices soar in Alberta as capacity tightens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Many Alberta consumers, alarmed by enormous price increases, are asking questions about whether electric sector restructuring in the province has progressed far enough. The average cost of power in Alberta's spot market in October were $70.46 per MWH above the $20-$30 that consumers had paid in recent years. It is widely admitted that the high prices reflect an increasingly tight supply situation in which construction of new capacity has not kept pace with growth in demand. It is a standard case of what happens when the market design focuses on promoting short-term price competition to the detriment of creating compeition in the forward markets. A debate has been produced in Alberta with major power consumers calling for a breakup of the three major generators, and the government suggesting that such intervention would be like returning to the days before competition when government tried to control everything. Competition may not work unless divestiture is revisited. There is a hard time seeing the light at the end of the restructuring tunnel for industrial consumers. Ontario's Market Design Committee struggled with the same issue, believing that an industry composed of many smaller independent generating companies was the only way to achieve lasting and meaningful price competition. The best price protection for consumers is an active and competitive investment market for new capacity, and Alberta should not repeat Ontario's mistake and leave the work until price problems develop

  19. Supporting Democratic Discourses of Teacher Professionalism: The Case of the Alberta Teachers' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond-Johnson, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores understandings related to teacher professionalism amongst a sample of highly engaged members of the Alberta Teacher's Association (ATA). Highlighting the many ways in which the Association supported members in their bid to embody roles as leaders, learners, advocates, and policy actors, I argue that the ATA serves as a platform…

  20. Initial scoping of GHG emissions trading potential in Alberta : CABREE discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.

    2002-03-01

    The past five years have seen the emergence of the concept of emissions trading for greenhouse gases, which would make possible a reduction of the costs required to meet emissions targets agreed upon under the Kyoto Protocol. Emissions trading potential and initial scoping in Alberta is examined in this document, with a special emphasis placed on greenhouse gases. The design of a system, encompassing the theory underlying the mechanism, the current developments, issues of importance in this context, as well as the potential for inclusion of other sectors in Alberta were also discussed. For the purpose of this document, emissions trading was defined as one party reducing its emissions levels then transferring the ownership of that reduction to another party who can then purchase this reduction to assist in meeting its own emissions target. Emission trading can be divided into two basic types called Cap and Trade, and Baseline and Credit. Market creation and behaviour, and regulatory behaviour are factors that can render a trading system more feasible. It is important to analyze the goals before designing the specifics of the system. The incorporation of the various sectors of the economy of Alberta would be affected by their unique features. The greatest promise for emissions trading in Alberta is shown by the energy sector. The percentage of emissions covered, the number of participants, the economic effectiveness are all criteria that affect the performance of any system. figs

  1. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Role in Educational Marketing: Insights from the Case of Edmonton, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2006-01-01

    Based on semi-structured interviews with high school teachers in Edmonton, Alberta, the reported study examined teachers' attitudes towards their roles and responsibilities in marketing their school, and the perceived impact of educational markets upon teachers' well-being. The teachers define marketing negatively and narrowly, resist any…

  2. Using Cognitive Coaching to Build School Leadership Capacity: A Case Study in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W. Todd; Hauserman, Cal P.; Skytt, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The impact of Cognitive Coaching? included as part of the Leader2Leader (L2L) Leadership Pilot Program for beginning principals in Alberta, Canada, was evaluated in the present study. Fifteen qualified principals (coaches) and 23 new principals completed the L2L Pilot Program that took place over 18 months. Questionnaires for coaches and new…

  3. The Changing Role of Guidance and Counselling in Alberta: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Peter; Melnychuk, Don

    1980-01-01

    Increased activity and production of materials and methods hold potential for constructive change in guidance and counseling. But there is need for reorganization of existing materials to alleviate the bandwagon effect if new methods of guidance and counseling are to improve in Alberta. (JAC)

  4. The Alberta Jubilee Halls reborn with up-to-date acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Niels V.; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    acoustical knowledge of that time, it had become clear that the halls suffered by several acoustical problems, and thus the government of Alberta wanted the halls to be brought up-to-date for the 100 years jubilee of the state. The Canadian architect Fred Valentine together with other North American...

  5. Cultural Competence in Alberta Schools: Perceptions of ESL Families in Four Major School Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hieu V.

    2012-01-01

    Complex linguistic, acculturative, and social needs of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) learners challenge the K-12 education system to develop cultural competence in working with culturally diverse families. This study surveyed 242 self-identified ESL students and their parents from four of Alberta's major school boards. Results of the survey…

  6. Alberta's 2002 Teacher Strike: The Political Economy of Labor Relations in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnetson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, approximately two thirds of school teachers in the Canadian province of Alberta went on strike. Drawing on media, government and union documents, this case study reveals some contours of the political economy of labor relations in education that are normally hidden from view. Among these features are that the state can react to worker…

  7. Alberta High School Counsellors' Knowledge of Homosexuality and Their Attitudes toward Gay Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Kevin G.; Orzeck, Tricia L.; McEwen, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigated Alberta high school counsellors' knowledge about homosexuality and their attitudes toward gay males. Three questionnaires were mailed to 648 high school counselling centres; 223 individuals returned the completed questionnaires. Most counsellors attained low scores in measured homo-negativity and high scores regarding…

  8. Northwest Territories Inuit, and Urban and Rural Alberta Normative Data: Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgosh, L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Normative data collected for the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test from children (ages 7-14) in urban and rural Alberta and for Inuit children in the Northwest Territories, Canada, were consistently below the Harris norms particularly for the Draw-a-Woman test. Alternate sets of Draw-a-Person norms are proposed for use with these groups. (Author/VW)

  9. Description of fuel element brush assembly's fabrication for 105-K west

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a description of the process to redesign and fabricate, as well as, describe the features of the Fuel Element Brush Assembly used in the 105-K West Basin. This narrative description will identify problems that occurred during the redesigning and fabrication of the 105-K West Basin Fuel Element Brush Assembly and specifically address their solutions

  10. An ethnographic study of communication challenges in maternity care for immigrant women in rural Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina M A; Safipour, Jalal; Yohani, Sophie; O'Brien, Beverley; Mumtaz, Zubia; Paton, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    many immigrant and ethno-cultural groups in Canada face substantial barriers to accessing health care including language barriers. The negative consequences of miscommunication in health care settings are well documented although there has been little research on communication barriers facing immigrant women seeking maternity care in Canada. This study identified the nature of communication difficulties in maternity services from the perspectives of immigrant women, health care providers and social service providers in a small city in southern Alberta, Canada. a focused ethnography was undertaken incorporating interviews with 31 participants recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. A community liaison and several gatekeepers within the community assisted with recruitment and interpretation where needed (n=1). All interviews were recorded and audio files were transcribed verbatim by a professional transcriptionist. The data was analysed drawing upon principles expounded by Roper and Shapira (2000) for the analysis of ethnographic data, because of (1) the relevance to ethnographic data, (2) the clarity and transparency of the approach, (3) the systematic approach to analysis, and (4) the compatibility of the approach with computer-assisted qualitative analysis software programs such as Atlas.ti (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Germany). This process included (1) coding for descriptive labels, (2) sorting for patterns, (3) identification of outliers, (4) generation of themes, (5) generalising to generate constructs and theories, and (6) memoing including researcher reflections. four main themes were identified including verbal communication, unshared meaning, non-verbal communication to build relationships, and trauma, culture and open communication. Communication difficulties extended beyond matters of language competency to those encompassing non-verbal communication and its relation to shared meaning as well as the interplay of underlying pre

  11. A Cooperative Industry - Government Woodland Caribou Research Program in Northeastern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Rippin

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of large scale logging and increasingly intensive petroleum exploration and development in northeastern Alberta prompted the establishment of a cooperative research program to investigate various aspects of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou biology. The ultimate goal of the program is to develop an effective plan that will ensure the long term survival of caribou while allowing for renewable and non-renewable resource development. There are three parts to the program. Part I began early in 1991 and makes use of conventional radio telemetry as a means of recording various parameters of general caribou biology. The study area encompasses approximately 4000 km2 of low relief, boreal mixedwood forest. Preliminary results from 2500 radio locations (involving 50 individuals indicate that woodland caribou inhabiting the study area are non-migratory and are strongly associated with some of the more scarce peatland forest types present in the area. Investigations to document the basic biology and ecology will continue for another two years. Part II began in early 1993 as a part of a two-year investigation into the disturbance effects of petroleum exploration and development on caribou movements and behaviour. One objective of this study is to develop a predictive model useful in determining the cumulative effects of varying intensities of disturbance on caribou. Part III began in early 1994 with a proposed three-year investigation to determine the mechanism of spatial and temporal separation of caribou and moose in the study area. These relationships may indicate the means by which caribou minimize the impact of wolf predation on their populations in northeastern Alberta. Results will be applied to industrial land use and specifically to large scale forest harvesting planned for the area. The research program is supported through cooperative funding contributed by 24 petroleum companies, 1 forest company, 2 peat companies and

  12. Giving away the Alberta advantage - are Albertans receiving maximum revenues from their oil and gas?: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxer, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the report was to see if Albertans are receiving maximum value from oil and gas revenues generated in their province. The study compared energy royalties collected on oil and gas production in Norway, Alaska and Alberta and found that both Norway and Alaska have realized greater turns (royalties and taxes) for every barrel of oil and gas produced than Alberta. The study examines Alberta with other international benchmarks such as Norway and Alaska, the collection performance of the current Alberta government compare with previous administrations, the indications for Alberta's future collection performance, the financial impact of Alberta's current provincial policies on the collection of oil and gas revenues and the policy implications for the fiscal management and accountability of government. Alberta's oil and gas legacy contributes significantly to employment, industry profits and government royalty and tax revenues, with government revenues from oil and gas royalties amounted to $3.78 billion or 21% of total government revenue in 1997-1998

  13. A description of mercury in fishes from the Madeira River Basin, Amazon, Brazil Um estudo descritivo do mercúrio em peixes da bacia do Rio Madeira, Amazônia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley Rodrigues Bastos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years several projects carried on the Madeira River basin in the Amazon produced a great amount data on total Hg concentration in different fish species. In this paper we discuss temporal trends in Hg contamination and its relation to body weight in some of those fishes, showing that even within similar groups, such as carnivorous and non-migratory fish, the interspecies variability in Hg accumulation is considerable.Vários estudos têm sido desenvolvidos nos últimos 20 anos na bacia do Rio Madeira (Amazônia com o objetivo de diagnosticar a presença de mercúrio em peixes e compreender o ciclo deste elemento no meio ambiente tropical. Neste artigo são discutidas tendências temporais na concentração de Hg e sua relação com a massa corporal de algumas espécies de peixes com diferentes hábitos alimentares, coletadas no Rio Madeira e no reservatório da hidroelétrica de Samuel, no Rio Jamari, Estado de Rondônia. Foi avaliada uma amostragem de peixes de 14 anos (1987 - 2000 com 86 espécies e um total de 1100 espécimes.

  14. Revision of Potamotrygonocotyle Mayes, Brooks & Thorson, 1981 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea: Monocotylidae), with descriptions of four new species from the gills of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon spp. (Rajiformes: Potamotrygonidae) from the La Plata river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Marcus V; Marques, Fernando P L

    2007-07-01

    The only known monocotylid genus to parasitise Neotropical freshwater stingrays (Potamotrygonidae) is Potamotrygonocotyle Mayes, Brooks & Thorson, 1981, a monotypic genus erected to accommodate P. tsalickisi Mayes, Brooks & Thorson, 1981. For more than 20 years, no other species has been recognised in this genus, but new efforts to survey the diversity of parasites inhabiting potamotrygonids have revealed the existence of new species and the need to redefine the genus. Here, the generic diagnosis of Potamotrygonocotyle is amended, P. tsalickisi is redescribed and four new species are recognised and described based on samples collected from the gills of freshwater potamotrygonids from the La Plata river basin: Potamotrygonocotyle chisholmae n. sp. and P. dromedarius n. sp. from Potamotrygon motoro; Potamotrygonocotyle eurypotamoxenus n. sp. from Potamotrygon cf. motoro (type-host), P. castexi, P. falkneri and P. histrix; and Potamotrygonocotyle uruguayensis n. sp. from Potamotrygon brachyura. Potamotrygonocotyle is characterised by species possessing: (1) slightly sinuous sclerotised ridges on all septa; (2) two pairs of the dorsal haptoral accessory structures associated with the four posterior peripheral loculi and with anterior dorsal haptoral accessory structure bilobate or semicircular; and (3) male copulatory organ without an accessory piece.

  15. Where's the risk? Landscape epidemiology of gastrointestinal parasitism in Alberta beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Melissa A; Colwell, Douglas D; Goater, Cameron P; Kienzle, Stefan W

    2015-08-25

    Gastrointenstinal nematodes (GIN) present a serious challenge to the health and productivity of grazing stock around the globe. However, the epidemiology of GIN transmission remains poorly understood in northern climates. Combining use of serological diagnostics, GIS mapping technology, and geospatial statistics, we evaluated ecological covariates of spatial and temporal variability in GIN transmission among bovine calves pastured in Alberta, Canada. Sera were collected from 1000 beef calves across Alberta, Canada over three consecutive years (2008-2010) and analyzed for presence of anti-GIN antibodies using the SVANOVIR Ostertagia osteragi-Ab ELISA kit. Using a GIS and Bayesian multivariate spatial statistics, we evaluated the degree to which variation in specific environmental covariates (e.g. moisture, humidity, temperature) was associated with variation in spatial and temporal heterogeneity in exposure to GIN (Nematodirus and other trichostrongyles, primarily Ostertagia and Cooperia). Variation in growing degree days above a base temperature of 5 °C, humidity, air temperature, and accumulated precipitation were found to be significant predictors of broad-scale spatial and temporal variation in serum antibody concentrations. Risk model projections identified that while transmission in cattle from southeastern and northwestern Alberta was relatively low in all years, rate of GIN transmission was generally higher in the central region of Alberta. The spatial variability in risk is attributed to higher average humidity, precipitation and moderate temperatures in the central region of Alberta in comparison with the hot, dry southeastern corner of the province and the cool, dry northwestern corner. Although more targeted sampling is needed to improve model accuracy, our projections represent an important step towards tying treatment recommendations to actual risk of infection.

  16. Lung cancer incidence attributable to residential radon exposure in Alberta in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Anne; Brand, Kevin; Khandwala, Farah; Poirier, Abbey; Tamminen, Sierra; Friedenreich, Christine M; Brenner, Darren R

    2017-06-28

    Radon is carcinogenic, and exposure to radon has been shown to increase the risk of lung cancer. The objective of this study was to quantify the proportion and number of lung cancer cases in Alberta in 2012 that could be attributed to residential radon exposure. We estimated the population attributable risk of lung cancer for residential radon using radon exposure data from the Cross-Canada Survey of Radon Concentrations in Homes from 2009-2011 and data on all-cause and lung cancer mortality from Statistics Canada from 2008-2012. We used cancer incidence data from the Alberta Cancer Registry for 2012 to estimate the total number of lung cancers attributable to residential radon exposure. Estimates were also stratified by sex and smoking status. The mean geometric residential radon level in Alberta in 2011 was 71.0 Bq/m3 (geometric standard deviation 2.14). Overall, an estimated 16.6% (95% confidence interval 9.4%-29.8%) of lung cancers were attributable to radon exposure, corresponding to 324 excess attributable cancer cases. The estimated population attributable risk of lung cancer due to radon exposure was higher among those who had never smoked (24.8%) than among ever smokers (15.6%). However, since only about 10% of cases of lung cancer occur in nonsmokers, the estimated total number of excess cases was higher for ever smokers (274) than for never smokers (48). With about 17% of lung cancer cases in Alberta in 2012 attributable to residential radon exposure, exposure reduction has the potential to substantially reduce Alberta's lung cancer burden. As such, home radon testing and remediation techniques represent important cancer prevention strategies. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  17. San Mateo Creek Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Mateo Creek Basin comprises approximately 321 square miles within the Rio San Jose drainage basin in McKinley and Cibola counties, New Mexico. This basin is located within the Grants Mining District (GMD).

  18. Outcrop - core correlation and seismic modeling of the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit, Fort McMurray area, northeast Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, F.J. [Alberta Geological Survey, Calgary, AB (Canada); Langenberg, C.W.; Cotterill, D.C.; Berhane, H. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lawton, D.; Cunningham, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    A joint study between the Alberta Geological Survey and the University of Calgary was conducted which involved a detailed facies analysis of cores and outcrops from the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in Alberta`s Steepbank area. A unified facies classification for the deposit was developed. Larger scale facies associations were also determined, as well as proxy sonic logs for outcrops used in seismic modeling. The cores which were displayed exhibited detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of 10 outcrops in the area. 7 refs.

  19. The influence of coal-fired power plants on lake sediment in central Alberta, Canada (work in progress)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Sanei; F. Goodarzi [University of Victoria (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

    2003-07-01

    This study focuses on the distribution, mobility, and early diagenesis of elements in the sediments and pore water from Wabamun Lake, Isle Lake and Lac St. Anne. These lakes are all located in Central Alberta, within the emission range of four major coal-fired power plants. The sediments are dated using 210Pb and 137Cs. The vertical profile of the elements in conjunction with the age of the sediments may reveal the history of the lake basin as related to the activities of the coal-fired power plants versus those of other anthropogenic and natural sources. However, the proper interpretation of the elemental data, in terms of historical events requires careful examination of the sediments in relation to the pore water found within the sediments. This task can be accomplished by collecting the pore water from the sediments and studying the elemental concentration in both media under anoxic conditions. The exchange of elements between sediments and pore water and therefore the mobility of the elements throughout the sediment profile in the early diagenesis, may alter the historical record of elements. Furthermore, the organic matter can be studied using conventional methods used in petroleum geochemistry such as Rock-Eval analyses and organic petrology. This is to study the role of organic matter in adsorption of elements and also to trace the organic matter originating from the coal seams or emitted from the power plants into surrounding lakes. The study also investigates possible correlations between the elements and other physical and geochemical factors involved in the sedimentation process (e.g., organic matter, grain size, catchments properties, etc.). 3 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Motorcycle-related trauma in Alberta: a sad and expensive story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, John P.; Buckley, Richard; Dyer, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Background Trauma caused by motorcycle-related injuries is extensive, expensive and increasing. Recent American literature reported that in 2004 the chance of a motorcyclist dying was 34 times greater than that for someone using any other motor vehicle for every mile travelled. In the United Kingdom a motorcyclist is killed or seriously injured every 665 894 km, compared with 18 661 626 km for cars. If this pattern is repeated in Canada, then this information should be in the public domain to support initiatives for injury prevention. Methods We gathered and analyzed retrospective population data on the injury patterns of adult motorcyclists and other adult motor vehicle drivers and passengers across Alberta from Apr. 1, 1995, to Mar. 31, 2006. We collected data from 3 Alberta sources: the Alberta Trauma Registry, the Alberta Office of the Chief Medical Examiners and the Government of Alberta Department of Infrastructure and Transportation. We compared the numbers and causes of crashes, injuries and deaths, as well as the acute care costs on the roads, and specifically compared motorcycle-related injuries to all other motor vehicle–related injuries. Results There were 70 605 registered motorcycles and 2 748 204 other registered motor vehicles in Alberta during the study period. During these 11 years, there were 286 motorcyclists killed and 712 were severely injured, representing a total of 998 injuries and deaths. There was 5386 deaths related to other motor vehicles and 6239 severe injuries, for a total of 11 625 injuries and deaths. This represents a percentage of 1.4% of all registered motorcycles and 0.4% of all other registered motor vehicles (3.5 times more motorcyclist injuries). The impact on the health care system can be measured in several ways. During the period of this study, motorcyclists accounted for 10 760 bed days. Assuming the patient was not admitted to intensive care, each admission cost Can$9200 (average in 2008). Conclusion Analysis of the

  1. Socio-economic status and types of childhood injury in Alberta: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenson Lawrence W

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood injury is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and permanent disability in children in the developed world. This research examines relationships between socio-economic status (SES, demographics, and types of childhood injury in the province of Alberta, Canada. Methods Secondary analysis was performed using administrative health care data provided by Alberta Health and Wellness on all children, aged 0 to 17 years, who had injuries treated by a physician, either in a physician's office, outpatient department, emergency room and/or as a hospital inpatient, between April 1st. 1995 to March 31st. 1996. Thirteen types of childhood injury were assessed with respect to age, gender and urban/rural location using ICD9 codes, and were related to SES as determined by an individual level SES indicator, the payment status of the Alberta provincial health insurance plan. The relationships between gender, SES, rural/urban status and injury type were determined using logistic regression. Results Twenty-four percent of Alberta children had an injury treated by physician during the one year period. Peak injury rates occurred about ages 2 and 13–17 years. All injury types except poisoning were more common in males. Injuries were more frequent in urban Alberta and in urban children with lower SES (receiving health care premium assistance. Among the four most common types of injury (78.6% of the total, superficial wounds and open wounds were more common among children with lower SES, while fractures and dislocations/sprains/strains were more common among children receiving no premium assistance. Conclusion These results show that childhood injury in Alberta is a major health concern especially among males, children living in urban centres, and those living on welfare or have Treaty status. Most types of injury were more frequent in children of lower SES. Analysis of the three types of the healthcare premium subsidy allowed a more

  2. Future environmental directions for Alberta project: Round one questionnaire results, summary of preliminary analyses. Working document No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the responses to the first questionnaire in a Delphi survey concerning future environmental directions for Alberta. The paper begins with an overview of the survey and the demographics of the survey participants. It then discusses the participants` views on the key factors that will drive Alberta toward a sustainable future and their views on what Alberta`s environment will be like in 20 years. The paper also summarizes responses to environmental issues such as agricultural impacts, declines in biodiversity, alternatives to environmental regulation, environmental threats to health, forest management, land degradation, global warming, energy, urban air pollution, and water quality. Finally, the paper reviews responses to environmental opportunities such as economic instruments, community planning, global information sharing, and ecotourism, as well as to new issues and opportunities identified by the participants.

  3. Validade concorrente e confiabilidade da Alberta Infant Motor Scale em lactentes nascidos prematuros Concurrent validity and reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in premature infants

    OpenAIRE

    Kênnea Martins Almeida; Maria Virginia Peixoto Dutra; Rosane Reis de Mello; Ana Beatriz Rodrigues Reis; Priscila Silveira Martins

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade concorrente e a confiabilidade interobservador da Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) em lactentes prematuros acompanhados no ambulatório de seguimento do Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IFF/Fiocruz). MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 88 lactentes nascidos prematuros no ambulatório de seguimento do IFF/Fiocruz entre fevereiro e dezembro de 2006. No estudo de validade concorrente, 46 lactentes com 6 (n = 26) ou 12 (n = 20) meses de idade corrigida foram...

  4. The identification and significance of kaolin-rich, volcanic ash horizons (tonsteins) in the Ardley coal zone, Wabamun, Alberta, Canada. [Canada - Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchuk, T.D.; Glatiotis, D.A.N. (Amoco Production Company, Houston, TX (United States). Geoscience Technical Service)

    1993-12-01

    Clay mineral assemblages present within the coals and coal-bearing strata of the Wabamun area of the central Alberta Plains are a product of the original peat-accumulating and adjacent fluvial depositional environments. In the Highvale area, acidic conditions promoted by the accumulation and humification of thick peats were conducive to the diagenetic mineralization of kaolinite from parent volcanic ash. Detrital minerals are few, and the presence of cristobalite is evidence that dissolution processes were active. Volcanic ash horizons from adjacent environments at Whitewood and Genesee, which were under a greater influence of fluvial activity and fresh water, are composed predominantly of smectite and display a diversity of detrital minerals.

  5. Conventional natural gas resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, B.

    1999-01-01

    The use of decline curve analysis to analyse and extrapolate the production performance of oil and gas reservoirs was discussed. This mathematical analytical tool has been a valid method for estimating the conventional crude oil resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). However, it has failed to provide a generally acceptable estimate of the conventional natural gas resources of the WCSB. This paper proposes solutions to this problem and provides an estimate of the conventional natural gas resources of the basin by statistical analysis of the declining finding rates. Although in the past, decline curve analysis did not reflect the declining finding rates of natural gas in the WCSB, the basin is now sufficiently developed that estimates of conventional natural gas resources can be made by this analytical tool. However, the analysis must take into account the acceleration of natural gas development drilling that has occurred over the lifetime of the basin. It was concluded that ultimate resources of conventional marketable natural gas of the WCSB estimated by decline analysis amount to 230 tcf. It was suggested that further research be done to explain why the Canadian Gas Potential Committee (CGPC) estimate for Alberta differs from the decline curve analysis method. 6 refs., 35 figs

  6. Early gross motor development of preterm infants according to the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haastert, I C; de Vries, L S; Helders, P J M; Jongmans, M J

    2006-11-01

    To systematically examine gross motor development in the first 18 months of life of preterm infants. A total of 800 preterm infants (356 boys), ages between 1 and 18 months and corrected for degree of prematurity, were assessed with the use of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. Comparison of the mean Alberta Infant Motor Scale scores of the preterm infants with the norm-referenced values derived from term infants revealed that as a group, the preterm infants scored significantly lower at all age levels, even with full correction for degree of prematurity. In general, preterm infants exhibit different gross motor developmental trajectories compared with term infants in the first 18 months of life. The gross motor developmental profile of preterm infants may reflect a variant of typical gross motor development, which seems most likely to be specific for this population. As a consequence, adjusted norms should be used for proper evaluation and clinical decision-making in relation to preterm infants.

  7. An emissions management framework for the Alberta electricity sector report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    This document presents the Clean Air Strategic Alliance's response to a request made by the Alberta Minister of the Environment in January 2002 to develop an approach for managing air emissions from the electricity sector. Significant reductions over time in four priority air emissions are expected from the implementation of the proposed framework. The four priority pollutants include mercury, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and primary particulate matter. The proposed framework calls for standards for new units, requirements for existing units, a five-year review, the use of renewable and alternative energy, energy efficiency and conservation, continuous improvement, monitoring, and transparency. Alberta would then become a leader in air quality management in North America and benefit from achieving a sustainable emissions management system resulting in environmental improvement. All parties would benefit from long term regulatory certainty. Management tools would include an emission trading system, and provide flexibility in reducing emissions. 11 tabs., 19 figs

  8. Rearing parasitoids of spruce budworm from northern Alberta. Forest management note No. 61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Numerous species of parasitic flies and wasps attack spruce budworm (SBW) throughout its geographic range and at all immature stages, but little is known about these dynamics in northern Alberta. This note gives the results of a study on rearing parasitoids from northern Alberta. Parasitoids sampled lay eggs on SBW larvae, live as larvae in the host body, and emerge from older larvae or pupae. Sampling techniques therefore include examination of the incidence of egg laying, the presence of parasitoid larvae in the host, and the emergence of adult parasitoids. In this study, large numbers of SBW larvae were individually reared to obtain adult parasitoids, but extensive dissection of SBW larvae was avoided, and results were obtained using limited time and materials.

  9. Concurrent Validity Between Live and Home Video Observations Using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Boonzaaijer, Marike; van Dam, Ellen; van Haastert, Ingrid C.; Nuysink, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Serial assessment of gross motor development of infants at risk is an established procedure in neonatal follow-up clinics. Assessments based on home video recordings could be a relevant addition. METHODS: In 48 infants (1.5-19 months), the concurrent validity of 2 applications was examined using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: (1) a home video made by parents and (2) simultaneous observation on-site by a pediatric physical therapist. Parents' experiences were explored using a questio...

  10. Palynology, petrography and geochemistry of the Ardley coal zone at Wabamun, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchuk, T.D. (University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Geology and Geophysics Department)

    1992-05-01

    The aims are to develop a depositional model for the Ardley coal zone at Wabamun that integrates organic and siliciclastic facies analyses; to correlate these facies to trends in coal quality variation; and to determine the viability of conducting similar studies on other Alberta Plains coals. The studies show that the coals were deposited in varied wetland environments. The coal characteristics are a reflection of the influence of fluvial activity on the deposition of the coals. 236 refs., 69 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. A day-ahead market for electricity in Alberta : is there a case to be made?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fronimos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Following the success of the introduction of competition in several heavily regulated industries in the 1980s and 1990s, traditional utilities were broken up and markets were introduced for their respective services. Some of these markets evolved into complex structures with multiple sub-markets for installed capacity, energy, transmission and for all types of reserves. Electricity submarkets now operate in a similar manner in different timeframes comprising two settlement systems: the Day Ahead (DA) market, operating a day ahead of the actual generation and consumption of electricity and one that operates in real time, the Real-Time (RT) or Balancing market. This paper explored the case for a binding DA market for electricity in Alberta, by looking at the challenges facing the marketplace and examining how using a DA market would affect them. This paper hypothesized that a correctly designed and implemented, financially binding DA market would enhance the fidelity of the price signal in Alberta by providing an information rich environment for participants and the system operator. The paper defined and discussed both types of settlement systems. It then discussed the DA market in Alberta in terms of risk management, reliability, price fidelity and demand response. It was noted that some of the benefits of using a DA market could also be achieved by improvements to the existing market. Alberta faces several challenges, such as merit order instability and price volatility which are likely due to market design and operations rather than the inherent inability of a power exchange to address them. 31 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  12. Managing uncertainty : an examination of adaptive management and progressive reclamation in Alberta's mineable oil sands

    OpenAIRE

    Gouin, Clayton David

    2017-01-01

    Alberta’s oil sands are large, naturally occurring deposits of bitumen, a non- renewable, mineral resource. One problem Alberta faces is the scale of ecological disturbance from oil sands mining. Alberta’s current reclamation law for oil sands requires land to be reclaimed to a state of equivalent land capability and reclamation responsibilities are placed on oil companies. Reclamation publications from oil sands mine sites are currently limited. Additionally, less research on stakeholders’ r...

  13. Evolving 50–50% bilingual pedagogy in Alberta: what does the research say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rahat; Schmidt, Elaine; Krickhan, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the provincial frameworks that define the Spanish bilingual program in Alberta, Canada, provides an historical overview of its pedagogic constraints and evolution, and proposes a framework for bilingual pedagogy. The framework is conceptualized from the research evidence of three local case studies, and is based on the centrality of cross-linguistic transfer, in relation to linguistic interdependence and bilingual learning. PMID:24987378

  14. DSM [demand-side management] opportunities in Alberta: An economist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    In Alberta, utility companies are placing increasing attention on demand-side management (DSM) as one option for meeting future demand. Some basic economic principles are provided to yield a guideline on how much a utility should be spending on DSM initiatives. For the case of financial incentives to customers, it is shown that subsidies based on sound economic principles will enable the utility to charge lower overall rates to customers receiving the subsidy without raising other customers' rates. Moving outside of a well-understood market-based system and into a fully centralized planning approach to DSM eliminates a critical link between utilities and their customers. In Alberta, DSM measures appropriate in other regions will not be appropriate due to the province's unique supply and demand characteristics. Most of Alberta's electricity supply comes from low-cost coal-fired plants. On the demand-side, there is a significant concentration of large industrial and commercial consumers, notably in the oil and gas industry, and there is essentially no demand for electric heating in homes since natural gas is very abundant. The Alberta integrated power system currently operates at a load factor of ca 77%, reflecting the large industrial demand and the absence of a winter peaking effect associated with electrical heating requirements. A relatively small difference in embedded and incremental electricity supply costs means that utilities have little to spend on DSM programs. The identification of cost-effective DSM opportunities, most of which are likely to be found in the industrial sector, requires a considerable amount of detailed information on consumer behavior and close collaboration between utility and customer

  15. Sulphur recovery and sulphur emissions at Alberta sour gas plants : first annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board has agreed to monitor the sulphur recovery of the province's grandfathered sour gas plants. This report is the annual summary report on industry performance for sulphur recovery at larger acid gas flaring sour gas plants, as well as for sulphur recovery at all acid gas injection sour gas plants. It follows Interim Directive (ID) 2001-3 dealing with sulphur recovery guidelines for the province of Alberta. It includes a list of grandfathered and non grandfathered plants in Alberta. ID 2001-3 sets out clear expectations for when older grandfathered plants must comply to the requirements of new plants. The interim directive uses a phased approach for compliance in order to encourage early action on sulphur recovery. Grandfathered sulphur recovery plants that exceed expectations have the option to file a sulphur emission performance credit report and can use the credits to meet a portion of their sulphur requirement in the future. Acid gas flaring plants face more stringent requirements and cannot earn credits. Seven plants have been degrandfathered in the past 3 years, while 3 have been relicensed and 3 have shut down. Sulphur emissions have decreased significantly for both grandfathered acid gas flaring operations and grandfathered sulphur recovery plants. 3 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs., 4 appendices

  16. Sulphur recovery and sulphur emissions at Alberta sour gas plants : annual report for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board has agreed to monitor the sulphur recovery of the province's grandfathered sour gas plants. This report is the annual summary report on industry performance for sulphur recovery at larger acid gas flaring sour gas plants, as well as for sulphur recovery at all acid gas injection sour gas plants. It follows Interim Directive (ID) 2001-3 dealing with sulphur recovery guidelines for the province of Alberta. It includes a list of grandfathered and non grandfathered plants in Alberta. Grandfathered sulphur recovery plants that exceed expectations have the option to file a sulphur emission performance credit report and can use the credits to meet some of their sulphur requirement in the future. Acid gas flaring plants face more stringent requirements and cannot earn credits. In the past 4 years, 8 plants have improved sulphur recovery to meet the stringent requirements of new plants. Three additional plants were relicensed to meet stringent requirements, and 4 grandfathered plants have shut down. Sulphur emissions have decreased 30 per cent from grandfathered acid gas flaring plants, and 25 per cent from grandfathered sulphur recovery plants. 9 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Utilization of a molecular serotyping method for Salmonella enterica in a routine laboratory in Alberta Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrato, Christina; Chui, Linda; King, Robin; Louie, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common enteric pathogens related to foodborne illness. Alberta's Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab) provides Outbreak and Surveillance support by performing serotyping. The Check&Trace Salmonella™ (CTS) assay (Check-Points, Netherlands), a commercial DNA microarray system, can determine the serotype designation of a Salmonella isolate with automated interpretation. Here we evaluate 1028 Salmonella isolates of human clinical or environmental sources in Alberta, Canada with the CTS assay. CTS was able to assign a serovar to 98.7% of the most frequently occurring human clinical strains in Alberta (82.5% overall), and 71.7% of isolates which were inconclusive by conventional methods. There was 99.7% concordance in environmental isolates. The CTS database has potential to expand to identify rare serovars. With the anticipated shift to molecular methods for identification, CTS provides an easy transition and demonstrates ease-of-use and reduces the turn-around-time of a reported result significantly compared to classical serotyping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Income growth, government spending, and wasting assets: Alberta's oil and gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and monetary accounts for the oil and gas sectors in Alberta from 1963 through 1988 are used to adjust Alberta's Gross Domestic Product and Gross Domestic Investment for changes in oil and gas reserves. Other resources, non-renewable and renewable, are important to Alberta, but the change in oil and gas reserves over the past quarter century deserves attention in itself. Growth rates of income and investment during the 1970s and 1980s differ significantly when the adjustments are made to conventional income accounts. Since policies are often based on conventional statistics, alternative measures yielding very different results warrant attention. The oil and gas accounts also permit comparison of past expenditures of resource revenues with what would be spent under a rule of thumb such as Robert Solow's (1986) suggestion that allowable consumption be interest on an initial patrimony of resource endowment. Such a comparison indicates the provincial government may, at times, have overspent resource revenues during the past quarter century; at other times its policies appear to have been quite conservative. The estimates presented require various assumptions, and therefore are but one possible set of adjustments deserving consideration. 26 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs

  19. Evaluation of air quality indicators in Alberta, Canada - An international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Md Aynul; Kindzierski, Warren B

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in oil sands development in northern Alberta, Canada and an overall increase in economic activity in the province in recent years. An evaluation of the state of air quality was conducted in four Alberta locations - urban centers of Calgary and Edmonton, and smaller communities of Fort McKay and Fort McMurray in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR). Concentration trends, diurnal hourly and monthly average concentration profiles, and exceedances of provincial, national and international air quality guidelines were assessed for several criteria air pollutants over the period 1998 to 2014. Two methods were used to evaluate trends. Parametric analysis of annual median 1h concentrations and non-parametric analysis of annual geometric mean 1h concentrations showed consistent decreasing trends for NO2 and SO2 (international urban areas to judge the current state of air quality. Median and annual average concentrations for Alberta locations tended to be the smallest in Fort McKay and Fort McMurray. Other than for PM2.5, Calgary and Edmonton tended to have median and annual average concentrations comparable to and/or below that of larger populated Canadian and U.S. cities, depending upon the air pollutant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploratory shaft facility preliminary designs - Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of the Preliminary Design Report, Permian Basin, is to provide a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility in the Permian Basin, Texas. This issue of the report describes the preliminary design for constructing the exploratory shaft using the Large Hole Drilling method of construction and outlines the preliminary design and estimates of probable construction cost. The Preliminary Design Report is prepared to complement and summarize other documents that comprise the design at the preliminary stage of completion, December 1982. Other design documents include drawings, cost estimates and schedules. The preliminary design drawing package, which includes the construction schedule drawing, depicts the descriptions in this report. For reference, a list of the drawing titles and corresponding numbers are included in the Appendix. The report is divided into three principal sections: Design Basis, Facility Description, and Construction Cost Estimate. 30 references, 13 tables

  1. Implication of drainage basin parameters of a tropical river basin of South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. J.; Sreekumar, S.; Aslam, Arish

    2016-03-01

    Drainage morphometry provides quantitative description of the drainage system which is an important aspect of the characterisation of watersheds. Chalakudi River is one of the important rivers of the South India which has attracted attention of many environmental scientists recently because of the proposed Athirapally Hydel Project across the river. SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission) data were used for preparing DEM (Digital Elevation Model), Aspect Map and Slope Map. Geographical Information System (GIS) was used for the evaluation of linear, areal and relief aspects of morphometric parameters. The study reveals that the terrain exhibits dentritic and trellis pattern of drainage. The Chalakudi River Basin has a total area of 1,448.73 km2 and is designated as seventh-order basin. The drainage density of the basin is estimated as 2.54 and the lower-order streams mostly dominate the basin. The high basin relief indicates high runoff and sediment transport. The elongation ratio of the Chalakudi Basin is estimated as 0.48 and indicates that the shape of the basin is elongated. The development of stream segments in the basin area is more or less effected by rainfall. Relief ratio indicates that the discharge capability of watershed is very high and the groundwater potential is meagre. The low value of drainage density in spite of mountainous relief indicates that the area is covered by dense vegetation and resistant rocks permeated by fractures and joints. These studies are helpful in watershed development planning and wise utilization of natural resources.

  2. Emergency department visits for dental problems not associated with trauma in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rafael; Fournier, Kerri; Levin, Liran

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this report was to describe the frequency of emergency department (ED) visits for dental problems not associated with trauma (DPNAT) in Alberta, Canada, over a 5-year period. In Alberta, ED visits for DPNAT between 1 January 2011 and 30 April 2016 were identified using the codes from the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Canada (ICD-10-CA). The codes for DPNAT range from K00 to K14, described as diseases of the oral cavity, salivary glands and jaws. The data were gathered from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) database and from the Alberta Real Time Syndromic Surveillance Net (ARTSSN). The information gathered on ED visits for DPNAT was related to the primary diagnosis of the discharge disposition of the visits. During the study period, there were a total of 147,357 ED visits for DPNAT in Alberta. The visits were made by 111,362 individuals, representing 1.3 visits per person. Among all ED visits, a prevalence of 1.2% of ED visits for DPNAT was observed. The most prevalent primary diagnosis of ED visits for DPNAT was for diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (K04), such as periapical abscess, representing 45.0% of all visits, followed by disorders of teeth and supporting structures (K08), such as toothache, representing 18.8% of all visits. The majority of the visits were made by patients from 20 to 44 years of age (52.2%). North and Calgary Alberta Health Service (AHS) Zones were those with the highest occurrence of ED visits (31.9% and 24.5%, respectively). ED visits for dental problems were more common than visits for other general health conditions, such as diabetes and asthma. The frequency of ED visits for DPNAT suggests barriers faced by the population in accessing dental care resources, especially for urgent dental needs. Policy efforts and political will are needed to provide alternative options for seeking emergency dental care. © 2017 FDI World Dental

  3. Evaluation of geothermal energy as a heat source for the oilsands industry in Northern Alberta (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorowicz, J. A.; Unsworth, M.; Gray, A.; Nieuwenhuis, G.; Babadagli, T.; Walsh, N.; Weides, S.; Verveda, R.

    2012-12-01

    The extraction and processing of bitumen from the oilsands of Northern Alberta requires very large amounts of heat that is obtained by burning natural gas. At current levels, the gas used represents 6% of Canada's natural gas production. Geothermal energy could potentially provide this heat, thereby reducing both the financial costs and environmental impact of the oilsands industry. The Helmholtz Alberta Initiative is evaluating this application of geothermal energy through an integrated program of geology, geophysics, reservoir simulation and calculations of the cost benefit. A first stage in this evaluation is refining estimates of subsurface temperature beneath Northern Alberta. This has involved three stages: (1) Corrected industrial thermal data have been used to revise estimates of the upper crustal temperatures beneath the oilsands regions in Alberta. The geothermal gradient map produced using heat flow and thermal conductivity for the entire Phanerozoic column suggests that the overall gradient of the entire column is less than the gradients calculated directly from industry measurements. (2) Paleoclimatic corrections must be applied , since this region has experienced a significant increase in surface temperatures since the end of the last ice age causing a perturbation of shallow heat flow. For this reason, estimates of geothermal gradient based on shallow data are not necessarily characteristic of the whole sedimentary column and can lead to errors in temperature prediction at depth. (3) Improved measurements have been made of the thermal conductivity of the crystalline basement rocks (average = 2.9±0.8 W/m K). Thermal conductivity exhibits significant spatial variability and to a large degree controls the temperature conditions in the Precambrian crystalline basement rocks and its heat content at given heat flow-heat generation. When these steps are used to calculate subsurface temperatures, it can be shown that the temperatures required for geothermal

  4. Native prairie revegetation on wellsites in southeastern Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulodre, E.; Naeth, A.; Hammermeister, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Native Prairie Revegetation Research Project (NPRRP) was initiated to address concerns about wellsite revegetation of native grassland. The objective was to determine the impact of alternative seeding treatments on soil and vegetation and to produce a quantifiable description of what constitutes successful revegetation of native prairie sites. Four wellsites, each site comprising four revegetation treatment plots and an undisturbed control plot, have been chosen for field study. The revegetation treatments included natural recovery without seeding; current mix dominated by native wheatgrass cultivars; simple mix seeding containing wheatgrasses plus other native grasses, and diverse mix seeding with a mixture of wheatgrasses, other grasses and thirteen perennial forbs. The plant communities were monitored for biomass production, species richness, species composition and a combination of factors which include density, frequency, canopy cover and basal cover, these collectively representing importance value. Nitrogen availability in the soil was also monitored. Results showed high importance values for wheatgrasses for all seeded treatments. Perennial non-wheatgrasses had low importance values in the seeded treatment but higher importance in the control plot. The dominance of wheatgrasses in the seeded treatments resulted in communities that differed significantly from both the control and natural recovery communities, probably due to suppression of the growth of other grasses

  5. Determining the Effects on Residential Electricity Prices and Carbon Emissions of Electricity Market Restructuring in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, Junaid Bin

    When electricity restructuring initiatives were introduced in Alberta, and finalized with the institution of retail electricity market competition in 2001, it was argued that the changes would deliver lower electricity prices to residential consumers. However, residential electricity prices in Alberta increased dramatically in 2001, and have never returned to their pre-restructuring levels. Proponents of restructuring argue that electricity prices would have been even higher under continued regulation, citing the effect of considerably higher natural gas prices and the roles of other variables. However, many Alberta residential electricity consumers tend to attribute their higher electricity prices to factors such as market power and manipulation associated with restructuring. Since the effects of restructuring on electricity prices cannot be evaluated by simply comparing prices before and after it occurred, the main objective of this thesis is to determine what electricity prices would have been under continued regulation, and to compare them with what was actually observed. To determine these counterfactual electricity prices, a structural model of the determinants of Alberta residential electricity prices is developed, estimated for the prerestructuring period, and used to forecast (counterfactual) prices in the postrestructuring period. However, in forming these forecasts it is necessary to separately account for changes in explanatory variables that could be viewed as occurring due to the restructuring (endogenous) from those changes that would Since the effects of restructuring on electricity prices cannot be evaluated by simply comparing prices before and after it occurred, the main objective of this thesis is to determine what electricity prices would have been under continued regulation, and to compare them with what was actually observed. To determine these counterfactual electricity prices, a structural model of the determinants of Alberta residential

  6. Superimposed versus residual basin: The North Yellow Sea Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyong Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The North Yellow Sea Basin is a Mesozoic and Cenozoic basin. Based on basin-margin facies, sedimentary thinning, size and shape of the basin and vitrinite reflectance, North Yellow Sea Basin is not a residual basin. Analysis of the development of the basin’s three structural layers, self-contained petroleum systems, boundary fault activity, migration of the Mesozoic–Cenozoic sedimentation centers, different basin structures formed during different periods, and superposition of a two-stage extended basin and one-stage depression basin, the North Yellow Sea Basin is recognized as a superimposed basin.

  7. Validade concorrente e confiabilidade da Alberta Infant Motor Scale em lactentes nascidos prematuros Concurrent validity and reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênnea Martins Almeida

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade concorrente e a confiabilidade interobservador da Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS em lactentes prematuros acompanhados no ambulatório de seguimento do Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IFF/Fiocruz. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 88 lactentes nascidos prematuros no ambulatório de seguimento do IFF/Fiocruz entre fevereiro e dezembro de 2006. No estudo de validade concorrente, 46 lactentes com 6 (n = 26 ou 12 (n = 20 meses de idade corrigida foram avaliados pela AIMS e pela escala motora da Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2ª edição, por dois observadores diferentes, utilizando-se o coeficiente de correlação de Pearson para análise dos resultados. No estudo de confiabilidade, 42 lactentes entre 0 e 18 meses foram avaliados pela AIMS por dois observadores diferentes, utilizando-se o intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC para análise dos resultados. RESULTADOS: No estudo de validade concorrente, a correlação encontrada entre as duas escalas foi alta (r = 0,95 e estatisticamente significativa (p OBJECTIVE: To verify the concurrent validity and interobserver reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS in premature infants followed-up at the outpatient clinic of Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IFF/Fiocruz, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: A total of 88 premature infants were enrolled at the follow-up clinic at IFF/Fiocruz, between February and December of 2006. For the concurrent validity study, 46 infants were assessed at either 6 (n = 26 or 12 (n = 20 months' corrected age using the AIMS and the second edition of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, by two different observers, and applying Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyze the results. For the reliability study, 42 infants between 0 and 18 months were assessed using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale, by two different observers and the results analyzed using the intraclass correlation

  8. Cross-cultural analysis of the motor development of Brazilian, Greek and Canadian infants assessed with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Saccani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the motor development of infants from three population samples (Brazil, Canada and Greece, to investigate differences in the percentile curves of motor development in these samples, and to investigate the prevalence of motor delays in Brazilian children. METHODS: Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with 795 Brazilian infants from zero to 18 months of age, assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS at day care centers, nurseries, basic health units and at home. The Brazilian infants' motor scores were compared to the results of two population samples from Greece (424 infants and Canada (2,400 infants. Descriptive statistics was used, with one-sample t-test and binomial tests, being significant p≤0.05. RESULTS: 65.4% of Brazilian children showed typical motor development, although with lower mean scores. In the beginning of the second year of life, the differences in the motor development among Brazilian, Canadian and Greek infants were milder; at 15 months of age, the motor development became similar in the three groups. A non-linear motor development trend was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The lowest motor percentiles of the Brazilian sample emphasized the need for national norms in order to correctly categorize the infant motor development. The different ways of motor development may be a consequence of cultural differences in infant care.

  9. Cross-cultural analysis of the motor development of Brazilian, Greek and Canadian infants assessed with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia Cristina

    2013-09-01

    To compare the motor development of infants from three population samples (Brazil, Canada and Greece), to investigate differences in the percentile curves of motor development in these samples, and to investigate the prevalence of motor delays in Brazilian children. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study with 795 Brazilian infants from zero to 18 months of age, assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) at day care centers, nurseries, basic health units and at home. The Brazilian infants' motor scores were compared to the results of two population samples from Greece (424 infants) and Canada (2,400 infants). Descriptive statistics was used, with one-sample t-test and binomial tests, being significant p ≤ 0.05. 65.4% of Brazilian children showed typical motor development, although with lower mean scores. In the beginning of the second year of life, the differences in the motor development among Brazilian, Canadian and Greek infants were milder; at 15 months of age, the motor development became similar in the three groups. A non-linear motor development trend was observed. The lowest motor percentiles of the Brazilian sample emphasized the need for national norms in order to correctly categorize the infant motor development. The different ways of motor development may be a consequence of cultural differences in infant care.

  10. The contribution of groundwater discharge to the overall water budget of two typical Boreal lakes in Alberta/Canada estimated from a radon mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon-222, a naturally-occurring radioisotope with a half-life of 3.8 days, was used to estimate groundwater discharge to small lakes in wetland-dominated basins in the vicinity of Fort McMurray, Canada. This region is under significant water development pressure including both oil sands mining and in situ extraction. Field investigations were carried out in March and July 2008 to measure radon-222 distributions in the water column of two lakes as a tracer of groundwater discharge. Radon concentrations in these lakes ranged from 0.5 to 72 Bq/m3, while radon concentrations in groundwaters ranged between 2000 and 8000 Bq/m3. A radon mass balance, used in comparison with stable isotope mass balance, suggested that the two lakes under investigation had quite different proportions of annual groundwater inflow (from 0.5% to about 14% of the total annual water inflow. Lower discharge rates were attributed to a larger drainage area/lake area ratio which promotes greater surface connectivity. Interannual variability in groundwater proportions is expected despite an implied seasonal constancy in groundwater discharge rates. Our results demonstrate that a combination of stable isotope and radon mass balance approaches provides information on flowpath partitioning that is useful for evaluating surface-groundwater connectivity and acid sensitivity of individual water bodies of interest in the Alberta Oil Sands Region.

  11. Implementing a Description Grammar Interpreter : A Notation for Descriptions and Description Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouffs, R.M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Description grammars represent a formalism for generating verbal descriptions of designs, used in conjunction with shape grammars. A description grammar constitutes a set of description rules that define a language of descriptions. A description grammar interpreter implements the mechanisms to

  12. Calgary, Edmonton and the University of Alberta: the extraordinary medical mobilization by Canada’s newest province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cambra, Mark P.; McAlister, Vivian C.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The Canadian contribution of medical services to the British Empire during the First World War was a national endeavour. Physicians from across the country enlisted in local regiments to join. No other region provided more physicians per capita than the newly formed province of Alberta. Largely organized through the Medical School of the University of Alberta, the No. 11 Canadian Field Ambulance out of Edmonton and the No. 8 Canadian Field Ambulance out of Calgary ultimately enlisted between one-third and half of the province’s doctors to the war campaign. Many individuals from this region distinguished themselves, including LCol J.N. Gunn from Calgary, who commanded the No. 8 Canadian Field Ambulance; Maj Heber Moshier, one of the founders of the School of Pharmacy at the University of Alberta; and Dr. A.C. Rankin, who would go on to be the first Dean of Medicine at the University of Alberta. These Canadian heroes, and the many others like them who served with the No. 8 and 11 Field Ambulances, personify the sacrifice, strength and resilience of the medical community in Alberta and should not be forgotten. PMID:28930035

  13. Strategies for reforestation under uncertain future climates: guidelines for Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Gray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commercial forestry programs normally use locally collected seed for reforestation under the assumption that tree populations are optimally adapted to local environments. However, in western Canada this assumption is no longer valid because of climate trends that have occurred over the last several decades. The objective of this study is to show how we can arrive at reforestation recommendations with alternative species and genotypes that are viable under a majority of climate change scenarios. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a case study for commercially important tree species of Alberta, we use an ecosystem-based bioclimate envelope modeling approach for western North America to project habitat for locally adapted populations of tree species using multi-model climate projections for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s. We find that genotypes of species that are adapted to drier climatic conditions will be the preferred planting stock over much of the boreal forest that is commercially managed. Interestingly, no alternative species that are currently not present in Alberta can be recommended with any confidence. Finally, we observe large uncertainties in projections of suitable habitat that make reforestation planning beyond the 2050s difficult for most species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: More than 50,000 hectares of forests are commercially planted every year in Alberta. Choosing alternative planting stock, suitable for expected future climates, could therefore offer an effective climate change adaptation strategy at little additional cost. Habitat projections for locally adapted tree populations under observed climate change conform well to projections for the 2020s, which suggests that it is a safe strategy to change current reforestation practices and adapt to new climatic realities through assisted migration prescriptions.

  14. Strategies for reforestation under uncertain future climates: guidelines for Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Laura K; Hamann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Commercial forestry programs normally use locally collected seed for reforestation under the assumption that tree populations are optimally adapted to local environments. However, in western Canada this assumption is no longer valid because of climate trends that have occurred over the last several decades. The objective of this study is to show how we can arrive at reforestation recommendations with alternative species and genotypes that are viable under a majority of climate change scenarios. In a case study for commercially important tree species of Alberta, we use an ecosystem-based bioclimate envelope modeling approach for western North America to project habitat for locally adapted populations of tree species using multi-model climate projections for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s. We find that genotypes of species that are adapted to drier climatic conditions will be the preferred planting stock over much of the boreal forest that is commercially managed. Interestingly, no alternative species that are currently not present in Alberta can be recommended with any confidence. Finally, we observe large uncertainties in projections of suitable habitat that make reforestation planning beyond the 2050s difficult for most species. More than 50,000 hectares of forests are commercially planted every year in Alberta. Choosing alternative planting stock, suitable for expected future climates, could therefore offer an effective climate change adaptation strategy at little additional cost. Habitat projections for locally adapted tree populations under observed climate change conform well to projections for the 2020s, which suggests that it is a safe strategy to change current reforestation practices and adapt to new climatic realities through assisted migration prescriptions.

  15. Strategies for Reforestation under Uncertain Future Climates: Guidelines for Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Laura K.; Hamann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background Commercial forestry programs normally use locally collected seed for reforestation under the assumption that tree populations are optimally adapted to local environments. However, in western Canada this assumption is no longer valid because of climate trends that have occurred over the last several decades. The objective of this study is to show how we can arrive at reforestation recommendations with alternative species and genotypes that are viable under a majority of climate change scenarios. Methodology/Principal Findings In a case study for commercially important tree species of Alberta, we use an ecosystem-based bioclimate envelope modeling approach for western North America to project habitat for locally adapted populations of tree species using multi-model climate projections for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s. We find that genotypes of species that are adapted to drier climatic conditions will be the preferred planting stock over much of the boreal forest that is commercially managed. Interestingly, no alternative species that are currently not present in Alberta can be recommended with any confidence. Finally, we observe large uncertainties in projections of suitable habitat that make reforestation planning beyond the 2050s difficult for most species. Conclusion/Significance More than 50,000 hectares of forests are commercially planted every year in Alberta. Choosing alternative planting stock, suitable for expected future climates, could therefore offer an effective climate change adaptation strategy at little additional cost. Habitat projections for locally adapted tree populations under observed climate change conform well to projections for the 2020s, which suggests that it is a safe strategy to change current reforestation practices and adapt to new climatic realities through assisted migration prescriptions. PMID:21853061

  16. Mapping groundwater storage variations with GRACE: a case study in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianliang; Pavlic, Goran; Rivera, Alfonso; Palombi, Dan; Smerdon, Brian

    2016-11-01

    The applicability of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to adequately represent broad-scale patterns of groundwater storage (GWS) variations and observed trends in groundwater-monitoring well levels (GWWL) is examined in the Canadian province of Alberta. GWS variations are derived over Alberta for the period 2002-2014 using the Release 05 (RL05) monthly GRACE gravity models and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) land-surface models. Twelve mean monthly GWS variation maps are generated from the 139 monthly GWS variation grids to characterize the annual GWS variation pattern. These maps show that, overall, GWS increases from February to June, and decreases from July to October, and slightly increases from November to December. For 2002-2014, the GWS showed a positive trend which increases from west to east with a mean value of 12 mm/year over the province. The resulting GWS variations are validated using GWWLs in the province. For the purpose of validation, a GRACE total water storage (TWS)-based correlation criterion is introduced to identify groundwater wells which adequately represent the regional GWS variations. GWWLs at 36 wells were found to correlate with both the GRACE TWS and GWS variations. A factor f is defined to up-scale the GWWL variations at the identified wells to the GRACE-scale GWS variations. It is concluded that the GWS variations can be mapped by GRACE and the GLDAS models in some situations, thus demonstrating the conditions where GWS variations can be detected by GRACE in Alberta.

  17. The distribution of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada) and associated aqueous geochemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Nightingale, Michael; Becker, Veith; Kingston, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Millot, Romain; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Development of unconventional energy resources such as shale gas and coalbed methane has generated some public concern with regard to the protection of groundwater and surface water resources from leakage of stray gas from the deep subsurface. In terms of environmental impact to and risk assessment of shallow groundwater resources, the ultimate challenge is to distinguish: (a) natural in-situ production of biogenic methane, (b) biogenic or thermogenic methane migration into shallow aquifers due to natural causes, and (c) thermogenic methane migration from deep sources due to human activities associated with the exploitation of conventional or unconventional oil and gas resources. We have conducted a NSERC-ANR co-funded baseline study investigating the occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater of Alberta (Canada), a province with a long record of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration. Our objective was to assess the occurrence and sources of methane in shallow groundwaters and to also characterize the hydrochemical environment in which the methane was formed or transformed through redox processes. Ultimately our aim was to determine whether methane was formed in-situ or whether it migrated from deeper formations into shallow aquifers. Combining hydrochemical and dissolved and free geochemical gas data from 372 groundwater samples obtained from 186 monitoring wells of the provincial groundwater observation well network (GOWN) in Alberta, it was found that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater in Alberta and is predominantly of biogenic origin. The highest concentrations of dissolved biogenic methane (> 0.01 mM or > 0.2 mg/L), characterized by δ13CCH4 values definition in the context of current and future unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation.

  18. Hazardous Alcohol Use in 2 Countries: A Comparison Between Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This article aimed to compare alcohol consumption between the populations of Queensland in Australia and Alberta in Canada. Furthermore, the associations between greater alcohol consumption and socio-demographic characteristics were explored in each population. Methods Data from 2500 participants of the 2013 Alberta Survey and the 2013 Queensland Social Survey were analyzed. Regression analyses were used to explore the associations between alcohol risk and socio-demographic characteristics. Results A higher rate of hazardous alcohol use was found in Queenslanders than in Albertans. In both Albertans and Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was associated with being between 18 and 24 years of age. Higher income, having no religion, living alone, and being born in Canada were also associated with alcohol risk in Albertans; while in Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was also associated with common-law marital status. In addition, hazardous alcohol use was lower among respondents with a non-Catholic or Protestant religious affiliation. Conclusions Younger age was associated with greater hazardous alcohol use in both populations. In addition, different socio-demographic factors were associated with hazardous alcohol use in each of the populations studied. Our results allowed us to identify the socio-demographic profiles associated with hazardous alcohol use in Alberta and Queensland. These profiles constitute valuable sources of information for local health authorities and policymakers when designing suitable preventive strategies targeting hazardous alcohol use. Overall, the present study highlights the importance of analyzing the socio-demographic factors associated with alcohol consumption in population-specific contexts.

  19. Regional habitat needs of a nationally listed species, Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis, in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Ball

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding factors that affect the distribution and abundance of species is critical to developing effective management plans for conservation. Our goal was to quantify the distribution and abundance of Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis, a threatened old-forest associate in Alberta, Canada. The Canada Warbler has declined across its range, including in Alberta where habitat loss and alteration from urban expansion, forestry, and energy development are changing the forest landscape. We used 110,427 point count survey visits from 32,287 unique survey stations to model local-level (150-m radius circular buffers and stand-level (564-m radius circular buffers habitat associations of the Canada Warbler. We found that habitat supporting higher densities of Canada Warblers was locally concentrated yet broadly distributed across Alberta's boreal forest region. Canada Warblers were most commonly associated with older deciduous forest at the local scale, particularly near small, incised streams, and greater amounts of deciduous forest at the stand scale. Predicted density was lower in other forest types and younger age classes measured at the local scale. There was little evidence that local-scale fragmentation (i.e., edges created by linear features influenced Canada Warbler abundance. However, current forestry practices in the province likely will reduce the availability of Canada Warbler habitat over time by cutting old deciduous forest stands. Our results suggest that conservation efforts aimed at Canada Warbler focus on retaining large stands of old deciduous forest, specifically stands adjacent to streams, by increasing the width of deciduous retention buffers along streams during harvest and increasing the size and number of old forest residual patches in harvested stands.

  20. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour of toddlers and preschoolers in child care centres in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzik, Nicholas; Clark, Dawne; Ogden, Nancy; Harber, Vicki; Carson, Valerie

    2015-04-29

    To describe duration of physical activity and duration and bouts of sedentary behaviour during child care in a sample of toddlers and preschoolers (19-60 months) from Alberta, Canada, and to examine whether duration and bouts differed among sex, age and parental immigration status groups. One hundred and fourteen children aged 19-60 months from eight child care centres throughout Alberta participated. Data were collected at baseline of a study examining revised Alberta Child Care Accreditation Standards. Duration of physical activity (light (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA)) and duration and bouts (1-4, 5-9, 10-14, and ≥15 minutes) of sedentary behaviour during child care were accelerometer-derived using 15-second epochs during October/November, 2013. Median [Interquartile ranges] and ANOVAs, accounting for the clustered nature of the data, were calculated. Minutes/hour spent in sedentary behaviour, LPA and MVPA were 36.9 [32.9, 40.7], 18.4 [16.0, 20.9] and 4.2 [2.5, 5.6] respectively. Frequency/hour of sedentary bouts lasting 1-4, 5-9, 10-14 and ≥15 mins were 6.7 [6.1, 7.6], 0.9 [0.6, 1.1], 0.4 [0.2, 0.5] and 0.3 [0.2, 0.4] respectively. Preschoolers participated in less sedentary behaviour and more LPA and MVPA, and had fewer sedentary bouts lasting 10-14 and ≥15 mins compared to toddlers (p < 0.05). This is the first Canadian study to report on the duration of physical activity and duration and bouts of sedentary behaviour among both toddlers and preschoolers attending child care centres. These findings suggest child care interventions are needed to increase MVPA and decrease total sedentary behaviour while continuing to promote short sedentary bouts.

  1. Role of season, temperature and humidity on the incidence of epistaxis in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Classical dogma holds that epistaxis is more common in winter months but there is significant variability reported in the literature. No study has yet examined the effect of season, humidity and temperature on epistaxis in a location with as severe weather extremes as seen in Alberta, Canada. The objective of the study is to evaluate for an effect of these meteorological factors on the incidence of epistaxis in Alberta. Method A retrospective review of consecutive adult patients presenting to the Emergency room (ER) in Edmonton and Calgary, Alberta over a three-year period was performed. Daily temperature and humidity data was recorded from the respective airports. Statistical analysis with Pearson’s correlation coefficient was performed. Results 4315 patients presented during the study period. Mean daily temperatures ranged from a low of -40°C to a high of +23°C. A significant negative correlation was found for mean monthly temperature with epistaxis (Pearson’s r = -0.835, p = 0.001). A significant correlation was also present for daily temperature and epistaxis presentation (Pearson’s r = -0.55, p = 0.018, range 1.8 to 2.2 events/day). No correlation was identified with humidity and no significant seasonal variation was present. Conclusions A negative correlation was found to exist for both daily and mean monthly temperature with rates of epistaxis. A seasonal variation was seen in Edmonton but not in Calgary. No correlation was found for humidity when compared to both presentation rates and admissions. PMID:24755112

  2. A process-based agricultural model for the irrigated agriculture sector in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, M. E.; Davies, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Connections between land and water, irrigation, agricultural productivity and profitability, policy alternatives, and climate change and variability are complex, poorly understood, and unpredictable. Policy assessment for agriculture presents a large potential for development of broad-based simulation models that can aid assessment and quantification of policy alternatives over longer temporal scales. The Canadian irrigated agriculture sector is concentrated in Alberta, where it represents two thirds of the irrigated land-base in Canada and is the largest consumer of surface water. Despite interest in irrigation expansion, its potential in Alberta is uncertain given a constrained water supply, significant social and economic development and increasing demands for both land and water, and climate change. This paper therefore introduces a system dynamics model as a decision support tool to provide insights into irrigation expansion in Alberta, and into trade-offs and risks associated with that expansion. It is intended to be used by a wide variety of users including researchers, policy analysts and planners, and irrigation managers. A process-based cropping system approach is at the core of the model and uses a water-driven crop growth mechanism described by AquaCrop. The tool goes beyond a representation of crop phenology and cropping systems by permitting assessment and quantification of the broader, long-term consequences of agricultural policies for Alberta's irrigation sector. It also encourages collaboration and provides a degree of transparency that gives confidence in simulation results. The paper focuses on the agricultural component of the systems model, describing the process involved; soil water and nutrients balance, crop growth, and water, temperature, salinity, and nutrients stresses, and how other disciplines can be integrated to account for the effects of interactions and feedbacks in the whole system. In later stages, other components such as

  3. Concurrent validity of the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Lillian; Mayson, Tanja A; Leo, Sara; Lee, Leanna L S; Harris, Susan R; Hayes, Virginia E; Backman, Catherine L; Cameron, Dianne; Tardif, Megan

    2008-02-01

    We examined concurrent validity of scores for two infant motor screening tools, the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (HINT) and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale, in 121 Canadian infants. Relationships between the two tests for the overall sample were as follows: r = -.83 at 4 to 6.5 months (n = 121; p < .01) and r = -.85 at 10 to 12.5 months (n = 109; p < .01), suggesting that the HINT, the newer of the two measures, is valid in determining motor delays. Each test has advantages and disadvantages, and practitioners should determine which one best meets their infant assessment needs.

  4. Probable ankylosaur ossicles from the middle Cenomanian Dunvegan formation of northwestern Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Burns

    Full Text Available A sample of six probable fragmentary ankylosaur ossicles, collected from Cenomanian deposits of the Dunvegan Formation along the Peace River, represent one of the first dinosaurian skeletal fossils reported from pre-Santonian deposits in Alberta. Specimens were identified as ankylosaur by means of a palaeohistological analysis. The primary tissue is composed of zonal interwoven structural fibre bundles with irregularly-shaped lacunae, unlike the elongate lacunae of the secondary lamellar bone. The locality represents the most northerly Cenomanian occurrence of ankylosaur skeletal remains. Further fieldwork in under-examined areas of the province carries potential for additional finds.

  5. Insight conference reports : proceedings of the 7. annual Alberta power summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This power summit conference provided a forum to discuss issues related to electricity transmission and distribution in Canada. The conference addressed recent regulatory and policy changes related to the electricity industry and provided an update on the Alberta Independent System Operator (AESO). Recent developments in wind power development and integration were also outlined, as well as issues related to power markets. Financial incentive regulations in Ontario were reviewed along with the current status of clean coal technologies. Issues related to biomass energy and rural electrification were also reviewed. One of the 17 presentations featured at this conference has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  6. Short-Term Influence of Revised Provincial Accreditation Standards on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Weight Status in Alberta, Canada Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Valerie; Clark, Dawne; Ogden, Nancy; Harber, Vicki; Kuzik, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In December, 2013, revised Alberta child care accreditation standards were released by the Alberta Government in Canada that included a new standard for physical activity and sedentary behavior in accredited child care settings. The main purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the new accreditation standard in increasing physical…

  7. Escala Motora Infantil de Alberta: validação para uma população gaúcha

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Nadia Cristina; Saccani, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Traduzir, adaptar e verificar a validade de critérios motor e de constructo (consistência interna, validade dis-criminante, correlação com outros testes e validade preditiva) da versão em Português da Alberta Motor Infant Scale. MÉTODOS: Estudo de validação transcultural. Participaram 21 profissionais e 561 crianças do Rio Grande do Sul, com idades de zero a 18 meses (291 meninos). Foram utilizados os instrumentos: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, Escala do Desen-volvimento do Comportame...

  8. Escala Motora Infantil de Alberta: validação para uma população gaúcha

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Nadia Cristina; Saccani, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    RESUMOObjetivo: Traduzir, adaptar e verificar a validade de critérios motor e de constructo (consistência interna, validade discriminante, correlação com outros testes e validade preditiva) da versão em Português da Alberta Motor Infant Scale. Métodos: Estudo de validação transcultural. Participaram 21 profissionais e 561 crianças do Rio Grande do Sul, com idades de zero a 18 meses (291 meninos). Foram utilizados os instrumentos: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, Escala do Desenvolvimento do Compor...

  9. Northern Rivers Basins ecological and human health studies : summary, relevance and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    Residents in northern Alberta expressed concerns that the original Northern River Basins Study (NRBS) only examined the impacts of contaminants on ecological health and did not include impacts on human health. In response to these concerns, Alberta Health established the Northern River Basins Human Health Monitoring Program in 1994 to investigate the possible relationships between various environmental risk factors and the health of northern residents in the province. This document links the ecological information collected by the original NRBS program with the information provided by the health program. Issues regarding health impacts from pulp mills and oil sand mining were also discussed. The findings of the health program were summarized and recommendations were made for future studies. The contaminants of potential concern (COPC) arising from the original NRBS were described in terms of their sources and any known connections between exposure and human health. The COPCs included arsenic, dioxins, chlorinated furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) mercury, chlorinated phenolics, toxaphene, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulphur dioxide, acid sulphates and particulate matter. Examples of Canadian regulatory criteria for these contaminants were also presented. 41 refs., 1 tab

  10. Upper Devonian conodonts in west central Alberta and adjacent British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, D.I. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)); Drees, N.C.M. (Inst. of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1993-06-01

    Conodont faunas from the Upper Devonian strata in the subsurface of west central Alberta are compared to those of the standard Frasnian and Famennian conodont zonations. Due to inadequate sample control in the Beaverhill Lake, Woodbend, and Winterburn groups, the comparison of Frasnian faunas did not result in new insights. Sample control in the uppermost Winterburn and Wabamun strata is adequate and the comparison of Famennian faunas shows that the Lower to Upper triangularis conodont zones are absent. They may be absent because of unfavorable facies or because of a hiatus in deposition. The Lower crepida to Upper marginifera zones occur in the lower part of the Wabamun Group. The absence of the Uppermost marginifera Zone and Lower and Upper trachytera and Lower and Upper postera zones in the upper part of this group in the Peace River region coincides with a local hiatus in deposition below the Big Valley Formation. The absence of the zones in southern Alberta may be due to nondeposition and/or unfavorable environments of deposition. Both the Big Valley and Exshaw formations include conodonts of the Famennian Lower expansa Zone. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Alberta's Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society : voluntary property purchase program information booklet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Alberta's industrial heartland is home to one of Canada's largest concentrations of petroleum, refining, petrochemical and chemical production facilities. To date, more than $25 billion has been invested in major industrial plants in the heartland and adjacent Strathcona industrial regions by major corporations, and more investment is expected in the future. The Industrial Heartland Collaboration to Address Resident Interests is a process in which area residents, municipalities, industries and the provincial government are working collaboratively to resolve concerns related to the cumulative operations and expansion of industry. This paper presented details of the Alberta Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society's voluntary purchase program, which was initiated to provide an equitable, efficient and economical process of acquiring properties of rural landowners currently located within region who voluntarily wish to relocate outside of the policy area. Application and eligibility details were presented, as well as an outline of the property appraisal process. Details of the compliance and real property report required by the program were presented. Issues concerning relocation and moving expenses were discussed, as well as details of the program's flat rate inconvenience payment

  12. Concurrent Validity Between Live and Home Video Observations Using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonzaaijer, Marike; van Dam, Ellen; van Haastert, Ingrid C; Nuysink, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    Serial assessment of gross motor development of infants at risk is an established procedure in neonatal follow-up clinics. Assessments based on home video recordings could be a relevant addition. In 48 infants (1.5-19 months), the concurrent validity of 2 applications was examined using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: (1) a home video made by parents and (2) simultaneous observation on-site by a pediatric physical therapist. Parents' experiences were explored using a questionnaire. The intraclass correlation coefficient agreement between live and home video assessment was 0.99, with a standard error of measurement of 1.41 items. Intra- and interrater reliability: intraclass correlation coefficients were more than 0.99. According to 94% of the parents, recording their infant's movement repertoire was easy to perform. Assessing the Alberta Infant Motor Scale based on home video recordings is comparable to assessment by live observation. The video method is a promising application that can be used with low burden for parents and infants.

  13. Concurrent validity and reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Kênnea Martins; Dutra, Maria Virginia Peixoto; Mello, Rosane Reis de; Reis, Ana Beatriz Rodrigues; Martins, Priscila Silveira

    2008-01-01

    To verify the concurrent validity and interobserver reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) in premature infants followed-up at the outpatient clinic of Instituto Fernandes Figueira, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IFF/Fiocruz), in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A total of 88 premature infants were enrolled at the follow-up clinic at IFF/Fiocruz, between February and December of 2006. For the concurrent validity study, 46 infants were assessed at either 6 (n = 26) or 12 (n = 20) months' corrected age using the AIMS and the second edition of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, by two different observers, and applying Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyze the results. For the reliability study, 42 infants between 0 and 18 months were assessed using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale, by two different observers and the results analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient. The concurrent validity study found a high level of correlation between the two scales (r = 0.95) and one that was statistically significant (p < 0.01) for the entire population of infants, with higher values at 12 months (r = 0.89) than at 6 months (r = 0.74). The interobserver reliability study found satisfactory intraclass correlation coefficients at all ages tested, varying from 0.76 to 0.99. The AIMS is a valid and reliable instrument for the evaluation of motor development in high-risk infants within the Brazilian public health system.

  14. Declining mortality in neurocritical care patients: a cohort study in Southern Alberta over eleven years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2013-10-01

    Few interventions have been proven to improve outcomes in neurocritical care patients. It is unknown whether outcomes in Canada have changed over time. We performed a cohort study in Southern Alberta to determine whether survival and discharge disposition have improved. Using prospectively collected data, we identified patients admitted to regional intensive care units (ICUs) over a more than 11-year period with traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intracerebral hemorrhage, anoxic encephalopathy, central nervous system infection, or status epilepticus. Four sequential time periods of 2.8 years were compared, as were periods before and after various practice modifications were introduced. Logistic regression was used to adjust for patient age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and case mix. A total of 4,097 patients were assessed. The odds of death were lowest in the most recent time quartile (odds ratio [OR] 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56 to 0.88, P Alberta have improved over time. Practice modifications in the region were associated with positive outcome trends. Longer ICU length of stay may imply that intensivists are increasingly delaying decisions about withdrawing life-sustaining interventions.

  15. Measuring the competitiveness benefits of a transmission investment policy: The case of the Alberta electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolak, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission expansions can increase the extent of competition faced by wholesale electricity suppliers with the ability to exercise unilateral market power. This can cause them to submit offer curves closer to their marginal cost curves, which sets market-clearing prices closer to competitive benchmark price levels. These lower wholesale market-clearing prices are the competitiveness benefit consumers realize from the transmission expansion. This paper quantifies empirically the competitiveness benefits of a transmission expansion policy that causes strategic suppliers to expect no transmission congestion. Using hourly generation-unit level offer, output, market-clearing price and congestion data from the Alberta wholesale electricity market from January 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013, an upper and lower bound on the hourly consumer competitiveness benefits of this transmission policy is computed. Both of these competitiveness benefits measures are economically significant, which argues for including them in transmission planning processes for wholesale electricity markets to ensure that all transmission expansions with positive net benefits to electricity consumers are undertaken. -- Highlights: •Define competitiveness benefits to consumers from transmission expansions in wholesale market. •Compute upper and lower bounds on competitiveness benefits for Alberta market. •Compare no-perceived congestion prices to actual prices to measure competitiveness benefits. •Economically substantial competitiveness benefits found for sample period studied. •To ensure adequate transmission, planning processes should account for these benefits

  16. The pros and cons of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    Alberta's deregulated wholesale and retail electricity market place is described. The objective of the government in restructuring the industry was defined as achieving the lowest sustainable long run supply costs, prices lower than they otherwise might have been, an open competitive market, with new choices for consumers, and increased flexibility of contracts. This author confidently asserts that deregulation in Alberta has been a great success, some initial difficulties notwithstanding. Today, the market is stable, rebates ended on cue after one year, investors have confidence in the stability of the market as shown by the nearly 5,500 MW of generation under development, there is a robust supply-demand balance, utilities and customers have the ability to forward contract, and customers are offered contracts at competitive prices. For the future, the goals remain lower regulatory costs, more choices, competitive prices, a level playing field for all participants, security of supply, strong competition, greater availability of green power, increased conservation, many new players, open access, market liquidity, and viable businesses

  17. The Challenge of Integrating Renewable Generation in the Alberta Electricity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kent Fellows

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Renewable electric generation is forecast to enjoy an increasing share of total capacity and supply regimes in the future. Alberta is no exception to this trend, having initiated policy incentives in response to calls for increasing the fraction of wind and solar energy available to the province over the next decade.1 This call is coming from various sectors including advocacy groups, the provincial government and some utilities. The University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy convened a roundtable discussion on Sept. 15, 2015. Given the wide-ranging aspects of increased renewables integration (for example the policy options, economic forces and engineering/technical issues the topic demands attention from a wide range of experts and stakeholders. To that end, we endeavoured to group expert panellists and representatives of utilities, public agencies, academe and consumer groups to consider the planning necessary to integrate new renewable capacity into the existing and future grid system in the province and its potential impact. The purpose of the roundtable was to facilitate and foster a knowledge exchange between interested and knowledgeable parties while also aggregating this knowledge into a more complete picture of the challenges and potential strategies associated with increased renewables integration in the Alberta electricity grid.

  18. A real-time voltage security assessment system (VSAS) at Alberta Electric System Operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.; Howell, R.; Moshref, A. [Powertech Labs Inc., Surrey, BC (Canada); Mueller, M.; Viray, E.; Yang, C.; Qiu, J. [Alberta Electric System Operator, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    A fundamental requirement for a power system involves its secure and reliable operation. The diversity of operating conditions that exist in a system create a high degree of uncertainty with regard to the scenarios and contingencies that need to be examined to ensure system security. The Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) is responsible for the safe, reliable and economic planning and operation of the Alberta interconnected electric system (AIES). Voltage stability is an issue due to transmission constraints in the AIES. This paper discussed AESO's implementation of an online voltage security assessment system (VSAS) using Powertech's voltage security assessment tool (VSAT) software at their system control center. Voltage security assessment at AESO and the performance requirements for VSAS were first described. The paper described the features of VSAS which included compliance with Western Electricity Coordinating Council voltage security criteria; real-time security monitoring and alarms; and suggestions of remedial actions when security violations were identified. The paper also detailed the development of the model, including contingencies; transfers; interfaces; monitored buses; special protection schemes; remedial action schemes; as well as other models applicable to voltage stability analysis. Computational scenarios that were included and analysed in VSAS for each real-time snapshot were also presented. Last, the paper described the system architecture and features and provided examples and operational experiences as well as future development plans. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Energy to the masses : a blueprint for competition in Alberta's retail energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topp, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for competition in Alberta's retail energy market and its influence on Direct Energy Marketing Limited . The main factors for successful retail energy competition were identified as being a level playing field for all retailers; a stable and committed regulatory framework; customer education; brand trust and visibility; regulated pricing which reflects market conditions; customer service and billing; unrestricted customer choice; and, conformity between electricity and gas markets. Direct Energy is a wholly owned subsidiary of British-based Centrica plc, one of the top 30 companies in the United Kingdom in terms of market capitalization. It was created during Britain's regulatory reform of the energy industry and operates through 4 retail brand units. Centrica entered the North American market in 2000 when it acquired Direct Energy Marketing Limited which supplies energy and services to half of the households in Ontario. Direct Energy is expected to increase its customer base with the pending closure of ATCO Gas and ATCO Electric in Alberta, making it Canada's largest provider of retail energy services. In a competitive energy market, retailers can offer a wider range of products than energy alone. Cost-to services can be reduced by offering services such as heating, ventilation and air conditioning

  20. Barriers to utilization of dental services for children among low-income families in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Maryam S; Perez, Arnaldo; Nyachhyon, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    To explore reasons for underutilization of dental services covered by a governmental funded program in Alberta. A survey questionnaire was sent to 4,000 randomly selected clients of Alberta Health Benefit program. Only respondents with children were included in the analysis. Reasons were explored among those who indicated that their children did not receive any dental services in the year prior to the survey (non-users). Difficulties faced by those who reported receiving at least one dental service (users) were also collected. Among 795 returned surveys, 597 had at least one child. A total of 1,303 children aged 1 to 19 years (mean age = 11.79 years, SD = 4.2) were included in the analysis. Of the 1,303 children, 443 (34%) did not receive any covered dental services (non-users); the most common reason (50.7%) was 'no perceived need' labeled for the replies 'my child was too young or had no dental problems' followed by perceived insufficient coverage (38.6%). The most common challenge reported by the dental care users was also insufficient coverage (44.9%). About 57% of parents were aware of the covered yearly fluoride application; however, only 34.3% of their children received fluoride and 14.2% had sealants. Low-income families underutilized available dental benefits for children. Perceived need seemed to be the primary determinant of utilization. Parental awareness about the coverage did not seem to promote the utilization of preventive measures for young children.

  1. Potential change in lodgepole pine site index and distribution under climatic change in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monserud, R.A. [United States Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, Portland, OR (United States); Yang, Y.; Huang, S. [Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Forest Management Branch; Tchebakova, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Sukachev Forest Inst.

    2008-02-15

    The Alberta climate model was used in conjunction with climate change scenario projections from 3 global circulation models to estimate the impact of global climate change on lodgepole pine site productivity in Alberta. The modelling study demonstrated that mean growing degree days greater than 5 degrees C (GGD{sub 5}) were increased by 18 per cent, 38 per cent, and 65 per cent by the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s respectively. Changes in precipitation did not occur. A dryness index was used to predict productivity ranges and GDD{sub 5}. Results showed that productivity increased by 3 meters for each 30-year period. A large reduction in growing areas was also indicated. Initially, warming increased the potential growing range by 67 per cent by the year 2020. By 2080, growing ranges had decreased to 58 per cent of its current area. Changes in range should be considered when setting longer-term forest management plans. It was concluded that the increased risk of both insect and wildfire outbreaks must also be considered. 40 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  2. The impact of roads on the demography of grizzly bears in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal factors that have reduced grizzly bear populations has been the creation of human access into grizzly bear habitat by roads built for resource extraction. Past studies have documented mortality and distributional changes of bears relative to roads but none have attempted to estimate the direct demographic impact of roads in terms of both survival rates, reproductive rates, and the interaction of reproductive state of female bears with survival rate. We applied a combination of survival and reproductive models to estimate demographic parameters for threatened grizzly bear populations in Alberta. Instead of attempting to estimate mean trend we explored factors which caused biological and spatial variation in population trend. We found that sex and age class survival was related to road density with subadult bears being most vulnerable to road-based mortality. A multi-state reproduction model found that females accompanied by cubs of the year and/or yearling cubs had lower survival rates compared to females with two year olds or no cubs. A demographic model found strong spatial gradients in population trend based upon road density. Threshold road densities needed to ensure population stability were estimated to further refine targets for population recovery of grizzly bears in Alberta. Models that considered lowered survival of females with dependant offspring resulted in lower road density thresholds to ensure stable bear populations. Our results demonstrate likely spatial variation in population trend and provide an example how demographic analysis can be used to refine and direct conservation measures for threatened species.

  3. Public policy processes and getting physical activity into Alberta's urban schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, Catherine P; Church, John; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Public policies impact the amount of physical activity (PA) that children receive at school. These policies are of interest because overweight and obesity among Canadian children have grown at significant rates, and increasing PA among children is one way to reverse this trend. This research investigates the public policy processes that have resulted in Alberta's education system adopting in-school daily physical activity (DPA) and not supporting walk-to-school (WTS) initiatives. Using the policy process described by Kingdon and others as a conceptual framework, this research reviews literature and documents on public policy relating to PA in schools and interviews key individuals (N = 20) to identify the policy-related facilitators and barriers in Alberta, Canada to increasing PA in school-aged children. DPA was mandated because Kingdon's three policy streams (problem, solution and politics) became joined or linked. DPA was the most viable solution because literature supports and teachers believe in the educational benefits of PA. As well, a physician with personal beliefs about the benefits of PA became the minister of education and coupled the solution with the political stream through his ministerial power. Reasons that WTS programs have not become school or health policy include advocacy led by politically weak organizations, lack of a supportive policy entrepreneur and poor saliency among educators. This research illuminates the inner workings of the policy process shaping PA in schools, identifying the unseen forces of the policy process that move issues forward. The findings provide valuable insight for building other healthy public policies.

  4. On properties of royalty and tax regimes in Alberta's oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plourde, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models that include royalty and tax provisions are used to examine the distribution between developers and governments of net returns from the development of Alberta's oil sands deposits. A specific focus is to assess the effects on the level and distribution of net revenues associated with a number of changes in assumed revenue and expenditure conditions. Developers typically bear a greater share of the consequences of variations in capital expenditures than they do of changes in operating expenditures, prices, and exchange rates. A comparison across royalty and tax regimes suggest that there is a positive relationship between the level of net revenues estimated to accrue to either developers or governments and the share of the consequences of changes in conditions borne by that party. Some differences across production technologies are noted. The role of the federal government as a fiscal player in oil sands development has shrunk over time. In contrast, under the current regime, the Government of Alberta captures a higher share of net returns and typically bears a greater proportion of the consequences of changes in conditions than at any time since the introduction of an explicit royalty and tax regime in 1997.

  5. Habitat associations with counts of declining Western Grebes in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara E. Erickson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During the past several decades, numbers of Western Grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis have declined throughout their breeding and wintering ranges in North America. We estimated Western Grebe abundance and documented habitat factors between 2007 and 2009 from 43 lakes in Alberta, Canada where Western Grebes historically have occurred, to (1 compare Western Grebe abundance with the relative probability of persistence, and (2 identify habitat correlates of grebe abundance. The relative probability of Western Grebe persistence was correlated with abundance in the study area, although only 19% of the variation in persistence probability was explained by abundance. Western Grebe abundance was positively correlated with the shoreline extent of emergent bulrush (Scirpus lacustris, which is consistent with past studies and underlies the importance of protecting emergent vegetation in efforts to conserve Western Grebes. Grebe abundance also was positively correlated with a longer shoreline perimeter, but was inversely correlated with the amount of forested backshore, which occurred on lakes primarily at the northern margins of Western Grebe range. The amount of backshore development was positively associated with Western Grebe abundance, which might reflect a preference for similar lake characteristics by humans and grebes. These relationships are important to consider in the context of implementing and managing recovery of the Western Grebe in Alberta.

  6. Escala Motora Infantil de Alberta: validação para uma população gaúcha Escala motora infantil de Alberta: validación para una población de Rio Grande do Sul (Brasil) Infant Motor Scale of Alberta: validation for a population of Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Cristina Valentini; Raquel Saccani

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Traduzir, adaptar e verificar a validade de critérios motor e de constructo (consistência interna, validade dis-criminante, correlação com outros testes e validade preditiva) da versão em Português da Alberta Motor Infant Scale. MÉTODOS: Estudo de validação transcultural. Participaram 21 profissionais e 561 crianças do Rio Grande do Sul, com idades de zero a 18 meses (291 meninos). Foram utilizados os instrumentos: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, Escala do Desen-volvimento do Comportame...

  7. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  8. Is There a Future for Nuclear Power? Wind and Emission Reduction Targets in Fossil-Fuel Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, G Cornelis; Duan, Jun; Lynch, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the viability of relying on wind power to replace upwards of 60% of electricity generation in Alberta that would be lost if coal-fired generation is phased out. Using hourly wind data from 17 locations across Alberta, we are able to simulate the potential wind power output available to the Alberta grid when modern, 3.5 MW-capacity wind turbines are spread across the province. Using wind regimes for the years 2006 through 2015, we find that available wind power is less than 60% of installed capacity 98% of the time, and below 30% of capacity 74% of the time. There is only a small amount of correlation between wind speeds at different locations, but yet it remains necessary to rely on fossil fuel generation. Then, based on the results from a grid allocation model, we find that CO2 emissions can be reduced by about 30%, but only through a combination of investment in wind energy and reliance on purchases of hydropower from British Columbia. Only if nuclear energy is permitted into the generation mix would Alberta be able to meet its CO2-emissions reduction target in the electricity sector. With nuclear power, emissions can be reduced by upwards of 85%.

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of ambient nitric acid and ammonia in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Bytnerowicz; W. Fraczek; S. Schilling; D. Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Monthly average ambient concentrations of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) and ammonia (NH3) were monitored at the Athabasca Oils Sands Region (AOSR), Alberta, Canada, between May 2005 and September 2008. Generally, concentrations of both pollutants were elevated and highly variable in space and time. The highest atmospheric...

  10. Is There a Future for Nuclear Power? Wind and Emission Reduction Targets in Fossil-Fuel Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Lynch, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the viability of relying on wind power to replace upwards of 60% of electricity generation in Alberta that would be lost if coal-fired generation is phased out. Using hourly wind data from 17 locations across Alberta, we are able to simulate the potential wind power output available to the Alberta grid when modern, 3.5 MW-capacity wind turbines are spread across the province. Using wind regimes for the years 2006 through 2015, we find that available wind power is less than 60% of installed capacity 98% of the time, and below 30% of capacity 74% of the time. There is only a small amount of correlation between wind speeds at different locations, but yet it remains necessary to rely on fossil fuel generation. Then, based on the results from a grid allocation model, we find that CO2 emissions can be reduced by about 30%, but only through a combination of investment in wind energy and reliance on purchases of hydropower from British Columbia. Only if nuclear energy is permitted into the generation mix would Alberta be able to meet its CO2-emissions reduction target in the electricity sector. With nuclear power, emissions can be reduced by upwards of 85%. PMID:27902712

  11. Development of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for detection of CO2, CH4 and PM in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michael; Crowther, Blake; Lemon, Robert; Valupadas, Prasad; Fu, Long; Leung, Bonnie; Yang, Zheng; Huda, Quamrul; Chambers, Allan

    2005-05-01

    Rapid expansion of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, including the oil sands, has challenged the Alberta Government to keep pace in its efforts to monitor and mitigate the environmental impacts of development. The limitations of current monitoring systems has pushed the provincial government to seek out advanced sensing technologies such as satellite imagery and laser based sensors. The Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) of Utah State University, in cooperation with Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency (AEMERA), has developed North America's first mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system designed specifically for emissions measurement. This instrument is housed inside a 36' trailer which allows for mobility to travel across Alberta to characterize source emissions and to locate fugitive leaks. DIAL is capable of measuring concentrations for carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at ranges of up to 3 km with a spatial resolution of 10 meters. DIAL can map both CO2 and CH4, as well as particulate matter (PM) in a linear fashion; by scanning the laser beam in both azimuth and elevation DIAL can create images of emissions in two dimensions. DIAL imagery may be used to understand and control production practices, characterize source emissions, determine emission factors, locate fugitive leaks, assess plume dispersion, and confirm air dispersion modeling. A system overview of the DIAL instrument and some representative results will be discussed.

  12. The Role of Sustainability Resources of Large Greenhouse Gas Emitters: The Case of Corporations in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Hannouf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the global challenge of climate change, it becomes crucial to understand the factors that can guide carbon intensive companies to comply with environmental regulations through significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Using the natural-resource-based view, the argument in this paper is that focusing on sustainability-driven resources by companies is a way to meet environmental compliance and reduce GHG emissions while gaining differential competitive benefits. A specific analysis on Alberta case has discussed large GHG emitters’ environmental compliance mechanisms in the context of their sustainability resources. The aim is examining if large GHG emitters in Alberta related to corporations having sustainability resources are complying with the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (SGER reduction requirement through cleaner-production driven internal mechanisms. The paper examines the existence of the sustainability resources in the reporting companies related to large GHG emitters responsible for 86% of total GHG reported by facilities with emissions above the threshold of 100 kilotonnes of GHG per year under SGER in Alberta. Corporations are found not using their sustainability resource potential to achieve internal reductions in GHG emissions throughout their facilities. Thus, some recommendations are presented for Alberta case as well as for environmental regulations in other jurisdictions that can potentially help policy makers improve their climate change regulations and achieve their global targets and enable companies to gain competitive advantage while meeting GHG reduction compliance.

  13. Fishes of the Taquari-Antas river basin (Patos Lagoon basin, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FG. Becker

    Full Text Available The aquatic habitats of the Taquari-Antas river basin (in the Patos Lagoon basin, southern Brazil are under marked environmental transformation because of river damming for hydropower production. In order to provide an information baseline on the fish fauna of the Taquari-Antas basin, we provide a comprehensive survey of fish species based on primary and secondary data. We found 5,299 valid records of fish species in the basin, representing 119 species and 519 sampling sites. There are 13 non-native species, six of which are native to other Neotropical river basins. About 24% of the total native species are still lacking a taxonomic description at the species level. Three native long-distance migratory species were recorded (Leporinus obtusidens, Prochilodus lineatus, Salminus brasiliensis, as well as two potential mid-distance migrators (Parapimelodus nigribarbis and Pimelodus pintado. Although there is only one officially endangered species in the basin (S. brasiliensis, restricted range species (21.7% of total species should be considered in conservation efforts.

  14. Magnetotelluric imaging of the crustal structure of the Great Slave Lake shear zone in Northwest Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, E.; Unsworth, M. J.; Chacko, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Alberta basement is part of the North American craton - Laurentia, which was assembled in the Paleoproterozoic era. The Great Slave Lake shear zone (GSLsz) is the major crustal-scale right-lateral strike-slip feature in northwest Laurentia. Because of the extensive coverage of the rocks of the WCSB, geological studies in northern Alberta are limited to studies of drill core samples. The crustal structures of northern Alberta were defined from potential field in combination with isotopic studies. Magnetotelluric method is helpful in this case, because it is sensitive to conductive bodies. New Broadband magnetotelluric data were collected across the GSLsz to give a clear image of the crustal structure. Dimensionality analyses showed that the data are two-dimensional at the crustal depth, even though 3-D effects are present at the lowest frequencies. Consequently, 2-D inversions were applied and a preferred resistivity model was achieved. The WCSB was imaged as a conductive layer on the top of the resistive Precambrian basement rocks. Four conductive bodies associate with terrane boundaries were identified. The largest conductor - KC is located coincident with the Kiskatinaw terrane at the mid-crustal depth. The second conductor - KCC is located at the boundary of the Ksituan and Chinchaga terranes at upper-crustal depth. The KC and KCC are suspected to be linear conductors that are consistent along the strikes of the Kiskatinaw terrane and the western boundary of the Chinchaga terrane, respectively. This is concluded when considering the result of this study in combination with the potential field data, a previously proposed 3-D resistivity model and a 2-D seismic reflection result. Both of the KC and KCC corresponds to seismically reflective zones. The third conductor - HC is imaged beneath the Hottah terrane. The GSLsz is close to the HC and they may be related in origin. The fourth conductor - CBHC is imaged at the boundary of the Chinchaga and Buffalo Head

  15. Combining Field and Modeling Tools As an Approach to Assess Cumulative Surface Erosion in Alberta Eastern Slopes and Foothills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A.; Wagner, M. J.; Hirshfield, F.; Howard, M.; Silins, U.; Benda, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Alberta is a large province with diverse forested landscapes and heavy industrial, range and recreation use. Hillslopes are generally stable but the cumulative surface erosion from bare areas (e.g. roads, well pad, trails, burns and pipelines) is a major concern for downstream water users, aquatic ecology and stream habitat. Most streams are not exhibiting issues from additional coarse soil (e.g. obvious changes to geomorphology) however, soils with high proportion of fines and phosphorus have been attributed to long lasting aquatic ecology impacts and associated downstream water quality issues. For this project we take a watershed scale approach to determine if we can reduce field effort by using high quality digital terrain data available for most of Alberta combined with tools such as the Geomorphic Road Analysis and Inventory Package (GRAIP) and landscape scale GIS assessment and modeling tools such as NetMap. We examine two contrasting regions of Alberta: (1) a tributary of the Oldman River in southwest Alberta that has steep topography, intense storms and heavy motorized recreation from the neighboring 1.5 Million people, and (2) the Foothills area that has fine lacustrine soil, low topography and extremely heavy industrial activity from energy, mining and forestry. We present the initial results of field data combined with GIS analysis for the eastern slopes as part of a larger project that is assessing these tools in represented end member watersheds for forested areas within the foothills and eastern slopes region (area of Alberta where watersheds have meaningful topography). Initial results suggest that GIS and associated modeling are very useful in providing rapid direction for field campaigns to refine the level of uncertainty, make prescriptive field plans and will likely be platforms that can track changes in predicated watershed scale erosion rates through time.

  16. Should Alberta upgrade oil sands bitumen? An integrated life cycle framework to evaluate energy systems investment tradeoffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquette-Levy, Nicolas; MacLean, Heather L.; Bergerson, Joule A.

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions costs in energy systems investment decision-making requires the development of a framework that accounts for GHG and economic tradeoffs. This paper develops such a framework by integrating partial cost–benefit analysis with life cycle assessment to explore the question of whether bitumen should be upgraded in the Canadian province of Alberta to produce synthetic crude oil (SCO), or blended with light hydrocarbons to produce lower-quality diluted bitumen (dilbit). The net present value (NPV) of these options is calculated from the stakeholder perspectives of the oil sands industry, the Alberta public, and a climate-concerned Alberta resident. This calculation includes monetized GHG emissions costs stemming from a hypothetical economy-wide GHG price, and a sensitivity analysis explores the effects of variations in technical and economic conditions on stakeholders’ preferences. We find that under most plausible sets of conditions, industry would prefer the dilution option, while the climate-concerned Alberta resident would prefer the upgrading option. In contrast, the preferences of the general Alberta public depend on the values of key variables (e.g., the SCO-dilbit price differential). Key drivers of differences among stakeholders’ preferences include different perceptions of risks and responsibilities for life cycle GHG emissions. - Highlights: • We develop a novel integrated partial cost-benefit analysis/LCA framework. • We consider stakeholder perspectives, and technical and GHG price variations. • Upgrading is typically less GHG-intensive than dilution per barrel of bitumen. • Dilution is typically less GHG-intensive than upgrading per mega joule of gasoline. • Even stringent GHG prices may not align preferences on energy systems investment decisions

  17. Modeling future water footprint of barley production in Alberta, Canada: Implications for water use and yields to 2064.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Mohammad Badrul; McAllister, Tim; Cordeiro, Marcos R C; Faramarzi, Monireh

    2018-03-01

    Despite the perception of being one of the most agriculturally productive regions globally, crop production in Alberta, a western province of Canada, is strongly dependent on highly variable climate and water resources. We developed agro-hydrological models to assess the water footprint (WF) of barley by simulating future crop yield (Y) and consumptive water use (CWU) within the agricultural region of Alberta. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to develop rainfed and irrigated barley Y simulation models adapted to sixty-seven and eleven counties, respectively through extensive calibration, validation, sensitivity, and uncertainty analysis. Eighteen downscaled climate projections from nine General Circulation Models (GCMs) under the Representative Concentration Pathways 2.6 and 8.5 for the 2040-2064 period were incorporated into the calibrated SWAT model. Based on the ensemble of GCMs, rainfed barley yield is projected to increase while irrigated barley is projected to remain unchanged in Alberta. Results revealed a considerable decrease (maximum 60%) in WF to 2064 relative to the simulated baseline 1985-2009 WF. Less water will also be required to produce barley in northern Alberta (rainfed barley) than southern Alberta (irrigated barley) due to reduced water consumption. The modeled WF data adjusted for water stress conditions and found a remarkable change (increase/decrease) in the irrigated counties. Overall, the research framework and the locally adapted regional model results will facilitate the development of future water policies in support of better climate adaptation strategies by providing improved WF projections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Description logics of context

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klarman, S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Description Logics of Context (DLCs) - an extension of Description Logics (DLs) for context-based reasoning. Our approach descends from J. McCarthy's tradition of treating contexts as formal objects over which one can quantify...

  19. Physics 3204. Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfoundland and Labrador Dept. of Education.

    A description of the physics 3204 course in Newfoundland and Labrador is provided. The description includes: (1) statement of purpose, including general objectives of science education; (2) a list of six course objectives; (3) course content for units on sound, light, optical instruments, electrostatics, current electricity, Michael Faraday and…

  20. Descriptive set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Moschovakis, YN

    1987-01-01

    Now available in paperback, this monograph is a self-contained exposition of the main results and methods of descriptive set theory. It develops all the necessary background material from logic and recursion theory, and treats both classical descriptive set theory and the effective theory developed by logicians.

  1. Skull ecomorphology of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the dinosaur park formation (upper campanian of Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan C Mallon

    Full Text Available Megaherbivorous dinosaur coexistence on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia has long puzzled researchers, owing to the mystery of how so many large herbivores (6-8 sympatric species, in many instances could coexist on such a small (4-7 million km(2 landmass. Various explanations have been put forth, one of which-dietary niche partitioning-forms the focus of this study. Here, we apply traditional morphometric methods to the skulls of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian of Alberta to infer the ecomorphology of these animals and to test the niche partitioning hypothesis. We find evidence for niche partitioning not only among contemporaneous ankylosaurs, ceratopsids, and hadrosaurids, but also within these clades at the family and subfamily levels. Consubfamilial ceratopsids and hadrosaurids differ insignificantly in their inferred ecomorphologies, which may explain why they rarely overlap stratigraphically: interspecific competition prevented their coexistence.

  2. Evaluating intrinsic bioremediation at five sour gas processing facilities in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J. E.; Moore, B. J.; Sevigny, J. H.; Forrester, P. I.

    1997-01-01

    Mass attenuation through intrinsic bioremediation of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) was studied at four facilities in Alberta. The objective of the study was to assess whether intrinsic bioremediation could attenuate BTEX-contaminated groundwater plumes at the four sites. The depletion of electron acceptors, and the enriched metabolic byproducts within the BTEX plumes indicate that BTEX biodegradation is occurring at all four sites. Bacterial plate counts were generally higher at three of the sites and lower at one site. At the three sites microcosm experiments indicated aerobic biodegradation, while anaerobic biodegradation was observed at only two sites after four to five months incubation. Theoretical estimates of the biodegradation potential were calculated for each site with intrinsic bioremediation appearing to have bioremediation potential at three of the sites. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  3. The Spanish version of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: Validity and reliability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Monforte, Erica; Bagur-Calafat, Caridad; Suc-Lerin, Neus; Fornaguera-Martí, Montserrat; Cazorla-Sánchez, Engracia; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat

    2017-02-01

    Validity and reliability of the cross-cultural adaptive translation of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS), to monitor gross motor development in infants from 0 to 18 months of age, were evaluated. A cross-cultural translation was used to generate a Spanish version of the AIMS. Fifty infants at risk or with diagnosis of motor delay, 0-18 months of age, participated in this study. Two independent physical therapists scored infants on the AIMS. Concurrent validity was tested using the AIMS and the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - III (Bayley - III). Reliability and the internal consistency were high (ICCs ranged from 0.94 to 1.00 and KR-20 ranged from 0.90 to 0.98, respectively). AIMS and Bayley - III scores correlated strongly (r = 0.97). The Spanish version of the AIMS presented excellent validity and reliability. Further studies are suggested in order to assess the AIMS in preterm babies.

  4. Clinimetric properties of the alberta infant motor scale in infants born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Tamis W; de Valle, Katy; Eldridge, Bev; Galea, Mary P

    2010-01-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is a standardized motor assessment for young infants. This study aimed to examine the reliability of the AIMS in a group of infants born at or before 29 weeks of gestation. Fifty-nine infants born preterm were recruited. Two experienced pediatric physical therapists participated in this reliability study. Infants were assessed at 4, 8, 12, and 18 months corrected age (CA). Intrarater reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] > or =0.99). The ICC for interrater reliability varied from 0.85 to 0.97. The ICC was low at 4 and 18 months CA. The AIMS is reliable in evaluating motor development in infants born preterm. Clinicians should be cautious about using the AIMS in infants at very young ages and those approaching independent ambulation. Accurate placement of the window on a movement repertoire is crucial. Attention is required when using the AIMS in infants developing atypically.

  5. Stress drop estimates and hypocenter relocations of induced seismicity near Crooked Lake, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Fiona; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yajing; Gu, Yu Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    We use a sequence of induced earthquakes near Crooked Lake, Alberta, to investigate the physical differences between induced and tectonic earthquakes. Starting with the Natural Resources Canada earthquake catalogue, we use a spectral ratio method to calculate the static stress drops of a group of relocated earthquakes ranging from December 2013 to June 2015. We find that stress drops fall within the high side of the typical reported range of tectonic events and show no correlation with earthquake magnitude, depth, or distance from the well. The stress drops appear roughly constant for events with Mw 3 to 4. Relocated hypocenters cluster both spatially and temporally around corresponding injection wells and appear to migrate deeper with increasing time from injection. Fine-scale lineations apparent in relocated hypocenters could indicate the presence and orientation of fault planes, consistent with the published focal mechanism solutions of M 4+ events in the area.

  6. Sediment oxygen demand of wetlands in the oil sands region of northeastern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slama, C.; Gardner Costa, J.; Ciborowski, J. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) can significantly influence the dissolved oxygen concentrations in shallow water bodies. This study discussed the types of sediments used to reclaim wetlands and their influence on SOD, successional processes, and ecosystem trajectories. The study hypothesized that oil sands process material (OSPM) affected wetlands would support cyanobacterial biofilms as opposed to submergent macrophytes as a result of insufficient phosphorus levels. SOD was assessed by monitoring dissolved oxygen concentrations within domes placed on the sediment surface for a 3-hour period. Gas flux and composition analyses were used to quantify the biological SOD components. Chemical SOD components were then determined by subtraction. Concentrations of phosphorus bioavailable to the macrophytes were estimated using plant root simulator probes. The study showed that OSPM wetlands exhibited higher chemical SOD and SOD than reference wetlands, and supported benthic biofilms as opposed to the submergent macrophyte communities typically found in northeastern Alberta wetlands.

  7. Sediment oxygen demand of wetlands in the oil sands region of northeastern Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, C.; Gardner Costa, J.; Ciborowski, J.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) can significantly influence the dissolved oxygen concentrations in shallow water bodies. This study discussed the types of sediments used to reclaim wetlands and their influence on SOD, successional processes, and ecosystem trajectories. The study hypothesized that oil sands process material (OSPM) affected wetlands would support cyanobacterial biofilms as opposed to submergent macrophytes as a result of insufficient phosphorus levels. SOD was assessed by monitoring dissolved oxygen concentrations within domes placed on the sediment surface for a 3-hour period. Gas flux and composition analyses were used to quantify the biological SOD components. Chemical SOD components were then determined by subtraction. Concentrations of phosphorus bioavailable to the macrophytes were estimated using plant root simulator probes. The study showed that OSPM wetlands exhibited higher chemical SOD and SOD than reference wetlands, and supported benthic biofilms as opposed to the submergent macrophyte communities typically found in northeastern Alberta wetlands.

  8. "Our power to remodel civilization": the development of eugenic feminism in Alberta, 1909-1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being a prominent political figure in equal rights legislation, Emily Murphy was a vital contributor to programs which sought to improve the human race through forced sterilization. These negative aspects of this period in feminist history tend to be described as outside of the women's sphere, representing instead the patriarchal realm of men. However, both eugenics and the first-wave feminist ambitions for equal political rights were connected through an agrarian construction of "mothers of the race." As "mothers of the race," women in Alberta were responsible for the physical and moral betterment of the nation, and were directly engaged in concepts of intelligent motherhood, healthy childhood, and an overarching moral philosophy that was politically driven.

  9. Smartphones reveal angler behavior: A case study of a popular mobile fishing application in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfuss, Jason T.; Phelps, Nicholas; Fulton, David C.; Venturelli, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Successfully managing fisheries and controlling the spread of invasive species depends on the ability to describe and predict angler behavior. However, finite resources restrict conventional survey approaches and tend to produce retrospective data that are limited in time or space and rely on intentions or attitudes rather than actual behavior. In this study, we used three years of angler data from a popular mobile fishing application in Alberta, Canada, to determine province-wide, seasonal patterns of (1) lake popularity that were consistent with conventional data and (2) anthropogenic lake connectivity that has not been widely described in North America. Our proof-of-concept analyses showed that mobile apps can be an inexpensive source of high-resolution, real-time data for managing fisheries and invasive species. We also identified key challenges that underscore the need for further research and development in this new frontier that combines big data with increased stakeholder interaction and cooperation.

  10. Skull ecomorphology of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the dinosaur park formation (upper campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Jordan C; Anderson, Jason S

    2013-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaur coexistence on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia has long puzzled researchers, owing to the mystery of how so many large herbivores (6-8 sympatric species, in many instances) could coexist on such a small (4-7 million km(2)) landmass. Various explanations have been put forth, one of which-dietary niche partitioning-forms the focus of this study. Here, we apply traditional morphometric methods to the skulls of megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta to infer the ecomorphology of these animals and to test the niche partitioning hypothesis. We find evidence for niche partitioning not only among contemporaneous ankylosaurs, ceratopsids, and hadrosaurids, but also within these clades at the family and subfamily levels. Consubfamilial ceratopsids and hadrosaurids differ insignificantly in their inferred ecomorphologies, which may explain why they rarely overlap stratigraphically: interspecific competition prevented their coexistence.

  11. Market redesign and regulatory change : how companies doing business in Alberta's power markets will be affected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Power Pool of Alberta (PPA) began its operations in 1996 based on a model with a single price set based on day ahead offers/bids and real time dispatch. The Electric Utilities Act was amended in 1998 and direct sales were permitted in 1999. The Power Purchase Arrangement Auction was implemented in 2000. Significant events took place in 2001, including: (1) retail competition, (2) PPAs began operations, (3) restrictions on direct sales were removed, (4) forward exchange operation, and (5) ancillary services market. In 2002, the Market Achievement Plan II was implemented and government industry structure was reviewed. There are several considerations regarding market redesign, such as day ahead market, capacity market, congestion management, and Northwest Regional Transmission Organization (RTO West). The role of the International Standard Organization (ISO) was discussed, with reference to the Independent System Operator, Independent Market Operator, and Transmission and Market Planner. Redesign must involve all participants and include informed, phased in changes

  12. Contrasting carbon isotope fingerprints of migrating and solution gas in heavy oil fields of northeastern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D.; Muehlenbachs, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Greenwood, G. [Chemex Labs. (Alberta) Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Jensen, E. [Amoco Canada Petroleum Co. Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using {delta}C{sup 1}3 isotopes for fingerprinting gases in Alberta and Saskatchewan to facilitate remediation. Thousands of wells have been drilled in this region to develop heavy oil reservoirs in the Lower Cretaceous Mannville sands. The solution gases in the heavy oil consist of biogenic methane with trace C{sub 2+} components. The gases from the Cretaceous shales have {delta}C{sup 1}3 values indicative of thermogenesis. The study showed that most of the gases migrating in and near the wells show the isotopic signal of the shallower Upper Cretaceous shales and not the Mannville sands in which the wells were completed.

  13. Spatial and stress-related variation in benthic microbial gas flux in northeastern Alberta wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciborowski, J.; Gardner Costa, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of oil sands process material (OSPM) on the sediment microbial respiration in newly constructed wetlands located in northeastern Alberta. The sediment gas flux in 10 wetlands with various sediment characteristics and ages was studied. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to contrast the mean wetland production of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) with season, wetland status, wetland age, and wetland zones. The study showed that CH 4 was significantly higher in reference wetlands than in OSPM-impacted wetlands. A significant relationship between the status and zone of the wetland was observed for CH 4 fluxes in reference wetlands. CH 4 fluxes were higher in the non-vegetated zones of reference wetlands than in the vegetated zones of reference wetlands. CO 2 fluxes were low and not significantly different in any of the studied sites. Results indicated that the wetlands contributed little atmospheric carbon.

  14. The Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfires: Emergency and recovery management of healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matear, David

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest wildfires in Canadian history raged through northern Alberta in May to July 2016, and prompted the largest emergency air evacuation in Canadian history. Central to the challenges were the evacuation of a regional hospital, and the emergency and recovery management associated with healthcare services. This paper describes multiple phases of emergency and recovery management, which employed and adapted the Incident Command System to healthcare services. There were no injuries reported throughout the medical evacuation and recovery of medical services. The leadership and management of healthcare services achieved the goals of evacuating patients and staff effectively, supporting emergency first responders and the re-entry of the population to Fort McMurray.

  15. Funds from non-renewable energy resources: Policy lessons from Alaska and Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baena, César; Sévi, Benoît; Warrack, Allan

    2012-01-01

    We document the use of energy natural resource funds in Alaska and Alberta and analyze theirs characteristics for further implementation in resource-rich countries. Such funds allow dealing theoretically with intergenerational equity issues, corruption, and more general institutional problems. The performance of both funds is very different, depending on the management and composition choices but some policy lessons can be drawn from these two examples. Importantly, the role of a public dividend policy is highlighted as a way to bypass corrupted institutions and to enhance quality of life for poorest people. We also emphasize the need to deal with inflation to make the fund sustainable. - Highlights: ► We document the optimal intergenerational energy resource management using funds. ► We use Alaskan and Albertan experiences to provide policy lessons for future implementation of such funds. ► We emphasize the role of a public dividend policy

  16. Managing regional cumulative effects of oil sands development in Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaling, H.; Zwier, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach to regional cumulative effects management using the case of oil sands development in Alberta, Canada. The 17 existing, approved, or planned projects, all concentrated in a relatively small region, pose significant challenges for conducting and reviewing cumulative effects assessment (CEA) on a project-by-project basis. In response, stakeholders have initiated a regional cumulative effects management system that is among the first such initiatives anywhere. Advantages of this system include (1) more efficient gathering and sharing of information, including a common regional database, (2) setting acceptable regional environmental thresholds for all projects, (3) collaborative assessment of similar cumulative effects from related projects, (4) co-ordinated regulatory review and approval process for overlapping CEAs, and (5) institutional empowerment from a Regional Sustainable Development Strategy administered by a public authority. This case provides a model for integrating project-based CEA with regional management of cumulative effects. (author)

  17. Well test flare plume monitoring : results of DIAL measurements in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Carbon and Energy Management

    2003-07-01

    The DIAL testing system in Alberta is used to track plumes of gaseous waste from sour gas plants and measure emissions of sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, methane, ethylene, volatile organic compounds, ozone, and benzene. The DIAL system can also determine the efficiency of flare combustion. The remote monitoring and plume tracking system can be used on plumes from tail gas incinerator stacks, sour gas well test flares, and fugitive emissions at sour gas plants. Several graphs and figures were presented to illustrate typical plume profiles, outgoing/returning DIAL signals, and an overview of a typical application. Studies have shown that DIAL can accurately track plumes of sulfur dioxide to at least 2 km and can detect levels that are smaller than 450 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Some of the limitations for DIAL were also presented. DIAL prefers winds above 7 km/h for fugitives and it did not work in fog. 7 tabs., 25 figs.

  18. Great Basin insect outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara Bentz; Diane Alston; Ted Evans

    2008-01-01

    Outbreaks of native and exotic insects are important drivers of ecosystem dynamics in the Great Basin. The following provides an overview of range, forest, ornamental, and agricultural insect outbreaks occurring in the Great Basin and the associated management issues and research needs.

  19. Melo carboniferous basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flossdarf, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report is about of the Melo carboniferous basin which limits are: in the South the large and high Tupambae hill, in the west the Paraiso hill and the river mountains, in the North Yaguaron river basin to Candidata in Rio Grande del Sur in Brazil.

  20. Proportion of adults fasting for lipid testing relative to guideline changes in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene; Viczko, Jeannine; Naugler, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines have historically recommended measuring lipid profile tests in a fasting state. However, in April 2011 and 2014, the Canadian city of Calgary and its province of Alberta, respectively, have changed their lipid guidelines to allow testing for individuals in any fasting state; several years prior to the release of the 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Hypertension Canada guidelines. The purpose of this study was to document the proportion of individuals in Calgary who fasted for a lipid encounter in relation to the change in various guidelines and policies. Counts were collected each month per gender from January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2016 for community-based adults ≥18years old who fasted (≥8h) or did not fast (fasting state. The proportion of adults who fasted declined from 98.59%±0.379% (mean±SD) in 2010 to 41.65%±1.295% (mean±SD) in 2016. However, a marked decline in the proportion of adults fasting for a lipid encounter was not observed until February 2015, which coincided with the release of Alberta's Toward Optimized Practice Clinical Practice Guidelines. This documentation of individuals fasting for a lipid encounter may assist other jurisdictions in Canada with the new nonfasting lipid guideline changes. We recommend releasing provincial clinical practice guidelines, in addition to laboratory bulletins and continuing medical education presentations, regarding the new nonfasting lipid recommendations in other jurisdictions to ensure community patients are aware of this change. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The downside of downsizing: lessons from the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson-Baker, C.

    1999-03-01

    Budget and staff cuts at the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB) beginning with 1994, and coinciding with the largest increases in oil industry activity in the province, have seriously impaired the ability of the Board to effectively monitor the oil and gas industry. Oil and gas applications at the AEUB have increased from 4,000 in 1993 to 12,000 in 1997. During the same period AEUB reduced staff levels by slashing field staff positions by over 60 per cent and in-the-field time for the remaining regional staff from 70 per cent to 35 per cent. Inability to keep pace with oil and gas activity in the face of budget cuts and staff reductions is evidenced by procedural breakdowns in several areas including oilfield waste management. The questionable application process for an oil field waste treatment facility and the past practice of burying oilfield waste in roadbeds are cited. There is also emerging evidence of industry impacts on human and animal health. Similar downsizing and deregulation is reported to have taken place at Alberta Environmental Protection, which since 1992 suffered a 37 per cent reduction in its funding and a 31 per cent decrease in staff positions. In addition, the government has committed to cut environmental regulations by 50 per cent. Public tolerance for the oil and gas sector in many areas of the province is decreasing. One indication of this is the estimated 160 incidents of acts of sabotage against oil and gas installations and the murder of an oil company executive early in 1998. An upgrading of enforcement capability is urgently needed. A bona-fide Environmental Advocate independent of government control and oil and gas industry funding would be a good start.

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacteria That Cause Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Michele Anholt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is the most important illness of feedlot cattle. Disease management targets the associated bacterial pathogens, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, and Trueperella pyogenes. We conducted a cross-sectional study to measure the frequencies of antimicrobial-resistant BRD pathogens using a collaborative network of veterinarians, industry, government, and a diagnostic laboratory. Seven private veterinary practices in southern Alberta collected samples from both living and dead BRD-affected animals at commercial feedlots. Susceptibility testing of 745 isolates showed that 100% of the M. haemolytica, M. bovis, P. multocida, and T. pyogenes isolates and 66.7% of the H. somni isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial class. Resistance to macrolide antimicrobials (90.2% of all isolates was notable for their importance to beef production and human medicine. Multidrug resistance (MDR was high in all target pathogens with 47.2% of the isolates resistant to four or five antimicrobial classes and 24.0% resistance to six to nine classes. We compared the MDR profiles of isolates from two feedlots serviced by different veterinary practices. Differences in the average number of resistant classes were found for M. haemolytica (p < 0.001 and P. multocida (p = 0.002. Compared to previous studies, this study suggests an increasing trend of resistance in BRD pathogens against the antimicrobials used to manage the disease in Alberta. For the veterinary clinician, the results emphasize the importance of ongoing susceptibility testing of BRD pathogens to inform treatment protocols. Surveillance studies that collect additional epidemiological information and manage sampling bias will be necessary to develop strategies to limit the spread of resistance.

  3. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : interim report November 1996-Jun 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.; Johnson, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report focused on the emissions and efficiency of flares under operating conditions typical of solution gas flares. While most solution gas produced in Alberta is conserved, it is estimated that 6 per cent of these gases are flared with significant changes in the volumes flared from site to site. The median volume of flared or vented gas was approximately 60,300 m 3 /year and 95 per cent of battery sites flare and vent less than 1,000,000 m 3 /year. The goal of this project is to experimentally study the scaled-down generic pipe flares under well-controlled conditions to better understand the performance of flares. Research was conducted in a closed-loop wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on flaring. Other objectives of the research are to develop methods for measuring the overall combustion efficiency of flares with either gaseous flare streams or those containing liquid droplets. Models for the scaling of plumes that disperse the products of combustion from flares as a function of wind speed, exit velocity and flare stack diameter were also examined. And finally, this research project measured the emissions of selected toxic compounds in both their vapor and soot phases. 38 refs., 10 tabs., 56 figs

  4. Identification of reliable gridded reference data for statistical downscaling methods in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, H. I.; Gupta, A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate models provide essential information to assess impacts of climate change at regional and global scales. However, statistical downscaling methods have been applied to prepare climate model data for various applications such as hydrologic and ecologic modelling at a watershed scale. As the reliability and (spatial and temporal) resolution of statistically downscaled climate data mainly depend on a reference data, identifying the most reliable reference data is crucial for statistical downscaling. A growing number of gridded climate products are available for key climate variables which are main input data to regional modelling systems. However, inconsistencies in these climate products, for example, different combinations of climate variables, varying data domains and data lengths and data accuracy varying with physiographic characteristics of the landscape, have caused significant challenges in selecting the most suitable reference climate data for various environmental studies and modelling. Employing various observation-based daily gridded climate products available in public domain, i.e. thin plate spline regression products (ANUSPLIN and TPS), inverse distance method (Alberta Townships), and numerical climate model (North American Regional Reanalysis) and an optimum interpolation technique (Canadian Precipitation Analysis), this study evaluates the accuracy of the climate products at each grid point by comparing with the Adjusted and Homogenized Canadian Climate Data (AHCCD) observations for precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature over the province of Alberta. Based on the performance of climate products at AHCCD stations, we ranked the reliability of these publically available climate products corresponding to the elevations of stations discretized into several classes. According to the rank of climate products for each elevation class, we identified the most reliable climate products based on the elevation of target points. A web-based system

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacteria That Cause Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, R Michele; Klima, Cassidy; Allan, Nick; Matheson-Bird, Heather; Schatz, Crystal; Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Otto, Simon Jg; Peters, Delores; Schmid, Karin; Olson, Merle; McAllister, Tim; Ralston, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important illness of feedlot cattle. Disease management targets the associated bacterial pathogens, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni , and Trueperella pyogenes . We conducted a cross-sectional study to measure the frequencies of antimicrobial-resistant BRD pathogens using a collaborative network of veterinarians, industry, government, and a diagnostic laboratory. Seven private veterinary practices in southern Alberta collected samples from both living and dead BRD-affected animals at commercial feedlots. Susceptibility testing of 745 isolates showed that 100% of the M. haemolytica, M. bovis, P. multocida , and T. pyogenes isolates and 66.7% of the H. somni isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial class. Resistance to macrolide antimicrobials (90.2% of all isolates) was notable for their importance to beef production and human medicine. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was high in all target pathogens with 47.2% of the isolates resistant to four or five antimicrobial classes and 24.0% resistance to six to nine classes. We compared the MDR profiles of isolates from two feedlots serviced by different veterinary practices. Differences in the average number of resistant classes were found for M. haemolytica ( p  BRD pathogens against the antimicrobials used to manage the disease in Alberta. For the veterinary clinician, the results emphasize the importance of ongoing susceptibility testing of BRD pathogens to inform treatment protocols. Surveillance studies that collect additional epidemiological information and manage sampling bias will be necessary to develop strategies to limit the spread of resistance.

  6. Feasibility study : identifying economic opportunities for bugwood and other biomass resources in Alberta and BC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-04-01

    This feasibility study discussed energy technologies for biomass feedstocks including mill residues, roadside residues, and non-merchantable tree stands in Alberta and British Columbia (BC). The study demonstrated that the lack of mill residue resources means that targeted government support may be needed to help the energy industry to use more costly resources such as roadside residue or bugwood. Government policies are also needed to support the long-term availability of biomass supplies in order to lower the supply risks related to the use of biomass resources in the energy industry. Lower prices for power in both provinces make the use of biomass unfavourable for small-scale technologies under 10 MW. However, cogeneration projects using biomass showed higher returns when power conversion efficiency was low. Higher revenues were generated from heat sales displacing natural gas than from electricity sales at current tariffs. Large-scale biomass power plants were viable when lower-cost feedstocks were available. Bio-oils were suitable as supplements for heat generation in cogeneration processes. Pellet production was also viable using less expensive feedstocks.The co-firing of biomass at coal plants required little capital investment. The study demonstrated that Alberta's power production incentive of $60 per MWh was sufficient to improve the economics of small-scale projects. It was recommended that the program be continued and paid out over a period of 10 years. It was concluded that specific electricity tariffs and incentives are needed to accelerate regrowth and create a viable biomass industry for the future. 33 refs., 45 tabs., 17 figs

  7. K Basin safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall

  8. The use of numerical simulation in predicting coalbed methane producibility from the Gates coals, Alberta Inner Foothills, Canada: Comparison with Mannville coal CBM production in the Alberta Syncline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentzis, Thomas [Petron Resources, L.P., 3000 Internet Boulevard, Suite 400, Frisco, TX 75034 (United States); Bolen, Dale [Primewest Energy Inc., 150, 6th Ave SW, Suite 4700, Calgary, AB T2P 3Y7 (Canada)

    2008-05-07

    Two medium to low volatile bituminous rank coals in the Lower Cretaceous Gates Formation (Mannville equivalent), Inner Foothills of Alberta, were cored as part of a coalbed methane exploration program. The target seams (Seam 4 and Seam 10) were intersected at 652 m and 605 m, respectively. The coals were bright banded, relatively competent and reasonably cleated, with cleat spacing between 5-20 mm. The FMI (Formation Micro-Imaging) log identified two primary fracture directions, corresponding to both face and butt cleats, which were developed almost equally in some coal intervals. The amount of shearing was limited, in spite of the presence of numerous thrust faults and fold structures in the corehole vicinity. Total gas content was high, with an average of 17.7 cm{sup 3}/g (arb; 568.1 scf/t). An adsorption isotherm of the thick Seam 4 showed gas saturation levels of 90% at in-situ reservoir conditions. Methane content was 92-96% and carbon dioxide levels were less than 2%. Isotopic studies on the methane confirmed the thermogenic origin of the gas, as anticipated based on the coal rank. The coal seams were fracture stimulated using 50/50 nitrogen and fresh water along with 9 to 12 tons of 12/20 mesh sand used as a proppant. It is believed that the coals were not stimulated properly because of the small proppant volume and the complex - and often unpredictable - fracture pattern in coals, particularly in the Inner Foothills region that has high stress anisotropy. An injectivity test showed coal absolute permeability to be less than 1 mD, the skin to be - 2 (indicating a slightly damaged coal) and water saturation in the cleats to be 90%. A four-month production test was conducted; gas rates declined from 930 to 310 m{sup 3}/d (33 to 11 MCFD) and water rates were low (< 5 BWD). Produced water was saline (TDS was 20,000 mg/L) and high in chloride and bicarbonate ions. Production testing was followed by history matching and numerical simulation, which consisted of

  9. On Meanings and Descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Bal

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Although descriptive passages would appear to be of marginal importance in narrative texts, they are, in fact, of both logical and semantic necessity. Narratology, therefore, must take these segments into account. In this article, I shall survey the present situation in this field and compare rival points of view. I shall also offer several suggestions for analyzing descriptions. The following topics will be discussed: the nature of description as a specific type of discourse which makes it recognizable as such; the internal structure of description; the place and function of descriptions in the text as a whole. In the latter section, the semantic impact of descriptions in the overall meaning of narrative texts will be accounted for. This article is intended as a contribution to the theory of description as a part of narratology. It also has a didactic purpose, since it proposes a model for the analysis of texts which can be used for systematic text-study, both in a historical and a comparative perspective.

  10. Hydrogeology of the West Siberian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle activities of the former Soviet Union (FSU) have resulted in extensive radioactive contaminant releases to the environment in western Siberia. We are developing three-dimensional numerical models of the hydrogeology and potential contaminant migration in the West Siberian Basin. We have assumed that ground-water flow in the West Siberian Basin is topographically driven, with recharge to the basin occurring in the highlands on the west, east, and south, and internal discharge localized in numerous river valleys and lakes that ultimately discharge north to the ocean. We are modeling the regional hydrogeology as three-dimensional, steady-state, saturated flow that is recharged from above. We acquired topographic, geologic, hydrostratigraphic, hydrogeologic, and water-balance data for the West Siberian Basin and constructed a regional water table. We correlated and combined 70 different rock types derived from published descriptions of West Siberian Basin rocks into 17 rock types appropriate for assignment of hydrogeologic properties on the basis of spatial heterogeneity and constituent (i.e., sand, silt, and clay) diversity. Examination of resulting three-dimensional assemblages of rock types showed that they were consistent with published and inferred paleogeography and depositional processes. Calibrating the basin's moisture balance (i.e., recharge and discharge) to the derived water table determined plausible input parameter values for unknowns such as hydraulic conductivities. The general directions of calculated ground-water flow suggest that major rivers act as discharge areas, with upwelling below the rivers extending down into the basement rocks, and that ground-water divides that penetrate the entire thickness of the model are evident between major rivers

  11. Wada basin boundaries and basin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusse, H.E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    In dynamical systems examples are common in which two or more attractors coexist, and in such cases the basin boundary is nonempty. We consider a two-dimensional diffeomorphism F (that is, F is an invertible map and both F and its inverse are differentiable with continuous derivatives), which has at

  12. Positioning pharmacists' roles in primary health care: a discourse analysis of the compensation plan in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine A; Breault, Rene R; Hicks, Deborah; Schindel, Theresa J

    2017-11-23

    A comprehensive Compensation Plan for pharmacy services delivered by community pharmacists was implemented in Alberta, Canada in July 2012. Services covered by the Compensation Plan include care planning services, prescribing services such as adapting prescriptions, and administering a drug or publicly-funded vaccine by injection. Understanding how the Compensation Plan was framed and communicated provides insight into the roles of pharmacists and the potential influence of language on the implementation of services covered by the Compensation Plan by Albertan pharmacists. The objective of this study is to examine the positioning of pharmacists' roles in documents used to communicate the Compensation Plan to Albertan pharmacists and other audiences. Publicly available documents related to the Compensation Plan, such as news releases or reports, published between January 2012 and December 2015 were obtained from websites such as the Government of Alberta, Alberta Blue Cross, the Alberta College of Pharmacists, the Alberta Pharmacists' Association, and the Blueprint for Pharmacy. Searches of the Canadian Newsstand database and Google identified additional documents. Discourse analysis was performed using social positioning theory to explore how pharmacists' roles were constructed in communications about the Compensation Plan. In total, 65 publicly available documents were included in the analysis. The Compensation Plan was put forward as a framework for payment for professional services and formal legitimization of pharmacists' changing professional roles. The discourse associated with the Compensation Plan positioned pharmacists' roles as: (1) expanding to include services such as medication management for chronic diseases, (2) contributing to primary health care by providing access to services such as prescription renewals and immunizations, and (3) collaborating with other health care team members. Pharmacists' changing roles were positioned in alignment with the

  13. Palaeoenvironmental drivers of vertebrate community composition in the Belly River Group (Campanian) of Alberta, Canada, with implications for dinosaur biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Thomas M; Evans, David C

    2016-11-15

    The Belly River Group of southern Alberta is one of the best-sampled Late Cretaceous terrestrial faunal assemblages in the world. This system provides a high-resolution biostratigraphic record of terrestrial vertebrate diversity and faunal turnover, and it has considerable potential to be a model system for testing hypotheses of dinosaur palaeoecological dynamics, including important aspects of palaeoecommunity structure, trophic interactions, and responses to environmental change. Vertebrate fossil microsites (assemblages of small bones and teeth concentrated together over a relatively short time and thought to be representative of community composition) offer an unparalleled dataset to better test these hypotheses by ameliorating problems of sample size, geography, and chronostratigraphic control that hamper other palaeoecological analyses. Here, we assembled a comprehensive relative abundance dataset of microsites sampled from the entire Belly River Group and performed a series of analyses to test the influence of environmental factors on site and taxon clustering, and assess the stability of faunal assemblages both temporally and spatially. We also test the long-held idea that populations of large dinosaur taxa were particularly sensitive to small-scale environmental gradients, such as the paralic (coastal) to alluvial (inland) regimes present within the time-equivalent depositional basin of the upper Oldman and lower Dinosaur Park Formations. Palaeoenvironment (i.e. reconstructed environmental conditions, related to relative amount of alluvial, fluvial, and coastal influence in associated sedimentary strata) was found to be strongly associated with clustering of sites by relative-abundance faunal assemblages, particularly in relation to changes in faunal assemblage composition and marine-terrestrial environmental transitions. Palaeogeography/palaeolandscape were moderately associated to site relative abundance assemblage clustering, with depositional setting

  14. Museum audio description

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Cláudia Susana Nunes

    2011-01-01

    Audio description for the blind and visually impaired has been around since people have described what is seen. Throughout time, it has evolved and developed within different media, starting with reality and daily life, moving into the cinema and television, then across other performing arts, museums and art galleries, and public places. Thus, academics and entertainment providers have developed a growing interest for audio description, especially in what concerns the best methods and strateg...

  15. An empirical analysis of the impacts of taxes and royalties on the supply of conventional crude oil in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoah, B.

    1998-01-01

    The economic impact of taxes, royalties and government fiscal policy tools on conventional crude oil supply in Alberta was examined. A dynamic economic model of Alberta's conventional petroleum industry was developed and used to evaluate the quantitative impacts of government fiscal policies on exploration and extraction of conventional crude oil in the province. It was determined that taxes and royalties can shorten the life of the industry, reduce activity level, reduce ultimate recovery of conventional crude oil, render more of the established reserves sub-economic and create social welfare loss. It was also revealed that compared to provincial corporate income tax and crown royalties, federal corporate income tax has a larger adverse effect on the performance of the industry in terms of creating higher dead-weight loss and shortening the life of the industry

  16. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  17. BASINS Framework and Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    BASINS enables users to efficiently access nationwide environmental databases and local user-specified datasets, apply assessment and planning tools, and run a variety of proven nonpoint loading and water quality models within a single GIS format.

  18. Watershed Planning Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Watershed Planning Basin layer is part of a larger dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes...

  19. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  20. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  1. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062/Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  2. Preferences of Residents in Four Northern Alberta Communities Regarding Local Post-Secondary Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The western Canadian province of Alberta has used some of the proceeds from exploitation of its extraordinary natural resources to make available a range of post-secondary training and education opportunities to residents. While these provisions appear comprehensive, this study examined how well they actually suit the express needs of the residents of remote, Northern areas of the province, many of them Aboriginal. The literature shows that while Aboriginal people are underrepresented in Canada in university enrollments, they are no longer underrepresented in college or other institutions, suggesting that gains have been made for some residents of rural and remote parts of Canada. Further, when Northern residents (especially Aboriginal males complete advanced training, Statistics Canada reports they are highly successful in employment and income. Access is the pivotal issue, however: leaving the local community to attend training programs elsewhere is often disruptive and unsuccessful. As will be seen, the issue of access arose in this study’s findings with direct implications for distance delivery and support.This study was conducted as part of Athabasca University’s Learning Communities Project (LCP, which sought information about the views and experiences of a broad range of northern Alberta residents concerning their present post-secondary training and education opportunities. The study addresses an acknowledged gap in such information in relation to Canada in comparison with other OECD countries.Results are based on input from 165 individuals, obtained through written surveys (some completed by the researchers in face-to-face exchanges with the respondents, interviews, discussions, and observations, conducted with full-time or part-time residents of the study communities during 2007 and 2008. The four northern Alberta communities studied were Wabasca, Fox Lake, Ft. McKay (sometimes MacKay, and Ft. Chipewyan, totaling just over 6

  3. A Recovery Program for Alberta: A 10-Year Plan to End the Addiction to Resource Revenues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald D. Kneebone

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alberta has a substance-abuse problem. The substance is fossil fuels, and the province has become hooked on the revenues from oil and gas sales to fund its spending on health, education and social services. As we are so often told, the first step in beating an addiction is admitting that a compulsion has gotten out of control. Recent announcements suggest that Alberta’s leaders appear to have finally taken that first crucial step. We applaud them for doing so. But if they plan to get this addiction under control and so ward off the sort of financial turmoil that has tormented Alberta in the past, they will have to do more. In this note we provide a menu of policy choices all of which take the government to a sustainable budget by 2023. They all involve reductions in what we identify as the government’s Budget Gap — that is, the difference between its spending and all its revenue besides the revenue it earns from nonrenewable resources. The size of that gap summarizes just how much provincial government spending on health care, education and social services is at the mercy of commodity-market swings. If current trajectories of government spending continue, then in another 10 years the gap will be nearly 4 times what it was in 1999. Reducing the size of the Budget Gap is necessary to protect Albertans from repeatedly suffering wide swings in levels of public service, shifting tax rates and plunges into deficit and debt. We identify a variety of ways to achieve fiscal sustainability over 10 years. Our investigation highlights two key results. First, provincial spending on health care currently comprises 40 per cent of provincial expenditures and is growing at a rate that causes it to double every 20 years. Exempting health care spending from cuts comes at the price of draconian cuts to education and social services of over 30% even after adjusting for inflation and population growth. It is therefore hard to fathom that constraints on health

  4. Euoplocephalus tutus and the diversity of ankylosaurid dinosaurs in the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada, and Montana, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Arbour

    Full Text Available Few ankylosaurs are known from more than a single specimen, but the ankylosaurid Euoplocephalus tutus (from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada and Montana, USA is represented by dozens of skulls and partial skeletons, and is therefore an important taxon for understanding intraspecific variation in ankylosaurs. Euoplocephalus is unusual compared to other dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta because it is recognized from the Dinosaur Park, Horseshoe Canyon, and Two Medicine formations. A comprehensive review of material attributed to Euoplocephalus finds support for the resurrection of its purported synonyms Anodontosaurus lambei and Scolosaurus cutleri, and the previously resurrected Dyoplosaurus acutosquameus. Anodontosaurus is found primarily in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta and is characterized by ornamentation posterior to the orbits and on the first cervical half ring, and wide, triangular knob osteoderms. Euoplocephalus is primarily found in Megaherbivore Assemblage Zone 1 in the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta and is characterized by the absence of ornamentation posterior to the orbits and on the first cervical half ring, and keeled medial osteoderms on the first cervical half ring. Scolosaurus is found primarily in the Two Medicine Formation of Montana (although the holotype is from Dinosaur Provincial Park, and is characterized by long, back-swept squamosal horns, ornamentation posterior to the orbit, and low medial osteoderms on the first cervical half ring; Oohkotokia horneri is morphologically indistinguishable from Scolosaurus cutleri. Dyoplosaurus was previously differentiated from Euoplocephalus sensu lato by the morphology of the pelvis and pes, and these features also differentiate Dyoplosaurus from Anodontosaurus and Scolosaurus; a narrow tail club knob is probably also characteristic for Dyoplosaurus.

  5. Determining geographic areas and populations with timely access to cardiac catheterization facilities for acute myocardial infarction care in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters Nigel M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study uses geographic information systems (GIS as a tool to evaluate and visualize the general accessibility of areas within the province of Alberta (Canada to cardiac catheterization facilities. Current American and European guidelines suggest performing catheterization within 90 minutes of the first medical contact. For this reason, this study evaluates the populated places that are within a 90 minute transfer time to a city with a catheterization facility. The three modes of transport considered in this study are ground ambulance, rotary wing air ambulance and fixed wing air ambulance. Methods Reference data from the Alberta Chart of Call were interpolated into continuous travel time surfaces. These continuous surfaces allowed for the delineation of isochrones: lines that connect areas of equal time. Using Dissemination Area (DA centroids to represent the adult population, the population numbers were extracted from the isochrones using Statistics Canada census data. Results By extracting the adult population from within isochrones for each emergency transport mode analyzed, it was found that roughly 70% of the adult population of Alberta had access within 90 minutes to catheterization facilities by ground, roughly 66% of the adult population had access by rotary wing air ambulance and that no population had access within 90 minutes using the fixed wing air ambulance. An overall understanding of the nature of air vs. ground emergency travel was also uncovered; zones were revealed where the use of one mode would be faster than the others for reaching a facility. Conclusion Catheter intervention for acute myocardial infarction is a time sensitive procedure. This study revealed that although a relatively small area of the province had access within the 90 minute time constraint, this area represented a large proportion of the population. Within Alberta, fixed wing air ambulance is not an effective means of transporting

  6. The prevalence and determinants of use of vitamin D supplements among children in Alberta, Canada: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Munasinghe, Lalani L.; Willows, Noreen; Yuan, Yan; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited cutaneous synthesis due to low sun exposure and inadequate dietary intake makes vitamin D supplementation a necessity for many Canadian children. Identification of the factors associated with supplement use is necessary for public health awareness campaigns, but they have not been identified previously. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and the determinants of the use of vitamin D supplements among children in the province of Alberta, Canada....

  7. The Potential of Aspen Clonal Forestry in Alberta: Breeding Regions and Estimates of Genetic Gain from Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylander, Tim; Hamann, Andreas; Brouard, Jean S.; Thomas, Barb R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspen naturally grows in large, single-species, even-aged stands that regenerate clonally after fire disturbance. This offers an opportunity for an intensive clonal forestry system that closely emulates the natural life history of the species. In this paper, we assess the potential of genetic tree improvement and clonal deployment to enhance the productivity of aspen forests in Alberta. We further investigate geographic patterns of genetic variation in aspen and infer forest management strategies under uncertain future climates. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetic variation among 242 clones from Alberta was evaluated in 13 common garden trials after 5–8 growing seasons in the field. Broad-sense heritabilities for height and diameter at breast height (DBH) ranged from 0.36 to 0.64, allowing 5–15% genetic gains in height and 9–34% genetic gains in DBH. Geographic partitioning of genetic variance revealed predominant latitudinal genetic differentiation. We further observed that northward movement of clones almost always resulted in increased growth relative to local planting material, while southward movement had a strong opposite effect. Conclusion/Significance Aspen forests are an important natural resource in western Canada that is used for pulp and oriented strandboard production, accounting for ∼40% of the total forest harvest. Moderate to high broad-sense heritabilities in growth traits suggest good potential for a genetic tree improvement program with aspen. Significant productivity gains appear possible through clonal selection from existing trials. We propose two breeding regions for Alberta, and suggest that well-tested southern clones may be used in the northern breeding region, accounting for a general warming trend observed over the last several decades in Alberta. PMID:22957006

  8. Integration of the Taber wind power project into the Alberta interconnected electric system : practical experience in design, testing and operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, S. [ENMAX Power Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Wachtel, S. [Enercon GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation discussed Alberta's ENMAX Taber wind power project. The farm was commissioned in 2007, and is comprised of 37 ENERCON E-70 turbines rated at 2.2 MW each. The turbines have an advanced blade design and variable speed operation with direct drive and full-scale AC-DC-AC power electronics. The turbines also use flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS). Due to the fact that good winds in Alberta are located far from major electrical loads, wind farms in the province are often required to perform like dispatchable generation plants. Reactive power is used to set up electromagnetic fields that enable current flow and charge certain electrical elements. Reactive power has a strong impact on voltage regulation in high voltage networks. Alberta's interconnection standards require continuous reactive power capability. The ENERCON E-70 power capability has a wide reactive power range with an actual measured response and a range fully available at MW outputs greater than 20 per cent. Overall facility response is influenced by a number of factors. Actual measured response at the Taber facility is optimized to within 1 second. A single central voltage controller is used per wind farm. Testing at the Taber farm has resulted in critical low voltage alarms on adjacent transmission lines. Close coordination with the Alberta Electricity System Operator (AESO) has been required to avert potential power outages in the area. It was concluded that a lack of compliance testing can result in difficulties complying with interconnection standards. tabs., figs.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance of fecal Salmonella spp. isolated from all phases of pig production in 20 herds in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Leigh B.; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Reid‐Smith, Richard J.; Checkley, Sylvia L.; McFall, Margaret E.; Rajíc, Andrijana

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella spp. (n = 468), isolated from the feces of sows, nursery, and grow‐finish pigs in 20 farrow‐to‐finish herds in Alberta and Saskatchewan, were tested for susceptibility to 16 antimicrobials. No resistance was identified to amikacin, amoxicillin‐clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or nalidixic acid, and less than 1% of the isolates were resistant to cefoxitin and gentamicin. Isolates were most commonly resistant to tetracycline (35%) and sulfamethoxazole (27%). Ove...

  10. A Basin-Wide Integrated Analysis of Human Impacts on River Basins Using Horton-Strahler Stream Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Michioku, K.

    2010-12-01

    Human impacts, such as land use change and human population distributed within a river basin, may affect the balance of water resources utilization and the ecological condition on the river basin environment. In this study, we proposed a mathematical model developed using Horton-Strahler’s stream order to analyze basin-wide distributions of the human activity impacts across several river basins with different geomorphologic features. We assumed that for successive stream orders, the mean area of each land use type, such as paddy fields, farmlands, forests, cites, etc., and the human population formed a geometric sequence, which was the same mathematical relationship as stated in Horton’s laws of river geomorphology. This geometric sequence modeling implied basically fractal nature of human activity distributions within a river basin. GIS datasets for the land use and human population in 109 river basins of Japan were used to verify the model. Then, we quantitatively compared the human activity distributions across the 109 river basins on the basis of results obtained from the model with descriptive statistics and classified these river basins into four categories through principal component analysis (PCA). The four categories could be labeled by the two PCA axes, i.e., the forested/urbanized and the cultivated /waters. Furthermore, GIS datasets of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and gross domestic product (GDP) with the basin classification obtained were used to evaluate the human activity influence on both the water quality (BOD) and the economic condition (GDP) in the 109 river basins of Japan and discussed their relationships through the framework of the Horton-type stream order model for land use and human settlement.

  11. Do Municipal Governments Need More Tax Powers? A Background Paper on Municipal Finance in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melville McMillan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Local governments in Alberta have faced considerable and variable challenges over the past 60 years. For example, the rapid population and economic growth during the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s created exceptional demands for schools, schooling and municipal infrastructure; demands exceeding those of the last 30 years. Local and especially municipal financing has relied heavily on the property tax throughout. Questions are being asked today about whether the property tax is sufficient for municipal government. Our historical analysis provides insights into the fiscal situation of Alberta’s municipalities that can assist in addressing those questions. The main findings are highlighted here. We conclude that current demands, though considerable, are not creating stress on the property tax as a source of municipal revenue. • The property tax burden in Alberta during the past decade is the lowest that it has been over the past 60 years. Presently, property taxes are about 3.5 per cent of personal income. They were as high as seven per cent during much of the 1960s and averaged in the four to five per cent range from 1950 to 2000. Local and provincial school taxes were responsible for most of the fluctuations in the property tax burden. Municipal property taxes ranged from two to three per cent of personal incomes and recently amounted to about 2.5 per cent, a level typical of that over the past 20 years. • Investment in local infrastructure has over the past 30 years been at half the rate of that of the previous 30 years. Only since 2006, with the assistance of provincial capital grants, has infrastructure spending shown upward movement. Capital spending lagged population growth for many years and probably contributed to a deterioration of infrastructure. • Municipal current or operating expenditures (about three-quarters of the total have been a declining share of personal incomes since the late 1980s and, since 2000, are a smaller share than

  12. Reliability of semiology description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Seo-Young; Cho, Jinwhan; Lee, Sang-Kun; Nam, Hyunwoo

    2008-01-01

    Seizure semiology is important for classifying patients' epilepsy. Physicians usually get most of the seizure information from observers though there have been few reports on the reliability of the observers' description. This study aims at determining the reliability of observers' description of the semiology. We included 92 patients who had their habitual seizures recorded during video-EEG monitoring. We compared the semiology described by the observers with that recorded on the videotape, and reviewed which characteristics of the observers affected the reliability of their reported data. The classification of seizures and the individual components of the semiology based only on the observer-description was somewhat discordant compared with the findings from the videotape (correct classification, 85%). The descriptions of some ictal behaviors such as oroalimentary automatism, tonic/dystonic limb posturing, and head versions were relatively accurate, but those of motionless staring and hand automatism were less accurate. The specified directions by the observers were relatively correct. The accuracy of the description was related to the educational level of the observers. Much of the information described by well-educated observers is reliable. However, every physician should keep in mind the limitations of this information and use this information cautiously.

  13. Advisory Council on Electricity report and recommendations on consumers concern : report to the Alberta Minister of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolger, L.F.

    2003-09-01

    This report presents a set of recommendations to help the Alberta government and industry address consumer concerns regarding electricity issues. It examined whether the restructuring process is working as planned and presented ways to move forward to create certainty in the marketplace, competitive prices, an adequate supply of electricity, and fair treatment for all consumers. Consumers are currently concerned about the following key electricity issues: higher electricity prices in some parts of Alberta; billing practices of utility companies; fairness of all line items on bills; consumer accessibility to competitive market options; long-range forecasts for consumer prices; current and future benefits of deregulation for consumers; and, the impact of government and Alberta Energy and Utilities Board decisions on consumer prices. The Council recommends that consumer education be expanded; a consumer ombudsman be established; markets be allowed to operate; and that billing practices and customer satisfaction be improved. The Council also suggests that the impact of flow-through regulated rate tariff be reviewed on an ongoing basis. It also recommends that the progress in the retail mass market be monitored and that the impact of change in some parts of the province be mitigated

  14. Royalty rules : Alberta producers are now beholden to formal regulations for reporting royalty payments to government levy collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Regulation was established by the Alberta Department of Energy in July 2005 in order to clarify the rules governing conventional crude oil royalties. The regulation provides an incentive for industry to comply with the long-existing oil royalty reporting requirements through the addition of non-compliance penalties. An initial shadow billing system has been implemented to give industry the opportunity to understand their responsibilities and implement procedures to correct reporting and delivery inaccuracies. Battery operators in Alberta must now submit a royalty report to the Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission on a monthly basis. The regulation provides provisions for interest charges on outstanding invoiced amounts, and formalizes existing eligibility requirements for the reimbursement of trucking costs associated with transporting the Crown's share. Penalties will be incurred if royalty reports contain erroneous information, or if the actual deliveries made are less than the prescribed royalty quantity. All penalties levied by the commission will now be sent to the battery operator in a monthly statement. Battery operators who wish to appeal their penalties may do so within 2 months after the date of the monthly statement. It was concluded that industry is not expected to experience any significant problems when the regulation comes into effect, as the 6 month shadow billing period will allow companies to make a smooth transition to the requirements of the new regulation. Details of information sessions for the new regulation were provided, as well as details of various non-compliance penalties. 1 fig

  15. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. Methods This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. Results Even though there was a high rate of “ever having breastfed” (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95% CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95% CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding is less likely to take place among lower-educated, primiparous women may help health practitioners focus their

  16. Corporate social responsibility motives and theories evidenced among oilwell drilling firms in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, Norbert

    This dissertation is a study in conceptual CSR motives and theories prompted by the knowledge that socially active NGOs have tried to influence the CSP of companies in Alberta's oil patch by using media pressure. The focus of the study was narrowed to changing CSP among Alberta's oilwell drilling firms. This permits intensive interviews with the firms' informants. The examination of changing CSP implies a consideration of the pressures that prompt and influence its change, and points this study to firm motives for behaving responsibly. The firms were firstly categorized according to their primary and secondary CSP using 5 dimensions of CSR previously used by The Conference Board of Canada. The study uses CSR motives conceptualized by Ruth Aguilera and her collaborators to assess the firms' CSP using self-assessed CSR motives and observed CSP. At the onset 3 working hypotheses were posited as starting points from which substantiated propositions were developed. Lance Moir's and Elisabet Garriga and Domènec Meld's classifications of CSR theories were used to organize and evaluate the data. A mapping of the motives and theories in respect of the firms' primary and secondary CSR dimensions appears to display correlations between the CSR theories and the conceptualized motives. Nevertheless, for some of the firms none of the motives conceptualized by Aguilera and her collaborators seem to apply. By re-visiting the motives, and examining them more closely, it seems possible refine the conceptualized motives relying more on perceived conceptions, which are at the basis of legitimacy theories, rather than on relational factors to better explain the normative expectations raised. A similar analysis also indicates that the firms' seem to seek economic benefits, social benefits, or a combination of both. The CSP that results is within the same continuum; the resulting CSP for the firms seems to mediate towards a blend of both, regardless of the original CSR motives. These

  17. Exploratory shaft facility preliminary designs - Paradox Basin. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of the Preliminary Design Report, Paradox Basin, is to provide a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility in the Paradox Basin, Utah. This issue of the report describes the preliminary design for constructing the exploratory shaft using the Large Hole Drilling Method of construction and outlines the preliminary design and estimates of probable construction cost. The Preliminary Design Report is prepared to complement and summarize other documents that comprise the design at the preliminary stage of completion, December 1982. Other design documents include drawings, cost estimates and schedules. The preliminary design drawing package, which includes the construction schedule drawing, depicts the descriptions in this report. For reference, a list of the drawing titles and corresponding numbers is included in the Appendix. The report is divided into three principal sections: Design Basis, Facility Description, and Construction Cost Estimate. 30 references

  18. Olkiluoto site description 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This fourth version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2008 with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2010. A descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model, SDM), i.e. a model describing the geological and hydrogeological structure of the site, properties of the bedrock and the groundwater and its flow, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. The SDM is divided into six parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and transport properties

  19. CRAC2 model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Johnson, J.D.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Aldrich, D.C.; Blond, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions

  20. Olkiluoto site description 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    This fourth version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2008 with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2010. A descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model, SDM), i.e. a model describing the geological and hydrogeological structure of the site, properties of the bedrock and the groundwater and its flow, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. The SDM is divided into six parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and transport properties.

  1. The Alberta Hip and Knee Replacement Project: a model for health technology assessment based on comparative effectiveness of clinical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Katherine L; Smith, Douglas; Wasylak, Tracy; Faris, Peter D; Marshall, Deborah A; Khong, Hoa; Hibbert, Julie E; Parker, Robyn D; Zernicke, Ronald F; Beaupre, Lauren; Pearce, Tim; Johnston, D W C; Frank, Cyril B

    2009-04-01

    The Alberta Hip and Knee Replacement Project developed a new evidence-based clinical pathway (NCP) for total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacement. The aim was to facilitate the delivery of services in a timely and cost-effective manner while achieving the highest quality of care for the patient across the full continuum of care from patient referral to an orthopedic surgeon through surgery, recovery, and rehabilitation. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the study design, rationale, and execution of this project as a model for health technology assessment based on comparative effectiveness of alternative clinical pathways. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial study design was used to evaluate the NCP compared with the standard of care (SOC) for these procedures. The pragmatic study design was selected as a rigorous approach to produce high quality evidence suitable for informing decisions between relevant interventions in real clinical practice. The NCP was evaluated in three of the nine regional health authorities (RHAs) in Alberta with dedicated central intake clinics offering multidisciplinary care teams, constituting 80 percent of THR and TKR surgeries performed annually in Alberta. Patients were identified in the offices of twenty orthopedic surgeons who routinely performed THR or TKR surgeries. Evaluation outcome measures were based on the six dimensions of the Alberta Quality Matrix for Health (AQMH): acceptability, accessibility, appropriateness, effectiveness, efficiency and safety. Data were collected prospectively through patient self-completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 and 12 months after surgery, ambulatory and inpatient chart reviews, and electronic administrative data. The trial design was successful in establishing similar groups for rigorous evaluation. Of the 4,985 patients invited to participate, 69 percent of patients consented. A total of 3,434 patients were randomized: 1,712 to SOC and 1,722 to the NCP. The

  2. Interrater reliability of early intervention providers scoring the alberta infant motor scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Y; Neilan, E; Busanich, J; Garavuso, L; Klimas, D

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interrater reliability of early intervention providers scoring of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and to examine whether training on the AIMS would improve their interrater reliability. Eight early intervention providers were randomly assigned to two groups. Participants in Group 1 scored the AIMS on seven videotapes of infants prior to receiving training and after training on another set of seven videotapes of infants. Participants in Group 2 scored the AIMS on all 14 videotapes of the infants after receiving training. Overall interrater reliability before and after training was high with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.98 to 0.99. Detailed examination of the results showed that training improved the reliability of the supine subscale in a subgroup of infants between the ages of five and seven months. Training also had an effect on the classification of infants as normal or abnormal in their motor development based on their percentile rankings. The AIMS manual provides sufficient information to attain high interrater reliability without training, but revisions regarding scoring are strongly recommended.

  3. Examination of the item structure of the Alberta infant motor scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pai-Jun M; Campbell, Suzann K

    2004-01-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is a screening tool for identifying delayed motor development from birth to 18 months of age. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric structure of the AIMS, including the hierarchical scale of items and the precision for measuring infant ability at different ages. Ninety-seven infants with varying degrees of risk of developmental disability were recruited from three hospitals or from the community in the Chicago metropolitan area. Infants were tested on the AIMS at three, six, nine, and 12 months of age. The hierarchical structure and the range and distribution of item difficulty on the AIMS were analyzed using Rasch psychometric analysis. The Rasch analysis confirmed that items for each of the four testing positions (supine, prone, sitting, and standing) were arranged in increasing order of difficulty, but a ceiling effect was present. Gaps exist at six ability levels, indicating low precision of measurement for differentiating among infants after about nine months of age. The AIMS shows a ceiling effect, measures infant ability best from three to nine months of age, and has few items available for discriminating among infants after they pass the controlled lowering through standing item. Clinical impressions should be drawn with caution at ages when the precision of measurement is low.

  4. Alberta infant motor scale: reliability and validity when used on preterm infants in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, S F; Yau, K I; Chen, L C; Hsiao, S F

    2000-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of measurements obtained with the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) for evaluation of preterm infants in Taiwan. Two independent groups of preterm infants were used to investigate the reliability (n=45) and validity (n=41) for the AIMS. In the reliability study, the AIMS was administered to the infants by a physical therapist, and infant performance was videotaped. The performance was then rescored by the same therapist and by 2 other therapists to examine the intrarater and interrater reliability. In the validity study, the AIMS and the Bayley Motor Scale were administered to the infants at 6 and 12 months of age to examine criterion-related validity. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for intrarater and interrater reliability of measurements obtained with the AIMS were high (ICC=.97-.99). The AIMS scores correlated with the Bayley Motor Scale scores at 6 and 12 months (r=.78 and.90), although the AIMS scores at 6 months were only moderately predictive of the motor function at 12 months (r=.56). The results suggest that measurements obtained with the AIMS have acceptable reliability and concurrent validity but limited predictive value for evaluating preterm Taiwanese infants.

  5. The origin of the Gold Creek collapse structure and associated dolomitization, West Central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, K. [Anadarko Petroleum Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The factors that contribute to the seismic anomaly at the Gold Creek Field located in West Central Alberta near the Peace River Arch were described. Wabamun gas is produced from the underlying Cold Creek Leduc NE-SW trending reef which is approximately 10 km by 5 km in size. The Upper Devonian Leduc reef is porous and water saturated, but the overlying Devonian Wabamun Formation is dolomitized and gas bearing. The Gold Creek Field has produced more than 100 Bcf of gas and continues to be productive, with most gas coming from the Wabamun Formation. This paper described the seismic expression of the Gold Creek Field, the Wabamun structure and isopath, and the origin of the Cold Creek Collapse Structure. Mississippian Isopach data was also presented along with Leduc Isopach and structural evidence. The role of faulting in the collapse process was also discussed. It appears that faulting was caused by differential compaction of the Leduc Reef. The faults related to the Gold Creek Collapse Structure also played a major role in the dolomitization of the Wabamun. The faults provided conduits for dolomitizing fluids to migrate upwards from the Leduc Formation to the Wabamun Formation. It is assumed that dolomitization occurred after the Debolt deposition. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  6. Volatile elements and radionuclides in Highvale and Whitewood Mines, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, F. [Geological Survey, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Gentzis, T. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Air pollution resulting from fossil fuel combustion has received significant attention recently. Coal contains elements whose concentration may vary significantly both vertically and laterally in a minesite. These elements may be associated either with the mineral matter or the organic matter in coal, could remain in the bottom ash, be mobilized in the fly ash, or be emitted with the flue gas. The distribution of trace elements and their concentration in the above fractions depend on the mode of occurrence and speciation, concentration in coal, boiler type and load, and on operating conditions. Volatile elements, such as Hg, Cd, Pb, F, and Be are of environmental concern. This study reports on the concentration of Be, Cd, F, Hg, Pb and radionuclides in subbituminous coals used exclusively for power generation in Alberta. One hundred (100) coals from the Highvale Mine and fifty (50) coals from the nearby (12 kms away) Whitewood Mine were analyzed. Coal from the Highvale Mine feeds the 766 MW Keephills and the 1987 MW Sundance power plants, whereas coal from the Whitewood Mine provides the feed for the 570 MW Wabamun plant. Approximately 14 million tonnes of low-sulphur (S{sub tot} <0.5 wt%) are mixed every year from six scams in both sites. The trace element geochemistry of the Highvale and Whitewood mines coals has been published by Gentzis and Goodarzi respectively.

  7. ASPECTS (Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score) Assessment of the Perfusion-Diffusion Mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Louis; Turc, Guillaume; Tisserand, Marie; Charron, Sylvain; Roca, Pauline; Lion, Stephanie; Legrand, Laurence; Edjlali, Myriam; Naggara, Olivier; Meder, Jean-François; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Rapid and reliable assessment of the perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch is required to promote its wider application in both acute stroke clinical routine and trials. We tested whether an evaluation based on the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) reliably identifies the PWI/DWI mismatch. A total of 232 consecutive patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (PWI and DWI) were retrospectively evaluated. PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS were determined blind from manually segmented PWI and DWI volumes. Mismatch-ASPECTS was defined as the difference between PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS (a high score indicates a large mismatch). We determined the mismatch-ASPECTS cutoff that best identified the volumetric mismatch, defined as VolumeTmax>6s/VolumeDWI≥1.8, a volume difference≥15 mL, and a VolumeDWImismatch-ASPECTS ≥2 best identified a volumetric mismatch, with a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) and a specificity of 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.89). The mismatch-ASPECTS method can detect a true mismatch in patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke. It could be used for rapid screening of patients with eligible mismatch, in centers not equipped with ultrafast postprocessing software. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Foliage Chemistry of Pinus baksiana in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette C. Proemse

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial emissions in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR, Alberta, Canada, have caused concerns about the effect of oil sands operations on the surrounding terrestrial environments, including jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb. stands. We collected jack pine needles from 19 sites in the AOSR (13–128 km from main operations for foliar chemical analyses to investigate the environmental impact on jack pine. Pine needles from three age classes, the current annual growth (CAG, 2011, one year and two year old pine needles, were collected. Samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC, nitrogen (TN, and sulfur (TS, inorganic S (SO4-S, base cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and other elements (B, Cu, Fe, Mn, P, Zn; CAG needles were also analyzed for their nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions. Only TN, TS, Ca, B, Zn, and Fe contents showed weak but significant increases with proximity to the major oil sands operations. C and N isotopic compositions showed no trend with distance or TC and TN contents. Total S contents in CAG of pine foliage increased significantly with proximity to the main industrial operation while foliar inorganic S to organic S ratios (SO4-S/Sorg ranged consistently between 0.13 and 0.32, indicating low to moderately high S loading. Hence, this study suggests some evidence of uptake of S emissions in close proximity to anthropogenic sources, although the reported values have not reached a level of environmental concern.

  9. Assessment of respiratory disorders in relation to solution gas flaring activities in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    A study was conducted by Alberta Health to address the issue of whether or not flaring of solution gas has a negative impact on human health. The Flaring Working Group of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance initiated this study which focused on the assessment of the relationship between human health disorders (such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and upper respiratory infections) and solution gas flaring activities in rural, urban and aboriginal populations. The personal exposure to flaring emissions was estimated by physical proximity to the source of emissions. A small area was studied in which geographical variations in human health disorders were compared to geographical variations of socioeconomic and environmental factors. Data was gathered from 1989 to 1996 to evaluate long term average conditions and changes over the time period investigated. Notwithstanding physicians' claims for increased rates of respiratory infections and hospitalization attributed to solution gas flaring, the study found no evidence linking respiratory infections and solution gas flaring. This was the conclusion regardless of the measure of health outcomes, the rural-urban status, ethnicity, or age. Nevertheless, the study recommended identification of bio-markers of exposure and effect reflective of the compounds of interest, and the development of a responsive and comprehensive geographic information database that would allow data linkage at all geographic levels for different periods of time. refs., 10 tabs., 15 figs., 1 appendix

  10. Development, reliability, and validity of the Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project Parental Outcome Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemister, Taryn B; Brooks, Brian L; Kirton, Adam

    2014-07-01

    Perinatal stroke is a leading cause of cerebral palsy and lifelong disability, although parent and family outcomes have not yet been studied in this specific population. The Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project Parental Outcome Measure was developed as a 26-item questionnaire on the impact of perinatal stroke on parents and families. The items were derived from expert opinion and scientific literature on issues salient to parents of children with perinatal stroke, including guilt and blame, which are not well captured in existing measures of family impact. Data were collected from 82 mothers and 28 fathers who completed the Parental Outcome Measure and related questionnaires (mean age, 39.5 years; mean child age, 7.4 years). Analyses examined the Parental Outcome Measure's internal consistency, test-retest reliability, validity, and factor structure. The Parental Outcome Measure demonstrated three unique theoretical constructs: Psychosocial Impact, Guilt, and Blame. The Parental Outcome Measure has excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.91) and very good test-retest reliability more than 2-5 weeks (r = 0.87). Regarding validity, the Parental Outcome Measure is sensitive to condition severity, accounts for additional variance in parent outcomes, and strongly correlates with measures of anxiety, depression, stress, quality of life, family functioning, and parent adjustment. The Parental Outcome Measure contributes to the literature as the first brief measure of family impact designed for parents of children with perinatal stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraclass reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in the Brazilian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Paiva Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study had as its objective to analyze the intraclass reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS, in the Brazilian version, in preterm and term infants. It was a methodological study, conducted from November 2009 to April 2010, with 50 children receiving care in two public institutions in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Children were grouped according to gestational age as preterm and term, and evaluated by three evaluators in the communication laboratory of a public institution or at home. The intraclass correlation indices for the categories prone, supine, sitting and standing ranged from 0.553 to 0.952; most remained above 0.800, except for the standing category of the third evaluator, in which the index was 0.553. As for the total score and percentile, rates ranged from 0.843 to 0.954. The scale proved to be a reliable instrument for assessing gross motor performance of Brazilian children, particularly in Ceará, regardless of gestational age at birth.

  12. Total Gaseous Mercury Concentration Measurements at Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Parsons

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations are described from total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations measured at the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA Fort McMurray—Patricia McInnes air quality monitoring station—from 21 October 2010 through 31 May 2013, inclusively. Fort McMurray is approximately 380 km north-northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, and approximately 30 km south of major Canadian oil sands developments. The average TGM concentration over the period of this study was 1.45 ± 0.18 ng∙m−3. Principal component analysis suggests that observed TGM concentrations are correlated with meteorological conditions including temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation, and also ozone concentration. There is no significant correlation between ambient concentrations of TGM and anthropogenic pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOX and sulphur dioxide (SO2. Principal component analysis also shows that the highest TGM concentrations observed are a result of forest fire smoke near the monitoring station. Back trajectory analysis highlights the importance of long-range transport, indicating that unseasonably high TGM concentrations are generally associated with air from the southeast and west, while unseasonably low TGM concentrations are a result of arctic air moving over the monitoring station. In general, TGM concentration appears to be driven by diel and seasonal trends superimposed over a combination of long-range transport and regional surface-air flux of gaseous mercury.

  13. Public perceptions of key performance indicators of healthcare in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Herbert C; Harvey, Michael D

    2012-06-01

    To examine the relationship between public perceptions of key performance indicators assessing various aspects of the health-care system. Cross-sequential survey research. Annual telephone surveys of random samples of adult Albertans selected by random digit dialing and stratified according to age, sex and region (n = 4000 for each survey year). The survey questionnaires included single-item measures of key performance indicators to assess public perceptions of availability, accessibility, quality, outcome and satisfaction with healthcare. Cronbach's α and factor analysis were used to assess the relationship between key performance indicators focusing on the health-care system overall and on a recent interaction with the health-care system. The province of Alberta, Canada during the years 1996-2004. Four thousand adults randomly selected each survey year. Survey questions measuring public perceptions of healthcare availability, accessibility, quality, outcome and satisfaction with healthcare. Factor analysis identified two principal components with key performance indicators focusing on the health system overall loading most strongly on the first component and key performance indicators focusing on the most recent health-care encounter loading most strongly on the second component. Assessments of the quality of care most recently received, accessibility of that care and perceived outcome of care tended to be higher than the more general assessments of overall health system quality and accessibility. Assessments of specific health-care encounters and more general assessments of the overall health-care system, while related, nevertheless comprise separate dimensions for health-care evaluation.

  14. Salinization of soil over saline-sodic overburden from the oil sands in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, S.; Dobchuk, B.S. [O' Kane Consultants Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Barbour, S.L. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). College of Engineering; Van Rees, K.C.J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering

    2010-11-15

    This paper characterized the 4-year evolution of salinity profiles in the reclaimed soil covers placed over saline-sodic overburden in the Athabasca region of Alberta, evaluated the influence of cover thickness and salt redistribution in the reclaimed material, and sought to identify the dominant mechanism of salt transport contributing to these profiles. A comparison of 4 reclamation treatments showed that salts accumulated in the cover soils, increasing the electrical conductivity in the lower part of the soils to levels exceeding the acceptable value for plant growth. Diffusion and not slope position was found to be the predominant mechanism driving the salt redistribution in the soils, at least for the 4-year period under observation. The cover thickness had no effect on the extent of salt ingress, but the average salinity for thinner soils was substantially higher than the average for thicker covers. The higher salinity levels compromised the overall quality of the thinner covers for vegetative growth. The thicker covers performed better as a reclamation prescription because the water storage capacity above the salt-affected zone was sufficient for the maintenance of vegetative communities. 46 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence and risk behaviors in patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, B; Campbell, P J; Preiksaitis, J K; Fonseca, K

    1997-09-01

    To investigate the dissemination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C infection in association with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), sexual practices, and injection drug use. All eligible men and women attending two STD clinics in Alberta, Canada, from May 1994 to May 1995 were studied. Anonymous, unlinked serosurveys were performed using leftover sera drawn for routine syphilis, hepatitis B, or HIV testing. Self-administered questionnaires collected a wide range of data: demographic, sexual behaviors, condom use, STD history, the exchange of drugs or money for sex, and drug and alcohol use. HIV seroprevalence in the overall sample group (n = 6,668) was 1.5%. Univariate analysis showed significant relationships for age between 30 years and 49 years, men having sex with men, injection drug use regardless of sexual orientation, history of STD, anal sex, and exchanging money or drugs for sex. At the multivariate level, only men having sex with men, injection drug use, and age more than 30 years remained predictive of HIV infection. The prevalence of hepatitis C was 3.4% with significant associations being injection drug use and exchanging money or drugs for sex. The behavioral associations between sex practices, injection drug use, and HIV and hepatitis C seroprevalence warrant ongoing investigation. Continuing prevention programs targeted at safer sex practices (particularly for men having sex with men) and the use of clean needles are needed.

  16. Shell pays $15 million at Waterton to meet sulphur recovery guidelines. [Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-21

    Shell Canada Ltd., at its Waterton location, is currently spending upward of $15 million on tail gas cleanup facilities to meet rigorous Alberta sulfur recovery guidelines. Other pollution abatement facilities have already cost $6 million. Hereford calves, pigs, chickens, young fish, and even white mice have all participated in test programs designed to yield accurate measurements of the effect of sulfur and compounds on animal life around a large plant with rated sulfur extraction capacity of 3,000 long tons per day. A unique feature is a control room computer which gives continuous cumulative ambient air quality readings. Besides instantaneous readings presented on a cathode ray tube, all data are duplicated on a hard copy printout. The computer can be called on to provide any wanted data, including a record of past operations. Checking on water quality at Waterton is a vital part of the environmental protection facilities in the plant. The biological fish assay system is used. Great advances have been made in controlling noise pollution during the 12-yr life of the complex.

  17. [Intraclass reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale in the Brazilian version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Larissa Paiva; Maia, Polyana Candeia; Lopes, Márcia Maria Coelho Oliveira; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão

    2013-10-01

    This study had as its objective to analyze the intraclass reliability of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS), in the Brazilian version, in preterm and term infants. It was a methodological study, conducted from November 2009 to April 2010, with 50 children receiving care in two public institutions in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Children were grouped according to gestational age as preterm and term, and evaluated by three evaluators in the communication laboratory of a public institution or at home. The intraclass correlation indices for the categories prone, supine, sitting and standing ranged from 0.553 to 0.952; most remained above 0.800, except for the standing category of the third evaluator, in which the index was 0.553. As for the total score and percentile, rates ranged from 0.843 to 0.954. The scale proved to be a reliable instrument for assessing gross motor performance of Brazilian children, particularly in Ceará, regardless of gestational age at birth.

  18. New reference values for the Alberta Infant Motor Scale need to be established.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuren, K M W; Smit, L S; Stijnen, Th; Hartman, A

    2007-03-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is an infant developmental test, which can be used to evaluate motor performance from birth to independent walking. Between 1990 and 1992 Piper and Darrah determined reference values in a cohort in Canada. To our knowledge no study has been carried out to determine whether the Canadian data are representative for other countries. In the present study we aimed to establish whether the AIMS test needs new reference values for Dutch children. Motor performance of 100 Dutch children, aged 0-12 months, was measured using the AIMS test. The mean percentile score of the Dutch children was 28.8 (+/-22.9, range 1-85). The percentile scores of the group were significantly lower than scores of the Canadian norm population (p < 0.001), whereby 75% of the Dutch children scored below the 50th percentile. These lower scores were not be explained by sex, racial differences or congenital disorders and were seen in all age groups. We conclude that new reference values on the AIMS test for the age group of 0-12 months need to be established for Dutch children. It is recommended that the need for new normative data is also determined in all other European countries.

  19. Beyond eco-terrorism : the deeper issues affecting Alberta's oil patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    Issues which have led to acts of sabotage in the Peace River country in northwestern Alberta are discussed. These acts are alleged to have been inspired by frustration and anger by rural Albertans over oil and gas pollution. Rural residents believe that activities such as well drilling, laying of pipelines, and the flaring of solution gas generate air emissions and other wastes which reduce the quality of air, water and soils, and harm the health of their livestock and crops, and have a direct impact on human health. This paper identifies the broad range of environmental and health issues that are currently known to be associated with the oil and gas industry. The findings of several independent scientific studies that corroborate the experiential evidence submitted by rural residents are discussed and some of the key socio-economic and political factors that are increasing the risk of environmental and health impacts are described. Recommendations for action by government and industry to respond to these issues are also presented. 1 tab., 3 figs

  20. Revegetation of wellsite disturbances on Fescue Prairie in east-central Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosaree, J.; Puhl, M.

    1999-01-01

    It has been observed that past methods of revegetating disturbed land in Alberta by using commercially-available species of grasses has had limited success in terms of biodiversity, the reason being that commercial forage species are highly competitive, and as such not only prevented the original prairie species from returning to reclaimed sites, but in some cases they have migrated from reclaimed sites and invaded surrounding native prairie. Alfalfa, crested wheatgrass, Kentucky bluegrass and Canada bluegrass are believed to be the most invasive of these commercially available species. Because their use in the past has resulted in landscape fragmentation, they are not recommended for use on wellsites located on native prairie. The limited mix of available native grass cultivars also have had limited success in increasing species diversity. Cross seeding has been suggested as one method for reducing the effect of inter-specific competition on the species emergence. However, the general view of government and industry is that improved methods of revegetation of wellsite disturbances and new guidelines for determining reclamation success are required to establish more ecologically compatible plant communities on well site disturbances 4 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  1. Cultural keystone species in oil sands reclamation, Fort McKay, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, A.; Straker, J. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    This presentation discussed a reclamation project conducted in Fort McKay, Alberta that was designed to address some of the social and cultural concerns related to oil sands mining in the region. Conventional reclamation practices in the region have demonstrated a lack of communication and participation from surrounding communities. The project was designed to address future land use plans and to include cultural values in the reclamation process. An integrative approach was used to address community landscapes issues and to explore methods of reclaiming the social and ecological components impacted by oil sands development. Traditional environmental knowledge was also incorporated into the program's design. Cultural keystone species (CKS) were used to provide a culturally relevant compass to guide people engaging in long-term reclamation and land use planning. Cultural keystone species were defined as salient species that significantly shape the cultural identity of a people. Keystone species in the region include the beaver; the moose; the ratroot; and cranberries and blueberries. Challenges to the program included the fact that the scale of oil sands disturbances are so immense that some community recommendations for reclaiming CKS may be impractical. tabs., figs.

  2. Diamonds from the Buffalo Head Hills, Alberta: Formation in a non-conventional setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Anetta; Stachel, Thomas; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; McCandless, Tom E.

    2007-01-01

    Kimberlite pipes K11, K91 and K252 in the Buffalo Head Hills, northern Alberta show an unusually large abundance (20%) of Type II (no detectable nitrogen) diamonds. Type I diamonds range in nitrogen content from 6 ppm to 3300 ppm and in aggregation states from low (IaA) to complete (IaB). The Type IaB diamonds extend to the lowest nitrogen concentrations yet observed at such high aggregation states, implying that mantle residence occurred at temperatures well above normal lithospheric conditions. Syngenetic mineral inclusions indicate lherzolitic, harzburgitic, wehrlitic and eclogitic sources. Pyropic garnet and forsteritic olivine characterize the peridotitic paragenesis from these pipes. One lherzolitic garnet inclusion has a moderately majoritic composition indicating a formation depth of ˜ 400 km. A wehrlitic paragenesis is documented by a Ca-rich, high-chromium garnet and very CaO-rich (0.11-0.14 wt.%) olivine. Omphacitic pyroxene and almandine-rich garnet are characteristic of the eclogitic paragenesis. A bimodal δ13C distribution with peaks at - 5‰ and - 17‰ is observed for diamonds from all three kimberlite pipes. A large proportion (˜ 40%) of isotopically light diamonds ( δ13C megalith. Type IaA to IaAB diamonds indicate formation and storage under lower temperature in normal lithospheric conditions.

  3. Naphthenic acids and other acid-extractables in water samples from Alberta: what is being measured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewer, David M; Young, Rozlyn F; Whittal, Randy M; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2010-11-01

    There is increasing international interest in naphthenic acids (NAs, classical formula C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2)) found in the oil sands from Alberta, Canada and in petroleum from around the world. The complexity of NAs poses major analytical challenges for their quantification and characterization. We used ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR MS) to probe the make up of NAs from various sources by searching for peaks corresponding to the formula C(n)H(2n+Z)O(x), for combinations of n=8 to 30, Z=0 to -12, and x=2 to 5. The sources included three commercial NAs preparations, and the acid-extractable organics from eight oil sand process-affected waters (OSPW) and from six surface fresh waters. Extracts from OSPW contained between 1 and 7% sulfur. The mass spectra showed between 300 and 1880 peaks, with >99% of the peaks having m/z between 145 and 600. In most cases, 50% of the compounds in the extracts of OSPW were not "naphthenic acids". Based on these findings, it appears that the term "naphthenic acids", which has been used to describe the toxic extractable compounds in OSPW, should be replaced by a term such as "oil sands tailings water acid-extractable organics (OSTWAEO)". Classical and oxy-NAs are components of OSTWAEO, but this term would not be as misleading as "naphthenic acids". Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated in the Province of Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane E Taylor

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of antibiotic resistance to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, metronidazole and tetracycline inHelicobacter pylori strains isolated from gastric biopsy specimens obtained in Alberta was investigated. Results for all antibiotics were obtained using agar dilution, and in addition to metronidazole, the E test was used. Resistance to amoxicillin and tetracycline was not detected. Metronidazole resistance determined using agar dilution was approximately 12% (95% CI 4% to 26% when minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs were at least 8 µg/mL, but fell to 2% (95% CI 0.1% to 13% when MICs were set at 32 µg/mL or greater. The E test for metronidazole resistance (MIC 8 µg/mL or greater yielded a slightly higher percentage of resistant strains compared with agar dilution tests (14%, 95% CI 5% to 29%. One of the 31 strains was resistant to clarithromycin (MIC 8 µg/mL and erythromycin (MIC 16 µg/mL. Thus, the incidence of resistance to clarithromycin, part of the currently used triple therapy for eradication of H pylori, was 3% (95% CI 0.1% to 17%.

  5. Olfactory deficits in frontotemporal dementia as measured by the Alberta Smell Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyanka, Daniel J; Golden, Charles J; McCue, Robert B; Scarisbrick, David M; Linck, John F; Zlatkin, Nancy I

    2014-01-01

    The study of olfaction in neurodegeneration has primarily focused on Alzheimer's disease. Research of olfaction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has generally not been empirically studied. The current study compared olfaction in FTD to major depressive disorder (MDD) using the Alberta Smell Test (AST). Independent-samples t test results suggested olfaction in FTD was impaired when compared with participants diagnosed with MDD. The AST Total score (out of 20 trials) significantly predicted the diagnostic group and accounted for 40% of the variance in diagnostic group status with an odds ratio of 20.08. Results suggested that a cutoff of ≤2/20 differentiated FTD from MDD with 94% accuracy (91% sensitivity, 97% specificity) and a cutoff of ≤1/20 differentiated the groups with a 95.5% hit rate (91% sensitivity, 100% specificity). Results confirmed olfactory identification deficits in FTD and suggested that the AST is an effective tool for the demarcation of FTD from MDD. This is especially important due to the potential for significant overlap in the behavioral/emotional phenotype and cognitive deficits between the two disorders when presented with early stages of FTD.

  6. Long-horned Ceratopsidae from the Foremost Formation (Campanian of southern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb M. Brown

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The horned Ceratopsidae represent one of the last radiations of dinosaurs, and despite a decade of intense work greatly adding to our understanding of this diversification, their early evolution is still poorly known. Here, two postorbital horncores from the upper Foremost Formation (Campanian of Alberta are described, and at ∼78.5 Ma represent some of the geologically oldest ceratopsid material. The larger of these specimens is incorporated into a fused supraorbital complex, and preserves a massive, straight, postorbital horncore that is vertical in lateral view, but canted dorsolaterally in rostral view. Medially, the supracranial sinus is composed of a small, restricted caudal chamber, and a large rostral chamber that forms the cornual diverticulum. This morphology is distinct from that of the long-horned Chasmosaurinae, and similar to, but still different from, those of younger Centrosaurinae taxa. The smaller specimen represents an ontogenetically younger individual, and although showing consistent morphology to the larger specimen, is less taxonomically useful. Although not certain, these postorbital horns may be referable to a long-horned basal (i.e., early-branching, non-pachyrhinosaurini, non-centrosaurini centrosaurine, potentially the contemporaneous Xenoceratops, largely known from the parietosquamosal frill. These specimens indicate the morphology of the supracranial sinus in early, long-horned members of the Ceratopsidae, and add to our understanding of the evolution of the cranial display structures in this iconic dinosaur clade.

  7. Is Universal Screening Necessary? Incidence of Tuberculosis among Tibetan Refugees Arriving in Calgary, Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Rachel; Jarand, Julie; Field, Stephen K; Fisher, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Background . Canadian policy requires refugees with a history of tuberculosis (TB) or abnormal chest radiograph to be screened after arrival for TB. However, Tibetan refugees are indiscriminately screened, regardless of preimmigration assessment. We sought to determine the incidence of latent (LTBI) and active TB, as well as treatment-related outcomes and associations between preimmigration factors and TB infection among Tibetan refugees arriving in Calgary, Alberta. Design . Retrospective cohort study including Tibetan refugees arriving between 2014 and 2016. Associations between preimmigration factors and incidence of latent and active TB were determined using Chi-square tests. Results . Out of 180 subjects, 49 percent had LTBI. LTBI was more common in migrants 30 years of age or older ( P = 0.009). Treatment initiation and completion rates were high at 90 percent and 76 percent, respectively. No associations between preimmigration factors and treatment completion were found. A case of active TB was detected and treated. Conclusion . Within this cohort, the case of active TB would have been detected through the usual postsurveillance process due to a history of TB and abnormal chest radiograph. Forty-nine percent had LTBI, compared to previously quoted rates of 97 percent. Tibetan refugees should be screened for TB in a similar manner to other refugees resettling in Canada.

  8. The soil and air quality connection: abstracts of the 36. Alberta soil science workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The workshop has the following general categories of papers (with abstracts only): plenary session, volunteer session I; volunteer session II; technical session I - soil reclamation, and soil fertility; technical session II - soil conservation, and soil information; and poster presentations. Twelve individual papers are abstracted/indexed as follows: (1) greenhouse gas emissions from Canadian prairie agriculture; (2) acid deposition, critical loads, soil sensitivity, and environmental responses; (3) the downwind health risks of intensive livestock production; (4) nitrous oxide emission as affected by tillage practices and fertilizer association; (5) a conceptual system for assigning sensitivities to potentially acidifying inputs to soils in the oil sands regions of Alberta; (6) a particle tracer method for soil aggregation and translocation studies; (7) DNA adduct quantification in Eisenia fetida after subchronic exposures to creosote contaminated soils; (8) the physical distribution of anthropogenic mercury in nine contaminated soils; (9) bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils: are treatability and ecotoxicity endpoints related?; (10) land reclamation using oil sand processing tailings: a field study; (11) assessment of toxicity based criteria for disposal of drilling waste in oil and gas exploration; and (12) toxicity assessment of approved drilling mud additives in the oil and gas sector.

  9. Estimating the sensitivity of forest soils to acid deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian AHERNE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Athabasca Oil Sands Region of northern Alberta is home to the largest source of S emissions in Canada, and some of the surrounding upland forests are located on acid-sensitive soils. The relative sensitivity of these ecosystems to acidic deposition is largely dependent upon the mineral weathering rate. Weathering rates were evaluated across a range of soils (n = 43 typical of the region using a soil texture approximation (STA and the PROFILE model. The STA was recalibrated for use in the region, and the weathering rates calculated with this method were used to calculate steady-state critical loads of acidity at 333 sites using the Simple Mass Balance (SMB Model and a critical chemical criterion for molar base cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ to aluminium ratio of 10. Soils are dominated by quartz, with small quantities of slowly weatherable minerals, and consequently weathering rates are among the lowest in Canada (median = 11.5 meq m–2 y–1, resulting in very low critical loads. Atmospheric acid (S and N deposition varies considerably across the region, but in general is much lower than impacted areas of central Canada. Under conditions of complete N retention, 34% of the sites receive acid deposition in excess of their critical load; if all N deposition is leached, 62% of the sites are currently exceeded. Acid-sensitive soils in the region are at risk of acidifying due to pressures from industrialization associated with extraction of fossil fuels.

  10. A bioassessment of lakes in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, using benthic macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. SOMERS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides and other pollutants have increased in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR in Alberta, Canada. Atmospheric pollutants impact aquatic communities through a number of processes, but due to a lack of regional monitoring programs potential biological impacts have not been assessed. In this study, a bioassessment was conducted using approaches borrowed from a variety of protocols to establish a baseline dataset, determine appropriate methodologies, and to assess the current impact of emissions on benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI communities in the AOSR. As a result, 32 lakes, including 5 test lakes located in a modelled high deposition region, were sampled for water chemistry and BMI. The Reference Condition Approach (RCA was used because a baseline dataset does not exist and data were evaluated using three separate statistical techniques. All of the statistical methods used: One Sample T-Tests, Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA and Test Site Analysis (TSA, showed that BMI assemblages in test lakes differed from BMI assemblages in reference lakes. Traditional statistics classified all 5 test lakes as "significantly impaired" whereas TSA identified 3 of the 5 test lakes as only potentially impaired and 2 lakes were in "reference condition". The variability in lake attributes present challenges in interpreting BMI data and establishing an accurate biomonitoring program in the AOSR which need to be addressed in future assessment studies.

  11. Sediment oxygen demand of wetlands in the oil sands region of north-eastern Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, C.; Ciborowski, J.J.; Gardner Costa, J.

    2009-01-01

    Reclaimed land in the Alberta oil sands mining area contains both reference and oil sands process-affected wetlands constructed using varying sediment compositions. The sediments derived from oil sands process materials (OSPM) may alter the biochemical reactions that take place and affect the sediment oxygen demand (SOD), which is a key factor that contributes to oxygen depletion. This presentation reported on a study in which SOD was measured in a suite of constructed wetlands of different ages, with or without OSPM and topsoil. The purpose of the study was to clarify the role of SOD in wetland function and in the reclamation process. Dissolved oxygen loggers were inserted into dome-shaped chambers on the sediment to measure changes in oxygen demand. Complementary measurements of respiration (CO 2 elution) were used to quantify the biological sediment oxygen demand (BSOD) component of SOD. The chemical sediment oxygen demand (CSOD) was then determined by subtraction from SOD. Wetlands reclaimed using OSPM are expected to have a lower BSOD to CSOD ratio than reference wetlands. Residual ammonia in OSPM sediments may react with sulphate and bind phosphorus. This reduces phosphorus bioavailability and may impede submergent macrophyte growth. As such, wetlands affected by CSOD will have fewer submerged macrophytes than BSOD dominant wetlands.

  12. Selenium investigations in the Elk Valley (British Columbia) and the Cheviot and Luscar coal mines (Alberta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, P.; Brinker, C.; Symbaluk, M.; Jones, R.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reported on a study that examined the concentration of selenium (Se) in the waters of the Elk River to determine the risks to the aquatic environment. Se concentrations are increasing in water downstream of coal mines. Se concentrations in benthic invertebrates in the Elk River are high, but have not increased over the last few years. The viability and productivity of fish and water bird populations do not appear to be negatively affected. The potential Se effects to trout in Alberta are being examined further in an effort to establish a certain adverse effects threshold for trout in the Elk River Valley. Human health or terrestrial wildlife do not appear to be adversely affected. Monitoring and management is the main focus of the study. Management studies include predicting future Se releases under different mining scenarios; determining factors affecting the cycling and conversion of inorganic Se once it enters the aquatic environment; and integrating current and future information to effectively manage Se releases. Treatment alternatives such as passive bioreactor and in situ methods are also being examined. Mapping of lentic and lotic areas in the Elk River Valley will help in evaluating the regional significance of any localized aquatic impacts associated with elevated Se concentrations. New studies involving a Standard Operating Procedure for fish deformity analysis and predictive modeling of trout populations are among the recommendations that have been applied from a 2005 Selenium Science Panel.

  13. Alberta Surface Reclamation Fund annual report, April 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Alberta Surface Reclamation Fund holds security deposits as an incentive to assure satisfactory reclamation of coal and oil sands exploration and coal, pipelines, sand and gravel and oil sands development operations. Upon satisfactory compliance, the funds are returned to the depositor. Where there is not satisfactory compliance, the Land Conservation and Reclamation Council is obligated to carry out the subsequent reclamation and the funds are used to complete the reclamation. This document also reports on the disposition of all non-cash security deposits which have been accepted instead of cash. During the year, $382,610 was refunded from coal exploration deposits, $82,226 was refunded from oil sands exploration deposits, $259,427 was refunded from pipeline development and reclamation deposits, and $94,421 was refunded from sand and gravel deposits where satisfactory reclamation had been completed. The fund, which is an integral part of the Consolidated Cash Investment Trust Fund administered by the Provincial Treasurer, earned between 6.15 and 7.85% interest on cash deposits calculated monthly. The interest accrues to the depositor's account on a quarterly basis. The total cash deposits plus interest, bonds and guaratees as of March 31, 1993 held in the fund was $116,199,168. The balance sheet and operating account summary summarize the fund and also provide details of each individual account

  14. Midges (Diptera:Chironomidae) as indicators of wetland viability in the Alberta Oil Sands region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciborowski, J. J. H.; Whelly, M. P.; Leonhardt, C.; Laing, D. [Windsor Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, ON (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Thirty-three wetlands northeast of Fort McMurray, Alberta, ten of which are receiving oil sands mine process-affected water (OSPW), have been examined to assess their biological integrity. Physico-chemical and environmental attributes were measured, sediment, zoobenthic, plankton and chlorophyll samples were analyzed. Results of principal component analysis indicated that the wetlands could be categorized into three classes on the basis of three independent combinations of environmental features, namely pH/size/dissolved oxygen; conductivity; and sediment composition. Cluster analysis identified four groups of wetlands. High conductivity wetlands were found to support greater density but reduced richness of benthic population, irrespective of the presence of OSPW. To evaluate OSPW wetland ability to support and maintain benthic populations chironomid larval morphology, density, adult emergence, flight activity, egg-laying behaviour and the ability of eggs to hatch in OSPW were monitored. Results indicated no inhibition of adult chironomid flight activity, egg-laying or hatching by OSPW, although there was some evidence of OSPW reducing chironomid density, diversity and secondary production.

  15. Options for cleaning up subsurface contamination at Alberta sour gas plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardisty, P.; Dabrowski, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the conclusion of two major phases of a study on subsurface treatment technologies for Alberta sour gas plants, a candidate site was selected for a remediation technologies demonstration project. The plant has an extensive groundwater monitoring network in place, monitoring records for a period exceeding 10 years, ten recovery wells with aquifer test data and four reinjection wells. Hydrogeological exploration determined the presence and delineated a plume of free phase natural gas condensate. Aquifer remediation efforts at the site began in 1990 with the installation of recovery wells. Recovered groundwater was treated using a pilot scale air stripping system with pretreatment for iron, manganese and hardness. Dual pump system, water depression and free product skimmers were installed in the wells and tested. The nature and extent of contamination, study methodology, technology-dependent criteria, assessment of technology, and conceptual design are discussed for the three demonstration projects selected, which are enhanced soil vapour extraction with off-gas treatment, pump-and-treat with soil vapour extraction, biological treatment and air sparging, and treatment of dissolved process chemicals by advanced oxidation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Alberta Surface Reclamation Fund annual report, April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Alberta Surface Reclamation Fund holds security deposits as an incentive to assure satisfactory reclamation of coal and oil sands exploration and coal, pipelines, sand and gravel and oil sands development operations. Upon satisfactory compliance, the funds are returned to the depositor. Where there is not satisfactory compliance, the Land Conservation and Reclamation Council is obligated to carry out the subsequent reclamation and the funds are used to complete the reclamation. This document also reports on the disposition of all non-cash security deposits which have been accepted instead of cash. During the year, $136,703 was refunded from coal development deposits, $199,788 was refunded from coal exploration deposits, $92,200 was refunded from oil exploration deposits, $145,565 was refunded from pipeline development and reclamation deposits, and $281,209 was refunded from sand and gravel deposits where satisfactory reclamation had been completed. The fund, which is an integral part of the Consolidated Cash Investment Trust Fund administered by the Provincial Treasurer, earned between 7.88 and 10.4% interest on cash deposits calculated monthly. The interest accrues to the depositor's account on a quarterly basis. The total cash deposits plus interest, bonds and guaratees as of March 31, 1992 held in the fund was $110,811,702. The balance sheet and operating account summary summarize the fund and also provide details of each individual account

  17. Farmers' preferences for water policy reforms: Results from a survey in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Bjornlund, H.; Klein, K.

    2012-12-01

    Facing increasingly urgent stress on global water scarcity, many reforms have been launched in countries around the world. As the biggest group of natural resource managers, farmers' behaviour is drawing increasingly wide attention. Satisfying new demands for water will depend on farmers' support since, generally, water will need to be transferred from farmers who have historically secure rights. Although water pricing reform is widely considered to lead to water conservation, the uncertainty of its potential impacts hinders the process of reform. This farmer-level empirical research explores farmers' possible responses to introduction of reforms in water pricing. A survey was conducted of about 300 farm households that use water for irrigating crops in Southern Alberta, an area that is facing water shortages and has had to stop issuing new water licences. By using structural equation modelling, the strength and direction of direct and indirect relationships between external, internal and behavioural variables as proposed in general attitude theory have been estimated. Farming as a family engagement, family members' and family unit's characteristics doubtlessly affect farming practice and farm decisions. Farmers' behaviour was explored under the family and farm context. In developing and testing conceptual models that integrate socio-demographic, psychological, farming context and social milieu factors, we may develop a deeper understanding of farmers' behaviour. The findings and recommendations will be beneficial for environmental practitioners and policy makers.

  18. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Pollution above the Oil Sands Region in Northern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Monika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol were conducted from a Twin Otter aircraft above the oil sands region of northern Alberta. For the majority of the flights, significant amounts of aerosol were observed within the boundary layer, up to an altitude of 2.0 km above sea level (ASL, while the ozone concentration remained at background levels (30-45 ppb downwind of the industry. On August 24th the lidar measured a separated layer of aerosol above the boundary layer, at a height of 2.0 km ASL, in which the ozone mixing ratio increased to 70 ppb. Backward trajectory calculations revealed that the air containing this separated aerosol layer had passed over an area of forest fires. Directly below the layer of forest fire smoke, pollution from the oil sands industry was observed. Measurements of the backscatter linear depolarization ratio were obtained with a ground based lidar operated by Environment Canada within the oil sands region. The depolarization measurements aided in discriminating between the separate sources of pollution from industry and forest fires. The depolarization ratio was 5-6% in forest fire smoke and 7-10% in the industrial pollution.

  19. Generalizing: The descriptive struggle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D.; Hon Ph.D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The literature is not kind to the use of descriptive generalizations. Authors struggle and struggle to find and rationalize a way to use them and then fail in spite of trying a myriad of work-arounds. And then we have Lincoln and Guba’s famous statement: “The only generalization is: there is no generalization” in referring to qualitative research. (op cit, p. 110 They are referring to routine QDA yielding extensive descriptions, but which tacitly include conceptual generalizations without any real thought of knowledge about them. In this chapter I wish to explore this struggle for the purpose of explaining that the various contra arguments to using descriptive generalizations DO NOT apply to the ease of using conceptual generalizations yielded in SGT and especially FGT. I will not argue for the use of descriptive generalization. I agree with Lincoln and Guba with respect to QDA, “the only generalization is: there is no generalization.” It is up to the QDA methodologists, of whom there are many; to continue the struggle and I wish them well.

  20. Tore Supra: technical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This report is aimed, after a brief recall of physics and technologic perspectives of Tore Supra, at giving a detailed description of the basic machine; details of each component are defined. Volume 1 is specifically concerned with the general aspects of Tore Supra and the toroidal field system [fr

  1. Systematic Description of Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Sydenham, Peter H.; Thorn, Richard

    A sensor performs the exchange of information (thus energy) from one domain to another and therefore it operates on the interface between different physical domains. Several frameworks have been developed for a systematic description of sensors. Basically, they are based on either of two different

  2. Fractal description of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.

    1991-06-01

    Recent studies on the fractal description of fractures are reviewed. Some problems on this subject are discussed. It seems hopeful to use the fractal dimension as a parameter for quantitative fractography and to apply fractal structures to the development of high toughness materials. (author). 28 refs, 7 figs

  3. MCFire model technical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Conklin; James M. Lenihan; Dominique Bachelet; Ronald P. Neilson; John B. Kim

    2016-01-01

    MCFire is a computer program that simulates the occurrence and effects of wildfire on natural vegetation, as a submodel within the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model. This report is a technical description of the algorithms and parameter values used in MCFire, intended to encapsulate its design and features a higher level that is more conceptual than the level...

  4. Dry Cleaning, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Albert J.; Anderson, Floyd L.

    This course description was developed by educators for use at the Work Opportunity Center which was established to teach high school dropouts and/or hard-core unemployed youth. The ultimate objectives of this course are to prepare students for employment in dry cleaning occupations and to assist them in completing their high school graduation…

  5. Business Education, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert; Anderson, Floyd L.

    This course description was developed by educators for use at the Work Opportunity Center in teaching high school dropouts and hard-core unemployed youth. The ultimate objectives of the business education curriculum at the Center are to prepare students for employment in clerical occupations and to assist them in completing their high school…

  6. Communications, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickstrom, Sandra E.; Anderson, Floyd L.

    This course description was developed by educators for use at the Work Opportunity Center which was established to teach high school dropouts and/or hardcore unemployed youth. The ultimate objectives of this curriculum are to develop communicative skills necessary for social interaction and to help the student complete high school graduation…

  7. Reading, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, George; Anderson, Floyd L.

    This course description was developed by educators for use at the Work Opportunity Center which was established to teach high school dropouts and hard-core unemployed youth. The objectives of this reading curriculum are to develop skills of retarded readers, further develop skills of adequate readers, and develop an appreciation for reading.…

  8. Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1978-04-01

    Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables

  9. Updating action domain descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiter, Thomas; Erdem, Esra; Fink, Michael; Senko, Ján

    2010-10-01

    Incorporating new information into a knowledge base is an important problem which has been widely investigated. In this paper, we study this problem in a formal framework for reasoning about actions and change. In this framework, action domains are described in an action language whose semantics is based on the notion of causality. Unlike the formalisms considered in the related work, this language allows straightforward representation of non-deterministic effects and indirect effects of (possibly concurrent) actions, as well as state constraints; therefore, the updates can be more general than elementary statements. The expressivity of this formalism allows us to study the update of an action domain description with a more general approach compared to related work. First of all, we consider the update of an action description with respect to further criteria, for instance, by ensuring that the updated description entails some observations, assertions, or general domain properties that constitute further constraints that are not expressible in an action description in general. Moreover, our framework allows us to discriminate amongst alternative updates of action domain descriptions and to single out a most preferable one, based on a given preference relation possibly dependent on the specified criteria. We study semantic and computational aspects of the update problem, and establish basic properties of updates as well as a decomposition theorem that gives rise to a divide and conquer approach to updating action descriptions under certain conditions. Furthermore, we study the computational complexity of decision problems around computing solutions, both for the generic setting and for two particular preference relations, viz. set-inclusion and weight-based preference. While deciding the existence of solutions and recognizing solutions are PSPACE-complete problems in general, the problems fall back into the polynomial hierarchy under restrictions on the additional

  10. South Platte River Basin - Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Kevin F.; Litke, David W.; Tate, Cathy M.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1993-01-01

    The South Platte River Basin was one of 20 study units selected in 1991 for investigation under the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. One of the initial tasks undertaken by the study unit team was to review the environmental setting of the basin and assemble ancillary data on natural and anthropogenic factors in the basin. The physical, chemical, and biological quality of the water in the South Platte River Basin is explicitly tied to its environmental setting. The resulting water quality is the product of the natural conditions and human factors that make up the environmental setting of the basin.This description of the environmental setting of the South Platte River Basin and its implications to the water quality will help guide the design of the South Platte NAWQA study. Natural conditions such as physiography, climate, geology, and soils affect the ambient water quality while anthropogenic factors such as water use, population, land use and water-management practices can have a pronounced effect on water quality in the basin. The relative effects of mining, urban, and agricultural land- and water-uses on water-quality constituents are not well understood. The interrelation of the surface-water and ground-water systems and the chemical and biological processes that affect the transport of constituents needs to be addressed. Interactions between biological communities and the water resources also should be considered. The NAWQA program and the South Platte River Basin study will provide information to minimize existing knowledge gaps, so that we may better understand the effect these natural conditions and human factors have on the water-quality conditions in the basin, now and in the future.

  11. Effect of Climate Change on Management of Surface Water of South Saskatchewan River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Z.; Gan, T. Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Modified Interaction Biosphere Atmosphere (MISBA) of Kerkhoven and Gan (2006) and the Water Resources Management Model (WRMM) of Alberta Environment have been used to assess the future management strategy of the South Saskatchewan River Basin (SSRB) of Alberta. First, MISBA was driven with changed precipitation and temperature based on SRES climate scenarios of several GCMs for the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s, to simulate the future natural flows of different subbasins of SSRB. Next, for each climate scenario, the irrigation water demand for changed climate was computed using the Irrigation District Model (IDM) of Alberta Agriculture Food and Rural Development. The instream flow requirement was also adjusted with respect to future climate scenarios. Thirdly, the WRMM was run for 68 years first for the base scenarios and then for different climate scenarios to simulate whether the current water allocation priorities at a weekly time step set up by the present SSRB management can be met or not. On average, in SSRB temperature is predicted to be increased by 1.3°C, 3.1°C and 5.0 °C in 2020s, 2050s and 2080s respectively. The precipitation change is projected to be between -4.25% to 3.5 % by 2020s, 1% to 8.0% by 2050s and -2.5% to 13.5 % by 2080s. It was found that, except for a few cases, most of the scenario runs show a decrease in the mean annual average streamflow for the sub-basins located in SSRB sub-basins over the 21st century. Percentage increases in water demand for the irrigation districts are expected to ranges within 2% -13% in 2020s, 4%-17% in 2050s and 4%-26% in 2080s and for non-district irrigation blocks, water demand are expected to be increased by 6%-17%, 9%-22% and 8%-33% in 2020s, 2050s and 2080s respectively. Apparently the future water supply and demand for SSRB under climate change impact could progressively affect the future overall water management significantly. In the 2020s it would mainly affect the junior licenses allocated by Alberta

  12. On the Existence of Oscillatory-Convective Thermohaline Flow in Sedimentary Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, T.; Diersch, H. G.; Simmons, C. T.

    2009-05-01

    In the Earth's crust, both groundwater temperature and salinity increase with depth. As a consequence, water density is variable, thereby creating density-driven thermohaline groundwater flow. While prior steady-state studies of thermohaline flow in porous media identified conductive, oscillatory and convective thermohaline flow modes, the present study numerically analyzes thermohaline flow using a transient approach. We discovered the existence of an oscillatory-convective flow mode within a specific range of thermal and haline Raleigh numbers. Oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow only exists when water temperature and salinity increase with depth (positive RaT, negative RaS). Candidate sedimentary basins of oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow may be found in Western Canada (Alberta), in the Gulf of Mexico, in Northern Germany, or in Australia.

  13. Stress Map 2.0: Updating the Stress Map of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallyon, D.; Schmitt, D. R.; Currie, C. A.; Gu, Y. J.; Heidbach, O.

    2015-12-01

    The greatest horizontal compression in much of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin appears to uniformly trend NE-SW. Beyond this, major gaps remain in our knowledge of stress magnitudes and even faulting regimes. This lack of quantitative information impedes a proper understanding of seismic events that appear to be linked to hydraulic fracturing stimulations. Apart from this immediate concern, such seismicity could impact long term green-house gas sequestration and geothermal energy development. As part of the Helmholtz-Alberta geothermal collaboration, we are developing a program to update this crustal stress state information. The program consists of more immediate studies related to conventional analysis of borehole image logs, core fractures, and transient pressure records as can be made available. Data sets analyzed to date include logs to 3.5 km depth from areas experiencing induced seismicity, from 2.5 km depth within the Precambrian craton in NE Alberta, and to 400 m depth within a large carbonate platform. All these data largely confirm the NE-SW stress directions. In some cases, the configurations of drilling induced tensile fractures and borehole breakouts allow the faulting regime to be constrained. The addition of new seismometers to the region is also allowing for the refinement of earthquake focal mechanisms. Finally, a dramatic contrast in lithosphere thickness, composition and geothermal gradient exists at the contact between the Cordillera and the North American craton; therefore, lithosphere-scale numerical models are also being developed to quantify the relative contribution of geodynamic processes, such as mantle flow and contact geometry, to the observed stress regime within the basin.

  14. Using Collaborative Modeling to Inform Policy Decisions in the Bow River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheer, A. S.; Sheer, D. P.; Hill, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Bow River in Alberta, Canada serves a wide range of municipal, agricultural, recreational, and industrial purposes in the province. In 2006, the basin was deemed over-allocation and closed to new licenses. The Calgary region, however, continues to expand. In the next 60 to 70 years, population levels are expected to reach 2.8 million (more than double the current 1.2 million) with 800,000 new jobs. This increasing pressure led several stakeholders to work together in the development of a new management model to improve the management of the system as an integrated watershed. The major previous model of the system allowed only limited flexibility in management, focusing instead on strict license based operations. Over a 6 month period, with numerous multi-party meetings, the group developed the Bow River Operations Model (BROM). Based in OASIS software, this model integrated input from the major water users in the region to emulate the real-life decisions that are actually made on a daily bases, even when technically in violation of the strict license agreements (e.x. junior licensees receiving water despite senior priority due to exceedingly low volume requirements). Using historical records as forecasts, and performance measures developed with the best available science through expert opinion, participants jointly developed a new reservoir operation strategy. Even with such a short timeframe, the BROM exercise showed that there was substantial room for improvement. Utilizing a "Water Bank" of purchased storage, downstream flows could be significantly improved without affecting quality. Additional benefits included fishery improvement, new recreation opportunities, dissolved oxygen improvement during critical periods, and the ability to accommodate long-term demand forecasts for surrounding municipalities. This strategy has been presented to, and favorably received by, the Alberta Minister of Environment for guidance during negotiations with the local

  15. Multidimensional nonlinear descriptive analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishisato, Shizuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of categorical, or non-numerical, data is a problem that scientists face across a wide range of disciplines. Exploring data analysis in various areas of research, such as the social sciences and biology, Multidimensional Nonlinear Descriptive Analysis presents methods for analyzing categorical data that are not necessarily sampled randomly from a normal population and often involve nonlinear relations. This reference not only provides an overview of multidimensional nonlinear descriptive analysis (MUNDA) of discrete data, it also offers new results in a variety of fields. The first part of the book covers conceptual and technical preliminaries needed to understand the data analysis in subsequent chapters. The next two parts contain applications of MUNDA to diverse data types, with each chapter devoted to one type of categorical data, a brief historical comment, and basic skills peculiar to the data types. The final part examines several problems and then concludes with suggestions for futu...

  16. Descriptive sensory evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian

    in projective mapping frame geometry and restrictions on the reported semantics. Two rapid descriptive evaluation techniques were proposed to represent a consensus evaluation. One of the approaches, ‘consensus attribute rating’ (CAR), allows a group of assessors to rate products on a list of pre......-selected attributes. The other approach, ‘consensus Napping’, allows a group of assessors to project products according to an agreed consensus placement on a paper sheet. Evaluations were performed either by groups of experienced sensory assessors or by product experts. Compared with conventional profiling techniques......, the evaluations showed significant correlations between some product configurations, but no consistent and systematic similarities. On average, product expert groups had less in common with the reference profiles than the trained panellist groups and the semantic descriptions of products varied to a large degree...

  17. Descriptive sensory evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian

    A recent trend in descriptive sensory evaluation methodology has been the application of rapid evaluation techniques. The ease in use makes the techniques extremely easy to implement by industry and university environments. Thus, one might not consider validity in the choice of method. The overall...... in projective mapping frame geometry and restrictions on the reported semantics. Two rapid descriptive evaluation techniques were proposed to represent a consensus evaluation. One of the approaches, ‘consensus attribute rating’ (CAR), allows a group of assessors to rate products on a list of pre...... for all groups. Hence, consensus profiling with untrained assessors should not be used for the purpose of considering consistency between panels, while assessors trained in the product may perform more reliably. As for projective mapping variations of frame geometry, evaluations in a rectangular...

  18. Resource Description Framework (RDF)

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbins, Nicholas; Shadbolt, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is the standard knowledge representation language for the Semantic Web, an evolution of the World Wide Web that aims to provide a well-founded infrastructure for publishing, sharing and querying structured data. This article provides an introduction to RDF and its related vocabulary definition language RDF Schema, and explains its relationship with the OWL Web Ontology Language. Finally, it provides an overview of the historical development of RDF and ...

  19. TMACS system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a description of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). It is intended as an introduction for those persons unfamiliar with the system as well as a reference document for the users, maintenance personnel, and system designers. In addition to describing the system, the document outlines the associated drawing documentation, provides maintenance and spare parts information, and discusses other TMACS documents that provide additional detail

  20. XML Diagnostics Description Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, A.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.; Lister, J.; Yonekawa, I.

    2006-01-01

    A standard for the self-description of fusion plasma diagnostics will be presented, based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The motivation is to maintain and organise the information on all the components of a laboratory experiment, from the hardware to the access security, to save time and money when problems arises. Since there is no existing standard to organise this kind of information, every Association stores and organises each experiment in different ways. This can lead to severe problems when the organisation schema is poorly documented or written in national languages. The exchange of scientists, researchers and engineers between laboratories is a common practice nowadays. Sometimes they have to install new diagnostics or to update existing ones and frequently they lose a great deal of time trying to understand the currently installed system. The most common problems are: no documentation available; the person who understands it has left; documentation written in the national language. Standardisation is the key to solving all the problems mentioned. From the commercial information on the diagnostic (component supplier; component price) to the hardware description (component specifications; drawings) to the operation of the equipment (finite state machines) through change control (who changed what and when) and internationalisation (information at least in the native language and in English), a common XML schema will be proposed. This paper will also discuss an extension of these ideas to the self-description of ITER plant systems, since the problems will be identical. (author)

  1. Response of Sphagnum fuscum to Nitrogen Deposition: A Case Study of Ombrogenous Peatlands in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitt, D.H.; Wieder, K.; Halsey, L.A.; Turetsky, M.

    2003-01-01

    Peatlands cover about 30% of northeastern Alberta and are ecosystems that are sensitive to nitrogen deposition. In polluted areas of the UK, high atmospheric N deposition (as a component of acid deposition) has been considered among the causes of Sphagnum decline in bogs (ombrogenous peatlands). In relatively unpolluted areas of western Canada and northern Sweden, short-term experimental studies have shown that Sphagnum responds quickly to nutrient loading, with uptake and retention of nitrogen and increased production. Here we examine the response of Sphagnum fuscum to enhanced nitrogen deposition generated during 34 years of oil sands mining through the determination of net primary production (NPP) and nitrogen concentrations in the upper peat column. We chose six continental bogs receiving differing atmospheric nitrogen loads (modeled using a CALPUFF 2D dispersion model). Sphagnum fuscum net primary production (NPP) at the high deposition site (Steepbank - mean of 600 g/m2; median of 486 g/m2) was over three times as high than at five other sites with lower N deposition. Additionally, production of S. fuscum may be influenced to some extent by distance of the moss surface from the water table. Across all sites, peat nitrogen concentrations are highest at the surface, decreasing in the top 3 cm with no significant change with increasing depth. We conclude that elevated N deposition at the Steepbank site has enhanced Sphagnum production. Increased N concentrations are evident only in the top 1-cm of the peat profile. Thus, 34 years after mine startup, increased N-deposition has increased net primary production of Sphagnum fuscum without causing elevated levels of nitrogen in the organic matter profile. A response to N-stress for Sphagnum fuscum is proposed at 14-34 kg ha-1 yr-1. A review of N-deposition values reveals a critical N-deposition value of between 14.8 and 15.7 kg ha -1 yr-1 for NPP of Sphagnum species.

  2. Differences between measured and reported volatile organic compound emissions from oil sands facilities in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Meng; Leithead, Amy; Moussa, Samar G; Liggio, John; Moran, Michael D; Wang, Daniel; Hayden, Katherine; Darlington, Andrea; Gordon, Mark; Staebler, Ralf; Makar, Paul A; Stroud, Craig A; McLaren, Robert; Liu, Peter S K; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L; Zhang, Junhua; Marson, George; Cober, Stewart G; Wolde, Mengistu; Wentzell, Jeremy J B

    2017-05-09

    Large-scale oil production from oil sands deposits in Alberta, Canada has raised concerns about environmental impacts, such as the magnitude of air pollution emissions. This paper reports compound emission rates ( E ) for 69-89 nonbiogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for each of four surface mining facilities, determined with a top-down approach using aircraft measurements in the summer of 2013. The aggregate emission rate ( aE ) of the nonbiogenic VOCs ranged from 50 ± 14 to 70 ± 22 t/d depending on the facility. In comparison, equivalent VOC emission rates reported to the Canadian National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) using accepted estimation methods were lower than the aE values by factors of 2.0 ± 0.6, 3.1 ± 1.1, 4.5 ± 1.5, and 4.1 ± 1.6 for the four facilities, indicating underestimation in the reported VOC emissions. For 11 of the combined 93 VOC species reported by all four facilities, the reported emission rate and E were similar; but for the other 82 species, the reported emission rate was lower than E The median ratio of E to that reported for all species by a facility ranged from 4.5 to 375 depending on the facility. Moreover, between 9 and 53 VOCs, for which there are existing reporting requirements to the NPRI, were not included in the facility emission reports. The comparisons between the emission reports and measurement-based emission rates indicate that improvements to VOC emission estimation methods would enhance the accuracy and completeness of emission estimates and their applicability to environmental impact assessments of oil sands developments.

  3. Micrometeorological Measurements Reveal Large Nitrous Oxide Losses during Spring Thaw in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Flesch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soils in Canada have been observed to emit a large pulse of nitrous oxide (N2O gas during the spring thaw, representing a large percentage of the annual emissions. We report on three years of spring thaw N2O flux measurements taken at three Alberta agricultural sites: a crop production site (Crop, cattle winter-feeding site (WF, and a cattle winter-grazing site (WG. Soil fluxes were calculated with a micrometeorological technique based on the vertical gradient in N2O concentration above each site measured with an open-path (line-averaging FTIR gas detector. The Crop and WG sites showed a clear N2O emission pulse lasting 10 to 25 days after thawing began. During this pulse there was a strong diurnal cycle in emissions that paralleled the cycle in near-surface soil temperature. The emission pulse was less pronounced at the WF site. The average spring thaw losses (over 25 to 31 days were 5.3 (Crop, 7.0 (WF, and 8.0 (WG kg N2O-N ha−1, representing 1 to 3.5% of the annual nitrogen input to the sites. These large losses are higher than found in most previous western Canadian studies, and generally higher than the annual losses estimated from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Canadian National Inventory Report calculations. The high N2O losses may be explained by high soil nitrate levels which promoted rapid denitrification during thawing. The application of a high resolution (temporal micrometeorological technique was critical to revealing these losses.

  4. Stress drop estimates and hypocenter relocations of induced earthquakes near Fox Creek, Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, F.; Harrington, R. M.; Liu, Y.; Gu, Y. J.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical differences between induced and naturally occurring earthquakes using a sequence of events potentially induced by hydraulic fracturing near Fox Creek, Alberta. We perform precise estimations of static stress drop to determine if the range of values is low compared to values estimated for naturally occurring events, as has been suggested by previous studies. Starting with the Natural Resources Canada earthquake catalog and using waveform data from regional networks, we use a spectral ratio method to calculate the static stress drop values of a group of relocated earthquakes occurring in close proximity to hydraulic fracturing wells from December 2013 to June 2015. The spectral ratio method allows us to precisely constrain the corner frequencies of the amplitude spectra by eliminating the path and site effects of co-located event pairs. Our estimated stress drop values range from 0.1 - 149 MPa over the full range of observed magnitudes, Mw 1.5-4, which are on the high side of the typical reported range of tectonic events, but consistent with other regional studies [Zhang et al., 2016; Wang et al., 2016]. , Stress drops values range from 11 to 93 MPa and appear to be scale invariant over the magnitude range Mw 3 - 4, and are less well constrained at lower magnitudes due to noise and bandwidth limitations. We observe no correlation between event stress drop and hypocenter depth or distance from the wells. Relocated hypocenters cluster around corresponding injection wells and form fine-scale lineations, suggesting the presence and orientation of fault planes. We conclude that neither the range of stress drops nor their scaling with respect to magnitude can be used to conclusively discriminate induced and tectonic earthquakes, as stress drop values may be greatly affected by the regional setting. Instead, the double-difference relocations may be a more reliable indicator of induced seismicity.

  5. Historical trends in greenhouse gas emissions of the Alberta oil sands (1970–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, Jacob G; Bharadwaj, Sharad; Brandt, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    There has been increased scrutiny of the Alberta oil sands due to their high carbon intensity (CI) relative to conventional crude oil. Relying entirely on public and peer-reviewed data sources, we examine historical trends in the CI of oil sands extraction, upgrading, and refining. Monthly data were collected and interpolated from 1970 to 2010 (inclusive) for each oil sands project. Results show a reduction in oil sands CI over time, with industry-average full-fuel cycle (well-to-wheels, WTW) CI declining from 165 gCO 2 e MJ −1 higher heating value (HHV) of reformulated gasoline (RFG) to 105 (−12, +9) gCO 2 e MJ −1 HHV RFG. 2010 averages by production pathways are 102 gCO 2 e MJ −1 for Mining and 111 gCO 2 e MJ −1 for in situ. The CI of mining-based projects has declined due to upgrader efficiency improvements and a shift away from coke to natural gas as a process fuel. In situ projects have benefitted from substantial reductions in fugitive emissions from bitumen batteries. Both mining and in situ projects have benefitted from improved refining efficiencies. However, despite these improvements, the CI of oil sands production (on a pathway-average basis) ranges from 12 to 24% higher than CI values from conventional oil production. Due to growing output, total emissions from the oil sands continue to increase despite improved efficiency: total upstream emissions were roughly 65 MtCO 2 e in 2010, or 9% of Canada’s emissions. (letter)

  6. Measurements of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the oil sands region of Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, S. G.; Leithead, A.; Li, S. M.; Gordon, M.; Hayden, K. L.; Wang, D. K.; Staebler, R. M.; Liu, P.; O'Brien, J.; Mittermeier, R.; Liggio, J.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, and represent an important fraction of volatile organic compounds. Additionally some OVOC species may pose health risks. OVOCs can affect the oxidative and radiative budget of the atmosphere since they are precursors to ground level ozone, hydroxyl radicals and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). OVOCs such as methanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, crotonaldehyde, methylvinylketone (MVK), methylethylketone (MEK) and acrolein can be emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Additionally, they are the secondary products of the photo-oxidation of hydrocarbons (biogenic and anthropogenic). Understanding the magnitude of these sources is a prerequisite for accurate representations of radical cycling, ozone production and SOA formation in air quality models. The sources of OVOCs in the Alberta Oil Sands (OS) region have not previously been well characterized. In the summer of 2013, airborne measurements of various OVOCs were made in the Athabasca oil sands region between August 13 and September 7, 2013. Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure methanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, crotonaldehyde, MVK, MEK, acrolein as well as other hydrocarbons. Emission ratios (ER) for several OVOCs (relative to carbon monoxide; CO) were used to estimate direct anthropogenic emissions from OS industrial sources, while the calculated OH radical exposures were used to estimate the production and removal of secondary anthropogenic OVOCs. The results indicate that OVOCs such as acetaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and MVK have both primary and secondary anthropogenic and biogenic sources. However, species such as methanol and acrolein are from biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The results of this work will help to characterize sources of OVOCs and the factors influencing their atmospheric fate in the Oil Sands region.

  7. Structural architecture and glacitectonic evolution of the Mud Buttes cupola hill complex, southern Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Emrys; Evans, David J. A.; Atkinson, Nigel; Kendall, Allison

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a detailed multidisciplinary study of the deformed bedrock and overlying Quaternary sediments exposed at the Mud Buttes in southern Alberta, Canada. This large, arcuate cupola hill is composed of intensely folded and thrust sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Cretaceous Belly River Group. Glacitectonism responsible for the development of this internally complex landform occurred at the margin of the newly defined Prospect Valley lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Analysis of the deformation structures reveals that construction of this landform occurred in response to at least two phases of south-directed ice sheet advance separated by a period of retreat. The first phase led to the formation of a forward propagating imbricate thrust stack leading to polyphase deformation of the Belly River Group. D1 thrusting led to the detachment of thrust-bound slices of bedrock which were accreted to the base of the developing imbricate stack. This process resulted in the structurally higher and older thrust-slices being progressively ;back-rotated; (tilted), accompanied by D2 thrusting and folding. Further thrusting during D3 was restricted to the core of the Mud Buttes as the deforming sequence accommodated further compression imposed by the advancing ice. Minor oscillations of the ice margin led to localised brittle-ductile shearing (D4) of the bedrock immediately adjacent to the ice contact part of the thrust stack. The second phase of ice advance led to the accretion of a relatively simple thrust and folded sequence seen the northern side of Mud Buttes. The resulting composite thrust moraine was subsequently overridden by ice advancing from the NNW to form a dome-like cupola-hill. This readvance of the Prospect Valley lobe led to the formation of a thin carapace of Quaternary sediments mantling the Mud Buttes which include glacitectonite, till and an organic-rich clay-silt (?palaeosol).

  8. Standardization of the Alberta infant motor scale in full-term Greek infants: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrengelas, D; Siahanidou, T; Kourlaba, G; Kleisiouni, P; Bakoula, C; Chrousos, G P

    2010-04-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is a norm-referenced test that assesses the spontaneous motor performance of infants from birth through independent walking (0-18 months). This scale has been utilized for clinical and research purposes in various countries, however, whether the initial standardization in Canadian infants is also representative of other countries' populations has been questioned. To assess whether the AIMS needs new reference values for Greek infants. A cohort of 424 healthy full-term infants (250 boys and 174 girls), aged between 7 days and 18 months, derived from various areas of the Prefecture of Attica and from all socio-economic classes to ensure a true representation, was studied. The AIMS-scores of Greek infants were compared with the norm-referenced values of the original Canadian population reported by Piper and Darrah. The mean AIMS-scores did not differ significantly between Greek and Canadian infants at any age level from birth to 18 months, except for the 2-<3 month of age when higher scores were observed in Greek infants (p=0.02). There was no significant difference in AIMS-values corresponding to the 5th and 90th percentile between Greek and Canadian infants. Inter-rater reliability was excellent in our study population [ICC: 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-0.99)]. In healthy full-term Greek infants, gross motor maturity assessed by the AIMS during the first 18 months of age, seems to follow a similar course to that of Canadian infants. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Crop Performance and Soil Properties in Two Artificially-Eroded Soils in North-Central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Malhi, S. S.; Nyborg, M.; Solberg, E. D.; Quiroga Jakas, Maria C.

    2006-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted from 1991 to 1995 at Josephburg (Orthic Black Chernozem, Typic Cryoboroll) and Cooking Lake (Orthic Gray Luvisol, Typic Cryoboralf), Alberta, to determine impact of topsoil removal on selected soil properties, N-mineralization potential and crop yield, and effectiveness of various amendments for restoring the productivity of eroded soils. The simulated-erosion levels were established in the autumn of 1990 by removing 20 cm topsoil in 5-cm depth increments. The four amendments were: control, addition of 5 cm of topsoil, fertilizers to supply 100 kg N ha-1 and 20 kg P ha-1, and cattle manure at 75 Mg ha-1. Topsoil and manure were applied once in the autumn of 1990, while fertilizers were applied annually from 1991 to 1995. Available N and P, total C, N and P, and N-mineralization potential decreased, while bulk density increased with increasing depth of topsoil removal. Tiller number, plant height, spike density, thousand kernel weight, and leaf area index decreased with simulated erosion. Grain yield reductions due to simulated soil erosion were either linear or curvilinear functions of nutrient removal. Application of N and P fertilizers and manure improved grain yield and reduced the impact of yield loss due to erosion. Return of 5 cm of topsoil also increased grain yield, but to a lesser extent than manure or fertilizers. Grain yields were maximized when fertilizers were also applied to organic amendment treatments. In conclusion, the findings suggest the importance of integrated use of organic amendments and chemical fertilizers for best crop yields on severely-eroded soils.

  10. Effects of pipeline construction on chernozemic and solonetzic A and B horizons in Central Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsburg, S. (NOVA Corp. of Alberta, Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1989-05-01

    The effects of pipeline construction on agricultural soil quality ratings were evaluated for the A and B horizons of Orthic Dark Brown Chernozem and Dark Brown Solonetz soils at three sites in Central Alberta 1 wk after construction. At each site, samples of the Ap horizon from the spoil side, trench, and work side portions of a pipeline right-of-way were compared to a sample of the Ap horizon from an adjacent area unaffected by pipeline construction. Spoil material below replaced topsoil on the trench was compared to a sample of an undisturbed B horizon. Regardless of soil type or land use, construction had no effect on the Ap horizon on the work side. This was due to optimum weather conditions during construction; low rainfall resulted in lack of soil ruting and minimal soil mixing. For both soil types under cultivation, construction increased soluble salt concentrations in the Ap horizons on the spoil side due to mixing of topsoil and spoil materials. There were few effects on the Ap horizon on the spoil side in pasture land, due to trench only topsoil stripping and easy spoil removal from a well-developed sod layer. Both the Ap and spoil from the trench in the Dark Brown Solonetz had increased salt concentrations, while there were few changes in the Dark Brown Chernozem. Mixing of topsoil and spoil material, and bringing salt-enriched material to the spoil surface are thought to be reponsible for the effects due to construction were reflected in the Ap horizon of the trench and spoil side by changes in pH, electrical conductivity, soluble salts and bulk density. Even with the increases in the soil properties monitored, the results indicated that regardless of soil type or land use, pipeline construction did not significantly affect the agricultural soil quality of the A and B horizons. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Influences of climate on the radial growth of lodgepole pine in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhin, S.; Lieffers, V.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Hogg, E.H. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Huang, S. [Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Forest Management Branch

    2008-02-15

    The forests of the Cordilleran region were used to document past relationships between tree growth and climate. Radial growth and climate relationships of lodgepole pines were examined across a network of 17 sites in Alberta over a distance of 1100 km. Pine sites were selected from a permanent plot database covering the predominant latitudinal and elevational range of lodgepole pines. An average of 21 dominant and co-dominant trees were sampled in a 50 m buffer zone. Ring-width series were detrended in 3 stages using negative exponential curves, linear regression, and low frequency standardized series (LFS). Each LFS series was detrended with a cubic-smoothing spline. Autocorrelation in each series was removed via autoregressive (AR) modelling resulting in high frequency residual series. High frequency residual (HFR) site chronologies were constructed by averaging HFR series developed at each site. Primary climate variables included mean daily minimum and maximum temperatures for each month and total monthly precipitation. Relationships between the different chronology types were then examined. Results of the study demonstrated that cool and moist conditions during the later summer months led to improved radial growth levels during the following years. Warm, dry winters and warm conditions during the autumn of the year in which the ring was formed also promoted tree growth. Results suggested that climatic warming and drying have opposing effects. It was concluded that future impacts on lodgepole pine radial growth will depend on the pattern and magnitude of changes in temperature and precipitation in each season. 55 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. Health researchers in Alberta: an exploratory comparison of defining characteristics and knowledge translation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdsell Judy M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canadian funding agencies are no longer content to support research that solely advances scientific knowledge, and key directives are now in place to promote research transfer to policy- and decision-makers. Therefore, it is necessary to improve our understanding of how researchers are trained and supported to facilitate knowledge translation activities. In this study, we investigated differences in health researcher characteristics and knowledge translation activities. Methods Our sample consisted of 240 health researchers from three Alberta universities. Respondents were classified by research domain [basic (n = 72 or applied (n = 168] and faculty [medical school (n = 128 or other health science (n = 112]. We examined our findings using Mode I and Mode II archetypes of knowledge production, which allowed us to consider the scholarly and social contexts of knowledge production and translation. Results Differences among health researcher professional characteristics were not statistically significant. There was a significant gender difference in the applied researcher faculty group, which was predominantly female (p p p = .01; Mode II, p p = .025 and number of publications (medical school > other faculties; p = .004. There was an interaction effect for research domain and faculty group for number of publications (p = .01, in that applied researchers in medical faculties published more than their peers in other faculty groups. Conclusion Our findings illustrate important differences between health researchers and provide beginning insights into their professional characteristics and engagement in Mode I and Mode II activities. A future study designed to examine these dimensions in greater detail, including potential covariates across more varied institutions, would yield richer insights and enable an examination of relative influences, needs and costs of each mode of activity.

  13. Paste backfill of shallow mine workings for land reclamation in Canmore, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predika, R.; Beattie, A. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Beddoes, R. [Golder Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The coal mining history in Canmore, Alberta was presented along with reclamation activities that mine regulators carried out following closure of the mines after nearly 100 years of underground mining. The 7 seams that were mined commercially extend over distances of a few hundred feet and have been displaced by faults. Voids and collapsed rubble in shallow underground workings pose a risk of potential ground subsidence that can affect the stability of surface structures and infrastructure, including the planned development of the proposed Three Sisters Mountain Village on land above the abandoned mines. The village includes plans for 10,000 residential homes, 2 golf courses, and a resource centre. A mine works mitigation program involved drilling primary injection boreholes on a 15 m grid pattern to map the constraint zones in order to gain a better perspective of the subsidence issues as well as the effects of subsidence on structural stress and public safety. When determining mitigation criteria, various land uses and ranges of subsidence hazards were considered to be compatible with each land use. A paste backfill composed of aggregate from a locally available till overburden site was mixed with cement and injected into the void spaces. This paper described the cemented paste backfill injection method; confirmatory methods; maximum volume and pressure criteria; survey for ground uplift; and borehole camera and manual checks for cemented paste backfill in adjacent boreholes. Quality control testing was carried out by means of slump tests. It was concluded that cemented paste backfill mix could be used successfully to stabilize abandoned mine workings for land recovery. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  14. Cultural keystone species in oil sands mine reclamation, Fort McKay, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, A.; Straker, J. [Stantec Ltd., Sidney, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Cultural keystone species (CKS) shape the cultural identify of people through the roles they have in diet, material and spiritual practices. The use of the CKS concept is regarded as a method of addressing linked social and ecological issues. This paper presented the results of using the CKS model in the indigenous community of Fort McKay, Alberta to address, social, ecological and spiritual values in regional mine-land reclamation. Fort McKay is at the epicenter of the existing mine developments. Its residents regard human and environmental health to be be linked and therefore experience the effects of development and subsequent reclamation on both cultural and ecological levels. The community is actively engaged in working with the local mining companies on issues of mine reclamation design. In order to hold meaning to the local people, oil sand operators used the CKS concept in their reclamation efforts to take into account ecological functionality and also address the linked social factors. Five CKS were identified through a literature review and extensive community interviews. The list includes moose, cranberry, blueberry, ratroot and beaver. These 5 CKS were used to focus discussions and make recommendations for relevant land reclamation within Fort McKay traditional territory. The project has influenced the way both the community and oil sands operators engage with reclamation. Lessons learned from this process will help direct reclamation activities on other portions of traditional territory, while offering guidance to other regional developers for addressing cultural values in reclamation on their leases. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Compressed air energy storage with waste heat export: An Alberta case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safaei, Hossein; Keith, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Export of compression waste heat from CAES facilities for municipal heating can be profitable. • D-CAES concept has a negative abatement cost of −$40/tCO 2 e under the studied circumstances. • Economic viability of D-CAES highly depends on distance between air storage site and heat load. - Abstract: Interest in compressed air energy storage (CAES) technology has been renewed driven by the need to manage variability form rapidly growing wind and solar capacity. Distributed CAES (D-CAES) design aims to improve the efficiency of conventional CAES through locating the compressor near concentrated heating loads so capturing additional revenue through sales of compression waste heat. A pipeline transports compressed air to the storage facility and expander, co-located at some distance from the compressor. The economics of CAES are strongly dependant on electricity and gas markets in which they are embedded. As a case study, we evaluated the economics of two hypothetical merchant CAES and D-CAES facilities performing energy arbitrage in Alberta, Canada using market data from 2002 to 2011. The annual profit of the D-CAES plant was $1.3 million more on average at a distance of 50 km between the heat load and air storage sites. Superior economic and environmental performance of D-CAES led to a negative abatement cost of −$40/tCO 2 e. We performed a suite of sensitivity analyses to evaluate the impact of size of heat load, size of air storage, ratio of expander to compressor size, and length of pipeline on the economic feasibility of D-CAES

  16. Escala Motora Infantil de Alberta: validação para uma população gaúcha Escala motora infantil de Alberta: validación para una población de Rio Grande do Sul (Brasil Infant Motor Scale of Alberta: validation for a population of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cristina Valentini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Traduzir, adaptar e verificar a validade de critérios motor e de constructo (consistência interna, validade dis-criminante, correlação com outros testes e validade preditiva da versão em Português da Alberta Motor Infant Scale. MÉTODOS: Estudo de validação transcultural. Participaram 21 profissionais e 561 crianças do Rio Grande do Sul, com idades de zero a 18 meses (291 meninos. Foram utilizados os instrumentos: Alberta Infant Motor Scale, Escala do Desen-volvimento do Comportamento da Criança e um questionário para controle de variáveis. O estudo compreendeu as fases de tradução e adaptação da escala; análise da validade de conteúdo; treinamento de profissionais; coleta de dados no ambiente familiar e em creches; análise da objetividade e fidedignidade, e validade de critério e construto. RESULTADOS: A versão portuguesa da Alberta Infant Motor Scale continha critérios motores claros e pertinentes; apresentou ótima confiabilidade (escore total, p=0,88; prono, p=0,86; supino, p=0,89; sentado, p=0,80 e em pé, p=0,85 e poder discriminativo (desenvolvimento típico versus atípico; escore, pOBJETIVO: Traducir, adaptar y verificar la validez y clareza de criterios motor y constructo (consistencia interna, vali-dez discriminante, correlación con otras pruebas y validez predictiva de la versión en Portugués de la Alberta Motor Infant Scale. MÉTODOS: Estudio de validación transcultural, descriptivo y transversal. Participaron 21 profesionales y 561 niños de Rio Grande do Sul, con edades entre 0 y 18 meses (291 niños y 270 niñas. Se utilizaron los instrumentos: Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS, Escala del Desarrollo del Comportamiento del Niño (EDCC y un cuestionario para control de variables. El estudio comprendió las etapas de traducción y adaptación de la escala; análisis de la validez de contenido; entrenamiento de profesionales; recolección de datos en el ambiente familiar y en guarderías; an

  17. Manyame River Basin, Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Available on website http://www.wrc.org.za. ISSN 1816-7950 (On-line) = Water SA Vol. 42 No. 1 January 2016. Published under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence. A test of the Lake Habitat Survey method in Cleveland Reservoir and. Lake Chivero (Manyame River Basin, Zimbabwe). Tatenda Dalu1*, Edwin ...

  18. The Mediterranean basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Barbaro, A.

    2008-01-01

    genetically from the rest of the populations in the Mediterranean area. This result supports the hypothesis of a low incidence of the south-north genetic interchange at the western shores of the Mediterranean basin. A low genetic distance was found between populations in the Middle East and the western part...

  19. Habitat Restoration as a Key Conservation Lever for Woodland Caribou: A review of restoration programs and key learnings from Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bentham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, Boreal Population in Canada (EC, 2012, identifies coordinated actions to reclaim woodland caribou habitat as a key step to meeting current and future caribou population objectives. Actions include restoring industrial landscape features such as roads, seismic lines, pipelines, cut-lines, and cleared areas in an effort to reduce landscape fragmentation and the changes in caribou population dynamics associated with changing predator-prey dynamics in highly fragmented landscapes. Reliance on habitat restoration as a recovery action within the federal recovery strategy is high, considering all Alberta populations have less than 65% undisturbed habitat, which is identified in the recovery strategy as a threshold providing a 60% chance that a local population will be self-sustaining. Alberta’s Provincial Woodland Caribou Policy also identifies habitat restoration as a critical component of long-term caribou habitat management. We review and discuss the history of caribou habitat restoration programs in Alberta and present outcomes and highlights of a caribou habitat restoration workshop attended by over 80 representatives from oil and gas, forestry, provincial and federal regulators, academia and consulting who have worked on restoration programs. Restoration initiatives in Alberta began in 2001 and have generally focused on construction methods, revegetation treatments, access control programs, and limiting plant species favourable to alternate prey. Specific treatments include tree planting initiatives, coarse woody debris management along linear features, and efforts for multi-company and multi-stakeholder coordinated habitat restoration on caribou range. Lessons learned from these programs have been incorporated into large scale habitat restoration projects near Grande Prairie, Cold Lake, and Fort McMurray. A key outcome of our review is the opportunity to provide a

  20. A focused ethnographic study of Alberta cattle veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The animal and public health communities need to address the challenge posed by zoonotic emerging infectious diseases. To minimize the impacts of future events, animal disease surveillance will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Diagnostic laboratory-based surveillance systems targeting domestic animals depend in large part on private veterinarians to submit samples from cases to a laboratory. In contexts where pre-diagnostic laboratory surveillance systems have been implemented, this group of veterinarians is often asked to input data. This scenario holds true in Alberta where private cattle veterinarians have been asked to participate in the Alberta Veterinary Surveillance Network-Veterinary Practice Surveillance, a platform to which pre-diagnostic disease and non-disease case data are submitted. Consequently, understanding the factors that influence these veterinarians to submit cases to a laboratory and the complex of factors that affect their participation in surveillance programs is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with ten cattle veterinarians in Alberta. Individual in-depth interviews with participants were recorded and transcribed to enable thematic analysis. Laboratory submissions were biased toward outbreaks of unknown cause, cases with unusual mortality rates, and issues with potential herd-level implications. Decreasing cattle value and government support for laboratory testing have contributed to fewer submissions over time. Participants were willing participants in surveillance, though government support and collaboration were necessary. Changes in the beef industry and veterinary profession, as well as cattle producers themselves, present both challenges and opportunities in surveillance.