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Sample records for albarrana uranium ores

  1. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Jodra, L.; Perez Luina, A.; Perarnau, M.

    1960-01-01

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  2. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores; Tratamiento de los minerales de uranio de Sierra Albarrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Jodra, L.; Perez Luina, A.; Perarnau, M.

    1960-07-01

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  3. Uranium ore dressing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floter, W.; Schoning, G.; Landsiedel, K.

    1982-01-01

    A process for dressing uranium ore containing water-soluble substances is claimed. In a mixture of crushed ore and water the solid material and water are partly separated. The first fraction, which contains the smaller grain-size portion of the solid material and the major part of the water is passed through a water softening means for removal of undesired ions. The second fraction, which contains the coarser grain-size portion of the solid material and most of the solids of the first fraction from which undesired ions have been at least partly removed is leached. The liquid is processed to obtain the dissolved uranium compounds

  4. Inhalation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Jackson, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In previous studies the biological dispositions of individual long-lived alpha members of the uranium chain ( 238 U, 234 U and 230 Th) were determined during and following repeated inhalation exposures of rats to pitchblende (26 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore. Although finely dispersed ore in secular equilibrium was inhaled, 230 Th/ 234 U radioactivity ratios in the lungs rose from 1.0 to 2.5 during 8 weeks of exposures and increased to 9.2 by four months after cessation of exposures. Marked non-equilibrium levels were also found in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, kidneys, liver, and femur. Daily exposures of beagle dogs to high levels of this ore for 8 days resulted in lung 230 Th/ 234 U ratios of >2.0. Daily exposures of dogs to lower levels (0.1 mg/1) for 6 months, with sacrifice 15 months later, resulted in lung and thoracic lymph node 230 Th/ 234 U ratios ranging from 3.6 to 9 and nearly 7, respectively. The lungs of hamsters exposed to carnotite (4 percent U 3 O 8 ) ore in current lifespan studies show 230 Th/ 234 U ratios as high as 2.0 during daily inhalation of this ore in secular equilibrium. Beagle dogs sacrificed after several years of daily inhalations of the same carnotite ore plus radon daughters also showed marked non-equilibrium ratios of 230 Th/ 234 U, ranging from 5.6 to 7.4 in lungs and 6.2 to 9.1 in thoracic lymph nodes. This pattern of higher retention of 230 Th than 234 U in lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, and other tissues is thus consistent for two types of uranium ore among several species and suggests a reevaluation of maximum permissible air concentrations of ore, currently based only on uranium content

  5. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  6. Uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelelli, Victorio.

    1984-01-01

    The main uranium deposits and occurrences in the Argentine Republic are described, considering, in principle, their geologic setting, the kind of 'model' of the mineralization and its possible origin, and describing the ore species present in each case. The main uraniferous accumulations of the country include the models of 'sandstong type', veintype and impregnation type. There are also other kinds of accumulations, as in calcrete, etc. The main uranium production has been registered in the provinces of Mendoza, Salta, La Rioja, Chubut, Cordoba and San Luis. In each case, the minerals present are mentioned, having been recognized 37 different species all over the country (M.E.L.) [es

  7. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  8. Studies on uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.H.; Park, S.W.; Lim, J.K.; Chung, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical and chemical engineering techniques of the uranium ore processing established by France COGEMA (Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires) have been comprehensively reviewed in preparation for successful test operation of the pilot plant to be completed by the end of 1981. It was found that the amount of sulfuric acid (75 Kg/t, ore) and sodium chlorate (2.5 Kg/t, ore) recommended by COGEMA should be increased up to 100 Kg/t, ore and 10 Kg/t, ore respectively to obtain satisfactory leach of uranium for some ore samples produced at the different pits of Goesan uranium mine. Conditions of the other processes such as solvent extraction, stripping, and precipitation of yellow cake were generally agreed with the results of intensive studies done by this laboratory

  9. Filtration aids in uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, H.L.; Levine, N.M.; Risdon, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process of improving the filtration efficiency and separation of uranium ore pulps obtained by carbonate leaching of uranium ore which comprises treating said ore pulps with an aqueous solution of hydroxyalkyl guar selected from the group consisting of hydroxyethyl and hydroxypropyl guar in the amount of 0.1 and 2.0 pounds of hydroxyalkyl guar per ton of uranium ore

  10. Zeolitization at uranium ore manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, R.V.; Buntikova, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    The process of zeolitization at uranium ore manifestation is studied. A specific type of low-temperature wall endogenous alteration of rocks due to the effect of primary acid solution with low content of carbonic acid is established. Leaching of calcium from enclosing rocks and its deposition in ore-accompanying calcium zeolites is a characteristic feature of wall-metasomatosis. Formation of desmin- calcite-laumontite and quartz-fluoroapatite of vein associations, including ore minerals (uranophane and metaotenite), is genetically connected with calcium metasomatosis. On the basis of the connection of ore minerals with endogeneous process of zeolitization a conclusion can be made on endogenous origin of uranophane and metaotenite [ru

  11. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  12. Uranium ore processing minimizing reagent losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaogiang, Chen; Moret, J.; Lyaudet, G.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium ore is treated by sodium carbonates and the solution is divided in two parts: a production solution which is decarbonated by an acid before uranium precipitation with sodium hydroxide and a recycling solution directly treated by sodium hydroxide for precipitation of about 85% of uranium and total transformation of sodium bicarbonate into sodium carbonate, the quantity of sodium hydroxide used on the recycling solution brings sodium ions required for attack of the ore [fr

  13. Uranium abundance in some sudanese phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.A.; Eltayeb, M.A.H.

    2009-01-01

    This work was carried out mainly to analysis of some Sudanese phosphate ores, for their uranium abundance and total phosphorus content measured as P 2 O 5 %. For this purpose, 30 samples of two types of phosphate ore from Eastern Nuba Mountains, in Sudan namely, Kurun and Uro areas were examined. In addition, the relationship between uranium and major, and trace elements were obtained, also, the natural radioactivity of the phosphate samples was measured, in order to characterize and differentiate between the two types of phosphate ores. The uranium abundance in Uro phosphate with 20.3% P 2 O 5 is five time higher than in Kurun phosphate with 26.7% P 2 O 5 . The average of uranium content was found to be 56.6 and 310 mg/kg for Kurun and Uro phosphate ore, respectively. The main elements in Kurun and Uro phosphate ore are silicon, aluminum, and phosphorus, while the most abundant trace elements in these two ores are titanium, strontium and barium. Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that uranium in Kurun phosphate shows strong positive correlation with P 2 O 5 , and its distribution is essentially controlled by the variations of P2O5 concentration, whereas uranium in Uro phosphate shows strong positive correlation with strontium, and its distribution is controlled by the variations of Sr concentration. Uranium behaves in different ways in Kurun phosphate and in Uro phosphate. Uro phosphate shows higher concentrations of all the estimated radionuclides than Kurun phosphate. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that Uro phosphate is consider as secondary uranium source, and is more suitable for uranium recovery, because it has high uranium abundance and low P 2 O 5 %, than Kurun phosphate. (authors) [es

  14. Origin of ores of endogeneous uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasanskij, V.I.; Laverov, N.P.; Tugarinov, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    The consideration mainly includes those endogenous uranium ore deposits of which more exact data are available, such as precambrian ones in areas of proto-activated old platforms, deposits of palaeozoic fold areas, and mesozoic deposits in areas of tectonic-magnetic activation. Their genesis and typical characters are mentioned and conclusions on the general distribution of the deposits are drawn. (author)

  15. Radiometric sorting of Rio Algom uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristovici, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    An ore sample of about 0.2 percent uranium from Quirke Mine was subjected to radiometric sorting by Ore Sorters Limited. Approximately 60 percent of the sample weight fell within the sortable size range: -150 + 25 mm. Rejects of low uranium content ( 2 (2 counts/in 2 ) but only 7.6 percent of the ore, by weight, was discarded. At 0.8-0.9 counts/cm 2 (5-6 counts/in 2 ) a significant amount of rejects was removed (> 25 percent) but the uranium loss was unacceptably high (7.7 percent). Continuation of the testwork to improve the results is proposed by trying to extend the sortable size range and to reduce the amount of fines during crushing

  16. Ferric sulphate leaching process for uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ximin

    1990-09-01

    A process using the ferric sulphate solution as a leaching agent to the uranium ore which was exploited in the south part of Hunan province was studied. The ore mainly contains uraninite. Comparing with the conventional sulphuric acid leching method, this process reduced the acid consumption about 30∼40%, and dissolved solids 15∼20%. The ferric leaching agent can cyclically be used by the ferrous oxidant bacteria. From the results of six cycles, it indicated that the ferric leaching ageng does not interfere the leaching results of uranium

  17. Application of biohydrometallurgy to uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiantang

    1989-01-01

    The development on application of biohydrometallargy to uranium ore processing is briefly introduced. The device designed for oxidizing ferrous ions in solution by using biomembrane, several bacterial leaching methods and the experimental results are given in this paper. The presented biohydrometallurgical process for recovering uranium includes bacterial leaching following by adsorption using tertiary amine resin 351 and oxidation of ferrous ions in the device with biomembranes. This process brings more economical benefits for treating silicate type original ores. The prospects on application of biogydrometallyurgy to solution mining is also discussed

  18. Possible uranium sources of Streltsovsky uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2005-01-01

    The uranium deposit of the Late Jurassic Streltsovaky caldera in Transbaikalia of Russia is the largest uranium field associated with volcanics in the world, its uranium reserves are 280 000 t U, and it is the largest uranium resources in Russia. About one third of the caldera stratigraphic pile consists of strongly-altered rhyolites. Uranium resources of the Streltsovsky caldera are much larger than any other volcanic-related uranium districts in the world. Besides, the efficiency of hydrothermal alteration, uranium resources appear to result from the juxtaposition of two major uranium sources; highly fractionated peralkaline rhyolites of Jurassic age in the caldera, and U-rich subalkaline granites of Variscan age in the basement in which the major uranium-bearing accessory minerals were metamict at the time of the hydrothermal ore formation. (authors)

  19. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  20. Chemical treatment of uranium ores in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Sartorius, R.

    1958-01-01

    The various processes of chemical treatment of uranium ores, from the oldest to the more recent, are exposed, considering the following conditions: economics, geography, techniques and safety. The interest of obtaining a final concentrate as uranyl nitrate is discussed. (author) [fr

  1. Economic evaluation of preconcentration of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The economics of two options for the preconcentration of low-grade uranium ores prior to hydrochloric acid leaching were studied. The first option uses flotation followed by wet high-intensity magnetic separation. The second option omits the flotation step. In each case it was assumed that most of the pyrite in the ore would be recovered by froth flotation, dewatered, and roasted to produce sulphuric acid and a calcine suitable for acid leaching. Savings in operating costs from preconcentration are offset by the value of uranium losses. However, a capital saving of approximately 6 million dollars is indicated for each preconcentration option. As a result of the capital saving, preconcentration appears to be economically attractive when combined with hydrochloric acid leaching. There appears to be no economic advantage to preconcentration in combination with sulphuric acid leaching of the ore

  2. RL-1: a certified uranium reference ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1985-06-01

    A 145-kg sample of a uranium ore from Rabbit Lake, Saskatchewan, has been prepared as a compositional reference material. RL-1 was ground to minus 74 μm and mixed in one lot. Approximately one half of this ore was bottled in 100-g units, the remainder being stored in bulk. The homogeneity of RL-1 with respect to uranium and nickel was confirmed by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques. In a 'free choice' analytical program, 13 laboratories contributed results for one or more of uranium, nickel and arsenic in one bottle of RL-1. Based on a statistical analysis of the data, the following recommended values were assigned: U, 0.201%; Ni, 185 μg/g; and As, 19.6 μg/g

  3. Bacterial leaching of uranium ores - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-11-01

    The bacterial leaching of uranium ores involves the bacterially catalysed oxidation of associated pyrite to sulphuric acid and Fe 3+ by autotrophic bacteria and the leaching of the uranium by the resulting acidic, oxidising solution. Industrial application has been limited to Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at pH 2 to 3, and examples of these are described. The bacterial catalysis can be improved with nutrients or prevented with poisons. The kinetics of leaching are controlled by the bed depth, particle size, percolation rate, mineralogy and temperature. Current work is aimed at quantitatively defining the parameters controlling the kinetics and extending the method to alkaline conditions with other autotrophic bacteria. (author)

  4. IAEA sends out samples of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Governments and organizations interested in developing uranium resources will be assisted by a new service, now being inaugurated by the Agency's laboratories, for the distribution of reference samples of uranium ores. This is an addition to the service which began at Seibersdorf in January 1962 for the distribution of calibrated radionuclides, and which has met with a steadily increasing demand. * Uranium deposits consisting of ores with a uranium content in the range 0.5 - 0.05 per cent occur in a number of countries, including developing countries and can present considerable analytical difficulties. In 1962 the Agency asked Member States whether they would be interested in receiving reference samples of uranium ores to assist them in checking their methods of chemical analysis. The response encouraged the Agency to proceed. There is a multiplicity of types of uranium ores and, initially, three of the most commonly occurring have been selected - torbernite, uraninite and carnotite. Member States have provided the laboratory with supplies of these three types of ore. In order to determine the uranium content, samples are sent to leading laboratories throughout the world, so as to arrive at the most accurate values possible. This work has proved to be useful to the laboratories themselves ; in searching for reasons for discrepancies between the different collaborating laboratories, they enlarge their own knowledge and improve their methods. The reference samples are sent out in the form of fine powder, and are available to atomic energy commissions, research laboratories or mining companies. The requesting laboratory, having worked out the analytical process best suited to its needs, is then able to check its results by analysing an IAEA reference sample of known uranium content. By the end of 1966, reference samples will be available of the three ores mentioned, and later also of pure uranium oxide and of uranium oxide containing trace impurities, the

  5. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  6. Processing uranium ores of Central Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaboun, H.

    2014-01-01

    A process conceptual design is proposed based on the results of a sequential metallurgical testing campaign. During which, both random and designed samples collected from uranium ore deposits of central Jordan have been subjected to dynamic and static leaching testing. The ore amenability to leaching under alkaline and acidic conditions was studied using finely ground, P80 < 64 μm, arbitrarily picked samples. Findings indicated obvious leaching amenabilities in both media, however acid leaching track was not pursued further due to the high consumption rates of reagent. Alkaline dynamic leaching rates were relatively slower and demonstrated a nonlinear tendency. Deportment analysis and dynamic testing on coarsely crushed bulk samples, planned and collected by JFUMC, supported the choice for heap leach as one promising option to process the aforementioned ore. A set of six columns were used to imitate, on a semi-pilot scale, the flow behavior inside a heap pad. Steadiness of liquid flow inside the bed was observed under a testing range 1 – 5 L/h/m 2 ; however, slumping behavior of around 7% was detected. Uranium recoveries matched well the findings of rotating bottle investigations and were attained in less than two weeks for fluxes larger than 4.5 L/h/m 2 . (author)

  7. Developments of uranium and gold ores heap leaching technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yuan; Guan Zibin; Gao Renxi

    1998-01-01

    The author reviews developments in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores at home and abroad, summarises condition of application. The author also presents problems having to be studied and settled urgently in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores in China

  8. Quantitative evaluation of uranium ore zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A logging method is described for quantitatively evaluating the abundance of uranium in ore zones in the vicinity of earth formations penetrated by a borehole, comprising: (a) obtaining measurements in the borehole of the intensities of the natural gamma ray activity of the formation in at least two energy bands of a gamma ray energy spectrum. The first band encompassing gamma rays at energies in an energy range from substantially 200 KeV to substantially 500 KeV where photoelectric absorption in uranium is significant and photoelectric absorption from other downhole elements is not significant. The second band encompassing gamma rays at energies in an energy range greater than substantially 800 KeV where photoelectric absorption is not significant for any elements, including uranium, and (b) forming a ratio of the measurements of intensities then comparing the ratio with a predetermined mathematical function to derive a quantitative indication of the uranium concentration present from the ratio of the measurements in the two energy bands and recording the quantitative indication as a function of the borehole depth of the measurement system

  9. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Calmoi, Rodica; Melniciuc-Puica, Nicoleta

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  10. NRC's limit on intake of uranium-ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1983-04-01

    In 1960 the Atomic Energy Commission adopted an interim limit on the intake by inhalation of airborne uranium-ore dust. This report culminates two decades of research aimed at establishing the adequacy of that limit. The report concludes that the AEC underestimated the time that thorium-230, a constituent of uranium-ore dust, would remain in the human lung. The AEC assumed that thorium-230 in ore dust would behave like uranium with a 120-day biological half-life in the lung. This report concludes that the biological half-life is actually on the order of 1 year. Correcting the AEC's underestimate would cause a reduction in the permitted airborne concentration of uranium-ore dust. However, another factor that cancels the need for that reduction was found. The uranium ore dust in uranium mills was found to occur with very large particle sizes (10-micron activity median aerodynamic diameter). The particles are so large that relatively few of them are deposited in the pulmonary region of the lung, where they would be subject to long-term retention. Instead they are trapped in the upper regions of the respiratory tract, subsequently swallowed, and then rapidly excreted from the body through the gastrointestinal tract. The two effects are of about the same magnitude but in opposing directions. Thus the present uranium-ore dust intake limit in NRC regulations should provide a level of protection consistent with that provided for other airborne radioactive materials. The report recalculates the limit on intake of uranium-ore dust using the derived air concentrations (DAC) from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's recent Publication 30. The report concludes that the silica contained in uranium-ore dust is a greater hazard to workers than the radiological hazard

  11. Discussion on uranium ore-formation age in Xiazhuang ore-field, northern Guangdong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lieqin; Tan Zhengzhong; Liu Ruzhou; Huang Guolong

    2003-01-01

    There exist two genetic types of granite-type uranium deposits, i.e. the early-stage one, and the late-stage one. The early-stage uranium deposits are characterized by ore-formation ages of 122-138 Ma, and are high-grade uranium deposits of postmagmatic hydrothermal origin. The late-stage uranium deposits have ore-formation ages of 54-96 Ma. They mostly are low-grade uranium deposits, and of hydrothermal-regeneration origin with the uranium source derived from the mobilization of consolidated rocks. The early-stage uranium deposits should be the main target of further prospecting for high-grade uranium deposits in the region

  12. Metallogenesis of rich uranium deposits in Xiangshan hydrothermal ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhijian; Du Letian; Liu Zhengyi

    2001-01-01

    Xiangshan Uranium Ore field located in Jiangxi Province, south of China, is one of the largest volcanogenic hydrothermal uranium ore fields in China. There are apparent difference in uranium metallogenesis between low-grade deposits and rich uranium ones (U > 0.3%, especially U > 1%) in Xiangshan hydrothermal uranium ore field. The special hydrothermal solution with higher content of P, Ti, K elements is a geochemical controlling factor for rich uranium mineralization. Fluorine is an important transporter for uranium migration in hydrothermal system, however, it plays a limited function of uranium mineralization. In fact, uranium and thorium are migrated and precipitated through some complicated processes including alkali-metasomatism, co-migration, colloid co-precipitation with phosphate minerals and gas reduction etc., which has been proved by field investigation, experiments and a number of analysis. The deeper the orebodies are located, the higher the grade of ore is. The reasonable explanation is as following: (1) the contents of P, Ti, F, K. U and reducing gases in hydrothermal solution increase along with deepness; (2) The temperature and pressure in deep are higher than that on shallower parts. All the factors mentioned above together play active roles in uranium enrichment. Some suggestions for further exploitation and exploration in Xiangshan area have been put forward

  13. Uranium recovery from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba Mountains, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Abdelmajid A.; Eltayeb, Mohamed Ahmed H.; Ibrahim, Omar B.

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out in a laboratory scale to recover uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba Mountains in Sudan. Phosphate ore samples were collected, and analyzed for uranium abundance. The results showed that the samples contain a significant concentration of uranium with an average of 310.3 μg/g, which is 2.6 times higher than the world average of phosphate. The green phosphoric acid obtained from the samples was found to contain uranium in the range of 186–2...

  14. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  15. Mining and processing of uranium ores in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Mamilov, V.A.; Korejsho, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experience gained in uranium ore mining by modern methods in combination with underground and heap leaching is summarized. More intensive processing of low-grade ores has been achieved through the use of autoclave leaching, sorptive treatment of thick pulps, extractive separation of pure uranium compounds, automated continuous sorption devices of high efficiency for processing the underground- and heap-leaching liquors, natural and mine water, and recovery of molybdenum, vanadium, scandium, rare earths and phosphate fertilizers from low-grade ores. Production of ion-exchangers and extractants has been developed and processes for concomitant recovery of copper, gold, ionium, tungsten, caesium, zirconium, tantalum, nickel and cobalt have been designed. (author)

  16. Uranium ore purchase and custom milling agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, B.T.

    1976-01-01

    Important considerations involved in structuring agreements for ore sale or other disposition are discussed. Payment provisions in ore purchase agreements and custom milling agreement provisions are considered. Proposed forms of Ore Purchase Agreement and Custom Milling Agreement are included as appendices

  17. Summary of the mineralogy of the Colorado Plateau uranium ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Alice D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Thompson, Mary E.

    1956-01-01

    In the Colorado Plateau uranium has been produced chiefly from very shallow mines in carnotite ores (oxidized vanadiferous uranium ores) until recent deeper mining penetrated black unoxidized ores in water-saturated rocks and extensive exploration has discovered many deposits of low to nonvanadiferous ores. The uranium ores include a wide range from highly vanadiferous and from as much as one percent to a trace of copper, and contain a small amount of iron and traces of lead, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, silver, manganese, and other metals. Recent investigation indicates that the carnotite ores have been derived by progressive oxidation of primary (unoxidized) black ores that contain low-valent uranium and vanadium oxides and silicates. The uranium minerals, uraninite and coffinite, are associated with coalified wood or other carbonaceous material. The vanadium minerals, chiefly montroseite, roscoelite, and other vanadium silicates, occur in the interstices of the sandstone and in siltstone and clay pellets as well as associated with fossil wood. Calcite, dolomite, barite and minor amounts of sulfides, arsenides, and selenides occur in the unoxidized ore. Partially oxidized vanadiferous ore is blue black, purplish brown, or greenish black in contrast to the black or dark gray unoxidized ore. Vanadium combines with uranium to form rauvite. The excess vanadium is present in corvusite, fernandinite, melanovanadite and many other quadrivalent and quinquevalent vanadium minerals as well as in vanadium silicates. Pyrite and part or all of the calcite are replaced by iron oxides and gypsum. In oxidized vanadiferous uranium ores the uranium is fixed in the relatively insoluble minerals carnotite and tyuyamunite, and the excess vanadium commonly combines with one or more of the following: calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, copper, manganese, or barium, or rarely it forms the hydrated pentoxide. The relatively stable vanadium silicates are little

  18. Rirang uranium ore processing: continuous solvent extraction of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riza, F.; Nuri, H. L.; Waluya, S.; Subijanto, A.; Sarono, B.

    1998-01-01

    Separation of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution by means of continuous solvent extraction using mixer-settlers has been studied and a mixture of 0.3 M D2EHPA and 0.075 M TOPO extracting agent and kerosene diluent is employed to recover and separate uranium from Th, RE, phosphate containing solution. The experiments have been conducted batch-wise and several parameters have been studied including the aqueous to organic phase ratio, A/O, the extraction and the stripping times, and the operation temperature. The optimum conditions for extraction have been found to be A/O = 2 ratio, five minute extraction time per stage at room temperature. The uranium recovery of 99.07% has been achieved at those conditions whilst U can be stripped from the organic phase by 85% H 3 PO 4 solution with an O/A = 1 for 5 minutes stripping time per stage, and in a there stage operation at room temperature yielding a 100% uranium recovery from the stripping process

  19. Oxidizing attack process of uranium ore by a carbonated liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Pierre; Nicolas, Francois.

    1981-01-01

    A continuous process for digesting a uraniferous ore by oxidation with a recycling aqueous liquor containing alkaline carbonates and bicarbonates in solution as well as uranium in a concentration close to its solubility limit at digestion temperature, and of recuperation of the precipitated uranium within the solid phase remaining after digestion. The digestion is carried out by spraying oxygen into the hot reactional medium in order not only to permit oxidation of the uranium and its solubilization but also to ensure that the sulphides of impurities and organic substances present in the ore are oxidized [fr

  20. Manual on laboratory testing for uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory testing of uranium ores is an essential step in the economic evaluation of uranium occurrences and in the development of a project for the production of uranium concentrates. Although these tests represent only a small proportion of the total cost of a project, their proper planning, execution and interpretation are of crucial importance. The main purposes of this manual are to discuss the objectives of metallurgical laboratory ore testing, to show the specific role of these tests in the development of a project, and to provide practical instructions for performing the tests and for interpreting their results. Guidelines on the design of a metallurgical laboratory, on the equipment required to perform the tests and on laboratory safety are also given. This manual is part of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing being prepared by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management. A report on the Significance of Mineralogy in the Development of Flowsheets for Processing Uranium Ores (Technical Reports Series No. 196, 1980) and an instruction manual on Methods for the Estimation of Uranium Ore Reserves (No. 255, 1985) have already been published. 17 refs, 40 figs, 17 tabs

  1. Processing of low-grade uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, P.

    1975-01-01

    Four types of low grade ores are studied. Low grade ores which must be extracted because they are enclosed in a normal grade deposit. Heap leaching is the processing method which is largely used. It allows to obtain solutions or preconcentrates which may be delivered at the nearest plant. Normal grade ores contained in a low amplitude deposit which can be processed using leaching as far as the operation does not need any large expensive equipment. Medium grade ores in medium amplitude deposits to which a simplified conventional process can be applied using fast heap leaching. Low grade ores in large deposits. The processing possibilities leading to use in place leaching are explained. The operating conditions of the method are studied (leaching agent, preparation of the ore deposit to obtain a good tightness with regard to the hydrological system and to have a good contact between ore and reagent) [fr

  2. Analytic study of organic matters in Lodeve uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campuzano, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Exploitation of uranium in the Permian basin of Lodeve is difficult because of simultaneous extraction of organic matters which are found, in small proportion, in ammonium diuranate and a supplementary purification is required. Available information on natural organic matters are briefly reviewed. Natural organic matters contained in the Lodeve uranium ore processing fluid is separated and fractionated. Physicochemical properties of ligands in each fraction are studied. The existence of bonds between these ligands and dissolved uranium is experimentally demonstrated [fr

  3. Uranium recovery from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba Mountains, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmajid A. Adam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a laboratory scale to recover uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba Mountains in Sudan. Phosphate ore samples were collected, and analyzed for uranium abundance. The results showed that the samples contain a significant concentration of uranium with an average of 310.3 μg/g, which is 2.6 times higher than the world average of phosphate. The green phosphoric acid obtained from the samples was found to contain uranium in the range of 186–2049 μg/g, with an average of 603.3 μg/g, and about 98% of uranium content of the phosphate ore was rendered soluble in the phosphoric acid. An extraction process using 25% tributylphosphate, followed by stripping process using 0.5 M sodium carbonate reported that more than 98% of uranium in the green phosphoric acid exists as uranyl tricarbonate complex, moreover, sodic decomposition using 50% sodium hydroxide showed that about 98% of the uranium was precipitated as sodium diuranate concentrate that is known as the yellow cake (Na2U2O7. Further purification and calcinations of the yellow cake led to the formation of the orange powder of uranium trioxide (UO3. The chemical analysis of the obtained uranium concentrates; yellow cake and uranium trioxide proved their nuclear purity and that they meet the standard commercial specification. The obtained results proved that uranium from Uro phosphate ore was successfully recovered as uranium trioxide with an overall recovery percentage of 93%.

  4. Processing of low grade uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, P.

    1978-10-01

    Four types of low-grade ores are studied: (1) Low-grade ores that must be extracted because they are enclosed in a normal-grade deposit. Heap leaching is the processing method which is largely used. (2) Normal-grade ores contained in low-amplitude deposits. They can be processed using in-place leaching as far as the operation does not need any large and expensive equipment. (3) Medium-grade ores in medium-amplitude deposits. A simplified conventional process can be applied using fast heap leaching. (4) Low-grade ores in large deposits. The report explains processing possibilities leading in most cases to the use of in-place leaching. The operating conditions of this method are laid out, especially the selection of the leaching agents and the preparation of the ore deposit

  5. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Burgman, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability

  6. Uranium Rirang ore processing: extraction of uranium from Rirang ore digestion solution with tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arief, E. R.; Zahardi; Susilaningtyas

    1998-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from Rirang ore acid digestion solution containing rare earths. A mixture of tributyl phosphate solvent and kerosene diluent is employed. Several parameters of solvent extraction have been studied included aqueous to organic phase ratio, H 2 O 2 reductor concentration and Tbp concentration in the solvent mixture, as well as the aqueous to organic phase ratio in the stripping process. The optimum conditions for the extraction step include the use of 25% H 2 O 2 (v/v), one to one aqueous to organic ratio, and 40% Tbp in kerosene. The extraction recovery for U, RE, Th, and PO 4 3 - are 99%, 4%, 70%, and 30%, respectively. The stripping step optimum conditions include the use of one to five organic to aqueous phase ratio 0.24 N HNO 3 . and the stripping recovery for U, RE, Th, and PO 4 3 - are 84%, 80%, 72%, and 83%, respectively

  7. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  8. Aqueous-chlorine leaching of typical Canadian uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory-scale aqueous-chlorine leaches were conducted on quartz-pebble conglomerates, pegmatite and vein-type ores. Optimum leach temperatures, pulp density and retention times were determined. Uranium extraction of 98 per cent was obtained from the Elliot Lake, Madawaska Mines of Bancroft and Rabbit Lake ores, 96 per cent from the Key Lake ore and 86 per cent from the Agnew Lake ore. However, tailings containing 15-20 pCi g -1 of radium-226 were obtained only from the Elliot Lake and Agnew lake quartz-pebble conglomerates and Bancroft pegmatite-type ores by second-stage leaches with HCl. The second-stage leach results indicate that multistage (3 or 4) acid-chloride or salt-chloride leaches might be effective to obtain tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the high-grade vein-type ores. Comparative reagent-cost estimates show that the sulphuric-acid leach process is far less expensive than aqueous chlorine leaching. Nevertheless, only the aqueous chlorine and acid-chloride leaches in stages are effective in producing tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the typical Canadian uranium ores. (Auth.)

  9. Uranium ore mill at Dolni Rozinka: 40 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, F.; Jezova, V.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore mined in the Rozna deposit is treated at a chemical treatment plant (a mill) situated in the close vicinity of the Rozna mine. In the mill, uranium is extracted from the crushed and ground-up ore by alkaline leaching. Uranium is then recovered from the solution by sorption on ion exchange resin; the next steps are precipitation and drying. Alkaline leaching is applied at the atmospheric pressure and the temperature of 80 deg C; the recovery factor is moving around 93%. The final product of the milling is uranium concentrate, ammonium diuranate (NH 4 ) 2 U 2 O 7 ), a so-called 'yellow cake' which is treated into a fuel for nuclear power plants in conversion facilities abroad. The milling is carried on under the condition of the closed cycle of technology water. Due to the positive annual precipitation balance, the over balance of technology water in tailings pond has to be purified before discharging into a river. Evaporation and membrane processes (electrodialysis and reverse osmosis) are used to purify the water. The mill at Dolni Rozinka has been in operation since 1968. It has processed 13.2 million tons of uranium ore which is about 14000 tons of uranium and purified more than 6 million m 3 of the over balanced technology water during 40 years. From the organizational point of view, the mine and the chemical treatment plant form the branch plant GEAM, which is a part of the state enterprise DIAMO. (author)

  10. Uranium extraction from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A. A.; Eltayeb, M. A. H.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out mainly to extract uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba mountains near Abu Gibiha town in southern Kurdufan state. For this purpose first, the phosphate ore samples were decomposed with sulphuric acid. the resulting phosphoric acid was filtered off, and pretreated with pyrite and activated charcoal. the chemical analysis of the obtained grain phosphoric acid showed that about 98% of uranium content of the phosphate ore was rendered soluble in the phosphoric acid. The clear green phosphoric acid was introduced to uranium extraction by 25% tributylphosphate (Tbp) in kerosene. The effect of several factors on the extraction and stripping processes namely, interference's effect, the suitable strip solution, the required number of extraction and stripping stages, the optimum phase ratio have been studied in details. A three stage extraction at a phase ratio (aqueous/organic) of 1:2, followed by two stages stripping using 0.5 M sodium carbonate solution at a phase ratio (A/O) of 1:4 were found to be the optimum conditions to report more than 98% of uranium content in green phosphoric acid to the aqueous phase as uranyl tricarbonate complex (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- . By applying sodica decomposition upon the stripping carbonate solution using 50% sodium hydroxide, about 98% of uranium content was precipitated as sodium diuranate concentrate (Na 2 U 2 O 7 ). The chemical analysis using atomic absorption spectrometry (Aas) showed a good agreement between the specification of the obtained uranium concentrate with the standard commercial specification of sodium diuranate concentrate. Further purification was achieved for the yellow cake by selective precipitation of uranium from the solution as uranium peroxide (UO 4 .2H 2 O) using 30% hydrogen peroxide. Finally the uranium peroxide precipitated was calcined at 450 degree C to obtain the orange powder uranium trioxide (UO 3 ). The chemical analysis of the final uranium trioxide

  11. Technique for in situ leach simulation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Seidel, D.C.; Nichols, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    In situ uranium mining offers the advantages of minimal environmental disturbance, low capital and operating costs, and reduced mining development time. It is becoming an increasingly attractive mining method for the recovery of uranium from secondary ore deposits. In order to better understand the process, a laboratory technique was developed and used to study and simulate both the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in ore bodies during in situ leaching. The laboratory simulation technique has been used to determine effects of leaching variables on permeability, uranium recovery, and post-leach aquifer restoration. This report describes the simulation system and testing procedure in sufficient detail to allow the construction of the system, and to perform the desired leaching tests. With construction of such a system, in situ leaching of a given ore using various leach conditions can be evaluated relatively rapidly in the laboratory. Not only could optimum leach conditions be selected for existing ore bodies, but also exploitation of new ore bodies could be accelerated. 8 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  12. Extraction of uranium from low-grade uranium ores in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiegiel, K.; Zakrzewska, G.; Samczynski, Z.; Chajduk, E.; Chwastowska, J.; Bartosiewicz, I.; Frackiewicz, K.; Zielinska, B.; Szczyglow, K.; Herdzik-Koniecko, I.; Gajda, D.; Jaworska, A.; Miskiewicz, A.; Bieluszka, P.; Abramowska, A.; Olszewska, W.; Dybczynski, R.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.; Danko, B.; Wolkowicz, S.; Miecznik, J.

    2014-01-01

    In January 2014 Polish Government adopted the Program of Polish Nuclear Energy. One of the objectives of this Program is the assessment of domestic uranium deposits as a potential source of uranium for Polish nuclear reactors. Presently, mining of Polish low-grade uranium ores is unprofitable. However, studies on the prospects of recovery of uranium from domestic resources are in progress, keeping in mind the inevitable growing uranium demand and perspectives of the global uranium market. The most perspective deposits are in the Lower Ordovician Dictyonema Shale of the Podlasie Depression (north-east Poland) with uranium concentration of 75-250 ppm and the Lower and Middle Triassic rocks of the central parts of Peribaltic Syneclise, where concentrations reach 1.5% U (recent analysis of archive samples). Uranium usually is accompanied by other rare metals e.g. V, Mo, Ln, Ag or Co that can be recovered in technological process to improve the profitability of the whole venture. The characteristics of the material originating from uranium ores vary significantly from deposit to deposit. The effect of ore mineralogy and mineral liberation on the leaching behaviour of uranium is not well defined. The procedure of uranium extraction must be designed to fit specific characteristics of the ore; however the general scheme of the process is similar for most of the ore materials. The main objectives of this research were: to assess the possibility of exploitation of uranium resources in Poland, and to work out methods of uranium extraction from the ores to produce yellow cake – U 3 O 8 . In the present work at the beginning of the extraction process, uranium was leached from the ground ore by using sulphuric acid or carbonate (CO 3 2- ) solutions. In comparison with acid processing, alkaline leaching had the advantage of being selective for uranium. The post-leaching solutions were concentrated and purified using solvent extraction or ion exchange chromatography. Novel

  13. Advantage of uranium contained in low grade dolomite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, A.L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate a technological route to recover uranium from a lean mineral ore. The experimental work includes studies concerning calcination, carbonate leaching, settling, filtration and resin-ion-exchange. Experimental data confirm the technological feasibility of the proposed process and two different preliminary flowsheets of a pilot plant were suggested. (author) [pt

  14. Equilibria determination in uranium ores by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormo Ferrero, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the U-234/U-238 activities is described. The separation of the uranium from the interferring elements is carried out by ionic change with anionic resine, in chlorhydric-metanol-ascorbic acid medium. The method has been applied to different spanish ores in which the equilibrium state has been determined (author)

  15. Uranium, thorium and potassium in Indian rocks and ores

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Usinglsodiurn iodide gamma-ray spectrometer, the radioactivity content of the crustal material from various places in India has been estimated. “Sedi- mentary and metamorphic rocks contain more uranium and. thorium than igneous rocks. PhoSphate rocks and ores from Kerala region contain higher nranir m and.

  16. Composition and method for solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.; Watts, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that, in the solution mining of uranium ores using ammonium carbonate solutions containing hydrogen peroxide or ozone as an oxidant, the tendency of the formation being treated to become less permeable during the leaching process can be overcome by including in the leaching solution a very small concentration of sodium silicate

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolat Uralbekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES. Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements concentration in the pregnant leach solution. It has been shown that the uranium in pregnant solutions appears by dissolution of calcium and magnesium carbonates and uranium minerals as well. It was found the decreasing of filtration coefficient from 0.099 m day-1 to 0.082 m day-1, due to the presence of mechanical and chemical mudding. Partial extraction of uranium (85% from the ore has been explained by the slow diffusion of sulfuric acid to the uranium minerals locates in the cracks of silicate minerals. It was concluded that the studied uranium ore sample according to adverse geotechnical parameters is not suitable for uranium extraction by filtration leaching.

  18. Chapter 3. Classical method of uranium leaching from ores and reasons for incomplete recovery at dumps of State Enterprise 'VOSTOKREDMET'. 3.1. Industrial reprocessing of uranium ores and uranium bearing productive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to industrial reprocessing of uranium ores and uranium bearing productive solutions. The basic process flow diagram of uranium-sulfide ores reprocessing by acid-soda and obtaining of technical uranium oxide was studied. The schematic diagram of sulphuric acid extraction, sorption concentration and extraction cleaning of uranium was considered.

  19. Chapter 3. Classical method of uranium leaching from ores and reasons for incomplete recovery at dumps of State Enterprise 'VOSTOKREDMET'. 3.1. Industrial reprocessing of uranium ores and uranium bearing productive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    Present article is devoted to industrial reprocessing of uranium ores and uranium bearing productive solutions. The basic process flow diagram of uranium-sulfide ores reprocessing by acid-soda and obtaining of technical uranium oxide was studied. The schematic diagram of sulphuric acid extraction, sorption concentration and extraction cleaning of uranium was considered.

  20. Mining and milling of uranium ore: Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of uranium minerals in Singhbhum Thrust belt of Eastern India has been known since 1937. In 1950, a team of geologists of the Atomic Minerals Division was assigned to closely examine this 160 km long belt. Since then, several occurrences of uranium have been found and a few of them have sufficient grade and tonnage for commercial exploitation. In 1967, the Government of India formed Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., under the administrative control of the Department of Atomic Energy, with the specific objective of mining and processing of uranium ore and produce uranium concentrates. At present the Corporation operates three underground uranium mines, one ore processing plant with expanded capacity, and two uranium recovery plants. Continuing investigations by the Atomic Mineral Division has discovered several new deposits and favourable areas. The most notable is the large Domiasiat deposit of the sandstone type found in the State of Meghalaya. This deposit is now being considered for commercial exploitation using the in-situ leaching technology. (author)

  1. South African gold and uranium ore mining in 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentrich, W.

    1977-01-01

    1976 was a difficult year for the South African gold and uranium ore mining industry, the region of Witwatersrand (Transvaal province) producing some 75% of all the gold mined in the western world besides being an important producer of uranium oxide. Despite the gold production, declining since 1971, not showing a downward tendency anymore as far as the quantity was concerned, the economic result, however, deteriorated as a consequence of continuously falling gold prices, but also on account of the inflationary rise in wages and the prices for energy and materials. Much higher prices for uranium oxide, which some mines produce as interim products from the 'degolded' slurries of their gold ore leaching plants, improved the economic overall result only to a small degree. (orig.) [de

  2. Chlorine-assisted leaching of Key Lake uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    Bench-scale chlorine-assisted leach tests were conducted on the Key Lake uranium ore. Leach tests conducted at 80 0 C on a slurry containing 50% solids during 10 hours of agitation gave the maximum extraction of uranium - 96% and radium-226 - 91%. Chlorine was added at 23.0 Kg Cl 2 /tonne of ore to maintain the leach slurry pH in the range of 1.5-1.0. To obtain residue almost free of radionuclides, hydrochloric acid leaches were conducted on the first stage leach residues. The second stage leach residue still was found to contain uranium - 0.0076% and radium-226 - 200 pCi/g of solids

  3. Chlorine/chloride based processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The CE Lummus Minerals Division was commissioned by The Department of Supply and Services to develop order-of-magnitude capital and operating cost estimates for chlorine/chloride-based processes for uranium ores. The processes are designed to remove substantially all radioactive consituents from the ores to render the waste products harmless. Two processes were selected, one for a typical low grade ore (2 lb. U 3 O 8 /ton ore) and one for a high grade ore (50 lbs U 3 O 8 /ton). For the low grade ore a hydrochloric acid leaching process was chosen. For high grade ore, a more complex process, including gaseous chlorination, was selected. Capital cost estimates were compiled from information obtained from vendors for the specified equipment. Building cost estimates and the piping, electrical and instrumentation costs were developed from the plant layout. Utility diagrams and mass balances were used for estimating utilities and consumables. Detailed descriptions of the bases for capital and operating cost estimates are given

  4. Ecomonics of uranium ore processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The recent fluctuations in the price of uranium have shown that it is only the cost-conscious producers who can hope to thrive in the uranium industry. The accuracy of the costing techniques is of critical importance when taking investment decisions on new processing projects. The papers in these proceedings cover a wide spectrum, from the methodology of cost engineering analysis through specific application of costing techniques for different processes, to details of actual investments and operating costs

  5. Chlorination of uranium ore for extraction of uranium, thorium and radium and for pyrite removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeaf, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature chlorination of uranium ore was investigated. The objective was to develop a process which is both economically viable and environmentally acceptable. Test work was directed toward obtaining high extractions of uranium, thorium and radium-226, as well as iron, sulphur and the rare earths, and consists of chlorinating samples of an Elliot Lake uranium ore at elevated temperatures and repulping the resulting calcine in dilute hydrochloric acid. The effect of temperature and chlorine throughput on the extraction of the various metals was investigated. The best conditions yielded extractions of uranium, iron and sulphur (all as chlorides) greater than 95 percent. Chlorine consumption varied between 6 and 16 percent by weight of the ore charge. (author)

  6. Management of wastes from the refining and conversion of uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report is the outcome of an IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Waste Management Aspects in Relation to the Refining of Uranium Ore Concentrates and their Conversion to Uranium Hexafluoride'', which was held in Vienna from 17 to 21 December 1979. The report summarizes the main topics discussed at the meeting and gives an overview of uranium refining processes, being used in nuclear industry. The meeting was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Radioactive Waste Management Section

  7. User's guide for the Uranium Ore Reserve Calculation System (URAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The URAD (Uranium Reserves and Data) system consists of four computer programs designed to facilitate the evaluation of uranium ore reserves analysis and the handling of basic uranium assay data. URAD is designed specifically as a training tool for anyone unfamiliar with the methodology, data requirements, and/or general computer applications in the field of uranium ore reserves analysis. However, it can effectively be used in a 'production' environment involving considerable amounts of data. The resulting programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 3.1) and may be run on any IBM-compatible microcomputer under DOS 2.1 (or later). Only a basic working knowledge of DOS 2.1 is needed to maintain the system and run the programs. This guide includes the overview of the URAD system, the review of sample data and a complete description of the file structure and sample type formats of the basic sample data files. Program URDAT explains the initial processing of the primary UDAT files to obtain standard output listings and gamma-log interpretations of radiometric data, and to create intermediate UDAT files which are used by the ore reserves programs - RESUV, ORSAC, and SCOR. Figs and tabs

  8. Uranium R and D directed to low-grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The treatment of depleted uranium ores by in-situ leaching and by counterflow ion exchange in the USA is described. In-situ leaching is mainly suitable for sandstone deposits. The research was originally focused on leaching with an acid and with carbonates. Phosphoric acid appears to be a promising leaching agent. The equipment for continuous ion exchange may be used for sludge processing but the application depends on the type of equipment and mineralogy of processed ores. The method is advantageous for lower capital costs and for smooth operation. Ion exchange is also used for uranium extraction from mine waters in the USA as well as in Canada. For example, in Grants, New Mexico, a yield exceeding 90% was reached in mine waters only containing 5 to 7 ppm U 3 O 8 . In the future, the treatment of ores with a low uranium content will require more selective extraction methods in view of the more stringent technical conditions of uranium concentrate processing. (J.P.)

  9. The geological characteristics and forming conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiangang; Tong Hangshou; Feng Mingyue; Li Yuexiang; Xu Zhan

    1993-03-01

    The forming conditions and concentration mechanism of rich ore, criteria of ore prospecting and selection of uranium-rich ore target area are introduced in the article that is based on the studying of geological characteristics and conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits of No 201 and 361 and on the comparisons of rich and poor ore deposits in geological conditions. Some new view points are also presented as the separate deposition of uranium minerals and gangue minerals is the main mechanism to form rich ore, for rich ore formation the ore enrichment by superimposition is not a universal regularity and most uranium-rich ore deposits are formed within one mineralization stage or mainly in one mineralization stage

  10. Geological exploration of uranium ores at Burgos' basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera Valdez, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    The outcrop sediments of the Burgos river basin cover the complete Cenozoic sequence from the Pallaeocene to recent date, and are arranged in the form of parallel strips with a regional dip towards the east, in which direction the sediments become steadily younger. Generally speaking they correspond to a regressive process the lithology of which is an alternation of shales, sandstones, tuffaceous material and conglomerates. The explorations and evaluations of sedimentary uranium deposits so far carried out in the north-east of Mexico show close relationships between the mineralization and the sedimentary processes of the enclosing rock. Analysis of the sedimentary-type uranium ore bodies in Mexico indicates characteristics very similar to those found in the deposits of the same type which were first studied and described in southern Texas and were used as a standard for the first exploratory studies. The uranium ore in the State of Texas is found in sands belonging mainly to the Jackson group of the Eocene and, to a lesser extent, the Catahoula formation of Miocene-Oligocene age. In the Burgos basin the existence of uranium deposits in the non-marine Frio formation of Oligocene age, with geological characteristics similar to the Texan deposits, has been demonstrated. This comparative analysis suggests very good prospects for uranium exploration in the region; it is recommended that priority be given to intensive study of the sediments of the non-marine member of the Frio formation, and the Jackson and Catahoula formations. (author)

  11. Present and future: heap leaching of uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Based on small and disperse uranium deposits, and low grade ores, heap leaching has been developed as the dominating technique in the uranium production of China. It is indicated that heap leaching technique has such advantages as less capital, low cost, low power consumption and water consumption. At the meanwhile, heap leaching technique presents shortcomings of poor adaptability and low recovery rate. In order to meet the oncoming enormous demand of nuclear power, great effort shall be put on research of new technology, new equipment, new material. (authors)

  12. Chlorine-assisted leaching of Rabbit Lake uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1981-05-01

    Bench-scale chlorine-assisted leaching tests were conducted on the Rabbit Lake uranium ore. Maximum extractions of uranium (97%), and radium-226 (90%) were obtained from leach tests conducted on slurries containing 60% solids at 40 degree C for 18 hours of leaching. Chlorine requirement was found to be 25.0 kg/tonne of ore to maintain the acidity level of the leach slurry at pH 1.0. Hydrochloric acid leaches were conducted on the chlorine-assisted leach residue to reduce the radium level to 25 pCi/g from 140 pCi/g of solids, but the radium level of the second-stage leach residue was found to be 90 pCi/g of solids. Therefore multistage (3 or 4 stages) acid chloride leaching have been recommended to obtain tailings almost free of radionuclides

  13. Determination of U (Ⅵ) content in uranium molybdenum ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haisheng; Ding Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Potentionmetric titration is established to determine U (Ⅵ) in uranium molybdenum ores. In the closed condition, U (Ⅵ) is leached by carbonate solution. U (Ⅵ) is reduced to U (Ⅳ) by ferrous sulfate in phosphoric acid. The exess ferrous sulfate is oxidized by sodium nitrite. urea decompose the exess sodium nitrite. U (Ⅳ) is titrated by ammonium metavanadate standard solution with potentionmetric titration. The precision is better than 5%, The recovery rate is 97.2%∼101.9%. (authors)

  14. Bottle roll leach test for Temrezli uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çetin, K.; Bayrak, M.; Turan, A. İsbir; Üçgül, E.

    2014-01-01

    The bottle roll leach test is one of the dynamic leaching procedure which can meet in-situ mining needs for determining suitable working conditions and helps to simulate one of the important parameter; injection well design. In this test, the most important parameters are pulp density, acidic or basic concentration of leach solution, time and temperature. In recent years, bottle roll test is used not only for uranium but also gold, silver, copper and nickel metals where in situ leach (ISL) mining is going to be applied. For this purpose for gold and silver metal cyanide bottle roll tests and for uranium metal; acidic and basic bottle roll tests could be applied. The new leach test procedure which is held in General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey is mostly suitable for determining metal extraction conditions and recovery values in uranium containing ore bodies. The tests were conducted with samples taken from Temrezli Uranium Ore located in approximately 200 km east of Turkey’s capital, Ankara. Mining rights of Temrezli Ore is controlled 100% by Anatolia Energy Ltd. The resource estimate includes an indicated mineral resource of 10.827 Mlbs U 3 O 8 [~4160 t U] at an average grade of 1426 ppm [~1210 ppm U] and an additional inferred resource of 6.587 Mlbs of U 3 O 8 [~2530 t U] at an average grade of 904 ppm [~767 ppm U]. In accordance with the demand from Anatolia Energy bottle roll leach tests have been initiated in MTA laboratories to investigate the recovery values of low-grade uranium ore under in-situ leach conditions. Bottle roll leaching tests are performed on pulverized samples with representative lixiviant solution at ambient pressure and provide an initial evaluation of ore leachability with a rough estimate of recovery value. At the end of the tests by using 2 g/L NaHCO 3 and 0.2 g/L H 2 O 2 more than 90% of uranium can pass into leach solution in 12 days. (author)

  15. A discussion on several problems in determination of uranium ore grade criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhixiang.

    1991-01-01

    The course of determination of uranium ore grade criteria in China is briefly introduced. The cut-off grade minimum industrial grade and allowable minimum average grade uranium ore bodies used in China are reviewed. The meanings and role of various grade criteria and their economic basis for determination in uranium exploration, mining and sorting are discussed and the author's ideas are given

  16. Contribution to study of effects consecutive to alpha decay of uranium 238 in some uranium compounds and uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez-Regil, E.

    1985-06-01

    The consequences of alpha decay of 238 U in uranium compounds and in uranium bearing ores have been examined in two ways: leaching of 234 Th and determination of the activity ratio of 234 U and 238 U. The results have been interpreted mainly in terms of the ''hot'' character of the nascent 234 Th atoms [fr

  17. Heap leaching process of high-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Sirong; Gao Xizheng; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1994-08-01

    A heap leaching process for high-grade primary uranium ore has been studied. The minerals mainly are uraninite. In the process the manganese dioxide is used as oxidant and ferric sulphate solution as leaching agent. The two-stage counter current heap leach method is used in the process. The leached liquor which contains dissolved uranium and iron returns to the neutralizing stage and the iron in the leached liquor is precipitated in the stage. The acid is added to the main stage and the precipitated iron is dissolved as Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 in the stage. Comparing with conventional agitation acid leaching method, this process decreases the consumption of acid by 21% and manganese dioxide by 29%. The extraction rate of uranium reduces 1.86%. (3 figs., 12 tabs.)

  18. Study on process of uranium extraction from a high chloride uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Pingru; Wang Desheng; Chen Xiangbiao

    1995-01-01

    The technology of uranium extraction from a high chloride uranium ore was studied by heap leaching. According to the source of water and water quality, the extraction technology of scrubbing-heap leaching-ion exchange-neutralization and precipitation can be used, if fresh water is available; and the process of leaching by leaching agent prepared with sea water-carbonate purification-thermal decomposition and precipitation can be used, if fresh water is unavailable

  19. Treatment of Abankor uranium ore by the Eluex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehablia, M.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Eluex process is a possible way of treating the Abankor uranium ore; this work represents a preliminary approach in the development of a process for this ore. However, a cost study would be necessary to enable the appropriate choice of a most adequate flowsheet. The parameters concerning comminution, extraction-purification and concentration for the Eluex process have been obtained. A leaching efficiency of up to 95% was reached with a mean consumption in acid (120 kg of sulfuric acid per metric ton of ore). The concentration-purification of the leach solution was carried out in two successive stages: a strong base ion exchange was used to yield an eluate (5 g U/1) that was then contacted, in a second step with a solvant (D2EHPA + Kerosene) to give an organic solution of 26g U/1. Ammonium uranyl tricarbonate (AUC) was obtained by combining the uranium stripping and cristallization processes in a single operation. A simulation of this last stage was carried out using Aspon plus software [fr

  20. An unusual feature of uranium ore from Domiasiat, Meghalaya: presence of water soluble uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.; Krishna Rao, N.

    1993-01-01

    An unusual feature of the recently discovered sandstone-type uranium deposit in Domiasiat is the presence of appreciable amount of water soluble uranium. With normal tap water at its natural pH (7.5-7.8), upto 35% of the uranium in the ore was found to be soluble during agitation in the different samples. Presence of other ions in appreciable quantities particularly SO 4 -2 Cl - and Fe +3 appear to influence the dissolution. Percolation experiments give terminal solubilization of upto 58%, but the instantaneous uranium concentration in the percolating water attains its maximum within the first few minutes of contact. A detailed study on the chemistry of uranium dissolution may throw light on the physico-chemical controls of localization of uranium in the deposit. (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs., 4 tabs

  1. Analytical procedure for the radiometric determination of uranium in ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, S.J.; Porritt, R.E.J.

    1976-06-01

    Two methods are described for the non-destructive determination of uranium in ores: a beta-gamma measuring method and a gamma-spectrometrical one. The first has the advantage that the analysis is not influenced by a radioactive unbalance in the sample (say by loss of radium as a result of chemical decomposition of the ores) and that it can be carried out with comparitively simple apparative expenditure. It is, however, relatively inaccurate (+-25%) and should only be used as a surveying method. The gamma-spectrometrical analysis (accuracy about +-10%) gives information about an unbalance present between U 238 and Ra 226 and thus enables an appropriate correction to be made. A thorium contribution with its decay products can also be corrected. (RB) [de

  2. Rirang Uranium Ore Processing System Design: Agitated Digester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erni, R.A.; Susilaningtyas

    1996-01-01

    A closed tank digester equipped with a pitched blades turbine agitator has been designed to facilities Rirang uranium ore dissolution using concentrated sulphuric acid at high temperature. The digester was designed to accommodate the digestion of 6 kg of-65 mesh ore at 200 o C, acid resistant material (SS-3 16). It has the dimension of 33 cm high, 22 cm diameter, and elliptical bottom and height of 4 cm. Moreover, the dimension of the 4 blades agitator is as follows: 8 cm long, 1,6 cm blades width. The distance between the blades and digester required 0, 007 Hp for a 500 rpm agitation speed and + 24. 103 kcal energy equipment for heating. Digestion experiment using the agitated digester yielded data that are in good agreement with laboratory scale experiment

  3. Behavior of uranium migration in epigenetic uranium ore deposits with reference to radioactive waste isolation in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K.; Hirono, S.

    1989-01-01

    Among the numerous uranium ore deposits and indications which have been discovered in Japan, the important uranium occurrences are found as strata-bound epigenetic ore deposits. This mineralization occurs in basal Neogene sedimentary rocks unconformably overlying granitic basements of the Mesozoic and/or early Cenozoic era. In many of these deposits, the epigenetic uranium mineralization occurs just above the unconformity, and groundwater migration is observed at the unconformity between the Neogene sediments and the granitic basement. This groundwater at the unconformity is thought to be a migrating agent for uranium from source rock to the ore deposit

  4. Uranium extraction from ores with salicylic acid; I - uranium extraction from input phosphate ore of Abu Zaabal phosphate plant, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Salicylic acid has been tested (for environmental importance) to extract U from input phosphate ore of Abu-Zaabal phosphate plant, Egypt prior to its processing for production of phosphatic fertilizers. Uranyl ion forms with this acid three stable complexes; namely [UO 2 Sal] degree, [U O 2 SaL 2 ] 2- and UO 2 SaL-3] 4- depending on the total uranyl and salicylic acid concentrations and their ratios. Study of relevant extraction factors revealed however that, the extraction process is controlled by the amount of salicylic acid used, alcohol/aqueous ratio, solid/liquid ratio and time of agitation. The obtained results showed that uranium is selectively leached by the application of such a leaching reagent. In order to recover U from the obtained pregnant leach liquor, the latter is adjusted by ammonia to PH 5-6.5, where the crystalline pp t of N H 4 [UO 2 SaL 3 ] 4 H 2 O has formed. This precipitation has been carried out after concentrating the obtained pregnant leach liquor by its recycle for U extraction from new ore batches. The precipitated ammonium uranyl tri salicylate is calcined at 500 degree C for obtaining pure orange yellow trioxide (UO 3 ) powder. On the basis of one ton ore treatment, an economic flowsheet for U recover y from the study ore material has been suggested

  5. The uranium ore deposits in Ciudad Rodrigo Phyllites. about the possibility of new deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro Martin, E.; Marin Benavente, C.

    1969-01-01

    The main features of the genesis of uranium deposits of the Fe mine type, are discussed in this paper. Pitchblende ore is related with phyllites bearing organic material and with geomorphological level, fossilized by eocene sediments. As a result, new uranium ore deposits are possible under Ciudad Rodrigo tertiary basin, tertiary cover depth being little more than three hundred feet. (Author)

  6. Experiment research on heap leaching of low content uranium ore with new solution distribution technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yingying; Lei Zeyong

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the advantage of new spray sprinkling technology. Solution is distributed by spray sprinkling, a uranium ore is simulated into mine heap, and small typed column leaching experiment in room is done, in order to exam the solution distribution uniformity of spray sprinkling and the ore leaching rule. After experiment, liquid leaching rate is 70.67%. The experiment results show that solution distribution uniformity of spray sprinkling is fine, and the uranium ore leaching character is good. Technology parameters on spray sprinkling solution distribution for heap leaching of the uranium ore are recommended. (authors)

  7. Extraction of uranium low-grade ores from Great Divide Basin, Wyoming. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, J.C.; Nichols, I.L.; Huiatt, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the leachability of carbonaceous uranium ore samples submitted by the DOE under an Interagency Agreement. Studies on eight samples from the Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, are the basis of this report. The uranium content of the eight ore samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.03% U 3 O 8 and contained 0.7 to 45% organic carbon. Experiments were performed to determine the feasibility of extracting uranium using acid leaching, roast-acid leaching and pressure leaching techniques. Acid leaching with 600 lb/ton H 2 SO 4 plus 10 lb/ton NaClO 3 for 18 h at 70 0 C extracted 65 to 83% of the uranium. One sample responded best to a roast-leach treatment. When roasting for 4 h at 500 0 C followed by acid leaching of the calcine using 600 lb/ton H 2 SO 4 , the uranium extraction was 82%. Two of the samples responded best to an oxidative pressure leach for 3 h at 200 0 C under a total pressure of 260 psig; uranium extractions were 78 and 82%

  8. Analytical method of uranium (IV) and uranium (VI) in uranium ores and uranium-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhuqin; Zheng Yongfeng; Li Qingzhen; Zhong Miaolan; Gu Dingxiang

    1995-11-01

    The best conditions for keeping the original valences of uranium during the dissolution and separation procedure of geological samples (especially those micro uranium-bearing rock) were studied. With the exist of high concentration protectants, the sample was decomposed with concentration HF at 40 +- 5 degree C. The U(VI) was dissolved completely and formed stable complex UO 2 F 2 , the U(IV) was precipitated rapidly and carried by carrier. Quantitative separation was carried out immediately with suction. The decomposition of sample and separation of solid/liquid phases was completed within two minutes. After separation, the U(IV) and U(VI) were determined quantitatively with laser fluorescence or voltametry respectively according to the uranium content. The limit of detection for this method is 0.7 μg/g, RSD is 10.5%, the determinate range of uranium is 2 x 10 -6 ∼10 -1 g/g. The uranium contents and their valence state ratio were measured for more than one hundred samples of sand stone and granite, the accuracy and precision of these results are satisfactory for uranium geological research. (12 tabs.; 11 refs.)

  9. Rules of determining the fragment size and composition of blasted uranium ore for leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changhan

    1998-06-01

    The relations of blasted uranium ore fragment size and composition with the processing conditions (such as solvent flow velocity, the thickness of solvent film embracing, the ore fragments, the permeating velocity, the leaching ratio, the solvent consumption, ore grade), the economic feasibility of ore fragmentation and technical mineralogy for in-situ leaching and heap leaching are investigated. The rules for determining the ore fragment size and ore composition adequate for leaching on the basis of field and laboratory test results are established. These rules are very helpful to the selection, design and production of in-situ leaching and heap leaching operations

  10. Non-filtration method of processing of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Vodolazov, L.I.; Tokarev, N.N.; Vyalkov, V.I.; Goldobina, V.A.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow)

    1977-01-01

    The development of the filterless sorption method has lead to working out the sorption leaching process and the process of extraction desorption, which has made possible to intensify the process of uranium ore working and to improve greatly the technical economic indexes by liquidating the complex method of multiple filtration and repulping of cakes. This method makes possible to involve more poor uranium raw materials and at the same time to extract valuable components: molybdenum, vanadium, copper, etc. Great industrial experience has been accumulating in sorption of dense pulp with the ratio of solid phase to liquid one equal to 1:1. This has lead to the increase of productivity of working plants by 1,5-3,0 times, the increase of uranium extraction by 5-10%, the increase of labour capacity of main workers by 2-3 times, and to the decrease of reagents expense, auxiliary materials, electric energy and vapour by several times. In fact the developed technology is continuous in all its steps with complete complex automatization of the process with the help of the most simple and available means of regulation and controlling. The process is equipped with high productivity apparatuses of great power with mechanic and pneumatic mixing for high density pulps, and with the columns KDS, KDZS, KNSPR and PIK for the regeneration of saturated sorbent in the counterflow regime. The exploitation of fine-granular hydrophilic ion-exchange resins in hydrophobized state is foreseen [ru

  11. Blind River uranium deposits: the ores and their setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the Blind River area, Proterozoic clastic sedimentary and minor volcanic rocks (Huronian Supergroup) unconformably overlie and transgress northward over dominantly granitic Archean terrane (2500 million years) and are intruded by Nipissing Diabase (2150 million years). Later deformations and metamorphic events are recognized. The Matinenda Formation (basal Huronian) comprises northward-derived arkose, quartzite, and pyritic, uraniferous oligomictic conglomerates, which contain 75 percent of Canada's uranium reserves. Historic grades approximate 2 pounds U 3 O 8 /ton (1 kilogram/metric ton), but lower grade material can be mined with increasing price. Some thorium and rare earths have been marketed. The conglomerate beds lie in southeasterly striking zones controlled by basement topography down-sedimentation from radioactive Archean granite. Distribution of monazite relative to uraninite and brannerite and the presence of uranium values in overlying polymictic conglomerates, which truncate the ore beds, indicate that the mineralization is syngenetic, probably placer. The role of penecontemporaneous mafic volcanics is problematical, but these could have been a source for sulphur in the pyrite. Drab-coloured rocks, uranium and sulphide mineralization, and a post-Archean regolith formed under reducing conditions all suggest a reducing environment. Sedimentary features indicate deposition in fast-flowing shallow water and possibly a cold climate. In the upper Huronian (Lorrain Formation), a monazite and iron oxide assemblage associated with red beds suggests a change to oxidizing conditions

  12. Lung cancer and inhaled uranium ore dust in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Jackson, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Using a nose only inhalation system, 187 nine week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two different concentrations of natural uranium ore dust aerosol (44% U) without significant radon content. Inhalation exposures averaged about 4.2 h/day, 5 days/week for 65 weeks at which point lung uranium burdens in the two groups averaged 0.9 and 1.9 mg/g dry weight. Animals (63) exposed to the air stream without dust served as controls. After inhalation exposure ceased, the rats were allowed to live for their natural lifetime, a maximum of about 900 days after the start of dust inhalation. Lung uranium burdens were measured at the time of death of each animal. Lung burdens were found to decline exponentially after dust inhalation ceased, and the rate of decline was independent of the initial lung burden. All lungs were examined at necropsy and histologically for lung tumors. Lung tumors of lung origin were observed in both exposed groups and in the control group. The frequency of primary malignant lung tumors was 0.016, 0.175 and 0.328 and primary non-malignant lung tumors 0.016, 0.135 and 0.131 in the control low and high aerosol exposed groups respectively. Absorbed dose to the lung was calculated for each animal in the study. The average maximum doses for all the animals exposed to the low or high concentration of dust aerosol were 0.87 Gy and 1.64 Gy respectively. The average risk of malignant lung tumors from inhaled natural uranium ore dust was therefore about 0.20 tumors/animal/Gy. For animals with lung tumors, the average doses were 0.98 and 1.90 in the exposed groups. In both exposed groups, the frequency of primary malignant or non-malignant lung tumors was significantly greater than in the control group (p < 0.02) and the frequency of primary malignant lung tumors in the two exposed group were significantly different from each other (p = 0.05). The frequency of primary lung tumors (malignant and non-malignant) was calculated as a function of dose

  13. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice; II,b. uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ore and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking Safaga phosphate and Qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (UO 3 ). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  14. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice I,b-uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ores and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Sayed, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking safaga phosphate and qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (U o 3 ). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  15. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  16. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  17. Comprehension of synergistic mechanisms for uranium extraction from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecheur, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Uranium VI is commonly extracted from phosphoric ores by a well-known process exploiting the synergistic mixture of two extractant molecules: HDEHP and TOPO. In the field of liquid-liquid extraction, synergistic combinations are common but the mechanisms at the origin of the synergy are not well understood. A multi-scale approach has been used to describe these mechanisms, combining two different descriptions: the molecular scale focuses on the ion point of view, while the supramolecular scale focuses on extractants' aggregation. These two approaches have been rationalized by molecular dynamics computations. The results allow describing the synergy through the structure of the complexes and aggregates. With the same approach, some bifunctional compounds, combining the two extracting sites in one molecule, have been studied and compared to the HDEHP/TOPO system in order to identify the origin of their increased capacities in extraction and selectivity. (author) [fr

  18. Standard practices for sampling uranium-Ore concentrate

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These practices are intended to provide the nuclear industry with procedures for obtaining representative bulk samples from uranium-ore concentrates (UOC) (see Specification C967). 1.2 These practices also provide for obtaining a series of representative secondary samples from the original bulk sample for the determination of moisture and other test purposes, and for the preparation of pulverized analytical samples (see Test Methods C1022). 1.3 These practices consist of a number of alternative procedures for sampling and sample preparation which have been shown to be satisfactory through long experience in the nuclear industry. These procedures are described in the following order. Stage Procedure Section Primary Sampling One-stage falling stream 4 Two-stage falling stream 5 Auger 6 Secondary Sampling Straight-path (reciprocating) 7 Rotating (Vezin) 8, 9 Sample Preparation 10 Concurrent-drying 11-13 Natural moisture 14-16 Calcination 17, 18 Sample Packaging 19 Wax s...

  19. Beneficiation studies of an uranium siliceous - phosphate ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.B.; Santos, A.T.; Santos Benedetto, J. dos

    1980-01-01

    The consolidation of the beneficiation studies of a low-grade uranium siliceous - phosphate ore (11% P 2 O 5 ) from Itataia region in the Northeast of Brazil, owned by Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. - NUCLEBRAS, are presented. Laboratory studies using froth flotation technique and applying statistical methods for data evaluation were made. Pilot plant tests in a 120 Kg/h scale were conducted as a consequence of the bench scale tests. The developed process using tall-oil as collector and starch as depressant gave a total yield of 80% for the P 2 O 5 and 71% the U 3 O 8 , for a 33% P 2 O 5 phosphate concentrate. (Author) [pt

  20. Non-polluting treatment of uranium effluents from the alkaline digestion of an uranium ore containing sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Bernard.

    1978-01-01

    New non-polluting process for treating uranium effluents from the alkaline digestion of an uranium ore containing sulphur, which makes it possible (a) to extract and obtain relatively pure uranium and (b) to process the digestion liquor freed from the uranium and containing in an aqueous solution a mixture of alkaline carbonate and/or bicarbonate and sodium sulphate, consisting in the selective extraction of the sodium sulphate present and the recycling of the liquor free of SO 4 = ions, containing in solution the sole carbonates and/or bicarbonates involved, towards the digestion of the ore [fr

  1. New techniques for the treatment of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, J.; Boutonnet, G.

    1977-01-01

    The growth in nuclear power programmes since 1970 has led to an increasing demand for uranium, and tenders have been invited from all parts of the world for the construction of new treatment plants. What types of plant could be suggested. The diversity of ores and sites, even more stringent safety requirements, greater care for the environment and economic facts called for numerous, if not basic, reviews of the conventional techniques. Two examples illustrate this point. In the case of a plant to treat a refractory ore situated in a desert area with limited water resources, Pechiney Ugine Kuhlmann studied and applied a new technique of leaching by sulphuric acid pulping, which gives a considerable saving of sulphuric acid and water in comparison with conventional leaching techniques. In dealing with a problem which arose at a plant situated in a mountainous region of touristic interest, where a tailings settling tank could not be installed, Pechiney Ugine Kuhlmann studied and developed techniques involving the use of band filters for solid-liquid separation and pulp washing. Apart from lowering investment costs by about 15% in comparison with the techniques used so far, this technique produces the tailings in solid form so that they do not require a settling tank for storage. (author)

  2. Temperature control of acid pressure leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies that demonstrate the importance of the coordination of mine planning, blending schemes, metallurgical testwork and process design for the treatment of high-grade uranium ores (approx. 2% U 3 O 8 ) with a high arsenic content (> 1.5%) by acid pressure leaching are described. It is demonstrated that the control of leaching temperature is critical for an efficient and economic mill operation and that a thorough evaluation of theoretical temperature profiles in the leaching circuit as a function of mill feed, design and operating conditions is essential to the determination of an acceptable ore blend for the feed. This evaluation is required to ensure that the autogenous leaching temperature under the worst conditions would not exceed the optimum temperature of 70 deg C. In addition to feed composition the other important variables in plant operation that will affect the temperature are (1) the extent to which concentrated acid is diluted and cooled in a separate vessel before being fed into one of the leach autoclaves and (2) the variation of solids concentration in the pulp. For additional temperature control water-jacket cooling of the autoclaves can be used to good effect. (author)

  3. The geochemical characteristics of alkali metasomatic ore and its ore-forming significance at Zoujiashan deposit, Xiangshan uranium field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun; Hu Baoqun; Sun Zhanxue; Li Xueli; Guo Guolin; Rao Minghui

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline metasomatites are widely distributed in Zoujiashan uranium deposit and have close relation with uranium mineralization. Based on the study of field geological survey, petrographic methods, element chemical analysis and EPMA, etc, the alteration in alkaline metasomatic ore was found in the order of sodium metasomatism, potassium metasomatism and silica metasomatism. The alkaline hydrothermal fluid of mineralization is rich in Na at first and then rich in K, and quite similar in other chemical composition, but the K rich one is more favourite for the metallization. Compared with the normal porphyroclastic lava, the alkaline metasomatic ores in lower in SiO 2 , but higher in K 2 O or Na 2 O, Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , MgO, P 2 O 5 , CaO and U, Th, Zr, Hf, Sm, Ti, REE. Compared with potassium metasomatic ore, the sodium metasomatic ore is with high ΣLREE/ΣHREE ratio and lower Rb and REE. Because alkaline metasomatism is beneficial to release uranium from accessory mineral and bring out uranium from rocks, therefore it is very important to the migration and precipitation of uranium. (authors)

  4. Uranium leaching and recovery from sandstone ores of Nong Son Basin (Viet Nam)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, H.T.; Le, Q.T.; Dinh, M.T.; Than, V.L.; Le, K.D.

    2002-01-01

    Sandstone ores containing uranium in Nong Son area were treated to recover uranium in the form of MDU. These ores are classified into 3 categories depending on the weathering degree, giving different chemical composition as shown. The amount of calcium carbonate (g CaCO 3 /100g of ore) reacted with HCI under different conditions of temperature and time shows that stirring method requires high acid consumption. The results obtained from static leaching of the 3 ore categories shows that leaching efficiency largely depends on the weathering degree and particle size of ore. The lowest leaching efficiency was observed for non-weathered ore. In order to increase uranium extraction this ore was ground to the size of max. 2.5mm, and then incubated by 40% H 2 SO 4 for 48 hours with the addition of KCIO 3 (3 kg/tone of ore) as oxidant. The results of acid pugging showed that uranium extraction efficiency reached min. 92%. The proposed flow-sheet for obtaining yellowcake is presented. The leaching experiments were carried out under the following conditions: Particle size of ore: Weathered: max. 30mm, Semi-weathered: max. 10mm, Non-weathered: max. 2.5mm (incubated by 40% H 2 SO 4 ); Temperature 25-30 deg. C; Redox potential; pH1, acid consumption: 40-50 kg/ore tone. Leaching efficiency reached 90%. Uranium concentration in the solution after 8-stage counter-current leaching was min. 4 g/L, uranium content in solid waste 0.01%. Leaching solution was filtered and directly neutralized through two stages to precipitate yellowcake. Experimental data showed that the uranium recovery reached 90%. Yellowcake product met the relevant specifications and had U 3 O 8 content of minimum 76%

  5. Disposal of residue from uranium ore processing in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crochon, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    Between 1949 and 2001, French mines produced 76, 000 metric tons of uranium and 50 million metric tons of ore, processing residues are stored at 17 sites (in ponds enclosed by dykes or in former open-cast mines) subject to ICPE (classified facility for environment protection) regulation. These disposal sites cover surface areas of between one and several tens of hectares and several thousands to several millions of metric tons of waste are stored at them. When uranium mining stopped in France, these sites were redeveloped, with caps placed over the residue to provide mechanical and radiological protection. All these sites are still monitored by AREVA. In the last fifteen years, these sites have been the subject of a number of studies, especially regarding the long-term evolution and impact of the residue. These studies are now being pursued within the framework of the national plan for the management of nuclear materials and waste (PNGMDR). A regulatory and institutional framework regarding long-term management of these disposal sites needs to be defined. (author)

  6. Precipitation of uranium peroxide from the leach liquor of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xizhen; Lin Sirong; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1995-06-01

    A chemical precipitation process of recovering uranium from the leach liquor of uranium ores was investigated. The process primarily includes the precipitation of iron with lime, the preprocessing of the slurry of iron hydroxides and the precipitation of uranium with H 2 O 2 . The leach liquor is neutralized by lime milk to pH 3.7 to precipitate the iron hydroxides which after flocculation and settle is separated out and preprocessed at 170 degree C in an autoclave. H 2 O 2 is then used to precipitate uranium in the leach liquor free of iron, and the pH of process for uranium precipitation adjusted by adding MgO slurry to 3.5. The barren solution can be used to wash the filter cakes of leach tailing. The precipitated slurry of iron hydroxides after being preprocessed is recycled to leaching processes for recovering uranium in it. This treatment can not only avoid the filtering of the slurry of iron hydroxides, but also prevent the iron precipitate from redissolving and consequently the increase of iron concentration in the leach liquor. The results of the investigation indicate that lime, H 2 O 2 and MgO are the main chemical reagents used to obtain the uranium peroxide product containing over 65% uranium from the leach liquor, and they also do not cause environmental pollution. In accordance with the uranium content in the liquor, the consumption of chemical reagent for H 2 O 2 (30%) and MgO are 0.95 kg/kgU and 0.169 kg/kgU, respectively. (1 fig., 8 tabs., 7 refs.)

  7. Radiation protection problems connected with uranium ore mining at Kvanefjeld and uranium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, A.

    1983-08-01

    The average content of uranium at Kvanefjeld is 340 gram per metric ton of ore, equivalent to 4200 Bq kb -1 in SI radioactivity units. The corresponding number of thorium are 850 gram per metric ton of ore and 3500 Bq kg -1 . The assessment of the radiation dose from external γ-radiation is based partly on the measured radiation levels in the Kvanefjeld plateau area and in the 1980-adit, and partly on measurements, with personal dosemeters, of the doses received by the work force in the adit. The contribution to the annual effective dose equivalent from extenal γ-radiation in an open pit - mine is, on this premise, estimate to be 2.5-3.7 mSv. Planning of a uranium mining and milling enterprise involves conccern about working conditions, but the sum of the calculated dose contributions from external γ-radiation, inhaled radon/thoron-daughter products and inhaled ore dust gives roughly estimated annual effective dose equivalent for work in the open pit-mine about 3.1-16.5 mSv (compared with the annual dose limit of 50 mSv recommended by the ICRP for occupatonally employed persons). (EG)

  8. Developments of bacteria leaching technologies in uranium and gold ores at home and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Renxi; Guan Zibin; Tian Shengjun

    2000-01-01

    The present development, including development of new leaching processes and equipment and soon, in bacteria leaching of uranium and gold ores at home and abroad are described. Opinions and advices are presented

  9. BL-2a and BL-4a: certified uranium reference ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.; Zechanowitsch, G.; Sutarno, R.

    1982-05-01

    Samples of two uranium ores BL-2a and BL-4a from Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan, were prepared as compositional reference materials to replace the similar certified ores, BL-2 and BL-4, of which the stock had been exhausted. Each ore was ground to minus 74 μm, blended in one lot and bottled in 200-g units. The homogeneity of the ores with respect to uranium was confirmed by both a neutron activation and a fluorimetric analytical procedure performed by two commercial laboratories. The recommended value for uranium is based on the results of one determination on each of 25 bottles by the volumetric-umpire method performed at CANMET. A statistical analysis of the data gave a recommended value for uranium of 0.426% for BL-2a and 0.1248% for BL-4a

  10. Management of wastes containing radioactivity from mining and milling of uranium ores in Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures and controls to achieve safe management of wastes containing radioactivity during the mining and processing of uranium ores are mainly site specific depending on the nature, location and distribution of the ore and gangue material. Waste rock and below-ore-grade material containing low levels of radioactivity require disposal at the mine site. In open cut mining the material is generally stockpiled above ground, with revegetation and collection of run-off water. Some material may be used to backfill open cuts. Management of these wastes requires a thorough investigation of ground water hydrology and surface soil characteristics to control dissipation of radioactive material. Dust containing radon and radioactive particulate is produced during ore milling, and dusts of ore concentrate are generated during calcination and packaging of the yellowcake product. These dusts are managed by ventilation and filtration systems, working conditions, and discharges to atmosphere will be according to the Australian Code of Practice on Radiation Protection during Mining and Milling of Uranium Ores. The chemical waste stream from leaching and processing of the uranium ores contains the majority of the radioactivity resulting from radium and its decay products. Neutralised effluent is discharged into holding ponds for settling of solids. This paper describes the nature of wastes containing radioactivity resulting from the mining and milling of uranium, and illustrates modern engineering practices and monitoring procedures to manage the wastes, as described in the Environmental Impact statement produced by Ranger Uranium Mines Proprietary Limited for public hearings

  11. Application of isotope techniques to groundwater pollution research for Xiangshan uranium ore field, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fulin; Liu Peilun; Zhu Chuande; Wu Xiaowei; Zeng Yinsheng

    1998-01-01

    The investigation of groundwater pollution due to uranium deposits focused on the most important uranium metallogenic area-Zhoujiashan district of Xiangshan uranium ore field, China. Groundwater collected from five completed exploration boreholes in the area is regarded as the pollution source and is traced and analysed by using isotope as well as radio-hydrochemical techniques. In addition, the pollution situation of a small uranium ore pile for heap-leaching and a big uranium ore open pit are monitored by the same techniques. It has been experimentally proven that the uranium concentration and the uranium isotope ratio 234 U/ 238 U in natural waters are two sensitive indicators of radioactive pollution in natural waters. It was concluded that under present conditions, exploration of uranium deposits may not cause serious groundwater pollution of radioactive elements (U, Ra, Rn and Th), however, it is difficult to avoid the serious surface water pollution coming from the exploitation of uranium ore by a big open pit. (author)

  12. The thinking of expanding prospection of Hecao keng uranium ore field, building a large bases of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guiliang; Tong Rifa; Yang Ruidong; Ni Xiuyi

    2014-01-01

    He cao keng uranium ore field. Located in Wuyishan Mountain metallogenic belt has good uranium geological background, and it has become an important base of volcanic rock type uranium mineral uranium. The area has experienced more than 20 years of exploration work, but there is still a lot geological problems left. In a new round of prospecting breakthrough action, combined with practice to solve 'four is not enough', implement to find the crater, attack red basin, prospect deep, the mine field construction is expected to becoming a large base of uranium. (authors)

  13. Work within the coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, K.M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The paper relates geological and lithological aspects of host rocks to the leaching and precipitation of uranium through the agency of microorganisms. For this purpose three different host rocks were studied: a low grade uranium ore analysing 0.045% U 3 O 8 and two high grade ores analysing 0.27% and 1.8% U 3 O 8 respectively. The affect of ore composition, water composition and climatic conditions were studied in relation to the nature of the microflora indigenously developed

  14. Design and construction of the multilayer cover for uranium ores landfills in Andujar (Spain) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Santiago, J.L. de.

    1994-01-01

    This report shows the design and construction of multilayer cover for the landfill of sterile uranium ores in Andujar Mining (Spain). The main chapters are: 1.- Decommissioning project of Uranium Mining in Andujar (Spain) 2.- Elements and design of cover. 3.- Characteristic material

  15. Determination of 36Cl in the groundwaters and ores around a uranium deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Songsheng; Jiang, Shan; Guo, Hong; Du, Shubin; Chen, Zhanru; Guo, Qifeng; Zhao, Yunlong

    1994-06-01

    We intend to use fission-induced 36Cl as a tracer to study the transport of mobile radionuclides and the invasion of a uranium ore body by groundwater in Lianshanguan uranium deposit, which has been considered as a natural geochemical analogue for a nuclear waste repository. The ore and groundwater samples were selected around the uranium deposit. The measurement of 36Cl was carried out using accelerator mass spectrometry at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. After correction for native Cl in the samples, the deduced 36Cl/Cl ratios range from 7000 × 10 -15 to 15000 × 10 -15 for ore samples and from 1200 × 10 -15 to 150 × 10 -15 for groundwater samples. The calculated 36Cl contents range from 3.7 × 10 7 to 7.5 × 10 6 atoms/g in the ore samples and from 1.4 × 10 8 to 8.2 × 10 6 atoms/1 in the groundwater samples. The calculated concentration of cosmogenic 36Cl in the groundwater is 5 × 10 6 atoms. The result shows that the concentration of 36Cl in groundwater is mainly due to in-situ production of 36Cl leached from the ore body by the groundwater and the 36Cl tracer can be used to investigate the invasion of the uranium ore body by groundwater and the geochemical isolation of groundwater in the uranium deposit area.

  16. Technical application of agglomerated acidic heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun; Li Jianhua; Li Tieqiu; Zhong Pingru

    2002-01-01

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay is difficult to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged several years studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration conditions, as well as the curing measures of agglomerated balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acidic heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore heap, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency is increased to 96% from less than 40% comparing with direct heap leaching program

  17. Study of a bacterial leaching program for uranium ores by Thiobacillus ferroxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Junior, O.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a bacterial leaching program for uranium ores is studied. Three basic points are presented: isolation and purification of Thiobacillus ferroxidans, as well Thiobacillus thio oxidans; physiological studies of growth and respiratory metabolism of T. ferroxidans; uranium leaching from two types of ore by T. ferroxidans action, on laboratory, semi pilot and pilot scales. The bacterial leaching studies were carried out in shake flasks, percolation columns (laboratory and semi pilot) and in heap leaching (pilot). The potential of the ores studied in relation to bacterial action, was first showed in shake flask experiments. The production of H 2 S O 4 and Fe 3+ was a result of the bacterial activity on both ore samples containing pyrite (Fe S 2 ). These two bacterial products resulted in a high uranium and molybdenum extraction and a lower sulfuric acid consumption compared to the sterilized treatments. Similar results were obtained in percolation column at the same scale (lab). (author)

  18. Research progress on structural ore-controlling of Xinjiang Baiyanghe uranium-polymetallic deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mou; Wang Guo; Zhang Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    This article mainly starts from the tectonics of Baiyanghe uranium-polymetallic deposit, which control the ore-mineralization distribution. Elaborate the research progress by analysising the characteristics and divising the stage of ore-controlling structures. which divided into contact zone structure and fracture structure, including complex contact zone and extensional double tectonic superimposition which control the output of main ore-body. According to the tectonic activities order. the ore-controlling structure can be mainly divided into three stage activities, metallogenic before, mineralization and metallogenic period after. (authors)

  19. Method of removing uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from aqueous solutions discharged in hydrometallurgical uranium ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Kuhr, I.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The separation of uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from water solutions discharged from uranium ore hydrometallurgical treatment, and its eventual simultaneous concentration in the biomass during uranium ore technological processing are described. The solutions are replenished with nutrients necessary for the growth of microorganisms, mainly with nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus and inoculated with fungi. During submersion cultivation, uranium incorporates in the mycelium, or is bound physico-chemically to the mycelium components. Together with these components, uranium is mechanically separated, i.e., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. Organisms of the Fungi imperfecti class, mainly the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera are used for cultivation which may be continuous or semicontinuous. (B.S.)

  20. New technology of bio-heap leaching uranium ore and its industrial application in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Liu Jian; Meng Jin; Li Weicai; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Du Yuhai; Huang Bin

    2006-10-01

    Bioleaching mechanism of uranium ore is discussed. Incubation and selection of new strain, biomembrane oxidizing tank--a kind of new equipment for bacteria culture and oxidation regeneration of leaching agent are also introduced. The results of industrial experiment and industrial production are summarized. Compared with conventional heap leaching, bioleaching period and acid amount are reduced, oxidant and leaching agent are saved, and uranium concentration in leaching solution is increased. It is the first time to realize industrial production by bio-heap leaching in Chinese uranium mine. New equipment-biomembrane oxidizing tank give the basis of bio-heap leaching industrial application. Bio-heap leaching process is an effective technique to reform technique of uranium mine and extract massive low-content uranium ore in China. (authors)

  1. Studies on geneses of Lianshanguan granites and Lianshanguan uranium ore deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiafu; Xu Guoqing; Wang Wenguang

    1994-02-01

    Based on the field work, and through the studies of thin-sections, minerals fluid inclusions, isotope geology, rare-earth elements and U-content in rocks and minerals, it is suggested that Lianshanguan granites are of magmatization genesis with multistage. The genetic model of mineralization of Lianshanguan uranium ore deposit is the magmatization-hydrothermal-filled uranium type. The role of mineralization of uranium ore deposit in that area is discussed. Furthermore, the direction of prospecting and following prospecting criteria for similar deposits in this area are also given

  2. Permeability restoration and lowering of uranium leakage from leached ore beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgman, H.A.; Grant, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The injection of an ammonium sulfite or bisulfite solution increases the permeability of an uranium ore bed that has suffered permeability losses during the in-situ mining of uranium with an alkaline leach solution containing a peroxide or dissolved oxygen oxidant. Such an injection recovers much of the lost formation permeability, thus decreasing costs and effort required to put needed restoration solutions or further leach solutions through the ore bed. In addition, uranium contamination of the ground water normally occurring after cessation of leaching is significantly lowered by such injection

  3. Application of AMT in detecting deep geological structures in Lejia district of Xiangshan uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Shuxin; Liu Hu

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, exploration in Xiangshan uranium ore field shows that the intersection of faults and the interface of different rock formation and the basement is an important sign of deep ore- prospecting. In order to evaluate deep uranium resource in Lejia district, audio magnetotelluric method (AMT) was undertaken to carry out profile investigation. With that method, we discerned the interface of different rock formation and the basement successfully, and faults in the deep, which provides a good basis for the prediction of deep uranium resource. Drilling results show that AMT method has an obvious advantage in detecting deep geological structures in Xiangshan. (authors)

  4. In situ carbonate leaching and recovery of uranium from ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.; Fife, T.P.; Stano, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium is leached from redox roll ore deposits by selective in-situ leaching with a solution of pH 7.4 to 9 (preferably 7.5 to 8.5) containing from about 0.5 to 5g/l of NH 4 HCO 3 and from about 0.1 to 3g/l of peroxide (preferably aqueous H 2 O 2 ), and sufficient NH 3 to maintain the desired pH. The leach solution is then withdrawn from the ore deposit and contacted with a strong base anion exchange material to strip the uranium from the leach solution. The uranium is eluted from the anion exchange material by an aqueous eluant, and the uranium is recovered from the eluate by first acidifying it and then treating it with ammonia to produce a precipitate of relatively pure ammonium diuranate. The content of the three components in the stripped leach solution is adjusted, and then the leach solution is recirculated through the ore deposit. After the uranium ore is removed to the extent economically practicable, the leach solution is replaced with an aqueous reducing solution which when passed into the ore deposit precipitates and renders insoluble any uranium and elements such as vanadium, molybdenum, and selenium. This process produces above ground a very low volume of impurities and waste solutions requiring disposal and does not cause material contamination of the underground deposit or any aquifer associated with the deposit

  5. New route for uranium concentrate production from Caetite ore, Bahia State, Brazil; dynamic leaching - direct precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Carlos A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: cmorais@cdtn.br; Gomiero, Luiz A.; Scassiotti Filho, Walter [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Caetite, BA (Brazil)]. E-mails: gomiero@inb.gov.br; scassiotti@inb.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The common uranium concentrate production consists of ore leaching, uranium purification/concentration by solvent extraction and uranium precipitation as ammonium diuranate steps. In the present work, a new route of uranium concentrate production from Caetite, BA-Brazil ore was investigated. The following steps were investigated: dynamic leaching of the ground ore with sulfuric acid; sulfuric liquor pre-neutralization until pH 3.7; uranium peroxide precipitation. The study was carried out in bath and continuous circuits. In the dynamic leaching of ground ore in agitated tanks the uranium content in the leached ore may be as low as 100 {mu}g/g U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, depending on grinding size. In the pre-neutralization step, the iron content in the liquor is decreased in 99 wt.%, dropping from 3.62 g/L to 0.030 g/L. The sulfate content in the liquor reduces from 46 g/L to 22 g/L. A calcinated final product assaying 99.7 wt.% U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was obtained. The full process recovery was over 94%. (author)

  6. Separation and recovery of uranium ore by chlorinating, chelate resin and molten salt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomohiro

    2000-12-01

    Three fundamental researches of separation and recovery of uranium from uranium ore are reported in this paper. Three methods used the chloride pyrometallurgy, sodium containing molten salts and chelate resin. When uranium ore is mixed with activated carbon and reacted for one hour under the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen at 950 C, more than 90% uranium volatilized and vaporization of aluminum, silicone and phosphorus were controlled. The best activated carbon was brown coal because it was able to control the large range of oxygen concentration. By blowing oxygen into the molten sodium hydroxide, the elution rate of uranium attained to about 95% and a few percent of uranium was remained in the residue. On the uranium ore of unconformity-related uranium deposits, a separation method of uranium, molybdenum, nickel and phosphorus from the sulfuric acid elusion solution with U, Ni, As, Mo, Fe and Al was developed. Methylene phosphonic acid type chelate resin (RCSP) adsorbed Mo and U, and then 100 % Mo was eluted by sodium acetate solution and about 100% U by sodium carbonate solution. Ni and As in the passing solution were recovered by imino-diacetic acid type chelate resin and iron hydroxide, respectively. (S.Y.)

  7. Exploration on relationship between uranium and organic materials in carbonate-siliceous pelite type uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yongjie

    1996-01-01

    The author determines the content of uranium and organic carbon of part specimen of surrounding rocks and ores, which sampled from carbonate and black shale type uranium deposits in Xiushui, Jiangxi Province, and Tongcheng, Hubei Province. According to the analytical operation regulations of organic materials, extraction and separation of chloroform pitch is carried out. Internal relationships between uranium and organic derivative is discussed. The conclusion shows that: (1) certain co-relationship between U and organic carbon and chloroform extract is detected; (2) evolutionary processes of organic materials in the exogenetic uranium deposits are not all the same; (3) non-hydrocarbon is closely related to uranium, so it can be regarded as indicator of uranium gathering in exogenetic uranium deposits

  8. Chapter 3. Classical method of uranium leaching from ores and reasons for incomplete recovery at dumps of State Enterprise 'VOSTOKREDMET'. 3.3. Basic regularities of uranium ores leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    Present article is devoted to basic regularities of uranium ores leaching. It was found that the basic method of uranium ores enrichment and producing of reasonably rich and pure uranium concentrates (usually technical uranium oxide) is a chemical concentration concluded in selective uranium leaching from ore raw materials with further, uranium compounds - so called uranium chemical concentrates. Such reprocessing of uranium ores with the purpose of uranium chemical concentrates production, currently, are produced everywhere by hydrometallurgical methods. This method in comparison with enrichment and thermal reprocessing is a universal one. Hydrometallurgy - the part of chemical technology covering so called moist methods of metals and their compounds (in the current case, uranium) extraction from raw materials, where they are contained. It can be ores or ore concentrates produced by radiometric, gravitational, floatation enrichment, sometimes passed through high-temperature reprocessing or even industry wastes. The basic operation in hydrometallurgy is its important industrial element - metal or metals leaching as one or another compound. Leaching is conversion of one or several components to solution under impact of relevant technical solvents: water, water solutions, acids, alkali or base, solution of some salts and etc. The basic purpose of leaching in uranium technology is to obtain the most full and selective solution of uranium.

  9. Ore controlling oxidized zonation epigenetic uranium-coal deposits and regularities in lignite transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspenskij, V.A.; Kulakova, Ya.M.

    1982-01-01

    Complex of analytical methods was used to study epigenetic transformations in uranium-coal ore manifestation. To clarify the principle scheme of oxidized zonation in coals the materials, related to three similar objects were used. When comparing obtained epigenetic column with columns of similar ore objects the principle scheme of oxidized epigenetic zonation for ancient infiltration uranium-coal deposits was specified; general regularities of eignite transformations and characteristics of profile distribution of uranium and accessory metal zonations were revealed. Infiltration processes, proceeded in coal measureses, formed the steady epigenetic oxidized zonation: O - zone of barren unoxidized coals, 1 - zone of ore-bearing unoxidized coals, 2 - zone of weakly ore-bearing oxidized coals, 3 - zone of oxidized terrigenous rocks with zonules of development of yellow and red iron hydroxides. Capacities of some zones and zonules reflect the intensity and duration of ore-forming processes. Distribution of U and accessory elements obeys completely epigenetic zonation. It is assumed, that ancient infiltration uranium-coal deposits formed due to weakly uranium-bearing oxygen-containing waters

  10. Uranium ores of Kazakhstan as the most technologic source of a fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berikbolov, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Kazakhstan as is known has unique deposits of uranium. Its resources composed a third part of the world resources. The most important part of resources having a practical value, is related with depression in southern regions of the Republic. By now more than 15 deposits are discovered and partially explored. These deposits from three uranium provinces - Shu-Sarysu, Syr-Darya and Ili. The ores occur in friable water-bearing sandy horizons of Cretaceous and Paleogene age between waterproof agrillaceous sediments at depth from 100 up to 600 m. Ore bodies thickness changes from 5 to 10 m at uranian average-grade 0.03-0.1 %. Width of band shaped ore bodies changes from tens meters to the one kilometers and extent changes from one kilometer up to many tens kilometers. The important feature of deposits is their suitability for development by progressive in situ leaching (ISL) method. It was demonstrated, that uranium ores are comprehensive and, that is important, a lot of commercially important elements, containing in ores, gives in to extraction at development by the ISL method. The preliminary calculation of expenditures for the extraction of useful byproducts from ordinary sulphate solution have demonstrated rather high profitableness for rhenium, scandium, selenium, rare earth even at the very low contents in solution. It was pointed out, that whole technological chain applied now at industrial scale is oriented to mono-metallic uranium ores, therefore present technology of leaching and recovery of industrial solution does not allow ti extract all valuable components containing in ores. The development of new improved technological chain. beginning with a composition of leaching out reagent and up to applying of miscellaneous sorbing materials, can create new mineral-raw base of rare and dissipated elements and to lower considerably the price of uranium mining from sandstone deposits

  11. The acid aging as alternative process for uranium recovery from silicated ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriani, M.; Della Testa, A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of different variables on the extraction uranium efficiency and on the silicate solubility by means of acid aging is studied. The variables studied in bench scale were: acid/ore, oxidizing/ore and liquid/solid relationships; reaction time; temperature and recovery time. The results are discussed and compared with the ones of continuous operation of a semi-pilot plant. A flowsheet of the industrial process application is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. Column leaching experiments of a uranium ore by atomizing irrigation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yingying; Lei Zeyong; Chen Haihui

    2007-01-01

    Column leaching experiments ora uranium ore were made by atomizing irrigation technique. The leaching results are compared with the results obtained by spray irrigation and drip irrigation techniques respectively under the same conditions of column leaching experiments. The results show that the atomizing irrigation technique has more uniform solution distribution, higher leaching rate, shorter leaching period, and less ratio of liquid to solid. Consequently, the atomizing irrigation technique is suitable to the ore. (authors)

  13. Safe management of wastes from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Wastes from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores pose potential environmental and public health problems because of their radioactivity and chemical composition. This document consists of two parts: a Code of Practice (Part I) and a Guide to the Code (Part II). The Code sets forth the requirements for the safe and responsible handling of the wastes resulting from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores, while the Guide presents further guidance in the use of the Code together with some discussion of the technology and concepts involved

  14. Technological studies on the Manisa-Koprubasi uranium ores of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdik, U.

    1980-01-01

    At the end of the laboratory and pilot plant scale technological experiments, three main types of ore have been classified: (i) Kasar type: The ores consist of secondary uranium mineralization (autunite, meta-autunite and torbenite) in loosely consolidated sands, gravels and clays of Neogene Age. Heap leaching has been carried out on 100 and 1000 t ore samples (0.05% U 3 O 8 ) under economical conditions, such as 20 to 40 kg of H 2 SO 4 per tonne of ore at ambient temperature; original size -20 cm, solid/liquid ratio of 10, 20 days, and 90% recovery of uranium has been reached. The uraniferous solutions (1 to 2 g of U 3 O 8 per litre) obtained from the heap leaching operations were purified in a solvent extraction unit with a capacity of 100 ltr/h by using an Alamine 336-kerosene-decanol solution. The uranium in the purified and concentrated solutions (15 g of U 3 O 8 per litre) was then precipitated as a yellow cake with 65 to 75% U 3 O 8 content by means of magnesia milk. (ii) Tasharman type: No specific uranium mineral has been detected in the mineralogical determination, although uranium is disseminated in phosphate minerals as dahllite and apatite. Uranium in the ore has been leached under rather uneconomical conditions; 100 kg of H 2 SO 4 per tonne of ore, particle size -1 cm, 25 0 C, 30 days. In the SX-treatment of pregnant solutions phosphate ions, higher acidity than pH 1, and compounds formed as a chemical precipitation, hindered the SX-recoveries. In such cases, the addition of acid, dilution of pregnant solutions, membrane filtration, or 40 0 C temperature have been applied to decrease the uranium loss in the raffinate. (iii) Carbonate type: Even if alkaline leaching at 65 0 C, or leaching with 400 kg of H 2 SO 4 per tonne of ore, was carried out on -200 mesh ore samples, no acceptable uranium recoveries were obtained

  15. The determination of radium-226 in uranium ores and mill products by alpha energy spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, J.B.; Armstrong, V.C.

    1975-12-01

    A reliable routine procedure for determining 226 Ra by alpha energy spectrometry is described. Radium is isolated as sulphate from the sample matrix by co-precipitation with a small mass of barium and analysed using a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector. The method is capable of providing high accuracy over a large 226 Ra concentration range and is applicable to materials such as uranium ores, uranium mill products and effluent streams. Samples resulting from nitric acid leach experiments with Elliot Lake ores were examined using the procedure. The distribution of 223 Ra, 224 Ra and 226 Ra between the leach products, (residue and leach liquor), is discussed. (author)

  16. Chlorination separation of uranium, thorium, and radium from low-grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, V.S.; Perumareddi, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Low-temperature chlorination of low-grade uranium ores containing uranium in the 0.02 to 0.06% range, thorium in the 0.036 to 0.12% range, and radium in the 70 to 200 pci/g range resulted in the extraction of >90% of the constituents. The residue left after chlorination was found to be innocuous and suitable for disposal as a waste acceptable to the environment. Use of sodium chloride in the charge was useful in reducing the chlorination temperature and in the formation of nonvolatile anionic chloro complexes of the metal ions in the ore

  17. Alpha spectrometry of thick sources. II. Application to the study of radioactive equilibria in uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena Barrenechea, M.L.; Tormo Ferrero, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining nuclide activities in 4n + 2 uranium series using alpha spectrometry of thick sources is described. This method has been applied to several uranium ores, showing different states of radioactive equilibria. The spectra from samples prepared by cold compression show some anomalies, due to the evolution and later decay of 219 Rn and daughters. This phenomenon must be taken in consideration when computing spectra line intensities. (author) [es

  18. A discussion about maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution of U3O8 type uranium ore concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Dechang; Liu Chao

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of discussing the influence of single factor on maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution,the influence degree of some factors such as U content, H 2 O content, mass ratio of P and U was compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the relationship between U content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was direct ratio, while the U content increases by 1%, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution increases by 4.8%-5.7%. The relationship between H 2 O content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 46.1-55.2 g/L while H 2 O content increases by 1%. The relationship between mass ratio of P and U and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 116.0-181.0 g/L while the mass ratio of P and U increase 0.1%. When U content equals 62.5% and the influence of mass ratio of P and U is no considered, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution equals 1 578 g/L; while mass ratio of P and U equals 0.35%, the maximum uranium concentration decreases to 716 g/L, the decreased rate is 54.6%, so the mass ratio of P and U in U 3 O 8 type uranium ore concentrate is the main controlling factor. (authors)

  19. The application of fractals to Xiazhuang uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li She; Guan Taiyang; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang; Pan Jiayong; Cao Shuanglin; Nanjing Univ., Nanjing

    2006-01-01

    Fractal theory is utilized to study spatial distribution features of uranium deposits in Xiazhuang region. The results show that the spatial distribution of uranium deposits has self-similarity statistically and the distribution regularity of uranium deposits can be quantitatively described with fractal dimension. The fractal dimension value of spatial distribution of uranium deposits are calculated with counting box method. The dimension value of different metallogenic regions are compared. The results show that the number of box correlates well to the scale with a correlation coefficient of more than 0.98. (authors)

  20. Respiratory tract carcinogenesis in large and small experimental animal following daily inhalation of radon daughters and uranium ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Dagle, G.E.; McDonald, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium ore miners of the Colorado plateau suffer more than 6 times the normal incidence of lung cancer, and their mortality rates due to pneumoconiosis and emphysema are 5 times greater than in the general population. Inhalation exposures of beagle dogs and rodents to radon daughters and uranium ore dust were undertaken to determine which of these uranium mine air contaminants, and at what levels, are responsible for the high incidences of these diseases. Results are discussed

  1. Respiratory tract carcinogenesis in large and small experimental animal following daily inhalation of radon daughters and uranium ore dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, B.O.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Dagle, G.E.; McDonald, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium ore miners of the Colorado plateau suffer more than 6 times the normal incidence of lung cancer, and their mortality rates due to pneumoconiosis and emphysema are 5 times greater than in the general population. Inhalation exposures of beagle dogs and rodents to radon daughters and uranium ore dust were undertaken to determine which of these uranium mine air contaminants, and at what levels, are responsible for the high incidences of these diseases. Results are discussed.

  2. Calculation of U, Ra, Th and K contents in uranium ore by multiple linear regression method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chao; Chen Yingqiang; Zhang Qingwen; Tan Fuwen; Peng Guanghui

    1991-01-01

    A multiple linear regression method was used to compute γ spectra of uranium ore samples and to calculate contents of U, Ra, Th, and K. In comparison with the inverse matrix method, its advantage is that no standard samples of pure U, Ra, Th and K are needed for obtaining response coefficients

  3. Biological effects in beagle dogs of inhaled radon daughters, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Stuart, B.O.; Hackett, P.; Ragan, H.A.; McDonald, K.E.

    1975-01-01

    After 5 years of daily inhalation exposures to 600 WL radon daughters plus uranium ore dust and/or cigarette smoking, observed pulmonary lesions include macrophage proliferation, septal fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia, emphysema, endothelial proliferation, and bronchiolar-alveolar epithelial changes involving multiple foci of squamous metaplasia with atypia. Epithelial neoplasms were found in the respiratory tracts of three dogs. (U.S.)

  4. Biomembrane oxidizing tank used in the process of bacterial heap leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yunsheng; Fan Baotuan; Liu Jian; Zheng Ying; Liu Chao

    2004-01-01

    The construction characteristic of biomembrane oxidizing tank and specialty of packing material used in the process of bacterial heap leaching of uranium ore are introduced in this paper. Method for designing biomembrane oxidizing tank, layout principle of aeration system and measurements on running management are summarized

  5. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores; Lixiviacion estatica de minerales arcillosos de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  6. Studies on feasibility of recovering uranium from Dongkeng second class submarginal ore by heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qingyi

    1994-01-01

    It was proved that it is feasible in economy and in technology to recover uranium from Dongkeng second class submarginal ore by heap leaching, on the basis of analysing the conditions of Mine No. 743 and the tests conducted. Moreover, the social and environmental effects are good. Two valuable suggestions are presented

  7. Neutron activation probe for measuring the presence of uranium in ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, N.P.; Smith, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron activation proble comprises a pulsed neutron source in series with a plurality of delayed neutron detectors for measuring radioactivity in a well borehole together with a NaI (Tl) counter for measuring the high energy 2.62 MeV gamma line from thorium. The neutron source emits neutrons which produce fission in uranium and thorium in the ore body and the delayed neutron detectors measure the delayed neutrons produced from such fission while the NaI (Tl) counter measures the 2.62 MeV gamma line from the undisturbed thorium in the ore body. The signal from the NaI (Tl) counter is processed and subtracted from the signal from the delayed neutron detectors with the result being indicative of the amount of uranium present in the ore body

  8. Uranium ore from Morro do Agostinho, Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.T.

    1976-01-01

    Three non-destrutive methods for determination of uranium from Morro do Agostinho's ore, Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais are presented. Comparative data between chemical analysis (volumetric method) and cited non-destructive methods are shown. Gamma spectrometry, x-rays fluorescense and delayed neutrons counting are the methods discussed. Uranium's and molibdenium's behavior related to anionic sulphuric resin system is also discussed. Comparative studies concerning retention of uranium and molibdenium in strong and weak anionic resins as well as selective elution using appropriate solvents are shown [pt

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of trace uranium in phosphate ore samples from kurum and uro areas, Nuba mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A. A.; Ali, A. H.; Altayeb, M. A. H.

    2004-01-01

    A method was proposed for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium content in phosphate ores. the method is based on the use of nitrogen (v) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (Vi) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion-exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of the absorbance of the yellow uranium (Vi)-8-hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 425 nm. The procedure was used for the determination of trace uranium content in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba mountains in Sudan. X-ray fluorescence technique was employed for the assessment of the method used. The spectrophotometric method results show a high similarity with those obtained by XRF technique. This agreement indicates that the procedure proposed here has been successfully applied for the determination of uranium in phosphate ores. (Author)

  10. Impact Of Low Grade Uranium Ores On The Echo System and the Workers of Phosphate Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the influence of uranium present in phosphate rocks as an environmental factor in the ccho system and on the workers of Abu-Zaabal Phosphate Company subjected to the inhalation of big quantities of rock phosphate dust during the benefication of the ore and the production of the fertilizers. Besides. extra amount of uranium reach the workers also through two path ways.The first is direct through eating contaminated planted grown in the near by area.The second is indirect through eating animals fed with contaminated plants. The uranium content is estimated in the soil samples at different depths, water (irrigation and drainage), air samples and plant samples (shoot and root) in Berseem from the four directions, urine samples from twenty workers in charge of the processing of phosphate compared to twenty volunteers far from the contaminated area.The results showed an elevated values for phosphorus and uranium in the air, water. soil and plant (Berseem) around Abu Zaabal Factory and extending to about 2 km from all directions. Urine may be considered as a biological indicator medium for the uptake of uranium in uranium miners and the workers in charge of ore processing and can represent the major route of excretion for the absorbed metal. Significant differences were shown between the uranium level in the urine of workers group and the control group

  11. Study on the relation between uranium content and total phosphorus in some sudanese phosphate ore samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, M. A. H.; Mohammed, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work uranium content and total phosphorus were determined in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba Mountains in Sudan. Spectrophotometry technique was used for this purpose. Uranium analysis is based on the use of nitrogen (V) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (Vi) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was eluted from the resin with 1 M hydrochloric acid. In the elute, uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of absorbance of the yellow uranium (Vi)-8-hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 400 nm. The total phosphorus was measured as (P 2 O 5 %) by treatment of the total liquor with ammonium molybdate solution. The absorbance of the blue complex was measured at λ 880 nm. The results show that a limited relation is existed between uranium content and total phosphorus in phosphate samples from kurun area, which contain 58.8 ppm uranium in average, where there are no relation is existed in phosphate samples from uro area, which contain 200 ppm uranium in average. (Author)

  12. Study on the relation between uranium content and total phosphorus in some sudanese phosphate ore samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.A.; Eltayeb, M.A.H.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work uranium content and total phosphorous were determined in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba mountains in sudan. Spectrophotometry technique was used for this purpose. Uranium analysis is based on the use of nitrogen (V) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (VI) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion-exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was eluted from the resin with 1 M hydrochloric acid. In the elute, uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of the absorbance of the yellow uranium (VI) - 8- hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 400 nm. The total phosphorus was measured as (P 2 O 5 %) by treatment of the leach liquor with ammonium molybdate solution. The absorbance of the blue complex was measured at λ 880 nm. The results show that a limited relation is existed between uranium content and total phosphorus in phosphate samples from Kurun area, which contain 58.8 ppm uranium in average, where there are no relation is existed in phosphate samples samples from Uro area, which contain 200 ppm uranium in average

  13. Geology of uranium and associated ore deposits, central part of the Front Range mineral belt, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul Kibler; ,

    1959-01-01

    The Central City district and adjoining mining areas in the central part of the Front Range mineral belt have supplied small quantities of uranium ore intermittently since the discovery of pitchblende at Central City in 1871. During the early years of development the uranium production form the region was of national importance, and until 1951 the region was this country's principal domestic source of pitchblende. In recent years, however, the production has been insignificant although the search for uranium has been greater than at any previous time. The pitchblende occurs as a local minor constituent of gold- and silver-bearing base-metal sulfide veins, chiefly valuable for their gold content, which have yielded ores valued at about $200 million.

  14. Studies on the mechanism for in-place leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hengshan; Wang Changhan

    2001-01-01

    The report is based on the locale test studies at No.745 Mine and Baifang Copper (Uranium) Mine. According to hydrokinetics of porous medium. The character of mining methods of in-place leaching of fragmented uranium are, the best application conditions, in-place leaching theory, the fittest composite of fragments of crashing uranium ore, the lowest velocity of flow in solution liquid, the reasonable parameter of stop structure, the technology of leaching, meaning, the equation of solution liquid, the name of solution mining and its classification are studied. Especially some creation in the theory of leaching in mud ore and the technology of strengthened leaching are given. It would be helpful to the design and production

  15. Research on metallogenic conditions of intersection-type uranium ore-deposits in Zhongdong area, Northern Guangdong province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengqi; Wu Lieqin; Zhang Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    The methods following as field geological investigation, trace element geo- chemistry and isotope geochemistry were used in this project. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics of Xiaoshui uranium ore deposits in Zhongdong area, Xiazhuang ore-field, Guangdong province, it could be concluded that: (1) The Provenance of Cretaceous mantle is a enriched mantle; (2) Silicified zone-type and intersection-type uranium ore are distinctness in the metallogenic period and mineralization process, and main metallogenic period of Xiaoshui uranium ore-deposit is 73.5 Ma; (3) The sources of uranium mineralization substance derived from enriched mantle; and (4)The intersection-type high grade uranium deposits were controlled by substances derived from mantle (contain with U, CO 2 , F, et al), tracks of intersection of NWW-across with NNE-trending faults and lithology of diabase. (authors)

  16. Evolution of ore-bearing material sources of endogenous uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansk, V.I.; Laverov, N.P.; Tugarinov, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the regularities of changes in types and conditions of uranium deposit formation in connection with the general development of the earth crust tectonic structures. Out of pre-Kembrian uranium deposits considered are Vitwatersrand conglomerates, hydrothermal deposits in pre-Kembrian iron quartzites in the areas of regional fractures in exocontacts of big multiphase granitoid massifs of Proterozoic age and in the fundament folded structures. The hydrothermal-metamorphogen theory is supported of the origin of uranium-bearing sodium metasomatite of Proterozoic, including uranium deposits in the area of the Atabaska lake. Four genetic classes of Palaeozoic deposits are considered. Four periods are singled out in the development of Palaeozoic uranium provinces. Most of the Palaeozoic deposits are shown to be of polygenous origin. Mesozoic deposits are also polygenous, but the combination of ore substance sources in them is more complex

  17. Hydrogeological analysis applied to regional evaluation of sandstone-type uranium ore-formation in sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Laisheng

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of regional evaluation of uranium ore-formation is to preliminarily divide environmental zones and to delineate favourable areas for uranium ore-formation in order to provide basis for further detailed prospecting work. Of the various kinds of prospecting work, the hydrogeologic work should be mainly carried out in following aspects: division of hydrogeological units, the determination of artesian water-bearing system and the identification of prospecting target horizon; the analysis on hydrodynamic regime, the analysis on hydrogeochemical environments, the paleo-hydrogeologic analysis and the delineation of redox front and favourable area for uranium ore-formation. (author)

  18. Recent trends in research and development work on the processing of uranium ore in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, H.E.

    1976-07-01

    The rapid increases in the price of gold and uranium in recent years have coincided with an unprecedented increase in working costs at South African gold mines. A re-examination of the existing flowsheets for the recovery of uranium, gold, and pyrite from Witwatersrand ores, in the light of these economic trends, has resulted in the identification of a number of profitable areas for research and development. The main topics under investigation in South Africa in the processing of uranium ore are the use of physical methods of concentration such as flotation, gravity concentration, and wet high-intensity magnetic separation; the wider adoption of the 'reverse leach', in which prior acid leaching for uranium improves the subsequent extraction of gold; the use of higher leaching temperatures and higher concentrations of ferric ion in the leach to increase the percentage of uranium extracted, including the production of ferric ion from recycled solutions; the application of pressure leaching to the recovery of uranium from low-grade ores and concentrates; the development of a continuous ion-exchange contactor capable of handling dilute slurries, so that simpler and cheaper techniques of solid-liquid separation can be used instead of the expensive filtration and clarification steps, and the improvement of instrumentation for the control of additions of sulphuric acid and manganese dioxide to the leach. A brief description is given of the essential features of the new or improved processing techniques under development that hold promise of full-scale application at existing or future uranium plants [af

  19. Recent trends in research and development work on the processing of uranium ore in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid increases in the price of gold and uranium in recent years have coincided with an unprecedented increase in working costs at South African gold mines. A re-examination of the existing flowsheets for the recovery of uranium, gold and pyrite from Witwatersrand ores, in the light of these economic trends, has resulted in the identification of a number of profitable areas for research and development. The main topics under investigation in South Africa in the processing of uranium ore are the use of physical methods of concentration such as flotation, gravity concentration and wet high-intensity magnetic separation; the wider adoption of the 'reverse leach', in which prior acid leaching for uranium improves the subsequent extraction of gold; the use of higher leaching temperatures and higher concentrations of ferric ion in the leach to increase the percentage of uranium extracted, including the production of ferric ion from recycled solutions; the application of pressure leaching to the recovery of uranium from low-grade ores and concentrates; the development of a continuous ion-exchange contactor capable of handling dilute slurries, so that simpler and cheaper techniques of solid/liquid separation can be used instead of the expensive filtration and clarification steps, and the improvement of instrumentation for the control of additions of sulphuric acid and manganese dioxide to the leach. A brief description is given of the essential features of the new or improved processing techniques under development that hold promise of full-scale application at existing or future uranium plants

  20. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (~58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.

  1. Transport of uranium ore from Narssaq to the Risoe National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, A.

    1980-08-01

    The report is a statement of the aspects of transporting two cargos of uranium bearing ore from Kvanefjeld, Narssaq to the Danish National Laboratory at Risoe. The statement, which is adressed to the pertinent authorities, comprises a description and a classification of the ore in accordance with the regulations in force for sea and road transport of radioactive material. A statement of the safety conditions shows that the expected radiation levels are well within the maximum values given in the regulations. (A.S.)

  2. The Blind River uranium deposits: the ores and their setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The Matinenda Formation (basal Huronian) comprises northward-derived arkose, quartzite, and pyritic, uraniferous oligomictic conglomerate that contains 75 percent of Canada's uranium reserves. The conglomerate beds occur in southeasterly striking zones controlled by basement topography down-sedimentation from radioactive Archean granite. The mineralization is syngenetic, probably placer. Drab-coloured rocks, uranium and sulphide mineralization, and a post-Archean regolith formed under reducing conditions, suggest a reducing environment. Sedimentary features indicate deposition in fast-flowing shallow water, and possibly a cold climate. (author)

  3. Link between ore bodies and biosphere concentrations of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.

    1992-01-01

    A literature review of uranium exploration studies was carried out to determine the size and concentration of uranium anomalies in the biosphere. Fourteen sites were studied and uranium data were obtained for rocks, water-borne sediments, surface waters, groundwaters, soils and plants. Detailed descriptions of the study areas and of their uranium anomalies are provided. No statistical analyses of the data of anomaly sizes was undertaken because of the variation in the scale of the studies and in the threshold values used and the small number of samples for each medium. The threshold values and the size of the anomaly were found to be dependent on the scale of the study and of the sampling density. Sediments and surface waters were found to have the largest uranium dispersion. Although there was a wide range in the anomaly sizes it was possible to assign typical values for each medium. Based on a typical source of 1 km 2 in the rock it was found that anomalies of similar size as the source are expected in soils and plants, anomalies twice as large are typical for sediments and surface waters and anomalies of smaller areas than the source are possible for groundwater. Some limitations to providing typical groundwater anomaly sizes are outlined. Typical maximum concentrations for the sites studied were greater than 1300 ppm for rock, 10 to 110 ppm for sediment, and 5 ppb for surface waters. No typical values were observed for groundwater, soils and plants. Susceptibility of the host rock to leaching and the presence of discharge zones were assessed for their role in biosphere anomalies

  4. Method for the recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid, originating from the wet-process of uraniferous phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.; Carrington, O.F.

    1978-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recoverying uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange circuits is described. (Auth.)

  5. Assessment of role of metamorphic remobilization in genesis of uranium ores from Ralston Buttes area, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Ralston Buttes mining district, the principal source of commercial uranium in the Front Range since the late 1940s, is located northeast of Golden and southeast of the Front Range mineral belt. Uranium ore occurs in veins emplaced in fault breccia in Precambrian metamorphic rocks. The progenitors of the metamorphic rocks are a possible source for the uranium. Hornblende gneisses of the Idaho Springs Formation is the major rock type in the area, thus its origin is a major consideration in assessing the quantity of uranium that might have been contributed by metamorphic processes. To evaluate this, 41 rock samples (19 hornblende gneisses, 7 biotite gneisses, 5 chlorite gneisses, and 10 metapelites) were analyzed for major elements, and 3 rock samples (16 hornblende gneisses, 8 biotite gneisses, 4 chlorite gneisses, and 5 mica schists) were analyzed for trace metals (Rb, Sc, Zr, V, Ni, Co, Cr, Ba, U, and Th). Four samples of hornblende gneiss and 1 sample of mica schists were also analyzed for rare earth elements. Major elements are rare earth data indicate that the hornblende gneiss was derived from sediments and tholeiitic basalts. Trace element data suggest a volcanic provenance for these sediments. Rare earth patterns and uranium and thorium abundances of metapelites are similar to average North American shales. Low uranium and thorium values and low thorium-uranium ratios in hornblende gneisses and mica schists preclude large-scale uranium remobilization during metamorphism of these source rocks

  6. Sulphatising roasting of a Greenlandic uranium ore, reactivity of minerals and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamborg Hansen, J.K.

    1977-03-01

    Uranium in the lujavrite ore from Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, can be solubilised by sulphatising roasting at 700degC. The reactivity of various lujavrite minerals in the roasting process and the mechanism of the reaction were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, electron microprobe, thermal analysis, Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy. Soluble sulphates are formed on the surface of the grains; an outer zone of the grains is transformed; usually a core remains unchanged. Variations in uranium recovery can be explained by variations in the contents of the uranium-bearing minerals, steenstrupine and uranium-containing pigmentary material (altered Zr containing silicate minerals), and in the degree of alteration os steenstrupine. Characterization of these minerals required many qualitative and a few quantitative electron microprobe analyses. (author)

  7. Pilot plant studies on the treatment of El Atshan Uranium Ores, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elghany, M.S.; Mahdy, M.A.; Abd El-Monem, A.M.; El-Hazek, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The present work deals with studying the different processes leading to the preparation of commercial uranium concentrate (yellow cake) from El Atshan granitic ore material (0.077%U) after acid leading of the latter, the two common extraction techniques of uranium from the obtained sulphate leach liquor; namely, anion exchange rein and solvent extraction have been studied. The studied leaching and extraction conditions-realized on the lab scale-were applied to inches pilot plant unit (capacity 150 kg ore). An average leaching leaching efficiency exceeding 88% has been achieved. Using anion exchange resin, it has been possible to prepare a uranium peroxide concentrate assaying a uranium content of about 67% U 3 O 8 . Only trace amount of Ca, Fe, Po 4 , Cr and Pb have been detected. On the other hand, sodium uranate, as a uranium precipitate was prepared from the strip solution of the loaded solvent (di-2-ethyl phosphoric acid concerned with the evaluation of a new optimized technique for the principle of chloramine-T method used for insulin iodination for the modified procedure can be carried out under normal condition of room temperature, employed longer reaction times and omitted the addition of inorganic reducing salts maintaining efficient iodination and avoiding denaturation to obtain labels of exceedingly high specific activity and small quantities of insulin for in vitro usage in the investigation of human erythrocytes 125 I-inulin binding capacity in normal and in some disease status. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Effect of reagent parameters on recovery of South Africa uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afolabi, A.S., E-mail: afolaas@unisa.ac.za [Univ. of South Africa, Dept. of Civil and Chemical Engineering, Johannesburg (South Africa); Muzenda, E. [Univ. of Johannesburg, Chemical Engineering Technology Dept., Johannesburg (South Africa); Sigwadi, R. [SGS Lakefield Research Africa (Pty) Ltd., Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of leach parameters to determine the variability of reagents consumption on a uranium ore was investigated in this work. The effects of time, temperature sulphates, and acid consumption on the rate of dissolution of the comminuted uranium ore samples were also studied. It was found that 77% dissolution of uranium was achieved after 8 hours while maximum uranium leaching of 92% was achieved at temperature 30{sup o}C for 1 hour. The addition of ferric sulphate at 30{sup o}C showed a decrease in acid consumption from 79.32 kg/t to 32.32 kg/t as well as decrease in the MnO{sub 2} consumption from 21.03 kg/t to 15.06 kg/t. At elevated temperature of 6{sup o}C a higher acid consumption of 100 kg/t was obtained and this is attributed to the fact that other acid consuming minerals were leached at this temperature. Maximum uranium dissolution of 89.37% was achieved after 24 hours and the acid consumption was 31 kg/t with a MnO{sub 2} addition of 24.26 kg/t. (author)

  9. Simple, cost effective method for determination of phosphorus in uranium ore concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, U.B.; Ramamurty, Vasantha; Dutta, M.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Subba Rao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper determination of phosphate as phosphorus in uranium ore concentrate has been described. The method used is spectrophotometric determination of phosphorus as phospho-molybdenum blue complex. As uranyl ion do not absorb in 600-900 nm range of visible region in the present medium, the phosphomolybdenum blue complex formation which is having maximum absorbance at 825 nm is exploited for determination of phosphorus. The molar absorptivity coefficient with and without the presence of uranium matrix are 2.6048 x 10 4 and 2.6730 x 10 4 lmol -1 cm -1 . The effect of matrix is not evident from the experiment carried out. (author)

  10. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. II. Determination of Uranium in ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Polonio, J.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    A method of analysis of uranium in ores by X-ray spectrometry was developed, using the internal standard technique. Strontium was found to be the most suitable internal standard for general use. A Norelco Philips X-ray fluorescent spectrometer was used in this work, equipped with a lithium fluoride crystal acting as a diffraction grating analyzer. The intensity of the uranium-L α 1 spectral line is calculated and related to corresponding strontium-K α spectral line, both detected with a Scintillation Counter. (Author) 31 refs

  11. An Overview of Process Monitoring Related to the Production of Uranium Ore Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, Brent [Innovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC

    2014-04-01

    Uranium ore concentrate (UOC) in various chemical forms, is a high-value commodity in the commercial nuclear market, is a potential target for illicit acquisition, by both State and non-State actors. With the global expansion of uranium production capacity, control of UOC is emerging as a potentially weak link in the nuclear supply chain. Its protection, control and management thus pose a key challenge for the international community, including States, regulatory authorities and industry. This report evaluates current process monitoring practice and makes recommendations for utilization of existing or new techniques for managing the inventory and tracking this material.

  12. Uranium characteristics and ore-searching prospect of the Baishiao area in northern Guangdong province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhiying; Liu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The Baishiao area is located in the south of Zhuguangshan granite, the exposed rocks in the field are Indosinian coarse spotted biotite adamellite and nearly EW diabase. The rock not only can afford benefit wall rocks, but also show the heat liquid is existing. The strong faulted structure si Niulan fault which is the main controlling and transmitting structure. The analysis of trance elements from 201 and 361 deposit, singularity of the U, Pb, V, W, Mo is symbol for searching uranium ore. The Pb, V, Zn, Ba, Th is rich in the sample of Baishiao area. Contrast curves of forty-seven trance elements form Baishiao and 201 deposit is accordant. Colligation diversified benefit factor, showing potential for searching uranium ore. These results offer scientific evidence for further survey in this region. (authors)

  13. LEACHING OF URANIUM ORES USING ALKALINE CARBONATES AND BICARBONATES AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbits, A.T.; Simard, R.; Herbst, H.J.

    1961-07-18

    A method of leaching uranium ores containing sulfides is described. The method consists of adding a leach solution containing alkaline carbonate and alkaline bicarbonate to the ore to form a slurry, passing the slurry through a series of agitators, passing an oxygen containing gas through the slurry in the last agitator in the series, passing the same gas enriched with carbon dioxide formed by the decomposition of bicarbonates in the slurry through the penultimate agitator and in the same manner passing the same gas increasingly enriched with carbon dioxide through the other agitators in the series. The conditions of agitation is such that the extraction of the uranium content will be substantially complete before the slurry reaches the last agitator.

  14. An instrument for rapid delineation of grade boundaries in selective mining of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.J.; Dickson, B.L.; Meakins, R.L.; Kenny, D.; Talaska, A.

    1982-01-01

    A vehicle-mounted radiation detector interfaced to a microprocessor called PRAM (programmable radioactive analyser mobile) has been developed to provide grade control for selective mining of a soft rock uranium ore. The grade of ore over which the vehicle passes is determined and indicated by several coloured lights to a pegman who walks behind the vehicle. Coloured pegs are then laid out to mark the uranium grade ranges on the floor of the mine pit. Comparison between grade ranges determined by the PRAM and by prior drilling and downhole logging at the Yeelirrie deposit, Western Australia indicate good agreement. Use of the PRAM decreases the cost, manpower and time required to grade extensive areas of a mine pit floor

  15. Shutdown and cleanup of the East German uranium ore mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, W.; Boettcher, J.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1991, the company was changed from SDAG Wismut into a private company (GmbH under German law) with the sole purpose of cleaning up the decommissioned uranium ore mining and dressing plants in such a way that pollutants, contaminated soil, water and air, and other damage to the environment will be removed both from the plant premises and from associated real estate. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Propp, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    Modern methods of uranium solution mining are typically accompanied by gains and losses of mass through reagent consumption by rock-forming minerals, with subsequent formation of clay minerals, gypsum, carbonates, and iron oxyhydroxides. A systematic approach to alleviate such problems involves the application of leach solutions that are in equilibrium with the host-rock minerals but in disequilibrium with the ore-forming minerals. This partial equilibrium can be approximated by solution-composition adjustments within the systems K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O and Na 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O. Uranium ore containing 0.15 percent U 3 O 8 from the Gulf Mineral Resources Corporation's Mariano Lake mine, the Smith Lake district of the Grants mineral belt, was collected for investigation. Presented are a theoretical evaluation of leachate data and an experimental treatment of the ore, which contained mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, and quartz (with lesser amounts of micas, clay minerals, and organic carbonaceous material). Small-scale (less than or equal to 1 kg) column-leaching experiments were conducted to model the results of conventional leaching operations and to provide leachate solutions that could be compared with solutions calculated to be in equilibrium with the matrix minerals. Leach solutions employed include: 1) sulfuric acid, 2) sodium bicarbonate, and 3) sulfuric acid with 1.0 molal potassium chloride. The uranium concentrations in the sodium-bicarbonate leach solution and the acid-leach solution were about a gram per liter at the termination of the tests. However, the permeability of the ore in the acid leach was greatly reduced, owing to the formation of clay minerals. Uranium solubility in the leach column stabilized with the potassium-chloride solution was calculated from leachate compositions to be limited by the solubility of carnotite

  17. Method of impact evaluation of storage sites for uranium ore tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, A.C.; Cessac, B.

    2001-11-01

    Mining and ore processing generate liquid effluents and solid waste ( tailings) in important quantities. On fifty years exploitation, 50 millions tons of tailings have been stored on twenty sites in France. From a radiological point of view, the uranium tailings contain only natural radioisotopes, daughters of 238 U and 235 U families and for a low part daughter's of 232 Th family. Their activity stay low to very low, under the ore activity. It decreases very slowly because of the long period of some radionuclides ( 230 Th, 75 000 years, 226 Ra, 1600 years). generally stored on the exploitation site, these tailings constitute a radiological source term of which it is necessary to evaluate the impact on man and environment. At close-down of an uranium ore exploitation site, the operator is required to give to the prefect of his region a file of rehabilitation with the dispositions to take to limit the radiological impact of the storage. It is in this frame that the direction of pollutions and risks prevention (D.P.P.R.) from the Minister of Territory landscaping and the Institute of protection and nuclear safety (I.R.S.N.) established a convention, reference 56/2000, relative to investigations in matter of radiological impact evaluation of uranium tailings storage sites, in order to supply a document allowing to judge the pertinence of the different files made by Cogema in the frame of tailings storage of uranium ore processing. The present document constitutes the report planned at the 3. article ( 3. paragraph) of the convention. It gives the information necessary to the evaluation of impact studies for the sites in question. (N.C.)

  18. High temperature chlorination of uranium and some radionuclides from rich sulphide ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the application of the high temperature chlorination technique upon a sulphide-rich uranium ore from elliot lake, ontario, canada. The purpose is to find a substitute to conventional sulphuric acid leaching which involves both acid drainage and radionuclide dissolution problems. Test work has therefore been directed towards studying some relevant factors of chlorination beside the effect of a number of additives

  19. Geodynamic simulation of ore-bearing geological structural units by the example of the Strel'tsovka uranium ore field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V. A.; Leksin, A. B.; Pogorelov, V. V.; Rebetsky, Yu. L.; San'kov, V. A.; Ashurkov, S. V.; Rasskazov, I. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Information on designing a 3D integrated model of the deflected mode (DM) of rock massif near the Strel'tsovka uranium ore field (SUOF) in the southeastern Transbaikal region is presented in the paper. This information is based on the contemporary stresses estimated by geostructural and tectonophysical techniques and by studying the seismotectonic deformation of the Earth's surface using the data on earthquake source mechanisms and GPS geodesy focused on the recognition of active faults. A combination of the results of geostructural, geophysical, geotectonic, and petrophysical research, as well as original maps of faulting and the arrangement of seismic dislocations and seismotectonic regimes (stress tensors), allowed us to design models of the structure, properties, and rheological links of the medium and to determine the boundary conditions for numerical tectonophysical simulation using the method of terminal elements. The computed 2D and 3D models of the state of the rock massif have been integrated into 3D GIS created on the basis of the ArcGIS 10 platform with an ArcGIS 3D-Analyst module. The simulation results have been corroborated by in situ observations on a regional scale (the Klichka seismodislocation, active from the middle Pliocene to date) and on a local scale (heterogeneously strained rock massif at the Antei uranium deposit). The development of a regional geodynamic model of geological structural units makes it possible to carry out procedures to ensure the safety of mining operations under complex geomechanical conditions that can expose the operating mines and mines under construction, by the Argun Mining and Chemical Production Association (PAO PPGKhO) on a common methodical and geoinformational platform, to the hazards of explosions, as well as to use the simulation results aimed at finding new orebodies to assess the flanks and deep levels of the ore field.

  20. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 1: laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Edwards, J.T.; Holmes, B.G.; Tsui, T.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  1. Assessment of surface contamination level in an operating uranium ore processing facility of Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, J.S.; Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, S.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological concern of the occupational workers and the area is given priority over other safety issue in confirmation with the stipulated guideline of national regulatory agency (AERB/FEFCF/SG-2, 2007). The key concern from the radiological hazard evaluation point of view is air activity, external gamma level and surface contamination. Present investigations was carried out to ascertain the surface contamination level of uranium ore processing facility at Jaduguda, Jharkhand. For a low grade uranium ore processing industry surface contamination is a major concern in product precipitation and recovery section. In view of this, the ore processing plant can broadly be classified into three areas i.e. ion exchange area, precipitation and product recovery section and other areas. The monitoring results incorporate the level of surface contamination of the plant during the last five years. The geometric mean activity of surface contamination level was 31.1, 34.5 and 9.8 Bq dm -2 in ion exchange, product precipitation and recovery and other areas with GSD of 2, 2.5 and 1.9. In most of the cases the surface contamination level was well within the recommended limit of 100 Bq dm -2 for M class uranium compound. Occasional cases of surface contamination levels exceeding the recommended limit were addressed and areas were decontaminated. Based on the study, modification in the design feature of the surface of the finished product section was also suggested so that the decontamination procedure can be more effectively implemented

  2. Photoneutron logging system for direct uranium ore-grade determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.P.; Marks, T.

    1982-06-01

    A prototype photoneutron probe for direct uranium assay in exploratory boreholes has been built and field tested. An approx. 10-Ci 124 Sb gamma-ray source together with a beryllium converter is used to produce neutrons that diffuse into the surrounding formation and cause fissions in any 235 U present. The fission neutrons that return to the probe are energy analyzed and counted by a high-pressure helium detector, thus indicating the concentration of uranium. The response of the probe was measured in concrete models at the US Department of Energy (Grand Junction, Colorado) calibration facility and found to be approx. 35 counts/s for an 1% U 3 O 8 concentration in an 11.4-cm-diam water-filled borehole (4.5 in.). The response is linear up to a concentration of at least 0.25% by weight U 3 O 8 . Effects resulting from changes in formation density, porosity, and neutron absorber content were also quantified, as well as the tool response as a function of borehole diameter and fluid. A logging vehicle was outfitted, and the photoneutron-based logging system was field tested at an exploration site near Canon City, Colorado. Logging data obtained in several open holes at this site are presented and compared to core chemical analyses and results obtained in the same holes using other logging methods. In about 1 month of field testing, the photoneutron-based uranium exploration system has proved to be simple to use and very reliable. 22 figures, 12 tables

  3. Guidebook on the development of projects for uranium mining and ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Bringing a uranium operation into production involves a sequence of interrelated steps. These are outlined in the simplified diagram of Fig. 1. The challenge is to determine how the various steps of the development sequence should function and whether the costs are sufficiently low to return a positive benefit to the owner. This Guidebook has been prepared to aid in the planning, development and implementation of feasible uranium projects. It is one in a series of publications by the IAEA. This guidebook is essentially the executive summary of the other publications. It is an overview of the systematic approach to project development. It might be viewed as the ''road map'' of a project. A list of other publications in this series is provided in the Bibliography. Each chapter of the Guidebook addresses a critical aspect of project development. Chapters follow a general sequence, but none should be considered in isolation. Each Chapter presents an overview of the requirements for reaching decisions necessary to advance a project. References are provided to more definitive information and to documents which will be required by technical personnel on a project. Such detailed publications include IAEA books such as ''An Instruction Manual on Methods for Estimation of Uranium Ore Reserves'', and the ''Significance of Mineralogy in the Development of Flow Sheets for Processing Uranium Ores''. This Guidebook does not detail how to do project development but rather what must be done to insure that all critical elements of a project are considered. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Hydrochemical uranium mining at the Straz ore deposit and its hydrogeological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzlik, J.; Moravec, J.; Macak, P.

    1992-01-01

    The uranium ore deposit at Straz is situated in the North Bohemian Cretaceous Massif. Uranium is extracted from the deposit by underground chemical leaching by means of drills from the ground. Relevant to this kind of extraction, from the hydrogeological and environmental aspects, are the hydrogeological location of the deposit, the kind and amounts of the leaching solution and ways of its injection. The following amounts, in thousand tons, have been injected underground throughout the entire period of practicing chemical extraction of uranium (till 1990): sulfuric acid 3700, nitric acid 270, ammonia 100, hydrofluoric acid 25. The overall area of the leaching fields is 630 hectares, which accommodate 9300 technological boreholes. The environmental burden of the Cenomanian rocks and Turonian water reservoir was analyzed, and significantly elevated heavy metal contents from the recirculation of the technological solutions were found. The solutions expand beyond the leaching fields, causing a contamination of underground water within wider surroundings. The volume of contaminated water in the Turonian reservoir is currently estimated at 2 - 20 million m 3 . Uranium extraction by leaching is harmful at this deposit, having far-reaching impacts on the hydrosphere and ecosystem (increased dust, deforestation of slopes of the Ralsko hill, contamination of water and soil, etc.). Abandoning the ore extraction appears to be the sole feasible approach to this problem. (Z.S.). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  5. The flotation of gold, uranium, and pyrite from Witwatersrand ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, P.J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Witwatersrand reefs contain gold, uranium, and pyrite in the following average concentrations: 0,001 per cent, 0,02 per cent, and 1,7 per cent respectively. The paper discusses the flotation of pyrite to produce a sulphide concentrate, reviews work done on the production of gold concentrates, discusses attempts to produce maximum concentrates, and closes with a review of processes for the simultaneous flotation of these three species. It is concluded that high recoveries of all three species can be achieved only if a rougher concentrate of perhaps 20 per cent of the feed (by mass) is produced, and it is suggested that reverse leaching (leaching before cyanidation) of this concentrate, followed by a cleaning flotation step for the recovery of the pyrite, would be more efficient than the routes employed at present [af

  6. The determination of trace elements in uranium ores by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, W. van Z.

    1983-11-01

    The determination of 17 trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Th, U, V, Y, Zn and Zr) in uranium ores by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry was investigated in this study. The determination of major elements was also necessary for the calculation of mass absorption coefficients. Initially a method was developed for the determination of the elements of interest in unmineralised silicates. Correction for absorption of radiation by the sample were made by means of mass absorption coefficients which were obtained from the relation between the inverse of the mass absorption coefficient and the intensity of the Compton scattering peak. The Feather and Willis method was used for determining the background intensity at the peak positions as well as for mass absorption coefficients. It was observed that the background intensity in the region of the uranium lines increases with increasing uranium content of the sample

  7. Study on trickle leaching of a high-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Sirong; Gao Xizhen; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1996-01-01

    The trickle leaching process for a high-grade silicate uranium ore existing mainly as uraninite form has been studied. Two-stage counter-current trickle leaching with manganese dioxide as oxidant and ferric sulphate solution as leaching agent is used in the process. The leached solution which contains dissolved uranium and iron is carried back to the neutralizing stage and the iron is precipitated in this stage. The acid is added to the main stage and the precipitated iron is dissolved into Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 serving as lixiviant in the stage. Compared with conventional agitation acid leaching method, this process decreases the acid consumption by 21% and manganese dioxide by 29%, the extraction rate of uranium reduces by 1.86%

  8. A process for the simultaneous recovery of gold and uranium from South African ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching tests carried out on run-of-mine ore from one of South Africa's gold-and-uranium mines show that gold and uranium dissolve simultaneously in an acidic solution containing ferric sulphate and thiocyanate ions, and that, under appropriate conditions, the recovery of both metals is similar to that achieved in conventional leaching. Moreover, since the gold and uranium are leached as anionic complexes, they can be extracted simultaneously from the leach liquor with an anion-exchange resin. The results presented indicate that it is technically feasible to recover the metals onto a strong-base resin, to strip them selectively from the resin, and to recover them in a marketable form from the strip liquors

  9. Ore leaching processing for yellow cake production and assay of their uranium content by radiometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A.E. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Military Technical College, Kobry El-Kobbah, Cairo (Egypt); El-Mongy, Sayed A. [Nuclear and Radiological Regularity Authority (ENRRA), Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2018-01-17

    In this study, Ore granite samples were collected from Gattar site for leashing of yellow cake. The process involves heap leaching of uranium through four main steps; size reduction, leaching, uranium purification, and finally precipitation and filtration. The separation process has been given in details and as flow chart. Gamma spectrometry based on HpGe detector and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to assay uranium content and activity before and after separation. The uranium weight percentage value as measured by EDX were found to be 40.5 and 67.5 % before and after purification respectively. The results of the calculations based on gamma measurements show high uranium activity and the uranium activity ratios values are 0.045 ± 4.9, 0.043 ± 4.7, and 0.046 ± 2.3 %, before purification, whereas these values were found to be 0.050 ± 3.3, 0.049 ± 3.3, and 0.050 ± 2.7 %, after purification, respectively. The results are discussed in details in the paper. (copyright 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Radiation risk, medical surveillance programme and radiation protection in mining and milling of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, A.K.

    1991-01-01

    Mining and milling of uranium ores comprise multiple operations such as developement, drilling, blasting, handling, crushing, grinding, leaching of the ore and concentration, drying, packaging and storing of the concentrate product. Apart from the hazards of any metal mining and milling operations due to dust, noise, chemicals, accidents etc there are radiation risks also resulting from exposure to airborne radioactivity and external radiation. The inhalation risk is of more concern in underground mines than in open pit mines. The objective of a Medical Surveillance Programme (an occupational Health Programme) is to ensure a healthy work force. It should ultimately lead to health maintenance and improvement, less absenteeism increased productivity and the achievement of worker and corporate goals. The programme includes prevention, acute care, counselling and rehabilitation. Radiological workers require special monitoring for their work-related radiation exposure effect by film monitoring service, whole body counting and bioassay. Radiation protection in the mining and milling of Uranium ores include the use of personal protective equipment, work station protection, personal hygiene and house keeping. (author). 15 refs

  11. Significance of mineralogy in the development of flowsheets for processing uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report has been prepared from material developed at and subsequent to a consultants' meeting held in Vienna in January 1978. The main purpose of the meeting was to prepare a document in the form of a guide for planning and developing treatment flowsheets for uranium ore processing. It was apparent that ore mineralogy, analysed, described and interpreted in ways most meaningful to the metallurgist, is the most essential information required for forming the basis of such planning. This topic, here termed metallurgical mineralogy, is therefore a major theme of this publication. In preparing the report the Agency has borne in mind the important need to impart the experience and knowledge gained in the more developed countries to those who are in the early stages of exploiting their uranium resources. The contents may be criticized as lacking, in some respects, the requisite depth and detail of treatment. The Agency and the consultants are conscious of the need to expand the information in a number of ways. However, the report is presented in its present form in the belief that, as the first attempt to correlate, on a world-wide basis, ore type with processing, it will be considered as a useful basis for future development of these themes

  12. In-situ leaching of crownpoint, New Mexico, uranium ore: part 1--mineralogical frame of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, T.C.; Dixon, S.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Strom, E.T.; Venuto, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Before assessing potential for in-situ leaching, it is advantageous to identify the nature of probable reactants in the ore horizon, including both the uranium species and those in the gangue material. We report mineralogical data on a broad suite of samples from the Westwater Canyon member of the Jurassic Morrison formation in the Crownpoint area of the Grants mineral belt. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and spectroscopic and wet chemical analyses were conducted. In these samples, the uranium occurs predominantly as either coffinite or uraninite. The host rock is arkosic sandstone comprising mainly detrital quartz and feldspar. Kaolinite and chlorite are present in claystone clasts, and calcite occurs as a cement. Major trace elements include molybdenum, vanadium, iron, selenium and sulfur. There is carbonaceous organic material in the ore, and it is intimately associated with the uranium mineral when it is coffinite. Geochemical, pyrolytic and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses indicate that the organic material is probably a very mature, coaly kerogen derived from plant components

  13. Diversity, metal resistance and uranium sequestration abilities of bacteria from uranium ore deposit in deep earth stratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ekramul; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    Metal resistance and uranium (U) sequestration abilities of bacteria residing in subsurface U ore was investigated using 122 pure culture strains isolated through enrichment. The cumulative frequencies of isolates resistant to each metal tested were as follows: As(V), 74%; Zn, 58%; Ni, 53%; Cd, 47%; Cr(VI), 41%; Co, 40%; Cu, 20%; and Hg, 4%. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that isolated bacteria belonged to 14 genera with abundance of Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas. Cobalt did not interfere with the growth of most of the bacterial isolates belonging to different groups while U allowed growth of four different genera of which Stenotrophomonas and Microbacterium showed high U tolerance. Interestingly, tolerance to Ni, Zn, Cu, and Hg was observed only in Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, Paenibacillus¸ and Acinetobacter, respectively. However, Microbacterium was found to be dominant when isolated from other five different metal enrichments including U. Uranium removal study showed that 84% of the test bacteria could remove more than 50mgUg(-1) dry weight from 80 or 160mgL(-1) U within 48h. In general, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter and Acinetobacter could remove a higher amount of U. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of U exposed cells revealed that accumulated U sequestered mostly around the cell periphery. The study highlights that indigenous U ore deposit bacteria have the potential to interact with U, and thus could be applied for bioremediation of U contaminated sites or wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ren; P. Goodell; A. Kelts; E.Y. Anthony; M. Fayek; C. Fan; C. Beshears

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.

  15. Age of uranium ores at Ranger and Jabiluka unconformity vein deposits, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Nutt, C.J.; Frishman, D.; Nash, J.T.; Simmons, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ranger and Jabiluka uranium deposits are the largest in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), which contains at least 20% of the world's low-cost uranium reserves. Ore occurs in early Proterozoic metasediments, below an unconformity with sandstones of the 1.65 Ga Kombolgie Formation. This study uses U-Pb isotope data from over 60 whole-rock drill core samples that contained a variety of mineral assemblages and textures. Data for Ranger samples indicate a well-defined age of 1.74 +/-.02 Ga. This 1.74 Ga age is distinctly pre-Kombolgie, so the Ranger deposit cannot have been formed by processes requiring its presence. This Ranger age is consistent, however, with mineralization related to heating associated with either the emplacement of early post-metamorphic granites, or possibly with intrusion of the nearby Oenpelli Dolerite. In contrast, data for the least-altered Jabiluka ores yield a concordia-intercept age of 1.44 +/-.02 Ga--significantly younger than the Ranger age, and also younger than the Komobolgie. This age may correspond to a regional thermal event, as indicated both by mafic dikes of roughly this age and a zircon lower-intercept age from a nearby granite-gneiss. Thus, together with the well-defined ∼900 Ma age of ores at the Nabarlek deposit, there are at least 3 distinct periods of major U-mineralization in the ARUF. Data for both Ranger and Jabiluka indicate the same, profound isotopic disturbance at some time in the interval of 0.4-0.6 Ga. Possibly this time corresponds to the development of basins and associated basalt flows to the W and SW, a suggested by Crick et. al. (1980)

  16. Influence of Blasted Uranium Ore Heap on Radon Concentration in Confined Workspaces of Shrinkage Mining Stope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y. J.; Liang, T.; Ding, D. X.; Lei, B.; Su, H.; Zhang, Y. F.

    2017-07-01

    A calculation model for radon concentration in shrinkage mining stopes under various ventilation conditions was established in this study. The model accounts for the influence of permeability and area of the blasted ore heap, ventilation air quantity, and airflow direction on radon concentration in a confined workspace; these factors work together to allow the engineer to optimize the ventilation design. The feasibility and effectiveness of the model was verified by applying it to mines with elevated radon radiation exposure. The model was found to accurately changes in radon concentration according to the array of influence factors in underground uranium mines.

  17. First aid to fight hazards at the uranium ore processing plant at Seelingstaedt/Thuringia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellermann, R.; Molitor, N.; Ripper, P.

    1991-01-01

    Mining for uranium ore in Saxonia and Thuringen under the ownership of the German-Soviet group SDAG Wismut has severely affected the environment in the concerned regions over the last 45 years. By means of a special project, the article gives an overview of hazard potentials, acute hazards and envisaged first aid, as well as on additional measures to restore and revegetate the landscape. The state of knowledge on which the article is based is as at June 1991. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Popp, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    The tests described were undertaken to determine the extent to leach solution-rock interactions with uranium-bearing ore obtained from the Mariano Lake mine. Leach solutions of an acidic (H/sub 2/O/sub 4/-sulfuric acid) and basic (NaHCO/sub 3/-sodium bicarbonate) nature were tested, in addition to a leach solution containing potassium chloride and sulfuric acid (KCl/H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The latter solution was chosen in an attempt to equilibrate the aqueous phase with the rock-forming silicate minerals and minimize adverse effects such as clay formation, porosity loss, and lixiviant loss. 29 refs

  19. Guidebook on design, construction and operation of pilot plants for uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of a pilot plant are often important stages in the development of a project for the production of uranium concentrates. Since building and operating a pilot plant is very costly and may not always be required, it is important that such a plant be built only after several prerequisites have been met. The main purpose of this guidebook is to discuss the objectives of a pilot plant and its proper role in the overall project. Given the wide range of conditions under which a pilot plant may be designed and operated, it is not possible to provide specific details. Instead, this book discusses the rationale for a pilot plant and provides guidelines with suggested solutions for a variety of problems that may be encountered. This guidebook is part of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing being prepared by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management. 42 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Experience with restoration of ore-bearing aquifers after in situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazikov, V.G.; Zabaznov, V.U.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases the most important environmental issue for in situ leach uranium mining technology is the impact on groundwater. Usually the greatest issue is the chemical condition of the ore bearing aquifer following the completion of leaching. Based on experience gained during post leach monitoring, it has been found that in properly selected sites the impact following leaching is greatly reduced because of the process of self restoration, otherwise known as natural attenuation. This paper provides ground water monitoring data from 1985 to 1997 following completion of leaching at the Irkol uranium deposit, Kazakhstan. It shows the evolution of the pH, and other chemical parameters over this period. The monitoring results demonstrate that at this site the process of natural attenuation appears to have effectively reduced the impact on groundwater at the site, as well as to keep contaminated leaching fluids from moving more than a few hundreds of metres from the wellfield. (author)

  1. The basic characteristics of TRPO-GDX-301 resin extraction chromatography and its application in analysis of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wenlong; Yao Mingxia.

    1986-01-01

    The basic characteristic, including capacity of column, loading quality of extraction agent, relationship between flow-rate of solution and height of theorical tower plate, leakage of extraction agent, separation behavior of uranium, of TRPO-extraction chromatography for separation of uranium has been inveistigated. The microamount of uranium on column can be eluted with mixed complex solution at pH 5.8-6.2 and determined by 5-Br-PADAP spectrophotometry. The method is simple and easy to operate. It has reasonable precision and accuracy. It is very suitable for determination of 0.002-0.4% uranium in ore

  2. An evaluation of the dissolution process of natural uranium ore as an analogue of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, V.H.

    1991-08-01

    The assumption of congruent dissolution of uraninite as a mechanism for the dissolution behaviour of spent fuel was critically examined with regard to the fate of toxic radionuclides. The fission and daughter products of uranium are typically present in spent unreprocessed fuel rods in trace abundances. The principles of trace element geochemistry were applied in assessing the behaviour of these radionuclides during fluid/solid interactions. It is shown that the behaviour of radionuclides in trace abundances that reside in the crystal structure can be better predicted from the ionic properties of these nuclides rather than from assuming that they are controlled by the dissolution of uraninite. Geochemical evidence from natural uranium ore deposits (Athabasca Basin, Northern Territories of Australia, Oklo) suggests that in most cases the toxic radionuclides are released from uraninite in amounts that are independent of the solution behaviour of uranium oxide. Only those elements that have ionic and thus chemical properties similar to U 4+ , such as plutonium, americium, cadmium, neptunium and thorium can be satisfactorily modelled by the solution properties of uranium dioxide and then only if the environment is reducing. (84 refs., 7 tabs.)

  3. Processing Pa-Lua Uranium ore by Mixing and Curing with Sulfuric Acid on a Scale of 500 kg/Batch to Recover Yellowcake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Quang Thai; Cao Hung Thai; Le Thi Kim Dung; Phung Vu Phong; Tran Van Son

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore in Pa-Lua area is sandstone with different levels of weathering. This kind of ore contains calcium and clay that may cause clogs during heap leaching. In this study, a technique of mixing and curing with strong acids is used and followed by washing to recover uranium. This study also focuses on study of ore processing issues such as crushing, regenerating particles in fine ores, mixing, curing and washing. The leach solution is treated by ion-exchange and precipitation of products by NH 4 OH. The experiment results show that regenerating a portion of fine ores, mixing and curing help washing residues in the column more effectively. Flow rate of the input solution can be controllable and stable. Columns do not clog even when washing takes place in the ore column of 5 meters high. Efficiency of uranium recovery can reach to 85-90%. Products of technical uranium are obtained with high quality. (author)

  4. Evolution of Xihulitu basin and its control to uranium ore-formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingyin; Li Ziying; Dong Wenming

    2003-01-01

    There is a close relationship between basin filling succession and evolution of the basin. Characteristics of basin evolution can be studied by analyzing the basin filling succession. Two major periods are recognized according to the filling succession and subsequent alteration of the Xihulitu Basin. Evolutionary characteristics of each stage of the basin formation and alteration have been discussed in details. The types and special distribution of uranium metallization are controlled by the scale, connection degree and distribution of sandstone units and impermeable mudstone beds. The environment of uranium ore-formation became favorable as the faults modified the hydrodynamic condition. The basin had been uplifted for a long time after it was filled. Intergranular pores are not destroyed due to the weak mechanical compaction, which is beneficial to groundwater penetrating. Montmorillonitization and zeolitization in some sandstone units are strong because of the high content of volcanic fragments. The major uranium metallization is the phreatic oxidation type. The northern zone of the second sub-basin in the central section of the basin is regarded as the first perspective target for subsequent exploration. (authors)

  5. Regulatory view of the close-out of the uranium ore mine Zirovski Vrh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankar, L.

    2005-01-01

    The production of the uranium mine Zirovski Vrh ceased in 1990. The main remaining problem of the remadiation are mine and mill tailings. The uranium mine Zirovski Vrh has one mill tailings site Borst and one waste pile Jazbec. According to the Act on protection against ionising radiation and nuclear safety which was adopted by the Parliament in 2002, they are classified as radiation facilities. Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) is authorised for issuing a mandatory consent to mining work. The SNSA prepared the initial proposal of content of the safety report for the mine waste pile Jazbec. In 2005, according to the detailed content of this document, the public company Zirovski Vrh Ltd prepared the safety report which was examined by an authorised expert for radiation and nuclear safety. After a careful revision of the safety evaluation report, the consensus for mining work shall be issued by the SNSA. After finishing the mining works the SNSA shall also issue a licence for the closure of waste pile Jazbec. The main goal of this article is to present the Slovenian regulations which cover also mining work in the field of close-out of the uranium ore mine. (author)

  6. Superposition of late albitites on the aureoles of near-ore argillization in one of uranium-molybdenum deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsukov, V.L.; Pogudina, M.A.; Ryzhov, O.B.

    1981-01-01

    Late albitites superimposed on oreoles of near-ore argillization in a deposit of uranium-molybdenum formation are studied. Morphology of the superimposed albitites, confirming their late formation and superposition on oreoles of argillization, is described. Composition and crystal structure of the albitites are pointed out [ru

  7. Agpaitic nepheline syenites from the Ilimaussaq Complex, south Greenland; an important new uranium ore type (v.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, J.L.; Bunn, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ilimaussaq Intrusive Complex in south Greenland is a layered alkaline igneous body that is predominantly comprised of agpaitic nepheline syenites. The Complex is now recognized as containing vast resources of uranium in polymetallic ores that are also strongly enriched in rare earth elements (REEs) and zinc. Uranium and REEs are dominantly hosted in phosphate minerals with a minor proportion hosted in zirconium silicate minerals. Equivalent ores are yet to be mined for uranium anywhere in the world; however, studies are well advanced in confirming a process route to economically extract uranium. The Ilimaussaq Complex is considered the world's type-locality for agpaitic rocks. Formation of the complex is attributed to four successive pulses of magma. The first produced an augite syenite, which now forms a marginal shell. This was followed by intrusion of a sheet of peralkaline granite. The third and fourth stages make up the bulk of the intrusion and are peralkaline to hyper-agpaitic in composition. The third batch of magma differentiated to produce pulaskite, foyaite and naujaite. Stage four produced the kakortokites and lujavrites, which are the units of particular economic significance. Kakortokites are strongly enriched in zirconium, niobium and tantalum, whereas the lujavrites are strongly enriched in uranium, rare earth elements, fluorine and zinc. Lujavrites are vertically zoned with arfvedonsite (black) lujavrites grading downward into aegerine (green) lujavrites. The upper most portions of the black lujavrites contain uranium concentrations of greater than 450 ppm, which decreases downward over 200 - 300m toward green lujavrites where uranium concentrations rarely exceeds 200 ppm. Resources defined to date in accordance with the Australian JORC code include 192 million lb. of U 3 O 8 at 350 ppm within an overall resource of 282 million lb. of uranium oxide at a grade of 280 ppm. With scope for several other similar sized resources within complex

  8. An investigation into heterogeneity in a single vein-type uranium ore deposit: Implications for nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keatley, A.C.; Scott, T.B.; Davis, S.; Jones, C.P.; Turner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in nuclear materials are important as they are used within the field of nuclear forensics as an indicator of sample origin. However recent studies into uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) have shown significant elemental and isotopic heterogeneity from a single mine site such that some sites have shown higher variation within the mine site than that seen between multiple sites. The elemental composition of both uranium and gangue minerals within ore samples taken along a single mineral vein in South West England have been measured and reported here. The analysis of the samples was undertaken to determine the extent of the localised variation in key elements. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyse the gangue mineralogy and measure major element composition. Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). The results confirm that a number of key elements, REE concentrations and patterns used for origin location do show significant variation within mine. Furthermore significant variation is also visible on a meter scale. In addition three separate uranium phases were identified within the vein which indicates multiple uranium mineralisation events. In light of these localised elemental variations it is recommended that representative sampling for an area is undertaken prior to establishing the REE pattern that may be used to identify the originating mine for an unknown ore sample and prior to investigating impact of ore processing on any arising REE patterns. - Highlights: • Demonstrating significant variation at meter scale distances. • Importance of understanding heterogeneity in aid of nuclear forensics interpretation. • Understanding local features prior to determining feed through of elements to UOCs. • Key elements, REE concentrations and patterns show significant variation

  9. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 2. Selective extraction of uranium using the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen in the presence of activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1996-01-01

    Selective extraction of uranium from a phosphate ore was studied by using the mixed gas of Cl 2 and O 2 . On heating the ore and carbon mixture in Cl 2 , the volatilized chloride of uranium is accompanied by iron, aluminum, phosphorus and silicon chlorides. The addition of O 2 gas effectively lowered the volatilization ratios of aluminum, phosphorus and silicon. The ratio decreased with increasing oxygen flow rate up to 50 ml/min at 1,223 K (Cl 2 : 100 ml/min, O 2 +N 2 : 400 ml/min). The volatilization ratio of uranium was almost unchanged at 90% up to 50 ml/min O 2 (carbon amount: 15 wt%). The effect of the other parameters, i.e. Cl 2 flow rate, carbon amount, reaction temperature and time was examined. (author)

  10. Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores. Proceedings of a Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The 22 specialists from 15 countries and one international organization who attended the meeting were asked to give an appraisal of the current situation with regard to the processing of low-grade uranium ores and make recommendations for a possible IAEA programme of activities. This publication covers the work of the panel. Contents: Status reports (13 reports); Technical reports (13 reports); Summaries of discussions; Recommendations of the panel. Each report is in its original language (16 English, 4 French, 2 Russian and 4 Spanish) and each technical report is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. The summaries of discussions and the panel recommendations are in English. (author)

  11. Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores. Proceedings of a Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Proceedings of a panel convened by the IAEA in Vienna, 27 June - 1 July 1966. The 22 specialists from 15 countries and one international organization who attended the meeting were asked to give an appraisal of the current situation with regard to the processing of low-grade uranium ores and make recommendations for a possible IAEA programme of activities. This publication covers the work of the panel. Contents: Status reports (13 reports); Technical reports (13 reports); Summaries of discussions; Recommendations of the panel. Each report is in its original language (16 English, 4 French, 2 Russian and 4 Spanish) and each technical report is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. The summaries of discussions and the panel recommendations are in English. (author)

  12. Hydrogeochemistry of uranium, daughter products and associated elements (lanthanides), application to ore prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulhoat, P.

    1987-09-01

    The behavior in ground water of uranium, daughter products with long half life (U 234 , Th 230 , Ra 226 ) and stable (radiogenic lead) and lanthanides is studied by two complementary methods: 1) In situ multielement tracing in fracturated granitic rocks and porous sedimentary rocks of low permeability allowing to understand interactions between hydrodynamics and geochemistry. 2) Study of the properties of U 234 and Pb 236 which are mineralization tracers and are relatively independent of redox conditions, on the contrary U 238 has a low solubility in reducing medium. Three areas are studied: Bazois and Lodeve basin (France) and Cigar Lake (Canada). Radioactive disequilibriums are thoroughly studied when required by ore/rock interaction. Adsorption-desorption phenomena are of great importance in proposed prospection models. If prospection models based on alpha activity ratio U 234 /U 238 and lead isotope ratio in ground water can be applied, an integrated prospection model requires more in situ and laboratory experiments [fr

  13. Treatment of tailings water from uranium ore processing by reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, D.P.; Andrei, L.

    2000-01-01

    Mining and metallurgical waste waters are considered to be the major sources of heavy metal contamination. The need of economic and effective methods for metals removal have resulted in the development of new separation technologies. Precipitation, ion exchange, electrochemical processes, filtration and flotation are commonly applied for industrial effluents treatment. Occasionally, the application of such processes is limited because of technical or economical constraints. The search for new technologies regarding the recovery and removal of toxic metals from waste waters has directed attention to membrane processes. These processes are developed in the recent years due to the availability of many new types of membranes. This paper presents the laboratory test results for liquid radioactive effluent treatment from alkaline uranium ore processing by reverse osmosis. (author)

  14. On a Bayesian estimation procedure for determining the average ore grade of a uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Zamora-Reyes, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A Bayesian procedure is applied to estimate the average ore grade of a specific uranium deposit (the Morrison formation in New Mexico). Experimental data taken from drilling tests for this formation constitute deposit specific information, E 2 . This information is combined, through a single stage application of Bayes' theorem, with the more extensive and well established information on all similar formations in the region, E 1 . It is assumed that the best estimate for the deposit specific case should include the relevant experimental evidence collected from other like formations giving incomplete information on the specific deposit. This follows traditional methods for resource estimation, which presume that previous collective experience obtained from similar formations in the geological region can be used to infer the geologic characteristics of a less well characterized formation. (Author)

  15. Determination of '2'1'0Po in environmental water and uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Dingxiang; Hu Xiaohua; Pan Jingrong

    1998-12-01

    6 L of water sample is acidified with HCl, then add Fe 3+ as carrier and precipitate 210 Po at pH 9 with NH 4 OH. 0.1-0.5 g solid sample is fused with Na 2 O 2 and NaOH, and leached, add Fe 3+ as carrier, adjust to about pH 9 with HCl. Both the precipitation of Fe(OH) 3 are centrifuged, dissolved in HCl and adjust the acidity between 0.2-0.4 mol/L. Add excessive 50-100 mg of ascorbic acid for reducing Fe 3+ and protect the disc, then spontaneously deposit for 3 h at temperature of 70 degree C. Then the disc is determined by a low level α counting system for the α particles of 5.301 MeV of 210 Po. After the background is corrected, detect the efficiency and overall recovery. In this way, the specific activity of 210 Po is obtained. 0.03-33 Bq of 210 Po can be spontaneously deposited quantitatively. The specific activity of 210 Po in tap water, fresh snow, ice from river, uranium ore, uranium-bearing rock and soil are determined. The experiment shows that the sublimation of 210 Po within the short time of alkali fusion at 650 degree C can be neglected and the silica gel forming within the leaching solution be neutralized has no effect on spontaneously deposit of 210 Po. the overall recovery of water samples are 95.3%-97.7% and of ore samples are (97.8+-1.3)%. For tap water samples, its activity is as low as 4.8 x 10 -4 Bq/L, the relative standard deviation is less than +-20%

  16. Occupational diseases in uranium and ore miners in connection with radiation exposure in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2003-01-01

    Dozens cases of diseases are submitted to judgement as occupational diseases every year in the Czech Republic. Patients or attending physicians suggest that these cases are caused by occupational ionizing radiation. Only a part of these cases is qualified as occupational disease. The term 'occupational disease' is rather a juridical term which underlies the right to financial compensation. The causal association with exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be indisputably verified by expert medical opinion. Most diseases, which are proposed as occupational disease, are malignant tumors of the lungs. Total majority of judged cases are lung cancers from radioactive agents. In 2002, a total of 33 cases of lung cancer in former uranium or ore miners have been acknowledged as occupational diseases. The decision about occupational disease is derived from probabilistic approach based on estimation of probability of causation of irradiation on disease origin (methodical guideline No. 15 of Ministry of Health Bulletin, part 9, 1998). The presented paper gives a general information about all judged causes of occupational diseases in former uranium and ore miners in the Czech Republic in 2002. A total of 72 cases were submitted to judgement of conditions of disease origin to the National Radiation Protection Institute in 2002. 67 cases were lung cancers, 1 case was chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, basaliom, cancer of larynx and cancer of nasal septum. The probability of causation was assessed as prevailing in 32 cases of lung cancer, borderline in 5 cases and low in other 30 cases of lung cancer. The probability of causation was prevailing in both cases of myeloid leukemia. (author)

  17. Expansion of the ore treatment plant at Ranger Uranium Mines at Jabiru, NT Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nice, R.W. [R.W. Nice and Associates Pty. Ltd., Wollstonecraft, New South Wales (Australia); Banaczkowski, M. [Anaconda Operations Pty. Ltd., Laverton, Western Australia (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    The Ranger Uranium Mine commenced processing ore in 1980. The original plant designed by the joint venture between Davy and Wright Engineers had been designed to treat 1.3 Mtpa of ore to produce 3500 tpa of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} concentrates. The plant operated successfully through good and bad years until the 1995 when the owners of Energy Resources of Australia, North Ltd. (70%) decided that there was a market opening to allow expansion of the treatment plant such that it would produce 6000 tpa of concentrate.The desire to produce more concentrates was market driven but the change from the mine Ranger 1 to a new pit Ranger 3 also necessitated the inclusion of the ability to treat more ore. This involved the installation of more grinding and CCD washing capacity. There were some other changes that were to be included into the expansion to overcome operating deficiencies, reduce operating costs and to generally make the operation easier.The Australian engineering company, Kvaerner Davy, was commissioned to provide the EPCM services to the clients, North and the Ranger Operation Group. North Technical Services managed the Project with considerable input from the site operating and maintenance personnel. The site operating personnel commissioned the plant and are successfully operating it at the time of the preparation of this paper. The first part of this paper presents the basic process related activities required to provide the expanded facilities. This includes the flowsheet modifications, equipment changes and new equipment procured. Additionally, a discussion is given regarding the P and ID changes, the piping modifications and the means to install the expanded facilities with a minimum of interruption to the continuing plant operation. A second part of the paper details some of the experiences gained while constructing the expansion and commissioning and operating the expanded plant. (author)

  18. Enhanced Uranium Ore Concentrate Analysis by Handheld Raman Sensor: FY15 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Timothy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Christopher R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-11

    High-purity uranium ore concentrates (UOC) represent a potential proliferation concern. A cost-effective, “point and shoot” in-field analysis capability to identify ore types, phases of materials present, and impurities, as well as estimate the overall purity would be prudent. Handheld, Raman-based sensor systems are capable of identifying chemical properties of liquid and solid materials. While handheld Raman systems have been extensively applied to many other applications, they have not been broadly studied for application to UOC, nor have they been optimized for this class of chemical compounds. PNNL was tasked in Fiscal Year 2015 by the Office of International Safeguards (NA-241) to explore the use of Raman for UOC analysis and characterization. This report summarizes the activities in FY15 related to this project. The following tasks were included: creation of an expanded library of Raman spectra of a UOC sample set, creation of optimal chemometric analysis methods to classify UOC samples by their type and level of impurities, and exploration of the various Raman wavelengths to identify the ideal instrument settings for UOC sample interrogation.

  19. Some evidence of radiolysis in a uranium ore body -- Quantification and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Neretnieks, I.

    1995-01-01

    Locally oxidizing conditions in the near-field of the Cigar Lake uranium deposit was observed. Ongoing processes of water radiolysis has also been predicted previously by the mass transport model. In the ore there was an enhanced concentration of helium, hydrogen and sulfate. Sulfate is the only oxidizing species of substantial amount in the groundwater samples, and is possibly indirectly produced by water radiolysis and oxidation of sulfides. The ongoing oxidant production rate has been calculated by the mass transport model. In this paper, the issue of water radiolysis is addressed from a more fundamental angle of approach. The maximum oxidant production rate is calculated based on the assumptions of geometric dispersion of the ore constituents, the estimate of the total radiation energy, the fraction of energy deposited into the pore water, and the G-values of water. The results show that only a few percent of the total radiation energy is deposited into the pore water to cause water radiolysis. If the recombination factor projected by other researchers are accounted for, the oxidant production rate thus calculated agrees with the present-day ongoing oxidant production rate predicted by the mass transport model

  20. Effects of barium chlorine treatment of uranium ore on 222Rn emanation and 226Ra leachability from mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Church, S.L.; Whicker, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate the effectiveness of barium chloride treatment of uranium ore on 222 Rn emanation from mill tailings, 226 Ra level in waste-water, and the leachability of radium from tailings. It has been shown that barium sulfate is an excellent carrier for radium and that barium sulfate crystals have high retention capacity for radon gas produced by radium trapped within the lattice. Ground uranium ore from a mine in Wyoming was mixed with water to form a 1:1 ratio before barium and potassium chlorides were added at concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per liter of slurry. The ore was then subjected to a simulated mill process using sulfuric acid leaching. The liquid representing tailings pond water was separated and analyzed for 226 Ra and the solid fraction, representing mill tailings, was tested for radon emanation and the leachability of radium by deionized water. This study suggests that barium treatment of uranium ore prior to sulfuric acid leaching could be effective in reducing radon emanation from tailings and also in reducing the 226 Ra concentration of waste-water. Leachability of radium from treated tailings was markedly reduced

  1. Nuclear forensic analysis of an unknown uranium ore concentrate sample seized in a criminal investigation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, Elizabeth; Kristo, Michael J.; Colella, Michael; Robel, Martin; Williams, Ross; Lindvall, Rachel; Eppich, Gary; Roberts, Sarah; Borg, Lars; Gaffney, Amy; Plaue, Jonathan; Wong, Henri; Davis, Joel; Loi, Elaine; Reinhard, Mark; Hutcheon, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In early 2009, a state policing agency raided a clandestine drug laboratory in a suburb of a major city in Australia. While searching the laboratory, they discovered a small glass jar labelled 'Gamma Source' and containing a green powder. The powder was radioactive. This paper documents the detailed nuclear forensic analysis undertaken to characterize and identify the material and determine its provenance. Isotopic and impurity content, phase composition, microstructure and other characteristics were measured on the seized sample, and the results were compared with similar material obtained from the suspected source (ore and ore concentrate material). While an extensive range of parameters were measured, the key 'nuclear forensic signatures' used to identify the material were the U isotopic composition, Pb and Sr isotope ratios, and the rare earth element pattern. These measurements, in combination with statistical analysis of the elemental and isotopic content of the material against a database of uranium ore concentrates sourced from mines located worldwide, led to the conclusion that the seized material (a uranium ore concentrate of natural isotopic abundance) most likely originated from Mary Kathleen, a former Australian uranium mine

  2. Extracting uranium from low-grade ore from the Coso Mountains, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maysilles, J.H.; Nichols, I.L.; Seidel, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, is investigating several types of low-grade uranium deposits. Projections indicate that an increased percentage of future production will be derived from such sources. One material studied was from the Coso Mountains of California; this material contained 0.04 to 0.12 percent U 3 O 8 . The deposit contains at least two distinct types of mineralization. The material representing the bulk of this deposit was amenable to acid leaching; 80 to 85 percent U 3 O 8 extraction resulted from leaching with 20 to 40 pounds per ton of sulfuric acid. No oxidizing agent was required. This ore fraction could be treated by either agitation or percolation leaching. Uranium recovery and purification from the acid leach solution was accomplished using anion exchange followed by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. The second type of mineral was very refractory to acid leaching; a maximum extraction of only 44 percent was obtained with sulfuric acid. Nitric and hydrochloric acids were ineffective also

  3. Techniques for the recovery of residues from uranium ore processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croizat, G.; Lauret, G.

    1996-01-01

    The techniques for recovering residues used at Crouzille (Haute-Vienne, France) by Cogema have now been perfected. Feedback from experience results in a reliable methodology, providing that there is prior size grading of the products to recover, and regular removal of surface waters. About 23500 tons of uranium have been extracted in about 40 years from surface or underground sites in a granitic environment. The treatment of uranium ores has generated about 13.7 millions of tons of residues distributed in four disposal sites. This paper gives an inventory of the chemical and radiological characteristics of the residues and a description of the disposal sites geometry. The recovering methodology involves specific preparation depending on the lithology and the mechanical properties of the residues. Zones characterized by weak lift muddy residues require a geo-textile and a welded wire netting protection beneath the dead cover to avoid mud raising. This precaution implies additional costs but allows to start the recovering a few month after residues drying which is an important economical advantage. (J.S.). 3 figs., 4 photos

  4. Dynamics of uranium ore formation in the basement and frame of the Streltsovskaya Caldera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.; Schukin, S.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of geological-geophysical, paleo-geodynamics, mineralogical, geochemical, isotope, geochronological, and thermo-baro-geochemical data allow us to offer a model of uranium ore formation dynamics in the basement and frame of the Streltsovskaya Caldera connected to activity of the fluid-conducting fault zones network with the aim to identify prospective areas The most ancient fluid-conducting structures are inter-block NE-SW, NNE-submeridional, NW-SE and, probably, WNW-sub-latitudinal faults. The oldest NE-SW faults and schistosity zones were formed during Proterozoic tectonic cycle (TC) with reactivation in T3-J2 time due to global reorganization of stress field and reactivation of tectonic movements. The NNE-submeridional and NW-SE faults were extended with increased fluid permeability during Caledonian and Variscan TCs. They also were reactivated in the process of Late Mesozoic tectonic and magmatic activation (TMA). Thus already at early stages of geotectonic evolution within the intersection of NE-SW (N-Urulyunguyevskiy fault) and NNE-submeridional (Chindachinskaya zone) faults the areas of increased fluid and magmatic activity were formed. The dynamics of fault formation in the basement and frame of the Streltsovskaya caldera and its volcano-sedimentary cover differs. In the basement and granite framework NE-SW, NNEsubmeridional and NW-SE faults are interblock structures of the I rank. Their intersection formed areas of long-term circulation of hydrothermal solutions and telescopic appearance of multi-age metasomatites that created conditions for localizing of vein-stockwork mineralization. In volcanosedimentary cover the NE-SW and NNE-submeridional faults should be considered as interblock structures of the I rank where intersections provided inflow of ore-bearing solutions and their redistribution within the cover. Here the main ore distributing role belongs to NW-SE shears. They are intrablock II rank structures which were formed due to dextral

  5. Early Phanerozoic trace fossils from the Sierra Albarrana quartzites (Ossa-Morena Zone, Southwest Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcos, A.; Azor, A.; González, F.; Simancas, F.

    1991-01-01

    Three ichnogenera are described from a 50 to 500 m thick shallow-water sandstone-shale sequence (Sierra Albarrana Quartzites). The ichnofauna consists of the burrows of worm-like animals (Arenicolites, Monocraterion, and Skolithos). The age of this formation, previously considered to be Precambrian

  6. Schneeberg lung disease and uranium mining in the Saxon Ore Mountains (Erzgebirge).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttmann, W

    1993-02-01

    The so-called Schneeberg lung disease is a form of bronchial or alveolar carcinoma caused by the effects of the radioactive gas radon and of its radioactive short half-life daughter products. This type of radiation-induced occupational cancer is the most common and the most important radiation injury among workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. There have been many deaths from lung cancer, especially in the Soviet uranium mines in the Erzgebirge of Saxony in the former German Democratic Republic. The history of disease in these miners extends over five centuries; the first observations of their health hazard start in the Middle Ages. The discovery of the lung cancer component was made toward the end of the nineteenth century, and the suspicion that a connection might exist between this cancer type and exposure to ionizing radiation was voiced at the beginning of the twentieth century. In the first half of this century, further research was carried out on this disease in the Schneeberg area of the Erzgebirge. Before the end of World War II, guidelines were set up to define the acceptable limits of radon exposure in the ore mines of Saxony. After World War II, the American uranium mines in the Colorado Plateau used the German research results as a basis for working out their own radiation protection standard. The uranium mines under Soviet occupation in the former GDR, on the contrary, paid no attention to these research findings. For many years, no precautions were taken for the miners' working conditions. The consequence of this serious omission was an estimated 9,000 fatal cases of lung cancer among these underground miners. High concentrations of radon are to be found in indoor air of homes in some districts of the Erzgebirge, suggesting an increasing lung cancer risk for the local inhabitants. The significance of this finding is evaluated.

  7. Investigation of spectral interference effects on determination of uranium concentration in phosphate ore by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachari, Ayoob H.; Jalali, Fatemeh; Alahyarizadeh, Ghasem [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Engineering Dept.

    2017-04-01

    Effects of spectral interferences on determination of the uranium concentration in phosphate ore were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Eleven high intensity emission lines including four lines recommended by ICP-OES apparatus were chosen to determine the uranium concentration. The ore samples were collected from phosphate acid producing industry in the south of Iran. Three different acid combinations [(HNO{sub 3}:HCl:HF-2:6:2), (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:HF-3:3:3), (HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:HF-4:2:2)] used in microwave digestion method to explore the spectral interference effects in different solvent environments. The results showed that the trusty uranium concentration, obtained in the 367.007 nm, 386.592 nm, 389.036 nm and 409.014 nm by second acid digestion method which were 0.665 ppm, 0.972 ppm, 0.670 ppm and 0.801 ppm, respectively. Although the line of 409.014 nm was reported as the best line for determining of the uranium concentration in several literatures, the results showed that this line has a significant spectral interference with vanadium in some ores which should be considered in determining of the uranium concentration. Spectral interference effects of some elements which have high concentrations in the phosphate ore including Ca, Fe, Mg, Pb, V, Mn, and Ti on the line intensities were also investigated. Results indicated that the chosen elements affect emission intensities of all of 11 lines. They also indicated that the line of 409.014 nm provides a trusty precision in the determination of the uranium concentration in the ore sample with low vanadium concentration (at least, U/V ratio of 1:5). Results show that the line of 409.014 nm provides acceptable precision with some corrections in comparison with other selected lines. For instance in high concentrations of other elements including Fe and Ti in the ore samples, strong influences on the line intensities of the 367.007 nm (by Fe

  8. Effects of barium chloride treatment of uranium mill tailings and ore on radon emanation and 226Ra levels. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Flot, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of barium chloride treatments on: reduction of 222 Rn emanation from mill wastes; reduction of 226 Ra levels in wastewater; and decreased leachability of 226 Ra from mill wastes. Baseline 226 Ra concentrations were determined for ore and tailings as well as radon emanation fractions. Uranium ore was treated with soluble barium at concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per litre of slurry. The leach-liquor declined in 226 Ra concentration by as much as 50%. When soluble potassium as well as barium was used in the treatment process at equal concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per litre of slurry, a similar reduction was observed. No significant difference was noted between the two treatment regimes. An accelerated leaching experiment was performed on the ore treated with barium chloride. All treatment groups except that treated with 10 mg of soluble barium per litre of slurry showed significant decreases in leachability. Available 222 Rn (corresponds with radon emanation fraction) was measured in treated and untreated ore. Ore treated with concentrations of Ba ++ up to 1.00 mg per gram of ore did not show a statistically significant reduction in available 222 Rn, however when potassium sulfate was also added, a significant decline was noted. This study suggests that barium chloride treatments reduce radon emanation from mill wastes and reduce 226 Ra levels in wastewater. Leachability of 226 Ra from treated samples decreased markedly. 19 references, 8 figures, 7 tables

  9. Order of 13 December 1985 on the transfer to ENRESA of the Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Sierra Albarrana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Order provides for the transfer of the Radioactive Waste Management Facility at Sierra Albarrana from the Junta de Energia Nuclear to ENRESA, the National Enterprise for Radioactive Waste; it also organises all stages of the transfer. (NEA) [fr

  10. Exploring implicit dimensions underlying risk perception of waste from mining and milling of uranium ores in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, B.; Charron, S.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding public perceptions of risks is increasingly considered to be important in order to make sound policy decisions. For many years, social scientists have been working to understand why the public is so concerned about nuclear energy and radioactive waste. Indeed, risk perception studies have essentially focused on high-level nuclear waste. As a result, there is now a fair understanding of what determines public support or opposition to high-level nuclear waste storage and disposal facilities. However, to date, little research has been conducted into radioactive waste from mining and milling of uranium ores. In France, such waste have a much debated legal status, which illustrates their ambiguous origin (natural versus artificial) and the manner people can perceive them. Therefore, it seems relevant to explore the individual judgements, attitudes and beliefs towards risk associated with uranium mill tailings. The present study provides a structural model based on both the identification and analysis of implicit dimensions underlying risk perception (psychological, cultural, moral...) applied to the case of french uranium mill tailings. One objective of the research has been to develop an interview grid based on this conceptual model in order to elicit social demand beyond public attitudes. Semi-structured interviews have been conducted on site in french uranium bearing areas. The relationships inferred between identified risk characteristics and contextual risk perceptions suggest that five majors thematics (time, space, nature, ethics and trust) build determinants of the public's perceptions of risk related to waste from mining and milling of uranium ores. (author)

  11. Uranium ore mining in Spain with a focus on the closure and remediation measures in former production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.; Blunck, S.; Lopez Romero, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    In early 2000, the uranium ore mining activities in Spain ceased. Since the middle of the last century, Spain had pushed ahead its own production of uranium concentrate with the formation of several companies (ENUSA, J.E.N.). In that period, Spain produced around 6000 t of uranium. With the completion of the operations at Andujar, La Haba and Elephante as well as Quercus at Saelices el Chico, the corporate tasks have shifted from building-up of a strategic uranium reserve to remediation and subsequent use of the locations. The operations have reached different remediation phases. While at Saelices el Chico remediation is still proceeding, the Andujar and La Haba locations are undergoing a monitoring phase as agreed for all former operating facilities. The estimated closure and remediation costs for the three operating facilities described amount to approx. 85 mio. Euro. In all three cases dealt with, however, these limited financial resources have been sufficient to successfully implement a closure and remediation concept that minimizes the risks from the facilities of uranium ore mining and processing with regard to the environment. (orig.)

  12. Uranium ore waste management of the CIPC (Mining Industrial Complex of Pocos de Caldas Plateau, Minas Gerais State, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiikmann, Luiz Oide; Figueiredo, Nestor; Taddei, Jose Fernando Aguiar Carrazedo; Valente, Sergio Mozart Coutinho; Chilelli Junior, Vicente; Souza, Vicente Paulo de

    1995-01-01

    Since 1982, the facilities in CIPC has been producing a uranium concentrate under ammonium diuranate form, from uranium ore. The CIPC,s Waste Management System is responsible for monitoring and controlling the mining and milling effluents, in accordance with norms established by government regulatory agencies. Here we are concerned with this system's efficiency, costs and, with necessary procedures for waste rock piles'stabilization in physical, chemical and biological aspects with aim of environmentally restoring these areas. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Critical evaluation of safety and radiological protection requirements adopted for the transport of uranium and thorium ores and concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezrahi, Arnaldo; Crispim, Verginia R.

    2009-01-01

    This work evaluates in a critical way the safety and radiological protection recommendations established by the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA and adopted national and internationally, for the transport of uranium and thorium ores and concentrates, known according the transport regulations, as being of the Low Specific Activity Material Type-I, LSA-I, basing on more realistic scenarios than the presently existent, aiming at the determination of maximum exposure levels of radiation as well as the maximal contents of those materials in packages and conveyance. A general overview taking into account the scenarios foreseen by the regulations of the IAEA pointed out for a need of a better justification of the requirements edited by the Agency or should be used to support a request of revision of those regulations, national and internationally adopted, in the pertinent aspects to the transport of uranium and thorium ores and concentrates. (author)

  14. Enumeration and characterization of microorganisms associated with the uranium ore deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada. Informal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    The high-grade uranium deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada, is being investigated as a natural analog for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Geochemical aspects of the site have been studied in detail, but the microbial ecology has not been fully investigated. Microbial populations in an ore sample and in groundwater samples from the vicinity of the ore zone were examined to determine their effect on uranium mobility. Counts of the total number of bacteria and of respiring bacteria were obtained by direct microscopy, and the viable aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were assessed as colony forming units (CFUs) by the dilution plating technique. In addition, the population distribution of denitrifiers, fermenters, iron- and sulfur-oxidizers, iron- and sulfate-reducers, and methanogens was determined by the most probable number (MPN) technique

  15. Titrimetric determination of uranium in low-grade ores by the ferrous ion-phosphoric acid reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchen, A.; Zechanowitsch, G.

    1980-01-01

    The modification and extension of the U.S.A.E.C. ferrous ion-phosphoric acid reduction method for the determination of uranium in high-grade or relatively pure material to a method for the determination of uranium with a high accuracy and precision, in ores containing 0.004 to 7% U is described. It is simple, rapid and requires no prior separations from elements that, in other methods, frequently interfere. For sample materials having very high concentrations of interfering elements, a prior concentration step using extraction with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide is described, but it is shown that, for most low-grade ores, this step is unnecessary. (author)

  16. Radium-226 in certified uranium reference ores DL-1a, BL-4a, DH-1a and BL-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Steger, H.F.

    1983-05-01

    Radium-226 radioactivity in uranium reference ores BL-4a and BL-5 and uranium-thorium reference ores DL-1a and DH-1a was determined in an interlaboratory program. Twelve of thirteen participants used certified radium solutions from the United States National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for calibration purposes. Recommended values of sup(226)Ra activity and associated parameters were calculated by statistical treatment of the results. In all cases, the recommended values are within 2 percent of activities predicted assuming secular equilibrium in the sup(238)U decay series. The recommended values for radium activity are 1.40, 15.5, 31.5 and 857 Bq/ for DL-1a, BL-4a, DH-1a and BL-5, respectively

  17. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  18. Influence of industrial dust of uranium ore on rats' lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumasheva, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Under the conditions of radiotoxic influence of uranium ore dust (UOD), the respiratory organs are the main system specifically responsible for adaptation to this factor. At the same time, there are not sufficient studies regarding the morphological aspects of structural lung distortions due to inhalational influence by UOD. To identify the nature of morphological changes in the animals' lung tissue at the cellular and subcellular levels under the influence of industrial dust of uranium ore in a dose of 50 MPC. Experimental studies were conducted on 80 white rats (tom) with a body mass of 120-180 g. The experimental animals were subjected to chronic inhalation of UOD in a dose of 50 MPC (107.75 mg/m 3 ). The animals that were kept in similar chambers but that were not exposed to UOD served as control animals. Material from the animals for research was withdrawn in 3, 7, 30 and 60 days after the beginning of the experiment. The animals were withdrawn from the experiment by decapitation after a brief ether anesthesia. The lung tissue was subjected to conventional histological processing. Sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin according to van Gieson's method. For electronic microscopic examination the lung tissue slices were fixed and embedded by conventional methods. Obtained blocks were used to prepare ultrathin sections. An impact of UOD in a dose of 50 MPC was accompanied by the development of acute focal serous inflammation in the wall of the small bronchi and lung parenchyma in the early stages of the experiment (3-7 days), pneumonic foci of fibrosis, and the development of marked sclerotic changes in the peribronchial lymphoid tissue by the 30-th day. By the 60-th day, an increase of sclerotic changes in the bronchial wall accompanied by inhibition of the reaction on the part of interstitial macrophages and bronchus associated lymphoid tissue were reported. These indicate the intense course of the compensatory processes. Conducted electron

  19. Size distribution of aerosol particles produced during mining and processing uranium ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala, Helena; Tomasek, Ladislav; Rulik, Petr; Beckova, Vera; Hulka, Jiri

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol particle size distributions of uranium and its daughter products were studied and determined in the area of the Rožná mine, which is the last active uranium mine in the Czech Republic. A total of 13 samples were collected using cascade impactors from three sites that had the highest expected levels of dust, namely, the forefield, the end of the ore chute and an area close to workers at the crushing plant. The characteristics of most size distributions were very similar; they were moderately bimodal, with a boundary approximately 0.5 μm between the modes. The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) were obtained from the distributions beyond 0.39 μm, whereas the sizes of particles below 0.39 μm were not differentiated. Most AMAD and GSD values in the samples ranged between 3.5 and 10.5 μm and between 2.8 and 5.0, respectively. The geometric means of the AMADs and GSDs from all of the underground sampling sites were 4.2 μm and 4.4, respectively, and the geometric means of the AMADs and GSDs for the crushing plant samplings were 9.8 μm and 3.3, respectively. The weighted arithmetic mean of the AMADs was 4.9 μm, with a standard error of 0.7 μm, according to the numbers of workers at the workplaces. The activity proportion of the radon progeny to (226)Ra in the aerosol was 0.61. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparative study for the conditions concentration and extraction of uranium from ores in sedimentary rocks from Egypt and Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium has been recently discovered in a sedimentary rock in Meshraq locality (north of Iraq). This rock composed mainly of gypsum with different proportions of dolomite and sand, thus it could be termed: dolomite sandy gypseous. On the other hand, the Oligocene deposits of Qatrani area (located at the northern part of the western desert, Egypt) in which gypsum and dolomite are the main constituents, contains various forms of uranium mineralizations. Thus, the could be technologically compared with the uraniferous samples of Iraq. This thesis concerned with the study of uranium concentration and extraction from the two ore materials. Uranium leaching study has been carried out by using many leaching variants, i. e.; sulfuric acid, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate. Also, a detailed study for the possibility of producing sulfuric acid from gypsum by the reaction with ammonium carbonate has been performed. During uranium recovery from the acidic leach liquors, the 'Uranous phosphate' method has been studied, and during uranium recovery from the alkaline leach liquors (Ammonium Carbonate), the process of uranium precipitation with steam has been studied

  1. Histopathologic, morphometric, and physiologic investigation of lungs of dogs exposed to uranium-ore dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, F.T.; Filipy, R.E.; Loscutoff, S.M.; Mihalko, P.J.; Palmer, R.F.; Busch, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The most consistent pulmonary-function change attributed to carnotite uranium-ore-dust exposure (at 15 mg/m/sup 3/, for 4 h/day, 5 days/week) is an increased slope of the single-breath N/sub 2/ washout curve, suggesting an uneven distribution of ventilation. This change was observed in dogs exposed for less than 1 year and continued through 4 years of exposure. Measurements of pulmonary resistance, after 27, 40 and 47 months exposure, showed slight age-related changes and increasing differences between control and exposed animals with duration of exposure. These two changes are suggestive of a bronchitic response, similar to the industrial bronchitis of mine workers. The most notable pulmonary lesions observed in dogs exposed for up to 4 years are: vesicular emphysema, peribronchiolitis and focal pneumoconiosis. Lesions of the major airways and upper respiratory tract, when present, were minimal in severity. Pulmonary vesicular emphysema was present in all but one of the examined dogs. The emphysema was dose-related, in that it was present only to a slight degree in dogs exposed for less than 3 years and, thereafter, increased in severity. Morphometric measurement data confirmed the value of the histopathologic grading system for the degree of emphysema. These data correlated best with the dynamic pulmonary compliance measurements.

  2. Dynamic Characteristics and Model for Centralization Reaction of Acidic Tailings From Heap Leaching of Uranium Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Liu Yulong; Li Guangyue; Wang Youtuan

    2010-01-01

    Centralization tests were carried out on acidic tailings from heap leaching of uranium ore by using CaO, NaOH and NH 4 OH. The variations of pH with time were measured for the three centralization systems and the dynamic models for the systems were set up by regressing the measured data. The centralization process consists of the fast reaction phase representing the reaction between the centralization agent and the acid on the surface of the tailing's particles and the slow diffusion-reaction phase representing the diffusion-reaction between the centralization agent and the acid within the tailing's particles. The non-linear coupling and feedback function model for the diffusion-reaction of the centralization agent can reflect the process and mode of the centralization reaction. There is a non-linear oscillation in the variation of pH within the centralization systems. The dynamic model for the tailing's centralization reaction can fit the pH variation within the centralization systems. (authors)

  3. Study of the Treatment of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Nong Son Uranium Ore Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba Tien; Trinh Giang Huong; Luu Cao Nguyen; Harvey, L.K.; Tran Van Quy

    2011-01-01

    Liquid waste from Nong Son uranium ore processing is treated with concentrated acid, agglomerated, leached, run through ion exchange and then treated with H 2 O 2 to precipitate yellowcake. The liquid radioactive waste has a pH of 1.86 and a high content of radioactive elements, such as: [U] 143.898 ppm and [Th] = 7.967 ppm. In addition, this waste contains many polluted chemical elements with high content, such as arsenic, mercury, aluminum, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese and nickel. The application of the general method as one stage precipitation or precipitation in coordination with BaCl 2 is not effective. These methods generated a large amount of sludge with poor settling characteristics. The volume of final treated waste was large. This paper introduces the investigation of the treatment of this liquid radioactive waste by the method of two stage of precipitation in association with polyaluminicloride (PAC) and polymer. The impact of factors: pH, neutralizing agents, quantity of PAC and polymer to effect precipitation and improve the settling characteristics during processing was studied. The results showed that the processing of liquid radioactive waste treatment through two stages: first stage at pH = 3 and the second stage at pH = 8.0 with limited PAC and polymer (A 101) resulted in significant reduced volume of the treated waste. The discharged liquid satisfied the requirement of the National Technical Regulation on Industrial Waste Water (QCVN 24:2009). (author)

  4. Recent technical changes in the treatment plants of Sismo for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clappier, L.; Michel, P.

    1983-01-01

    The mills of the Ste. Industrielle des Minerais de l'Ouest (Simo) have undergone various reconstructions, consisting of the replacement of worn equipment, an extension of the capacity (from 600000 to 1100000 tonnes per year) and the introduction of new techniques which are described in the present article: endless belt filters; the grinding operations in a wet medium lead to a pulp which contains 1.11 m 3 of water per tonne of ore; the insulation of one endless-belt filter from the washing sector after leaching has permitted an increase of the solid concentration of the pulps; the recovery of uraniferous solutions includes generally a stage of concentration and of purification of the uranium in solution by ion exchange on a resin or liquid solvent substrate; instead of using them in parallel, the ''Eluex'' process utilizes them in series; the extraction by solvent is achieved with mixers and decanters and more recently with the ''pulsed column'' since 1981; the treatment of scum which hampers the liquid/liquid extraction has been planned in several ways; the latest solution adopted concerns the filtration under pressure; the drying of the concentrate has been effected for several years at ''l'Ecarpiere'' by atomization at the drying space on the belt [fr

  5. Characterization of heavy metals in a uranium ore region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Jairo Dias; dos Santos Amaral, Romilton; dos Santos Júnior, José Araújo; Genezini, Frederico Antonio; Menezes, Rômulo Simões Cezar; de Oliveira, Iane Andrade

    2014-03-01

    The concentrations of As, Zn, Co, Cr, and Ba were determined in soil samples from an anomalous uranium ore region in the countryside of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The main land use system in this region is dairy farming, and there is a need to evaluate the potential risk of milk contamination. Twenty-three soil samples were activated with neutrons and analyzed using a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer system. The results, recorded in mg kg(-1), varied from 0.4 to 6.7 for As, from 17.0 to 110.0 for Zn, from 2.8 to 38.4 for Co, from 12.1 to 65.5 for Cr, and from 443.0 to 1,497.0 for Ba. All of the Ba concentrations were higher than the intervention value adopted by the Brazilian National Environmental Board. This finding justifies research in other environmental areas to predict the toxicological risks to the local population.

  6. Comparison method for uranium determination in ore sample by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Şenol

    2013-07-01

    A comparison method for the determination (without sample pre-concentration) of uranium in ore by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) has been performed. The experiments were conducted using three procedures: matrix matching, plasma optimization, and internal standardization for three emission lines of uranium. Three wavelengths of Sm were tested as internal standard for the internal standardization method. The robust conditions were evaluated using applied radiofrequency power, nebulizer argon gas flow rate, and sample uptake flow rate by considering the intensity ratio of the Mg(II) 280.270 nm and Mg(I) 285.213 nm lines. Analytical characterization of method was assessed by limit of detection and relative standard deviation values. The certificated reference soil sample IAEA S-8 was analyzed, and the uranium determination at 367.007 nm with internal standardization using Sm at 359.260 nm has been shown to improve accuracy compared with other methods. The developed method was used for real uranium ore sample analysis.

  7. The design and construction of the bottom working for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting in No. 745 mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Yang Shijiao; Li Ming

    1998-11-01

    Bottom working is a very important structure for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting. Its design and construction should simultaneously satisfy the requirements for receiving fragmented ore, transporting the ore, providing relief space for blast operation, passage for workers and fresh air for the slope and collecting the pregnant solution from spraying over the fragmented ore. The author deals with the design and construction of the complete water cutoff bottom working for collecting the pregnant solution for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by long hole blast in No. 745 mine in Guangdong Province. The preparation system for the block, the undercutting, the construction process and method of the bottom working and the measures to guide the solution leaked into the surrounding rock mass to the bottom of the block are described in detail

  8. Report on intercomparisons IAEA/S-17, S-18, and S-19 of the determinaton of uranium in uranium phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszonicki, L.; Hanna, A.N.; Suschny, O.

    1984-08-01

    The aim of the reported intercomparisons, organized by the IAEA's Analytical Quality Control Service, was to provide an opportunity to the participating laboratories to check the reliability of their results by comparing them with the results obtained by other laboratories. The participants were requested to determine the concentration of uranium in three samples of Brasilian uranium phosphate ores containing uranium of a low, a medium, and a large concentration. Twenty-four laboratories from 19 countries returned results. The analytical method most frequently used was radiometry of natural isotopes, followed by neutron activation analysis, fluorimetry, X-ray fluorescence and spectrophotometry. In general, the results can be considered as satisfactory. The relative confidence intervals of the medians extend in the range from -3% to +5%. The overall medians of all materials were accepted as reliable for certification

  9. A study on direct determination of uranium in ore by analyzing γ-ray spectrum with dual linear regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunkui

    1996-01-01

    The method introduced is based on different energy of γ-ray emitted from radionuclide in the uranium-radium decay series in ore. The pulse counting rates of two spectra bands, i.e. N 1 (55∼193 keV) and N 2 (260∼1500 keV), are measured by portable type HYX-3 400-channel γ-ray spectrometer. On the other side, the uranium content (Q U ) is obtained by chemical analysis of channel sampling. Then the regression coefficients (b 0 , b 1 ,b 2 ) can be determined through dual linear regression by using Q U and N 1 , N 2 . The direct determination of uranium can be made with the regression equation Q U = b 0 + b 1 N 1 + b 2 N 2

  10. Laboratory studies on leaching of low grade uranium ores and treatment of low level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, O.T.; Antonino, E.J.; Caluag, L.A.; Villamater, D.

    1980-07-01

    Acid leaching experiments of preconcentrated uranium ore were carried out at a pulp density of 50% solids, using sulfuric acid with sodium chlorate as oxidant. The different leaching parameters considered in this work were temperature, oxidant level and leaching time. In the experimental procedure, the concentration of oxidant and the temperature were varied to determine how they affect the leaching process. Experimental results are illustrated in tabulated form for better interpretation. Uranium analyses were done by fluorimetric and delayed-neutron activation analysis. An anion exchange method using Dowex 1 x 8, 200-400 mesh (Cl - ) was used in treating the low-level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments. The purpose of this treatment was to minimize radioactive contamination in the waste materials and also to recover some of the uranium left in the liquid waste. (author)

  11. Radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population exceeding the background as a result of mining and processing of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonchev, L.; Vasilev, G.

    1999-01-01

    The nearly 50-year-long history of researches, mining and processing and closure of uranium industry of researches, mining and processing and the closure of uranium industry sites in the country as well necessitate reassessment of the radiation exposure of the human population in the regions nearby such projects. Proceeding from the available data from expert examination reports the radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population in excess of the background as a result of mining and processing of uranium ores is analysed. The study covers about 135000 persons. The mean value of exposure above the background, attributable to the technologically increased background amounts to 3.04 mSv/a at effective background dose about 2.3 mSv/a. The collective effective dose is 410 mSv/a and represents about 5 per cent of the overall radiation exposure of the Bulgarian population

  12. Radiation legacy of the USSR enterprises for mining, milling and processing of uranium ores: Conservation, decommissioning and environmental rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burykin, A.A.; Iskra, A.A.; Karamushka, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    The long-term operation of USSR uranium mining and milling enterprises produced a great volume of low level radioactive waste in the form of rock spoil heaps (181 million m 3 ), hydro-metallurgical plants tailings dumps (340 million m 3 ) and basins of mine waters (200 million m 3 ) with total activity of 25.1·10 15 Bq (670 kCi). The total area occupied by the dumps is about 180 km 2 . The paper presents brief characteristics of the activities of uranium ore mining enterprises located at the CIS countries' territories, their wastes' status and describes measures for rehabilitation and restoration of territories of the Soviet uranium mining and metallurgical complex. (author)

  13. Ore and metal standards vital to labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Information provided on ore and metal analytical standards available from CANMET includes preparation, certification, and use. The collection of standards includes four samples of uranium ore and three samples of uranium-thorium ores

  14. Radionuclide migration around uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory, Australia - analogue of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Roman, D.; Golian, C.; Short, S.; Nightingale, T.; Lowson, R.T.; Davey, B.G.; Gray, D.

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate geochemical analogues may be used to reduce the uncertainties in predicting the long-term transport of actinides, radium and fission products from laboratory adsorption and hydrological data. In this study the migration of uranium series nuclides within, and down-gradient of ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers uranium province of the Northern Territory of Australia is described. A mathematical framework was developed to permit calculation of the rate of leaching or deposition of uranium and radium between defined zones of the ore bodies, and the rate of loss of the nuclides due to groundwater transport and surface erosion. A detailed study was made of the distribution of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes within various minerals comprising the weathered ore assemblage. Uranium and thorium concentrate principally in the iron minerals and radium in the clay-quartz phases. Substantial disequilibria are observed, which are attributed to a combination of α-recoil and chemical effects. Evidence of the relative lability of iron phases is presented. The transport of uranium series nuclides in groundwater intersecting the deposits was investigated. Down-gradient of the Ranger One deposit, the maximum retardation factor of uranium is 250. The role of colloids in groundwater transport is being studied. Uranium is transported principally in solution. There appears to be an equilibrium between solute and articulate uranium

  15. Technical Report on the Behavior of Trace Elements, Stable Isotopes, and Radiogenic Isotopes During the Processing of Uranium Ore to Uranium Ore Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Borg, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gaffney, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Genneti, V. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kristo, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robel, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, S. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schorzman, K. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sharp, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Singleton, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The goals of this SP-1 effort were to understand how isotopic and elemental signatures behave during mining, milling, and concentration and to identify analytes that might preserve geologic signatures of the protolith ores. The impurities that are preserved through the concentration process could provide useful forensic signatures and perhaps prove diagnostic of sample origin.

  16. Uranium Chemical and Radiological Risk Assessment for Freshwater Ecosystems Receiving Ore Mining Releases: Principles, Equations and Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Adam, C.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium is an element that has the solely characteristic to behave as significant hazard both from a chemical and radiological point of view. Exclusively of natural occurrence, its distribution into the environment may be influenced by human activities, such as nuclear fuel cycle, military use of depleted uranium, or coal and phosphate fertilizer use, which finally may impact freshwater ecosystems. Until now, the associated environmental impact and risk assessments were conducted separately. We propose here to apply the same methodology to evaluate the ecological risk due to potential chemotoxicity and radiotoxicity of uranium. This methodology is articulated into the classical four steps (EC, 2003: problem formulation, effect and exposure analysis, risk characterisation). The problem formulation dealt both with uranium viewed as a chemical element and as the three isotopes 234, 235 and 238 of uranium and their main daughters. Then, the exposure analysis of non-human species was led on the basis of a common conceptual model of the fluxes occurring in freshwater ecosystems. No-effect values for the ecosystem were derived using the same effect data treatment in parallel. A Species Sensitivity Distribution was fitted: (1) to the ecotoxicity data sets illustrating uranium chemotoxicity and allowing the estimation of a Predicted-No-Effect-Concentration for uranium in water expressed in μg/L; (2) to radiotoxicity effect data as it was done within the ERICA project, allowing the estimation of a Predicted No-Effect-Dose-Rate (in μGy·h -1 ). Two methods were then applied to characterize the risk to the ecosystem: a screening method using the risk quotient approach, involving for the radiological aspect back calculation of the water limiting concentration from the PNEDR for each isotope taken into account and a probabilistic risk assessment. A former uranium ore mining case-study will help in demonstrating the application of the whole methodology

  17. Uranium Chemical and Radiological Risk Assessment for Freshwater Ecosystems Receiving Ore Mining Releases: Principles, Equations and Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Adam, C.

    2008-08-01

    Uranium is an element that has the solely characteristic to behave as significant hazard both from a chemical and radiological point of view. Exclusively of natural occurrence, its distribution into the environment may be influenced by human activities, such as nuclear fuel cycle, military use of depleted uranium, or coal and phosphate fertilizer use, which finally may impact freshwater ecosystems. Until now, the associated environmental impact and risk assessments were conducted separately. We propose here to apply the same methodology to evaluate the ecological risk due to potential chemotoxicity and radiotoxicity of uranium. This methodology is articulated into the classical four steps (EC, 2003: problem formulation, effect and exposure analysis, risk characterisation). The problem formulation dealt both with uranium viewed as a chemical element and as the three isotopes 234, 235 and 238 of uranium and their main daughters. Then, the exposure analysis of non-human species was led on the basis of a common conceptual model of the fluxes occurring in freshwater ecosystems. No-effect values for the ecosystem were derived using the same effect data treatment in parallel. A Species Sensitivity Distribution was fitted : (1) to the ecotoxicity data sets illustrating uranium chemotoxicity and allowing the estimation of a Predicted-No-Effect-Concentration for uranium in water expressed in μg/L; (2) to radiotoxicity effect data as it was done within the ERICA project, allowing the estimation of a Predicted No-Effect-Dose-Rate (in μGyṡh-1). Two methods were then applied to characterize the risk to the ecosystem: a screening method using the risk quotient approach, involving for the radiological aspect back calculation of the water limiting concentration from the PNEDR for each isotope taken into account and a probabilistic risk assessment. A former uranium ore mining case-study will help in demonstrating the application of the whole methodology.

  18. Closedown programme for the uranium ore and processing plant at Eleshnitsa, Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansson, R.; Hedman, K.; Oosterbaan, A.; Popov, I.

    1998-01-01

    The tailings pond of the uranium ore and resin processing plant at Eleshnitsa, Bulgaria has been subject to a rehabilitation programme under a phare contract. The tailings cover 34 ha behind a 70 m high dam. The volume of waste is 12 million m 3 . Furhermore, there are considerable areas with contaminated soils within the industrial area. In order to be able to prepare detailed design and full tender documents for the actual contractual works a number of additional studies has been performed. The studies include geophysical, geodetical and geotechnical surveys, piezometer installations, a sub-regional sampling survey of surface and groundwater and a laboratory scale water treatment test. From these studies final design data and parameters have been obtained with respect to long term dam-stability, composition of cover and shape of contouring of the tailings pond area, structures for diversion of upstream surface waters and size and type of waste water treatment plant. Based on this information are contract Dossiers prepared The main part of this paper deals with the rehabilitation concept to be used for the contractual works. A description of present-day conditions, starting point for the rehabilitation concept, is also presented. Specific emphasis is put on the long-term stability of the dam and covering of the tailings by a soil membrane, on the design of the waste water treatment plant and on the monitoring programmes to be put into place. Besides above mentioned more technical and environmental aspects of the closedown programme a preliminary planning as well as cost-estimates for the different contractual works are presented. (orig.)

  19. Radon and radioactivity at a town overlying Uranium ores in northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Vlahopoulou, M; Tsirliganis, N; Kastelis, N; Ouzounis, K; Kazakis, N

    2015-12-01

    Extensive measurements of (222)Rn in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500 Bq m(-3). A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200 Bq m(-3) while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400 Bq m(-3). Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th-early 20th century. Measurements of (238)U and (232)Th content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor (222)Rn was found with temperature (r(2) = 0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r(2) = 0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere (222)Rn flux should be in the range 150-250 Bq m(-2) h(-1), which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A uranium-bearing coalificated wood remain from the Upper Carboniferous uranium ore deposit in the Baden-Baden region of the Black Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheimer, F.

    1981-01-01

    From the 1973 discovered Upper Carboniferous uranium ore sandstone deposit in the Baden-Baden region (Black Forest) a uranium-bearing coalificated wood remain derived, probably the relic of a Cordaites-trunk. The chemical determinated whole uranium content of this amounts about to 40 wght.-%. Pitchblende of the collomorphic type is embedded in the vitrinite of the fossil and imitates the nearly destroyed former wood-structure. The aggregates of this mineral, surrounded by zones of contact, consist of at least two modifications of different reflectance and hardness. Radiometric analyses reveale a different disturbed radioactive equilibrium, which indicated partly loss and re-enrichment of the uranium-content in recent time. A part of the fossil is completely mineralized by pitchblende of high reflectance and associated galena. For this paragenesis the radiometric investigations proved an approached equilibrium of radioactive substances. Therefore it is to be estimated, that the pitchblende is not alterated substantially, in contrast to the embeddings in the vitrinite, rich in little reflecting and soft nasturanium. The inhomogenic mineralization of the highly coalificated fossil, also to recognise microscopically, is set in relation to the controverse genetic interpretation of the deposit. Final remarks are concerned to other uranium-enriched fossils, especially remains of bones of different origin and age. (orig.) [de

  1. Uranium (-nickel-cobalt-molybdenum) mineralization along the Singhbhum copper belt, India, and the problem of ore genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S. C.

    1982-08-01

    Uranium mineralization is present at many places along the 200 km long Singhbhum copper belt, but the mineralization is relatively concentrated at the central part of it. The belt is characterized by many shear zone features, such as mylonites, phyllonites, and L-S type of structures and of course, copious metasomatism. Country rocks are basic schists, metapelites, quartzose rocks and albite schist/gneiss (‘Soda Granite’). Orebodies are sheet-like, conformable with the pervasive planar structures in the host rocks. No pronounced ‘wall rock alteration’ accompanied the mineralization. Grade of the ore is low (pile.

  2. Extraction of uranium from anomaly ores no 1,6,8 in salt domes of Bandar Abbas region using column leaching by seawater in sulfuric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, K.

    2003-01-01

    Column leaching is one of the experimental methods which is used for identifying the specifications of uranium ores. From the efficiency point of view, the process has some complications and usually it is applied in parallel with the conventional leaching process in order to facilitate of finding an appropriate design and operational method, to be applicable in an large practical scale. In this research work, at the first stage, the existed free chlorine in the samples was washed out using seawater. Then, in a process of acid leaching with seawater and sulfuric acid by the use of the column leaching was applied. The results show that the maximum of 85% of uranium from the ore of Anomali ≠1 is extracted. The extra residual of the used acid dose not react with the uranium and therefore it will increase the free acidity of the leach liquor. In Anomali ≠6, the extraction efficiency of uranium is 75%, while in Anomali ≠8, using 30 periods of leaching, the efficiency is 81%. However, the maximum efficiency achievement has to be avoided by the non-economical circumstances. Based on some comparisons, it is shown that the presence of chlorine in ore will affect the efficiency. The capability of s eawater i n uranium extraction from salted, compared with the n ormal or sweat water h as some advantages. These include: reduction of the operational period, less acid consumption, and reduction in the ore leaching costs. Thus, the heap leaching industry is believed to be a valuable and economical method for uranium extraction, where the needs of utilizing the complicated technical facilities can be reduced. The present work is the first research project on the uranium extraction and concentration in solution containing chlorine. Our experimental results can provide a valuable pattern for the heap leaching of uranium ores design from arches shaped in the region Bandar Abbas

  3. The influence on the environment of uranium ore transport from mining sites to processing site in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peic, T.; Banciu, O.; Bardan, N.; Radulescu, C.

    1997-01-01

    In Romania, the transport of uranium ores from mining sites to the processing plant is carried out by road and rail. The length of the road transport routes is between 5 and 45 km and rail routes between 300 and 500 km. This laboratory began to monitor these transport routes in 1984. Gamma dose rate measurements were made on and around the special wagons and trucks along the road and rail transport routes and in railway stations. Soil and vegetation samples have also been collected along the road and rail transport routes and in railway stations. From the collected samples the specific activity of natural uranium and 226 Ra were measured. The level of natural radioactivity in the train assembling stations in the period 1984-1996, increased 1-4 times in comparison with the natural background. (Author)

  4. In-situ leaching of South Texas uranium ores - 2. Oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Johnson, W.F.; Fletcher, A.; Venuto, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction, by sodium hypochlorite, of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced South Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% sodium hypochlorite with the concentration of ammonia in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10-15 pore volumes of the oxidant. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed. Large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the pre-saturation with ammonium bicarbonate during the oxidation stage. 28 refs

  5. Geochemical barriers formed during in-situ leaching in ore-bearing horizons of hydrogenic uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodov, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of major metallogenetic element and associated elements on the boundary of the leaching solution transiting to the unchanged natural water in a layered uranium deposit of infiltration origin is studied. Neutralization geochemical barrier and their relevant secondary barriers-degassing barrier and neutralization barrier are defined, and recent accumulation of uranium, rare earth elements and a series of other elements at these barriers are in progress. The action of underground microorganism during this process is pointed out; the neutralization capacity of the ore-hosting terrigenous rocks is determined and the dimension of the matter removal, migration and reprecipitation in the studied system is evaluated. The principal conclusion is that the studied geological media have sufficient protective nature to resist direct and strong leaching action of the solution

  6. Deactivation and treatment of mine wastewaters and of aqueous solutions discharged in uranium ore treatment and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description is presented of decontamination and purification of mine wastewaters and water solutions discharged from uranium ore treatment and processing and of the simultaneous removal and concentration of uranium-radium daughters, mainly of 226 Ra and 210 Pb. These elements are incorporated in the mycelium of microorganisms, such as those of the Fungi imperfecti class or are sorbed on the mycelium surface. The mycelia are then mechanically separated from the decontaminated solution, e.g., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. The mycelium may be cultivated in the purified solutions to which nutrients are added, such as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in concentrations necessary for the growth of the microorganisms used. The mycelium may be added to the purified solution either in the native or in the dried state. (B.S.)

  7. The uranium ore deposits in Ciudad Rodrigo Phyllites. about the possibility of new deposits; Los yacimientos uraniferos en las pizarras paleozoicas de Ciudad Rodrigo. sobre la posible existencia de nuevas mineralizaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarro Martin, E.; Marin Benavente, C.

    1969-07-01

    The main features of the genesis of uranium deposits of the Fe mine type, are discussed in this paper. Pitchblende ore is related with phyllites bearing organic material and with geomorphological level, fossilized by eocene sediments. As a result, new uranium ore deposits are possible under Ciudad Rodrigo tertiary basin, tertiary cover depth being little more than three hundred feet. (Author)

  8. Development of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores for conditions of OJSC Priargunsky Mining and Chemical plant (PPGKhO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Litvinenko, V.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of low-grade commercial uranium ores by heap leaching has been carried out at the enterprise since 1996. During the initial stage of development, the ore piles were formed of the raw ore having the run-of-mine coarseness with uranium content around 0.08%. Under such conditions, recovery of the metal to the solution is 60-65% in case of a pile treatment lasting 2 years. To intensify the process and to provide a stable concentration of uranium in the productive solutions transferred to sorption, the enterprise developed and implemented a method of percolation leaching of low-grade ores with re-circulation of productive solutions through the re-treated ore bulk (RF patent No. 2226564). The main peculiarity of such leaching is simultaneous moistening of the ore by productive solutions and by barren solutions that are sharpened with sulphuric acid; that gives the possibility to wet far bigger areas of piles under constant volume of productive solutions outputting to the sorption treatment. Such scheme enables to treat successively first the piles at the “re-treatment” (where the metal is mainly extracted), and then the piles at the “active leaching” stage (where the metal is mainly inside the ore bulk). The technical and economic indexes of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores were significantly increased in 2006, when the X-ray-radiometric treatment plant was commissioned. The technological scheme of ore treatment at the processing plant includes mould and grating of the raw material with delivery of undersized products enriched with uranium: -5 mm are transferred to the pulp process; fractions (-200+40) mm to the X-ray-radiometric separation; the material of size (-40+5) mm, washed-out from clayey and fine particles, are sent to the uranium heap leaching in piles. Delivery of the ore material having size (-40+5) mm to treatment by the acid leaching method excluded colmatage and creation of zones impermeable for water, and in combination

  9. Geological characteristics and metallogenetic model of Zhuguang uranium ore concentrated area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yi; Wang Mingtai; Li Jianhong; Ma Hanfeng

    2002-01-01

    The authors mainly discuss the geological background and metallogenic mechanism of large and high-grade uranium deposits in Zhuguang region. New progresses have been made in regional metallogenic regularities and metallogenic theories and a series of new outcoming have been achieved: (1) The pre-Sinian uranium-rich crystalline basement aged at 1.9-2.2 Ga has been determined in the region for the first time. The discovery contributes greatly to the uranium metallogenic potential in Zhuguang area. (2) For the first time, authors propose that uranium and material sources in Zhuguang region were mainly derived from the uranium-rich thermal fluid chambers of crust-mantle mixed-melting origin, rather than from the wall rocks of uranium deposits, as considered by traditional views. (3) The stage and sequence of magmatic activity, and genetic type of magmatic rocks in Zhuguang region have been redetermined. (4) Four NE-trending tectonic belts, i. e. Nanxiong, Baishun, Changjiang and Jilong have been determined as Mesozoic extensional taphrogeny zones, which are the regional crust-cutting tectonic belts controlling the basins, magmatic activities and uranium mineralization. (5) For the first time, uranium deposits in Zhuguang region are divided into two types: the pneumatolytic-hydrothermal fracturing alteration-micro vein dissemination type uranium deposits and the vein-filled type uranium deposits. And a deep-sourced metallogenic model of uranium deposits in the region has been set up

  10. Recovery of uranium low grade ores by froth flotation: study of the texture and synergetic effects of flotation reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duverger, Agathe

    2013-01-01

    Due to the energy growing demand, uranium low grade ores may be those exploited in the future. Uranium ores conventional treatment does not often use mineral processing such as concentration methods for reducing leaching reagent consumption. The aim of this work is to develop an upgrading process to improve the operating process (alkaline heap leaching) taking into account the mineralogical and textural variability of the ore. The Trekkopje deposit is composed of calcrete and a gypscrete. The uranium bearing mineral is carnotite (K 2 (UO 2 ) 2 [VO 4 ] 2 .3H 2 O). The gangue minerals are composed by silicates, such as quartz, feldspars, micas and Ca-minerals, calcite and gypsum (XRD and ICP-MS analysis). A SEM image processing was used to study the textural properties and the exposed free surface of mineral inclusions in clay clusters. In calcrete milled to -200 μm, 50 % of all carnotite is associated with clay clusters, which are composed by 98 % of palygorskite, 2 % of illite, montmorillonite, and interbedded clays (XRD and microprobe analysis). The carnotite grain size is 95 % less than 70 μm. Calcite is the main inclusion in clay clusters. Indeed, the calcite inclusions average rate in the clay clusters is 12 % and 5 % for carnotite inclusion. And the free exposed surface percentage of these minerals in clay clusters is 3 % and 6 %, thus indicating that the inclusions should not affect the behavior of mixed clay particles. However, ore flotation essays did not verify this hypothesis. Three minerals separation have been proposed based on the mineral ability to consume leaching reagents: separating Ca-minerals from silicates, palygorskite from gangue minerals and carnotite from gangue minerals. A study of silicates and Ca-minerals electrokinetic properties (electrophoresis) was carried out to select the collectors and the optimum pH range for selective flotation. Basic pH near neutral was proved to be optimal for the separation of gangue minerals with cationic

  11. Research on the possibility of concentrating low-grade uranium ores by bacterial leaching. Part of a coordinated programme on the bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tataru, S.

    1978-12-01

    Effect of extraction reagents with solvents on the bacteria and the influence of eluants on the bacteria development was studied. To establish the effects of various solvents and eluants on the development of bacteria, on oxidizing capacity of Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ , and to study their influence on bacteria morphology, bacteria strains were contacted with Alamine 336, trioctylamine, LIX and nitric eluant. Bacteria development and the oxidizing ability of Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ were significantly inhibited and morphological changes of individuals in the bacteria population were found. The bacteria populations resulted from ores had a more decreased resistance as the bacteria culture was better selected by repeated inoculations and incubations. In case of the bacterial leaching in heap or in situ a periodical extraction with solvents is required in order to allow the bacteria population between successive extraction stage be remade

  12. Method for determining microamounts of uranium in solutions from copper ores, by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometry with arsenazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, B.

    1972-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for determining small amounts of uranium in aqueous solutions from copper ores. Uranium is quantitatively separated in a single extraction by a solution of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in benzene, using ethylendiaminetetracetic acid and sodium fluoride as complexing agents, for improving the selectivity of the procedure. An aliquot of the extract is diluted with a hydrocolloidal solution of arsenazo III. Optical density is measured at 650 nm. (Author) 3 refs

  13. Code of Practice on radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores (1980) - Guidelines for storage and packaging of uranium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guideline is intended to provide assistance in the application of the 1980 Code of Practice on radiation protection in mining and milling of radioactive ores. Its purpose is to give advice relevant to the design, construction and operation of an uranium concentrate storage and packaging facility in which exposure to ionizing radiation from uranium-bearing concentrate will not only conform to the Code, but will also be as low as reasonably achievable. (NEA) [fr

  14. Regional geologic characteristics of uranium ores and assessment of metallogenetic potentials in the central part of Eastern Liaoning Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenguang; Tao Quan; Zhang Shouben

    1997-10-01

    Regional geologic characteristics, metallogenetic conditions and prospects of uranium ores in the central part of the Eastern Liaoning Province of North China is studied systematically. It demonstrates that the Archaean basement of the study area consists of a special type of granite-greenstone belts in China. It is called the granite-greenstone belts of the Liaoning-model, in which the granitic rocks are mainly migmatitic granite and granite-gneiss of migmatitic genesis. The greenstone belts in this area have undergone strong metamorphism. Large amounts of Precambrian geochronological studies have been made with U-Pb isotopic method on zircon; and a new Precambrian geologic time scale has been established. It is also proved that multistage activation of the Early Precambrian basement and the proto-platform took place in Early Proterozoic. Emphases are laid on uranium and thorium abundances and their variations as well as primary uranium contents of rocks in the granite-greenstone terrain and those of the Lower Proterozoic. At the same time, uraninite as accessory mineral in granitic rocks is found to exist more or less. Early Precambrian strata and many kinds of mineral deposits occurring in the strata are in origin chiefly of syngenetic hot brine sedimentation and of submarine extrusive gas-hydrothermal sedimentation superimposed by metamorphism. Metallogenetic features and models of various types of uranium deposits are studied emphatically and compared with similar large deposits abroad. In addition, overall synthetical appraisals are made for this area; and on this basis, prospecting directions and favourable sections of uranium metallization are suggested. (4 refs., 4 tabs.)

  15. Geological-economic analysis on the exploration of backup resources for depleted mines in Lujing uranium ore-field, central-southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deping; Wang Zhicheng; Fan Shaoyun

    2006-01-01

    With the geological-economic evaluation program for pithead heap-leaching mining uranium deposits developed by the authors and the data of column-leaching tests and the geological reserve, the geological-economic evaluation is made to the residual geological reserves of both Lujing and Huangfengling deposit, and the geological reserves of Yangjiaonao deposit of the depleted mines in Lujing uranium ore-field, central-southern China. The results of static analysis on these reserves show that the residual geological reserves of both Lujing and Huangfengling deposit belong to sub-profitable type, but the ones of Yangjiaonao deposit is profitable with 26.56% tax-before profit. 1 tU profitable type of ore from Yangjiaonao deposit can use 2.40-3.79 tU subprofitable type of ores from Lujing and Huangfengling deposit. In order to solving the problem on scarcity of backup resources of the depleted mines in Lujing uranium ore-field and using the existing sub-profitable type of geological reserves, it is suggested that the high grade of profitable type of deposits should be explored around the exhausting mines so that the production of the mines could be profitable by the pithead heap-leaching mining method with arrangement groups of both sub-profitable and profitable type of ores. (authors)

  16. Wet high-intensity magnetic separation for the concentration of Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores and residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrans, I.J.; Levin, J.

    1979-01-01

    Wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS) for the concentration of gold and uranium was tested on many Witwatersrand cyanidation residues, and on some ores and flotation tailings. The results varied, but many indicated recoveries of over 60 per cent of the gold and uranium. The main source of loss is the inefficiency of WHIMS for material of smaller particle size than 20μm. The recoveries in the continuous tests were lower than those in the batch tests. The continuous tests indicated an operational difficulty that could be experienced in practice, namely the tendency for wood chips and ferromagnetic particles to block the matrix of the separator. It was decided that a solution to the problem lies in the modification of the separator to allow continuous removal of the matrix for cleaning. A system has been developed for this purpose and is being demonstrated on a pilot-plant scale. Promising results were obtained in tests on a process that combines a coarse grind, gravity concentration, and WHIMS. In the gravity-concentration step, considerable recoveries, generally over 50 per cent, of high-grade pyrite were obtained, together with high recoveries of gold and moderate, but possibly important, recoveries of uranium. A simple model describing the operation of the WHIMS machine in terms of the operating parameters is described. This should reduce the amount of empirical testwork required for the optimization of operating conditions and should provide a basis for scale-up calculations. The economics of the WHIMS process is discussed [af

  17. Applied methodology to mineralogic/petrographic characterization and to the liberation grade of material proceeding from physics tests of uranium phosphate ores of Itataia - Ce, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, H.T.; Murta, R.L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A method, had been developed to determination of the liberation grade, was applied to uranium phosphate ore from Itataia rreserves, in Ceara, Brazil. The liberation grade was calculated from the petrographic analysis with quantitative mineralogy in special thin microscopic slides. (L.H.) [pt

  18. Applied methodology to mineralogic/petrographic characterization and to the liberation grade of material proceeding from physical tests of uranium phosphate ores of Itataia-Ce, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, H.T.; Murta, R.L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A method, had been developed to determination of the liberation grade, was applied to uranium-phosphate ore from Itataia reserves, in Ceara Brazil. The liberation grade was calculated from the petrographic analysis with quantitative mineralogy in special thin microscopic slides. (L.H.) [pt

  19. Utilization of low grade and waste uranium ores by means of biological processes. Part of a coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czegledi, B.

    1978-01-01

    Investigation of the possible affect of bacteria in leaching uranium using alkaline carbonate medium has been investigated. Eleven strains of bacteria were isolated from the alkaline percolation solutions. Most belonged to the genus Thiobacillus. Each strain was characterized by growth under aerobic conditions in Levinthal - bouillon medium and under vaseline (semi-anaerobic in Hetehens medium. Growth of the bacteria was optimum at pH range 7 to 8 but a significant population was found to exist in alkaline leaching solutions of about pH 9 to 9.5 in heap leaching experiments. It was concluded that microbiological processes can play a role in alkaline heap leaching although the quantitative measure is yet uncertain

  20. British strong-acid leach process targeted at refractory uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The UKAEA-patented strong-acid leach process for refractory U ores is briefly outlined with emphasis on its variations from the conventional dilute-acid process and the projected economics for a processing plant using this process. The process uses 6N H 2 SO 4 with a sharply reduced leaching time over conventional processes. The solubilized U is removed by percolation and the use of only about 10 percent liquid produces less effluent. Conventional processing plant equipment can be used except at the feed preparation, acid mixing, curing, and washing stages. Ore can be processed at larger grain sizes and the milling is done in a dry rod mill. Alternatives to the percolation removal of U are listed. Other work being done by UKAEA on U recovery from ores is briefly indicated. (U.S.)

  1. Uncertainty evaluation on the determination of uranium ores by volumetry of ammonium vanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Likui; Wang Yao; Luo Yuanyuan; Li Jinbiao; Zhu Lejie

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty evaluation on the criteria of 'ferrous sulfate deoxidization/ammonium vanadate oxidation titrimetry to measure uranium' (EJ 267.2-84) issued by Ministry of Nuclear Industry was analyzed. The uncertainty brought by the method itself was obtained through the identification of uncertainty sources, quantification of uncertainty components and determination of uranium content by titration with calibrated ammonium vanadate solution. With the analytical study to uncertainty sources of entire process and components, and the application of statistical treatment based on scientific data, the combined standard uncertainty and expanded uncertainty about different levels of uranium content was reported. (authors)

  2. Factor analysis of geochemical data from ore and host rocks of the uranium mineralization at Mika, N. E. Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I. I.

    1997-01-01

    The Mika uranium occurrence is located in one of a series of NW-NE trending shear zones which host uraniferous Jurassic rhyolitic dykes located in Pan-African brecciated granites within peraluminous granite complex of NE Nigeria. The bodies of mineralization are about 100 metres long and up to 4 metres thick. The U mineralization associated with the rhyolite dykes contains predominantly meta-autunite and apatite, while that of the brecciated granites displays variable mineralogy with meta-autunite, one or two generations of coffinite and colloformic, pitch blend in open veins. The mineralization is thought to be related to bimodel magmatism of the Burashika group and the reactivation of regional structures. Multivariate statistical evaluation of geochemical data of 28 elements/oxides in 296 host rock and mineralized samples from the surface and drill cores display a coherent association of [(U, Pb, Zn, Cu, P 2 O 5 , Fe 2 O 3 ) + Mo], [(CaO, Zr, Sr) +(Y, Mo, V, As)] and [(MgO, K 2 O) + (TiO 2 , Rb)] in the mineralized rocks; reflecting the presence of hamatized phosphate bearing ores in association with sulphide minerals and apatite in the granite rhyolites. A link of the mineralizing fluids with the emplacement of the rhyolites is implied from the striking resemblance between the above element association in mineralized rocks to those of the unmineralized rhyolites. A source of ore fluids over saturated in uranium and silica emanating from crystallizing rhyolitic melts which were expelled into faults and/or shear zones in the surrounding country rock is inferred

  3. Production of ferric sulphate from pyrite by thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Application to uranium ore leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouas, C.

    1988-12-01

    A process for uranium extraction by oxidizing solutions of ferric sulphate produced by T. ferrooxidans from pyrite is developed. A new counting method specific of T. ferrooxidans is designed. An uranium resistant wild strain, with oxidizing properties as high as the strain ATCC 19859, is isolated. Optimal conditions for ferric sulphate production from pyrite are defined (pH 1.8, density of the medium 1.2%, pyrite granulometry [fr

  4. Dynamics of Uranium Ore Formation in the Basement and Frame of the Streltsovskaya Caldera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.A.; Poluektov, V.V.; Schukin, S.I.; Tolstobrov, V.A.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions and challenges: 1. Caldera Granitic Frame: Urtuy and Bambakay Massifs: • AR-PR 800 Ma (relics?) granite-gneiss and PZ1 520 Ma (Caledonian) granites • NE-SW main fluid conducting faults; • Uraninite formation 770±35 Ma and transformation 195±79 Ma (U-Pb). 2. Caldera Basement U Deposits: • AR-PR 800 Ma (relics) granite-gneiss (Argun deposit); • PZ2 240 Ma (Variscian) granites (Antey deposit); • NNE-submeridional main fluid conducting faults; • Hydromicatization 131-139 Ma; • U (economic) ores formation 133-135 Ma 3. Long-term fluid circulation in the ore-forming fluid-magmatic system: • Chronology; • Depth (source and PT conditions); • Pathways; • Transport mechanisms; • Stress-strain-temperature field evolution

  5. Rirang Uranium Ore Processing System Design: Designing A Quencher Unit: A Continuous Quencher Has Been Designed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effendi, Amir; Lisa Nuri, Hafni

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the design is to make a laboratory scale quencher model that is used to facilitate the dissolution and sudden cooling of the digestion product of the Rirang ore. The designed quencher was based on the previous batch quenching data, feed capacity of 325 g/minute, and residence time of one and two hours for quenching tank and thickener, respectively. The cylindrical quenching tank has dimension of 30 cm diameter and 30 cm high. It has three 2,5 cm baffles and is equipped with a blade-impeller agitator. The bottom-pitched cylindrical thickener has the diameter of 56 cm. The thickener is divided into four zones including clarification, feed; critical, and compression with 5, 3, 3, and 4 cm zones height, respectively. In addition, the bottom pitch has 12,5 cm height. The quencher model is further used to conduct performance test against Rirang ore digestion product

  6. Disposal of residue from uranium ore processing in France; Les stockages de residus de traitement de minerais d'uranium en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crochon, Ph. [AREVA NC, Business Group Mines, Dir. de la responsabilite environnementale et societale, 75 -Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    Between 1949 and 2001, French mines produced 76, 000 metric tons of uranium and 50 million metric tons of ore, processing residues are stored at 17 sites (in ponds enclosed by dykes or in former open-cast mines) subject to ICPE (classified facility for environment protection) regulation. These disposal sites cover surface areas of between one and several tens of hectares and several thousands to several millions of metric tons of waste are stored at them. When uranium mining stopped in France, these sites were redeveloped, with caps placed over the residue to provide mechanical and radiological protection. All these sites are still monitored by AREVA. In the last fifteen years, these sites have been the subject of a number of studies, especially regarding the long-term evolution and impact of the residue. These studies are now being pursued within the framework of the national plan for the management of nuclear materials and waste (PNGMDR). A regulatory and institutional framework regarding long-term management of these disposal sites needs to be defined. (author)

  7. Ore reserve calculations of a sedimentary uranium deposit in Figueira, PR-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, P.A.G.; Censi, A.C.; Marques, J.P.M.; Huijbregts, Ch.

    1978-01-01

    The are reserve calculations of a sedimentary uranium deposit in Figueira-PR-Brazil are presented. The evalution of reserves was based on chemical and/or radiometric analisys from boreholes. Geoestatistical methods were used to study the spacial correlation between radiometric and'in situ' uranium content and to calculate the equivalent uranium content without the need for chemical analysis. To this end, a new method was developed based on the regression between accumulated chemical and radiometric grades as determined by increasing thicknesses defined from the maximum peak of the γ-ray logs. Thus, the effect of non-focalization of the probe and of the continuous logging was eliminated. The system of evalution used was two-dimensional using classical Kriging to calculate thicknesses and accumulations determined using distinct cut-off grades. (Author) [pt

  8. Bacteriological lixiviation of low-grade uranium ores at low temperatures, by phiobacillus ferrooxidaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato Filho, A.N.S.

    1976-12-01

    Laboratory experiments are described that, using selective and mutagenic agents, allowed the isolation of a strain of thiobacillus ferrooxidams capable of developing at 8 0 C, and keeping its oxidesing characteristics tests showed that the isoled sample is capable of solubilizing 95% of the uranium content in samples with U 3 O 8 content below 1000ppm [pt

  9. Numerical simulation of radon migration from a uranium ore storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, I.A.; Politov, V.Yu.; Chernov, V.V.; Shestakov, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Data on geologic structure and radiation environment in the vicinity of the tailings storage facility (TSF) of Kara-Balta uranium hydrometallurgical factory in Kyrgyzstan were used to design a mathematical model of radon migration from the surface of TSF. Numerical calculations have been performed to describe prevalence of radon contamination [ru

  10. Geostatistical ore reserve estimation for a roll-front type uranium deposit (practitioner's guide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.C.; Knudsen, H.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report comprises two parts. Part I contains illustrative examples of each phase of a geostatistical study using a roll-front type uranium deposit. Part II contains five computer programs and comprehensive users' manuals for these programs which are necessary to make a practical geostatistical study

  11. Determination of 230Th (Ionium) in uranium ores and wastes from uranium reprocessing. IV. Calculation of ionium separation yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Acena Barrenechea, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    For determining ionium ( 2 30Th) in minerals and uranium processing wastes by precipitation with fluorhidric acid, using lanthanum as carrier, and selective extraction with tenoytrifluoroacetone (TTA) followed by radiometric determination of the isolated nuclide, it is necessary the use of a tracer since the chemical yield of the separation ranges between wide limits. In this paper, the use of the beta-emitter 2 34Th as the most convenient tracer is discussed. Equations are derived for correcting for counting errors introduced by other thorium isotopes which are present either in the sample or in the tracer, as well as for calculating the chemical yield of the separation. These equations have been experimentally checked by ionium determinations carried out with different types of samples. (Author) 18 refs

  12. Pleistocene apparent ages by U-Pb isotope and U-series methods for uranium ore in Dakota Sandstone near Gallup, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Szabo, B.J.; Granger, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    Radiometric dates of a high-grade uranium ore from the Hogback No. 4 mine in Dakota Sandstone near Gallup, N. Mex., indicate a late Pleistocene age of mineralization. The 206 Pb/ 238 U and 207 Pb/ 235 U apparent ages of about 70,000 y and 100,000 y, respectively, are discordant, but are in broad agreement with the discordant 230 Th/ 238 U and 230 Pa/ 235 U apparent ages of 130,000 y and 78,000 y, respectively. Although it is not clear how the analyzed sample relates to the main period of mineralization at this mine, these dates are consistent with previous age limits suggested for Dakota Sandstone uranium ores

  13. Indirect exploration techniques in search for concealed and high grade uranium ore in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Anjan

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research is engaged in uranium exploration for nearly six decades. Initial approach was 'from known to the unknown' i.e., to extend exploration to the subsurface, essentially by drilling from the known surface indication. Repeated reconnaissance has more or less identified major deposits in the country from initial surface indication. Now the exploration strategy has been largely oriented more on 'concept based'. The deposits of unconformity type, well known in Canada and Australia, are of high grade and such deposits have little or no surface manifestation, have become the ideal hunt targets. These deposits are known as 'concealed deposits', which warrant exploration largely by indirect techniques. In India, unconformity related type uranium deposits have been targeted in some of the Proterozoic basins like Cuddapah, Bhima, Kaladgi, Chhattisgarh and Vindhyan, to locate high grade large tonnage deposits. Beside extensive surface and borehole core based detailed geochemical studies, remote sensing techniques like airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey, aerial photo interpretation and very recently airborne FEM and TDEM surveys are being conducted to a depth of 5000m. Satpura Gondwana basins in central India as well as Mahadek Basin in Meghalaya are in different stages of integrated exploration programme for uranium and it includes ground geophysical, as well as airborne radiometric magnetic and EM survey

  14. A study of the volatilization-excitation phenomena affecting to the efficiency of spectrochemical buffers applied to uranium ore analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra Gonzalez, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A direct-current arc emission spectroscopy method allowing the determination of Alm Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si and Ti in uranium ores and geological materials has been developed by studying the efficiency of Ag 2 O, BaCO 3 , Bi 2 O 3 , CuF 2 , CuO, Ga 2 O 3 , GeO 2 , graphite, K 2 CO 3 , Li 2 B 4 O 7 , Li 2 CO 3 , Ni, PbS, Sb 2 O 4 , SrCO 3 , Tl 2 O 3 and ZnO as spectrochemical buffers. Volatilization-excitation mechanisms of Li 2 CO 3 : graphite, GeO 2 : graphite and SrCO 3 : graphite buffer mixtures have been specially considered. Procedures to investigate phenomena taking place in the electrode, anodic load and arc plasma have been selected. Intensity-time curves; voltage variation between electrodes; vapour diffussion through the electrode walls; load depletion; reaction products formation and temperature, electron pressure and ionization degree in the arc plasma have been studied. Measurements of plasma parameters are performed by introducing thermometric and manometric species in both the anode and the cathode electrodes. The effects of different alkalin matrices on transportation phenomena are also considered. Emission efficiency of some analytical lines has been investigated by the application of a mathematical model enclosing fundamental parameters of the arc plasma. Efficiency of scattered primary X-rays of various wavelengths has been studied as a correction of matrix effects in the uranium determination. Results illustrate that the incoherently-scattered MoKβsub(1,3) radiation is the optimum reference line. (author)

  15. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  16. Occupational disease disclosed by preventive follow-up of former uranium ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacina, V.; Vich, Z.; Elterlein, E.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of preventive follow-up examinations of former employees of the concern Czechoslovak Uranium Mines is to determine possible health damage of chronically exposed workers in an area that can become manifest even following a long time after leaving the high-risk working environment. In a group of 1,139 persons that had undergone preventive follow-up examinations in the years 1977 to 1980 there were 63 cases of newly detected affections that were reported as occupational diseases, and other serious affections. The system of preventive follow-up examinations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of health care of the workers. (author)

  17. Natural uranium concentrations of native plants over a low-grade ore body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Thibault, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Plant uranium concentrations generally reflect soil or rock substrate concentrations in upland areas, but they may not in lowland areas where the rhizoids of Sphagnum spp. and rocks of Ledum groenlandicum may be in direct contact either continuously or on a seasonal basis with the groundwater. This study points out the importance of selecting plant species and collection sites where the true substrate can be well defined and sampled. Sphagnum spp. and Ledum groenlandicum best reflect the substrate uranium concentrations in lowland areas, Umbilicaria spp. and Cladonia spp. in rock outcrop, and Picea mariana and Betula papyrifera in upland locations. The study shows the best plant part to sample is the older tissue such as the stems, twigs, and wood. Since no systematic changes in plant tissue concentrations were found throughout the season, sampling can be carried out anytime. Expression of soil concentrations on an ash weight basis gave a considerably different result than those on a dry weight basis, particularly when comparisons were made between litter-enriched mineral soil and true organic soils. The amount of ash varied among plant organs, species, and taxonomic divisions, and a constant value cannot be used to convert plant ash concentrations on a dry weight basis

  18. Determination of contents of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate in solutions for alkaline leading of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new analytical method is based on the determination of the molar ratio carbonate - hydrogen carbonate using the measured concentration of hydrogen ions, the determination of the dissociation constant of carbonic acid for different values of ionic strength. The concentration of hydrogen ions was measured with a Metrohm 632 pH meter with the use of a combined glass electrode. The content of total carbonate carbon was determined coulometrically and the uranium content was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate and by spectrometry of the complex of uranyl ions with Arsenazo III. Model solutions were used for the experiments which contained a high concentration of sulfate ions, thiosulfate ions, uranium and various proportions of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The composition of the individual samples of the extraction solutions are tabulated. The calibration was made of the glass combined electrode at different ionic strength, the values determined of dissociation constants of carbonic acid for different ionic strength. The mathematical procedure is described for the calculation of molar concentrations of carbonate and hudrogen carbonate and the results are presented of the analysis of model solutions. (E.S.). 5 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs

  19. Studies on radioactivity distribution and radioactive mineral identification in uranium ores from Espinharas (PB), Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, G.N.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    Studies about the identification of radioactive minerals in uranium bearing rocks from Espinharas (PB), Brazil are presented. Autoradiography with α-sensitive nuclear emulsions was utilized for determining radioctivity distributions and for localizing radioactive minerals, in combination with microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, PIXE and eletron microprobe analysis for its identification. Mineralized gneisse and feldspatic rock, the two principal samples studied, show distinct differences in radioactive distribution patterns, however the main carriers for U and Th seem to be the same. Microanalysis shows that elements are associated with Si, Ca, Fe and Al an some trace elements like Y, Zr, Ti, etc. U and Th are distributed uniformly in feldspatic rock and inhomogeneously in mineralized gneisse, indicating that the zonary structure of the radioactive cristals, frequently observed in gneisse, could be due to variable U:Th ratios. Chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction datas and microscopic studies indicates that the principal carrier for radioactivity in the rocks of Espinharas is a silicate mineral of U and Th, probably situaded in the series of transition: Coffinite -> uraninite, thorogummite -> thorianite. Some additional experiments about leachability of uranium with diluted sulfuric acid are reported, which confirm the different nature of radioactivity distribution in feldspatic and gneissic rocks. (author) [pt

  20. Historical assessment of uranium release by the ore treatment unit - at Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil from 1999 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Carmo, R.F.; Py Junior, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) is located at the source of three rivers: Ribeirao das Antas, Ribeirao do Soberbo and Corrego da Consulta. Each interface of installation with the environment, at the tree rivers, has been monitored for the release of radionuclides. At Ribeirao das Antas a weekly sample collection was made at point 014. At Ribeirao Soberbo there was a weekly sample collection at point 025, and at Corrego da Consulta a monthly collection was carried out at point 076. This work analyses the average annual releases of uranium from the historical series started in 1999 and ended in 2011. Points 014 and 025 showed average release of 0.12 Bq L -1 . Point 076 showed somewhat higher average release, 1.27 Bq L -1 . An Analysis Of Variance test (ANOVA) has been carried out to verify the existence of different means between these collecting points. The averages were considered statistically different. As a complementary analysis, the Student's t test was performed between the averages at considered points. Between points 014 and 025, the averages were considered identical. Between points 014 and 076, the average release at point 076 was considered higher than that at point 014. The same behavior was observed between points 025 and 076. The releases at point 076 were considered higher than those at point 025. Thus it can be concluded that releases at points 014 and 025 are identical and both are lower than releases at point 076. (author)

  1. Study on treatment of radioactive liquid waste from uranium ore processing by the use of nano Fe3O4 KT particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Anh; Nguyen Ba Tien; Doan Thi Thu Hien; Luu Cao Nguyen; Nguyen Van Chinh

    2015-01-01

    Nano Fe 3 O 4 KT was produced from the Military Institute of Science and Technology were used to adsorbed heavy metal elements in liquid waste. In this report, the nano Fe 3 O 4 KT particles sized 80-100 nm and specific surface area was 50-70 m 2 /g was applied to study the adsorption of radioactive elements in the liquid waste of uranium ores processing. The effective parameters on adsorption process included temperature, stirring rate, stirring time, the pH value of the solution, the initial concentration of uranium in solution. The results showed the maximum adsorption capacity of the nano Fe 3 O 4 KT was 53.5 mg/g with conditions such as room temperature, stirring speed 120 rounds/minute, the pH value of solution was 8, stirring time about 2 hours (Uranium/materials). From the results obtained, nano Fe 3 O 4 KT tested to treatment liquid waste of uranium ore processing after preliminary precipitation removed almost heavy metals and a part of radioactive elements. The results were analyzed on the ICP-MS and α, β total counting, instrument. The solution concentration after treatment was suitable for Vietnam discharge standards into environment (QCVN 40:2011 on Industrial wastewater). (author)

  2. Contribution of U-Pb geochronology to characterizing the Cadomian magmatism of the southeastern French Massif Central and of the related uranium-ore at Bertholene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, Marie-Helene

    1990-01-01

    U-Pb geochronology and whole-rock geochemistry (major, trace and rare earth elements) were applied to various ortho- and paragneiss formations of the southeastern part of the French Massif Central. The Mendic granite and the Les Palanges granite were dated at 603 ± 9 Ma and 540 ± 18 Ma, respectively. Their micaschist host-rocks show a multi-episodic evolution that matches the U-Pb data obtained on metasediments and leucogranites of the Variscan Orogen. An old zircon source was detected at 1.87 Ga in the Les Palanges micaschist, while, seemingly, this heritage was wiped out of the Mendic micaschist during the Cadomian events. In the Decazeville gneiss, where a crustal component of unknown age has been detected, the major event is the Variscan migmatization. At Bertholene, the geochronology of uranium ores associated to the Les Palanges orthogneiss evidenced two periods of emplacement: -the relicts of the first phase, of Liassic age at 173 ± 9 Ma, are restricted to an uranium oxide; -the second phase, related to coffinites, represents the economical ore emplaced from Oligocene until Recent times, generated through remobilization of the Liassic stock. A comparison between the geochronological data from the ore, and of those from its granite host, suggests a genetic relationship between the Cadomian magmatism and the U-concentrations, spatially linked to the unconformity between the Les Palanges basement and its Permo-Carboniferous cover series. Metamictization of the source minerals combined with tectonic processes would be responsible for the release of uranium. Uranium-rich minerals from Bertholene, from Lodeve and from Les Pierres-Plantees have been subjected to trial dating by the isotopic Xe-Xe method, which confirms the evolution admitted for those occurrences. This technique is demonstrably expeditious and faithful. Various phenomena were investigated, at the scale of the crystalline structure, related to the xenon energy states and to the problem of rare

  3. Determination of elemental impurities and U and O isotopic compositions with a view to identify the geographical and industrial origins of uranium ore concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, A.; Hubert, A.; Pointurier, F.; Aupiais, J.; Pili, E.; Richon, P.; Fauré, A.; Diallo, S.

    2012-12-01

    First events of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radiological materials occurred 50 years ago. Nuclear forensics expertise are aiming at determining the use of seized material, its industrial history and provenance (geographical area, place of production or processing), at assisting in the identification and dismantling of illicit trafficking networks. This information is also valuable in the context of inspections of declared facilities to verify the consistency of operator's declaration. Several characteristics can be used to determine the origin of uranium ore concentrates such as trace elemental impurity patterns (Keegan et al., 2008 ; Varga et al., 2010a, 2010b) or uranium, oxygen and lead isotopic compositions (Tamborini et al., 2002a, 2002b ; Wallenius et al., 2006; Varga et al., 2009). We developed analytical procedures for measuring the isotopic compositions of uranium (234U/238U and 235U/238U) and oxygen (18O/16O) and levels of elemental impurities (e.g. REE, Th) from very small amounts of uranium ore concentrates (or yellow cakes). Micrometer particles and few milligrams of material are used for oxygen isotope measurements and REE determination, respectively. Reference materials were analyzed by mass spectrometry (TIMS, SF-ICP-MS and SIMS) to validate testing protocols. Finally, materials of unknown origin were analyzed to highlight significant differences and determine whether these differences allow identifying the origin of these ore concentrates. References: Keegan, E., et al. (2008). Applied Geochemistry 23, 765-777. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002a). Analytical Chemistry 74, 6098-6101. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002b). Microchimica Acta 139, 185-188. Varga, Z., et al. (2009). Analytical Chemistry 81, 8327-8334. Varga, Z., et al. (2010a). Talanta 80, 1744-1749. Varga, Z., et al. (2010b). Radiochimica Acta 98, 771-778 Wallenius, M., et al. (2006). Forensic Science International 156, 55-62.

  4. Significance of special blasting modes for anti shock struggle at hydrothermal Pribram uranium ore deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenczel, J.

    1988-01-01

    Situations are presented which occur in connection with blasting jobs. Special blasting operations are described. In the Pribram uranium deposit two types of special blasting operations were tested. Conditions are described under which softening blasting was carried out. This type of work did not prove satisfactory in operation and is therefore not performed at the Pribram deposit. A theoretical analysis is made of shock distrubance blasting and the procedure of designing such projects, the placement of explosives and the determination of their size. Such blasting jobs have been tested in shock zones of vein node. The total weight of the explosive was 100 to 200 kg of Px V 19. In most cases a mine shock was initiated (in some cases with a delay of up to several dozen hours). The said method increases the technical safety of operation. At the Pribram deposit it is only used in cases of utmost necessity because its use increases costs and delays the procedure of mining work. (E.S.). 9 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs

  5. Flotation in column-recovery of fine uranium phosphate ore from Itataia, in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, J.B.; Peres, A.E.C.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic study of main variables of the flotation column and, the study of different pillot circuits integrated by flotation cells in colunm and mechanic cells, aiming at reduction the loss of the sludges for processing uranium phosphate from Itataia, in Brazil, are presented. A recovery of 49% of P 2 O 5 for a content of 24% of P 2 O 5 and 0,185% of U 3 O 8 in the concentrate, using a circuit with two columns, a rougher and scavenger, was obtained. For a content of 33.4% of P 2 O 5 and 0.240% of U 3 O 8 , a recovery of 38% of P 2 O 5 was obtained, using a circuit composed by a mechanical cell as scavenger and two columns as rougher and cleaner. The circuit used to obtain these parameters operated with 7,6 Kg/h solid flow in the grain size range of 10μm and 3μm and the flotation column with 5 cm of diameter and 6m of high. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Liquid wastes from mining and milling of uranium ores - a laboratory study of treatment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, R.K.; Alfredson, P.G.

    1976-10-01

    Methods of reducing the concentration of contaminants in mine water and in the acidic raffinate from uranium milling operations have been studied. Lime, limestone, caustic soda and lime-soda ash mixtures were compared as reagents for neutralising raffinates and for removing amines and heavy metals including radium from solution. All methods of neutralisation reduced contaminant levels significantly. Two-stage neutralisation using limestone in the first stage to pH 4, followed by second stage lime treatment appears to be an economically attractive approach. This method usually gave the lowest residual radium concentration provided the solids from the first stage were not removed before adding lime. Radium can be further removed from neutralised raffinates or from mine water conditioned with sulphate by the addition of barium chloride to co-precipitate the sulphates of barium and radium. The concentration of radium was readily reduced to less than 3 pCi l -1 by adding 10 mg Ba l -1 raffinate. For mine waters conditioned to 0.01 M in sulphate, barium additions of 20 mg l -1 were required to attain the same radium concentrations. Adsorption on barytes was also effective in removing radium from conditioned mine water and neutralised raffinates. (author)

  7. A study of the efficiency of different spectrochemical buffers applied to the uranium ore analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Diaz Guerra, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A direct-reading emission spectroscopy method allowing the determination of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si and Ti in geological materials, that are of interest for the prospecting and recovery of uranium, is proposed. Direct-current are between graphite electrodes Is used as the excitation source. Efficiency of Ag 2 O, BaCO 3 , Bi 2 O 3 , CuF 2 , CuO, Ga 2 0 3 , Ge0 2 , graphite, K 2 CO 3 , H 2 B 4 O 7 , Li 2 CO 3 , Ni, PbS, Sb 2 o 4 , SrC0 3 , Ti 2 O 3 and ZnO as spectrochemical buffers has been studied. It has been inferred that through a sample dilution with Li 2 CO 3 , SrC0 3 and graphite powder in the rations 1:10:10:20, respectively, the highest reduction of the matrix effects is achieved. Phosphorus determination Is better performed with PbS as spectrochemical buffer Instead of the indicated above. The action of the selected compounds Is completed by using Co, In, Li and Sr as internal standards, and, as a whole, satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility are attained. (Author) 7 refs

  8. A new genetic interpretation for the Caotaobei uranium deposit associated with the shoshonitic volcanic rocks in the Hecaokeng ore field, southern Jiangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sheng Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Combined with in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS zircon UPb geochronology, published and unpublished literature on the Caotaobei uranium deposit in southern Jiangxi province, China, is re-examined to provide an improved understanding of the origin of the main ore (103 Ma. The Caotaobei deposit lies in the Hecaokeng ore field and is currently one of China's largest, volcanic-related uranium producers. Unlike commonly known volcanogenic uranium deposits throughout the world, it is spatially associated with intermediate lavas with a shoshonitic composition. Uranium mineralization (pitchblende occurs predominantly as veinlets, disseminations, and massive ores, hosted by the cryptoexplosive breccias rimming the Caotaobei crater. Zircons from one latite define four distinct 206Pb/238U age groups at 220–235 Ma (Triassic, 188 Ma (Early Jurassic, 131–137 Ma (Early Cretaceous, and 97–103 Ma (Early-Late Cretaceous transition, hereafter termed mid-Cretaceous. The integrated age (134 ± 2 Ma of Early Cretaceous zircons (group III is interpreted as representing the time of lava emplacement. The age data, together with the re-examination of literature, does not definitively support a volcanogenic origin for the generation of the deposit, which was proposed by the previous workers based mainly on the close spatial relationship and the age similarity between the main ore and volcanic lavas. Drill core and grade-control data reveal that rich concentrations of primary uranium ore are common around the granite porphyry dikes cutting the lavas, and that the cryptoexplosive breccias away from the dikes are barren or unmineralized. These observations indicate that the emplacement of the granite porphyries exerts a fundamental control on ore distribution and thus a genetic link exists between main-stage uranium mineralization and the intrusions of the dikes. Zircon overgrowths of mid-Cretaceous age (99.6

  9. Assessment of radon-induced health risk for occupants of a house built on uranium ore residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clero, E.; Marie, L.; Challeton-De Vathaire, C.; Laurier, D.; Rannou, A.

    2016-01-01

    At the request of French public authorities, the Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety has assessed the radiological situation of a house built on uranium ore residues in Haute-Vienne and the health risks induced from exposure to radon for all occupants. Classified as a lung carcinogen by the World Health Organization, radon is a proven cause of lung cancer in case of regular inhalation over a long period, and the risk increases with cumulative exposure. Radon exposure was reconstructed for various standard profiles of house occupancy. A risk model derived from a European epidemiological study was used to calculate the lifetime probability of death from lung cancer according to these standard profiles. Risk assessment of the occupants of the house highlighted the following main findings. For a resident school child having been exposed to radon from birth to the age of 7, the lifetime relative risk (LRR) was estimated at 5. For last adult and young adult residents having lived more than 10 years in the house, the probability of death from lung cancer was in the same order of magnitude as that of a regular cigarette smoker, with a LRR from 10 to 13 and a lifetime probability of death from lung cancer between 3 and 4%. If these individuals smoked regularly, in addition to being exposed to radon, this probability would be between 6 and 32% (supposing an additive or multiplicative interaction). For former occupants (non-smokers) having been exposed 10 years during childhood, the LRR was two-fold lower. For children having been in day care in the house, the increased probability of death from lung cancer was low, with a LRR lower than 2. Supposing, as in adults, that the risk decreases beyond 30 years after the end of radon exposure, the increase was almost zero for former occupants exposed during childhood and during day care, with a LRR close to 1. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of the Cerro Solo nuclear ore, province of Chubut. The Cerro Solo project within the frame of uranium exploration in Argentina. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, R.J.; Navarra, P.R.; Benitez, A.F.; Gallucci, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Cerro Solo ore deposit was selected by the CNEA to invest in an assessment project because of their promising grade and amount of known and potential resources, significant to Argentina's uranium requirements. The deposit, which is located in the central region of the Chubut Province, belongs to the sandstone type and is hosted by the cretaceous Chubut Group. Technical studies carried out forecast an important growth of nuclear capacity to meet Argentina's energy requirements in the first two decades of of the the next century. To be in position to confront the challenge presented by increasing uranium resources to fuel the nuclear powers plants it is very important, as a first step, to improve the geological knowledge of uranium favorability in the country. The preliminary results of the Cerro Solo project indicate that the eastern slope of the Pichinan hills is a promising area for development of uranium resources, increasing the favorability of the San Jorge Basin in order to allow contributing to meet future uranium requirements. The Cerro Solo Project was planned in a sequential manner, as a multidisciplinary effort which includes studies on: geologic setting of mineralization, resource estimates, costs of mining and milling methods, economic analysis and environmental impact research. Among the mining methods, studies include the alternative of the in-situ leaching technology, which is becoming a low producing cost interesting possibility. (Author)

  11. Selective arsenical purification of substances during an alkaline treatment process of an uranium and/or molybdenum bearing ore by means of a magnesium compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Pierre; Lamerant, J.M.; Pallez, Francois.

    1983-01-01

    The ores is digested by means of an aqueous liquor of sodium or potassium carbonate and/or bicarbonate, the digestion being carried out under conditions of concentrations, temperatures and pressures bringing about the solubilization of the uranium and/or molybdenum and the arsenic present in the core. A solid phase suspension is lifted from a liquid phase and the phases are separated. The arsenic solubilized during the digestion is extracted as magnesium arsenate by treatment of the medium containing the arsenic by means of a magnesium compound [fr

  12. Standard practice for sample preparation for X-Ray emission spectrometric analysis of uranium in ores using the glass fusion or pressed powder method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation of uranium ore samples to be analyzed by X-ray emission. Two separate techniques, the glass fusion method or the pressed powder method, may be used. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Conditions of uranium-bearing calcite formation in ore-enclosing sediments of the Semizbaj deposit (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Maksimova, I.G.; Dojnikova, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation into uranium-bearing calcite, forming the cement of gravelly-sandy rocks of the Semizbaj uranium deposit. Core sampling in prospecting boreholes were used to establish geological conditions, place and time of uranium-bearing calcite formation. Calcite was investigated by optical, electron-microscope and radiographic methods. It is shown that uranium in calcite doesn't form its own mineral phase and exists in scattered state. Uranium in calcite-bearing minerals is present in isomorphic form. Uranium content in calcite was equal to 0.009-0.15 %. It is proposed that mineralization, formed in sedimentary rocks by processes of ground-stratum oxidation, is the source of uranium, enriching calcite. refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Application of self-organizing maps to the study of U-Zr-Ti-Nb distribution in sandstone-hosted uranium ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazka, David; Mikysek, Petr; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Slobodník, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for processing the spectral information obtained from high-resolution elemental mapping performed by means of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The proposed methodology is aimed at the description of possible elemental associations within a heterogeneous sample. High-resolution elemental mapping provides a large number of measurements. Moreover, typical laser-induced plasma spectrum consists of several thousands of spectral variables. Analysis of heterogeneous samples, where valuable information is hidden in a limited fraction of sample mass, requires special treatment. The sample under study is a sandstone-hosted uranium ore that shows irregular distribution of ore elements such as zirconium, titanium, uranium and niobium. Presented processing methodology shows the way to reduce the dimensionality of data and retain the spectral information by utilizing self-organizing maps (SOM). The spectral information from SOM is processed further to detect either simultaneous or isolated presence of elements. Conclusions suggested by SOM are in good agreement with geological studies of mineralization phases performed at the deposit. Even deeper investigation of the SOM results enables discrimination of interesting measurements and reveals new possibilities in the visualization of chemical mapping information. Suggested approach improves the description of elemental associations in mineral phases, which is crucial for the mining industry.

  15. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 2: Oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Fletcher, A.; Johnson, W.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced south Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% NaOCl, with the concentration of NH 3 in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10 to 15 PV NaOCl oxidant. A small fraction (5 to 10%) of NaOCl was utilized in reacting with NH 3 . After the NH 3 was nearly depleted, mono-, di-, and trichloramines, the expected intermediates in NaOCl oxidation of NH 3 , were observed. Chloramine decomposition studies showed that all three decomposed completely within 12 days. Since the ore was relatively highly reducing, the major part of the NaOCl was, not unexpectedly, consumed in side reactions. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed, large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the presaturation with NH 4 HCO 3 preceding the oxidation stage

  16. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 2: oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Fletcher, A.; Johnson, W.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced south Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% NaOCl, with the concentration of NH 3 in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10 to 15 PV NaOCl oxidant. A small fraction (5 to 10%) of NaOCl was utilized in reacting with NH 3 . After the NH 3 was nearly depleted, mono-, di-, and trichloramines, the expected intermediates in NaOCl oxidation of NH 3 , were observed. Chloramine decomposition studies showed that all three decomposed completely within 12 days. Since the ore was relatively highly reducing, the major part of the NaOCl was, not unexpectedly, consumed in side reactions. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed, large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the presaturation with NH 4 HCO 3 preceding the oxidation stage

  17. Geology of hydrothermal uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, K.G.; Belov, V.K.; Putilov, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    Geological characteristics of hydrothermal phosphorus-uranium deposits placed in sedimentary, igneous-sedimentary, metamorphic and intrusion formations are presented. Attention is paid to mineral composition, texture and structure of ores, their genesis, tectonics. Geochemical peculiarities of ores and age of molybdenum-uranium and uranium deposits are described. Geological criteria and prospecting features of uranium and uranium-molybdenum deposits are given

  18. Environmental restoration plans and activities in the zones of uranium ore extraction and milling in Romania: 1995-1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejenaru, C.; Ionescu, I.; Georgescu, D.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the ecological impact on environment as a consequence of more than 30 years of activity in the field of uranium exploration, mining and ore processing in Romania and a brief description of the measures taken for limiting the effects of contamination on the affected zones including the proposed restructuring and rehabilitation programmes. The Autonomous Regie for Rare Metals (RAMR), the coordinator of the activities in the uranium field is responsible to implement the provisions of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Project on Environmental Restoration in Central and Eastern Europe joined by Romania in 1993. The characterization of radioactively contaminated areas is dealt with broadly under two categories, one pertaining to sites where the mining and milling activities have already ceased and the other where the units are still operational but are going to be closed down in the near future and will be placed under surveillance. Generally speaking, the activity in the uranium field is developed by observing the national Norms of Nuclear Safety for the Activity of Geological Investigation, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Material. This report includes an evaluation of the necessary investments for the first stage of the programme dealing with the environmental restoration and the necessary research activities. This will be followed by studies for closing down and surveillance of the mines with special problems taking into account their depth and complex hydrology

  19. The Au-Ag-Sb-Bi-Te mineralization from the deposit Bytíz (mine 19), the Příbram uranium-polymetallic ore discrit, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Litochleb, J.; Sejkora, J.; Šrein, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, Spec. pap. (2006), s. 133-135 ISSN 1896-2203. [Central European Mineralogical Conference /1./. Vyšná Boca, 11.09.2006-15.09.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : Au-Ag-Sb-Bi-Te * mineralization * uranium-polymetallic ore Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the the uranium industry in Australia that took place during the quarter ended 30 June 1980 are reviewed. These include uranium mine production and uranium exploration. Prices for uranium oxide and uranium hexafluoride as at the end of June 1980 and figures for U 3 O 8 production and export from 1978 to March 1980 are listed

  1. Study of the combined effects of smoking and inhalation of uranium ore dust, radon daughters and diesel oil exhaust fumes in hamsters and dogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Busch, R.H.; Stuart, B.O.

    1978-09-01

    Exposure to particulates from uranium ore dust and diesel exhaust soot provoked inflammatory and proliferative responses in lungs. Also exposure to radon and radon daughters yielded increased occurrences of bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and metaplastic changes of alveolar epithelium. The data suggest that this cellular change is also a precursor of premalignant change in hamsters. The authors suggest an animal model other than the hamster based on two observations: (1) the Syrian golden hamster has been shown to be highly refractory to carcinoma induction; and (2) that when exposed to realistic levels of agents in life-span exposure regimens, the hamster does not develop lesions. Dog studies with cigarette smoke exposure showed mitigating effects on radon daughter induced respiratory tract cancer. Two reasons are suggested although no empirical evidence was gathered. A strict comparison of human and animal exposures and interpolative models are not possible at this time. (PCS)

  2. Exposure of miners' to ore dust and its long-lived α-emitters in Banduhurang open cast uranium mine, Jharkhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.K.; Topno, R.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sahoo, S.K.; Shukla, A.K.; Puranik, V.D.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring of airborne respirable particulate and its long-lived a -emitters (LLa) of the natural uranium decay series in a highly mechanised open cast uranium mine at Banduhurang is carried out for quantifying the hazard potentials associated with it. Respirable dust in the mine assumes geometric mean (c g ) of 0.71 mg m -3 (AM =0.78 mg m -3 ) and geometric standard deviation (S g ) of 1.5 (A.S.D.=0.30) whereas those for the LLa are 15.97mBq m -3 (A.M. =19.67 mBq m -3 ) and 1.97 (A.S.D.= 12.52) respectively. The specific activity of LLa of respirable dust assumes c g of 22.5 Bq g -1 which is ∼1.9 times higher compared to theoretically computed value for this low ore grade (0.026 U 3 O 8 %) mine. However, the internal radiation exposures attributable to airborne LLa in this mine would constitute merely a small fraction (<1.5%) of annual effective dose limit for mine workers. (author)

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  4. Types of ore-controlling zonations at uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks; their main features and methods for identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimova, M.F.; Sergeev, I.P.; Strelyanov, N.P.; Shevchenko, O.E.

    1985-01-01

    Classes of uranium mineralization controlling zonations, singled out in agreement with lithogenesis stages, are considered. They are as follows: facial zonation zonation of geochemical facies of early diagenesis (monofacial lateral zonation, interfacial frontal and lateral zonations), epigenetic geochemical zonation, hypergenous geochemical zonation. The latter comprises complete oxidation zone, partial oxidation and cementation zone, non-oxidated rocks. When studying zonations the mineralogo-geochemical mapping is conducted, as a result of which a number of profiles is constructed: lithological, autogenetic mineralization propagation, epigenetic zonation. As a result of lithological, structural, hydrogeochemical and epigenetic profiling and mapping the map of uranium mineralization prediction is drawn up

  5. Geostatistical ore reserve estimation for a roll-front type uranium deposit (practitioner's guide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.C.; Knudsen, H.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report comprises two parts. Part I contains illustrative examples of each phase of a geostatistical study using a roll-front type uranium deposit. Part II contains five computer programs and comprehensive users' manuals for these programs which are necessary to make a practical geostatistical study. (LK)

  6. In-situ leaching of Crownpoint, New Mexico, uranium ore: Part 7 - laboratory study of chemical agents for molybdenum restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, E.T.; Vogt, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    While in-situ leaching has significant advantages over conventional uranium recovery methods, one possible drawback to its use is the potential release of previously insoluble chemical species into the formation water. Before Mobil began a pilot test of in-situ uranium leaching at Crownpoint, New Mexico, extensive laboratory studies were undertaken to develop chemical methods for treating one possible contaminant, molybdenum (Mo). In-situ production of uranium entails oxidizing uranium from the insoluble +4 oxidation state to the soluble, readily complexed +6 state. However, this process also transforms insoluble Mo +4 compounds such as molybdenite or jordesite, MoS 2 , into the soluble T6 form, molybdate, Mo0 4 2- . New Mexico regulations restrict the amount of Mo permissible in formation waters after leaching to less than one ppm. Conceptually, Mo restoration after leaching can be dealt with in one of two ways. (1) The oxidizing environment can be left unchanged with something added to render the molybdate ion insoluble or (2) the environment can be changed to a reducing one, converting the Mo back to the less soluble +4 oxidation state

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  11. Rainy Periods and Bottom Water Stagnation Initiating Brine Accumulation and Metal Concentrations, 2. Precambrian Gold-Uranium Ore Beds and Banded Iron Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol-Strick, Martine

    1987-08-01

    I previously suggested that heavy runoff during the 12,500-7000 years B.P. tropical pluvial period generated bottom water quiescence and reducing conditions making possible sapropel formation, accumulation of brine originating at the sea bottom, and long-term preservation of hydrothermal sulfides in the Red Sea Deeps. I hypothesized the same process to account for two Precambrian strata-bound ores. In the Upper Witwatersrand paleoplacers, South Africa, gold and uranium eroded by running water from upstream greenstones, reached highest concentrations in association with organic matter in carbonaceous seams, and deposited in the distal end of fluvial fans during transgressive phases. I propose that the deep waters over these fans became anoxic when large, sudden floods stratified the water column. The organic matter thus locally preserved concentrated gold and uranium from the partial dissolution of the detrital metallic grains. In the Hamersley basin of Western Australia, banded iron formations (BIF) of the Dales Gorge Member are a major source of iron ore. Regularly fluctuating environmental conditions are shown by repetitious BIF and black shale macrobands. I propose that they were deposited in a confined, silled, deep basin connected with the open ocean. Before initiation of the lowest BIF deposition the active regional thermohaline circulation flushing the deep waters under a rather arid climate diluted and oxidized the Fe2+-rich hydrothermal effluents exhaling from the basin floor. Then, during a strong wet period, heavy runoff scavenging volcanoclastics from the land surface lowered the basin surface water salinity and prevented deepwater renewal. The hydrothermal effluents began to accumulate and progressively concentrated in the quiescent and progressively oxygen-depleted deep water. During this wet initial phase, the massive black, organic-rich pyritic shale at the top of the Mount McRae Shale Member was deposited immediately and conformably underlying the

  12. Fluorite as an Sm-Nd geochronometer of hydrothermal processes: Dating of mineralization hosted in the Strel'tsovka uranium ore field, eastern Baikal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshev, I. V.; Golubev, V. N.; Aleshin, A. P.; Larionova, Yu. O.; Gol'tsman, Yu. V.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using hydrothermal fluorite as an Sm-Nd geochronometer is based on the results of an REE pattern study of this mineral (Chernyshev et al., 1986). As a result of REE fractionation, in many cases, the Sm/Nd ratio achieves a multifold increase compared with its level in terrestrial rocks, and the radiogenic shift of the 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratio reaches 10-20 ɛNd units over a short time interval (as soon as tens of Ma). This is a necessary prerequisite for Sm-Nd isochron dating of fluorite. Zonal polychrome fluorite from a vein referred to the final stage of large-scale uranium mineralization at the Sterl'tsovka deposit in the ore field of the same name located in the eastern Transbaikal region has been dated using the 143Nd/144Nd method. To optimize isochron construction, local probes with high and contrasting Sm/Nd ratios have been sampled from the polished surfaces of two samples, taking into account the REE pattern of zonal fluorite. Sm-Nd isochron dating has been carried out separately for each sample. The 147Sm/144Nd i 143Nd/144Nd ratios vary within the intervals 0.5359-2.037 and 0.512799-0.514105, respectively. Two isochrons, each based on six fluorite probes, have been obtained with the following parameters, which coincide within 2σ uncertainty limits: (1) t = 134.8 ± 1.3 Ma, (143Nd/144Nd)0 = 0.512310 ± 13, MWSD = 0.43 and (2) t = 135.8 ± 1.6 Ma, (143Nd/144Nd)0 = 0.512318 ± 10, MWSD = 1.5. The mean age of fluorite based on two isochron datings is 135.3 ± 1 Ma. Comparison of this value with the most precise dating of pitchblende related to the ore stage in the Strel'tsovka ore field (135.5 ± 1 Ma) shows that four mineralization stages, distinguished by geological and mineralogical data, that were completed with the formation of polychrome fluorite veins 135.3 ± 1 Ma ago, represent a single and indivisible hydrothermal process whose duration does not exceed 1 Ma.

  13. Exchange of notes constituting an agreement between the Government of Australia and the Government of the United States of America concerning Australian ores containing uranium or thorium (monazite and xenotime)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Agreement which entered into force on the date of its signature concerns the procedures for treatment of ores transferred from Australia to the United States containing more than 0.05 per cent by weight of uranium, thorium or both. It provides that such transfers are subject to the provisions of the Agreement on the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy concluded between both countries on 5 July 1979; in particular with a view to non-proliferation principles. (NEA) [fr

  14. Uranium recovery from phosphate rocks concentrated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, M.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The reserves, geological data, chemical data and technical flowsheet from COPEBRAS and Goiasfertil ores are described, including the process of mining ore concentration. Samples of Goiasfertil ores are analysed by gravimetric analysis, for phosphate, and spectrofluorimetry for uranium. (author)

  15. The prospection of uranium and thorium ores in desert country and in equatorial forest regions of the Union Francaise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, J.J.; Bigotte, G.; Hinault, J.; Leconte, J.R.

    1958-01-01

    Since it was founded, the D.R.E.M. has carried out important prospection work in the overseas territories which now make up the Communaute Francaise. This work, now involving almost a million km 2 , represents an experiment scarcely equalled throughout the world. Research in these territories presents both general and technical difficulties, which are especially severe in countries with extreme climates: deserts or dense equatorial forests. The adaptation of various methods of radioactive ore prospection to these regions is described, and also the results obtained. Three particular examples are given in detail: - general exploration in the Hoggar, and reconnoitring of particular indications; - general exploration in the equatorial forest of French Guyana; - detailed study of a sign of uraniferous occurrences and its surroundings in the equatorial zone (Mounana deposit near Franceville (Gabon)). (author) [fr

  16. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  17. Working and benefit project by the in-situ leaching of the copper-uranium ore of the deposit named Luz del Cobre, in the municipality of Soyopa, state of Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga P, J.de J.

    1976-01-01

    This research was carried out with the object to recover the existing uranium in the copper-uranium deposit of Luz del Cobre located at 1300 Kms. approximately of the NW of Mexico City in the state of Sonora this deposit is geologically formed by a partially mineralized chimney which contains 572,732 tons of uranium ore with an average of 362.26g. of U 3 O 8 per ton, which represents 207,374 tons of U 3 O 8 in situ. To recover the uranium from this deposit, the only technical and economical possibility which presents a real interest is the system of leaching in situ. This operation will consist in the selective dissolution of the copper and uranium through leaching solution with a pH varying from 2.2 to 2.5, leaving the gangue on the ground and collecting the enriched solutions at the lower level of the mine, precipitating the copper subsequently through scrap iron and recovering the uranium from the tails of the copper precipitation plant through an ionic interchange process in counter current and its subsequent elution solvent extraction, reextraction and precipitation. This system makes possible to recover an uranium concentrate up to 98% of U 3 O 8 and practically free from impurities. The production cost would cost exceeding $300.00 Mexican currency per Kg of U 3 O 8 . (author)

  18. Potential impact of former Zn ore extraction activities on dissolved uranium distribution in the Riou-Mort watershed (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, Hanna-Kaisa.; Schmidt, Sabine; Coynel, Alexandra; Huguet, Stephanie; Schaefer, Joerg; Blanc, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    The industrial basin of Decazeville (Riou-Mort watershed, South-West France) is well known for its heavy metal pollution and its subsequent environmental effects on the Lot-Garonne River system. The source of this pollution is the Riou-Mort River, which drains smelting waste areas. A first survey after remediation works has revealed elevated dissolved uranium (U D ) concentrations in the outlet of the Riou-Mort River. The objective of this research is to identify the origin of U D in the Riou-Mort watershed and to evaluate the impact of industrial activities on this element. Uranium was measured at 10 water sampling sites, located upstream and downstream the industrial basin, and in three smelting waste deposits. Uranium concentrations in the smelting waste deposits reach up to 14.4 mg kg -1 and ( 234 U/ 238 U) activity ratios (AR) are near unity. Dissolved U concentrations in the Riou-Mort River and its main tributaries ranges over two orders of magnitude from 0.02 to 6.1 μg L -1 . The highest levels were measured in a site with no anthropogenic pollution, upstream from the industrial area. This observation suggests that U D is mainly linked to weathering; the elevated U concentrations originate from the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) located in the Permian bedrock and no significant U pollution exists, at present, in the Riou-Mort watershed. This work demonstrates that spatial monitoring coupled with a long time-series are an essential prerequisite in assessment of spatiotemporal variations of U D , prior to a diagnostic of pollution in a small watershed

  19. Continuous leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.; Yamashita, T.; Kameda, M.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described which comprises sprinkling continuously and uniformly a solvent selected from an acid, an alkali and an organic solvent on the surface of each of a plurality of multi-staged, moving continuous unit layers formed of pulverized uranium ore fed in a predetermined amount from a multi-staged, metering, continuous feed apparatus. Layers composed of a uniform mixture of the pulverized ore and solvent are thermally cured and then subjected to repulping and solid-liquid separation to recover a pregnant liquor containing the extracted metal component

  20. Recover of some rare earth elements from leach liquor of the Saghand uranium ore using combined precipitation and cation exchange methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanchi, A. R.; Rafati, H.; Rezvaniyanzadeh, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    In this research work, the recovery and separation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III), Dy(III) and Nd(III) from Saghand uranium ore have been studied by precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography methods using Dowex 50 W-X 8 cation exchanger. At first, some preliminary and preconcentration experiments such as comminution, sieve analysis, gravity table and electrostatic in preconcentration of lanthanides were performed. Then, acidic digesting and leaching procedure were used. The results of experiments showed that rare earth elements, along with interfering ions such as Al(III), Fe(III), Mg(II) and Mn(II) present in the leach liquor solution. The investigation of separation process by precipitation method revealed that precipitation and then fast separation using centrifugal technique had the best results in the elimination of interference elements. In order to separate the lanthanides and to obtain their elution curves, the chromatographic column containing Dowex 50 W-X 8 resin was employed. For efficient separation of lanthanides from interference elements the hydrochloric acid with concentration of two and six molar was used respectively. Recovery of lanthanides from the leach liquor solution was achieved more than 85%

  1. Application of the angle measure technique as image texture analysis method for the identification of uranium ore concentrate samples: New perspective in nuclear forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Lorenzo; Ho, Doris Mer Lin; Kvaal, Knut; Mayer, Klaus; Rondinella, Vincenzo V

    2016-05-15

    The identification of interdicted nuclear or radioactive materials requires the application of dedicated techniques. In this work, a new approach for characterizing powder of uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) is presented. It is based on image texture analysis and multivariate data modelling. 26 different UOCs samples were evaluated applying the Angle Measure Technique (AMT) algorithm to extract textural features on samples images acquired at 250× and 1000× magnification by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). At both magnifications, this method proved effective to classify the different types of UOC powder based on the surface characteristics that depend on particle size, homogeneity, and graininess and are related to the composition and processes used in the production facilities. Using the outcome data from the application of the AMT algorithm, the total explained variance was higher than 90% with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), while partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) applied only on the 14 black colour UOCs powder samples, allowed their classification only on the basis of their surface texture features (sensitivity>0.6; specificity>0.6). This preliminary study shows that this method was able to distinguish samples with similar composition, but obtained from different facilities. The mean angle spectral data obtained by the image texture analysis using the AMT algorithm can be considered as a specific fingerprint or signature of UOCs and could be used for nuclear forensic investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The pretreatment of uranium ores by physical processing; Les problemes de la preconcentration des minerais d'uranium par voie physique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuchot, L.; Ginocchio, A.; Hubert, G.; Roques, E.; Sandier, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    After giving an outline of the classical means of physical processing - granulometry, gravimetry, flotation, magnetism, electrostatics, the authors study the methods peculiar to radioactive ores: pretreatment in batches (counting cylinders) or stone by stone (electronic sorting belt). The three factors to be considered in any treatment operation are studied (cost of the operation, metal recovery, ratio of concentration), as well as their bearing on the cost and the productivity of the following operations. Making use of radioactivity in order to find out instantaneously the approximate grade of the obtained product makes it possible to reduce costs and improve results by setting up total automation. (author) [French] Apres un apercu des procedes classiques de concentration physique des minerais - granulometrie, gravimetrie, flottation, magnetisme et electrostatique, les auteurs s'attachent aux methodes propres aux minerais radioactifs: preconcentration par lots (cylindre de comptage) ou caillou par caillou (bande de triage electronique). Les trois facteurs a considerer lors de toute operation de traitement sont etudies (prix de revient de l'operation, rendement metal et rendement poids), ainsi que leurs repercussions sur les prix de revient et rendements des traitements ulterieurs. L'utilisation de la radioactivite pour determiner instantanement la teneur approximative des produits obtenus permet d'envisager de reduire les prix de revient et d'ameliorer les resultats par une automatisation totale. (auteur)

  3. Fracture distribution determined by borehole TV in the vicinity of the Koongarra uranium ore field and predictable groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Kimio; Tanaka, Yasuharu

    1996-01-01

    To contribute good understanding of geo-hydrogeological structure in and around the Koongarra uranium deposit, the borehole TV logging and the three dimensional groundwater flow analysis were conducted. The results of the borehole TV measurement showed directional trends in the schistosity represented folds which were the most characteristic structure in the site scale. This fold structure was in accord with the directional trends in fracture and fracture frequency, and the axes of the interference test drawdown. The three dimensional groundwater flow analysis was taken into account the hydraulic anisotropy which derived from the assumption that the direction normal to schistosity agree with minimum hydraulic conductivity. The result of analysis showed that directions of ground water flow agreed with drawdown axes, and the conceptual model of hydrogeological structure governed the site scale fold was verified. (author)

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Production of uranium oxide in Australia for 1983 was 3786 t(3211 t U). Uranium exports for 1983 were 3273 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. value of $41.02/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1982-83 fiscal year was $36.5 million, 35% less than in 1981-82. In November 1983, the Government decided that uranium mining would be allowed only at the existing Ranger and Nabarlek mines and at the proposed Olympic Dam mine. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U as at December 1983, totalled 474 000 t U. Australia's total now represents 30% of the Western world's low-cost RAR. In addition Australia has 235 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category 1, which represents 31% of the Western world's resources in this category

  6. The radon 222 transport in soils. The case of the storage of residues coming from uranium ores processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, C.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium Mill Tailings (UMT) contain comparatively large quantities of radium-226. This radionuclide yields, by radioactive decay, the radioactive gas radon-222. Tailing piles are routinely covered to reduce the radon release-rate into the atmosphere. In order to assess the long term environmental impact of a UMT repository, mechanisms governing radon exhalation at the soil surface must be deciphered and understood. A model of radon transport in the unsaturated zone is developed for this purpose: water- and air-flow in the porous material are determined, as well as radon transport by diffusion in the pore space and advection by the gas phase. The radon transport model in the unsaturated zone - TRACI (which stands, in French, for Radon Transport within the Unsaturated Layer) - calculates moisture contents in the soil, Darcy's velocities of the liquid and gas phases, radon concentrations in the gas phase and radon flux at the soil surface. TRACI's results are compared with observations carried out on a UMT and a cover layer. Input parameters are derived from the textural analysis of the material under study, whereas upper boundary conditions are given by meteorological data. If we consider measurement errors and uncertainties on the porous medium characterisation, model's results are generally in good agreement with observations, at least on the long run. Moreover, data analysis shows hat transient phenomena are understood as well, in most situations. (author)

  7. Processing of lateritic ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, D.E.; Ring, R.J. [Environment Division, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, New South Wales (Australia); McGill, J.; Russell, H. [Energy Resources of Australia Ltd., Ranger Mine, Jabiru, Northern Territory (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    Highly weathered or lateritic ores that contain high proportions of fine clay minerals present specific problems when they are processed to extract uranium. Of perhaps the greatest significance is the potential of the fine minerals to adsorb dissolved uranium (preg-robbing) from leach liquors produced by processing laterites or blends of laterite and primary ores. These losses can amount to 25% of the readily soluble uranium. The clay components can also restrict practical slurry densities to relatively low values in order to avoid rheology problems in pumping and agitation. The fine fractions also contribute to relatively poor solid-liquid separation characteristics in settling and/or filtration. Studies at ANSTO have characterised the minerals believed to be responsible for these problems and quantified the effects of the fines in these types of ores. Processing strategies were also examined, including roasting, resin-in-leach and separate leaching of the laterite fines to overcome potential problems. The incorporation of the preferred treatment option into an existing mill circuit is discussed. (author)

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, E.

    1986-01-01

    After the increase in oil prices in 1973, several European countries increased their power programs. As a result some uranium mining companies from the FRG, Spain and France invested in exploration of radioactive minerals in Colombia hoping to find uranium resources needed to fuel European reactors. In the article a historic review of foreign investment in uranium in Colombia is made; some recommendations about joint-venture contracts used to regulate the work of the foreign companies are included. The four companies involved in exploration left the country in the early eighties, due to the difficulties in finding a large deposit and the difficult world situation of nuclear power

  9. Temporal variability of radon in a remediated tailing of uranium ore processing – the case of Urgeiriça (central Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, S.M.; Lopes, F.; Correia, A.D.; Barbosa, S.; Pereira, A.C.; Neves, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    Radon monitoring at different levels of the cover of the Urgeiriça tailings shows that the sealing is effective and performing as desired in terms of containing the strongly radioactive waste resulting from uranium ore processing. However, the analysis of the time series of radon concentration shows a very complex temporal structure, particularly at depth, including very large and fast variations from a few tens of kBq m −3 to more than a million kBq m −3 in less than one day. The diurnal variability is strongly asymmetric, peaking at 18 h/19 h and decreasing very fast around 21 h/22 h. The analysis is performed for summer and for a period with no rain in order to avoid the potential influence of precipitation and related environmental conditions on the radon variability. Analysis of ancillary measurements of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, as well as atmospheric pressure reanalysis data shows that the daily averaged radon concentration in the taillings material is anti-correlated with the atmospheric pressure and that the diurnal amplitude is associated with the magnitude of atmospheric pressure daily oscillations. - Highlights: • The temporal variability of radon at the Urgeiriça tailing is examined. • The cover of the tailing is effective in containing the strongly radioactive waste. • Radon concentration varies with depth and exhibits very large sub-daily variations. • The daily variability is strongly asymmetric and non-stationary. • Apparent influence of atmospheric pressure on radon concentration patterns

  10. Deployment of independent method of culture to detect bacteria and archaean domains in drainage basin under the influence of uranium mining - ore treatment unit, Caldas/MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borba Junior, Palvo J.; Azevedo, Heliana de; Ronqui, Leilane Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Bortolan reservoir (BR), part of the Ribeirao das Antas Hydrographic Sub-Basin, is a dam located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau region and characterized by the reception of industrial and domestic residue discharge from the city of Pocos de Caldas. Another important dam, found within the same hydrographic sub-basin and the focus of many studies as well, is Antas reservoir (AR), situated on the proximities of a uranium mine (Brazilian Nuclear Industries Ore Treatment Unit - UTM/INB), and the receiver of treated radioactive effluents originated there. The UTM/INB Pit Mine (PM) is an artificial pond characterized by its acidity and elevated electrical conductivity, besides the presence of radioactive and stable metals. The focus of this study is to determine the phylogenetic classification of the Bacteria and Archaea domains, in addition to quantify the bacterial community at points PM, BR and AR, seeking to compare the data to results from other analyzed water bodies. These microorganisms can be determined with the use of molecular techniques that allow their phylogenetic identification, such as the Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) that detects the presence of specific organisms' DNA or RNA. In the FISH method, probes produced from each domain's DNA fragments are used (EUB338 and ARC915), allowing the identification of oligonucleotide sequences with a higher degree of similarity. The bacterial cells quantification is verified by the use of the DAPI (4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) stain, allowing the density calculation of the bacteria found in the samples from AR and BR, as well as from the PM. (author)

  11. Assessment of alternatives for long-term management of uranium ore residues and contaminated soils located at DOE's Niagara Falls Storage Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merry-Libby, P.

    1985-01-01

    About 11,000 m 3 of uranium ore residues and 180,000 m 3 of slightly contaminated soils (wastes) are consolidated within a diked containment area at the Niagara Falls Storage Site located about 30 km north of Buffalo, New York. The residues account for less than 6% of the total volume of contaminated materials but almost 99% of the radioactivity. The average radium-226 concentration in the residues is 67,000 pCi/g. The US Department of Energy is considering several alternatives for long-term management of the wastes and residues, including: improvement of the containment at NFSS, modification of the form of the residues, management of the residues separately from the wastes, management of the wastes and residues at another humid site (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) or an arid site (Hanford, Washington), and dispersal of the wastes in the ocean. Potential radiological risks associated with implementation of any of the alternatives are expected to be smaller than the nonradiological risks of occupational and transportation-related injuries and deaths. Dispersal of the slightly contaminated wastes in the ocean is not expected to result in any significant radiological risk to humans. The residues and wastes will remain hazardous for thousands of years. After controls cease, the radioactive materials will eventually be dispersed in the environment. Loss of the earthen covers over the buried materials is predicted to occur from several hundred to more than two million years, depending primarily on the use of the land surface. Groundwater will eventually be contaminated in all alternatives; however, the groundwater pathway is relatively insignificant with respect to radiological risks to the general population. 2 references, 2 figures, 6 tables

  12. Sedimentary rocks Uranium in Cerro Largo Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaron, P.; Garau Tous, M.

    1976-01-01

    With the aim of the uranium minerals exploration has been carried out several studies by UTE technicians in Cerro Largo Province from 1968 to 1969. In uranium concentration has been found pyrite, phosphate, iron oxides and manganese in uranium. Furthermore in La Divisa Ore were studied concentration Uranium enrichment has been studied in La Divisa ore

  13. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  14. 77 FR 14001 - Continuation of Suspended Antidumping Duty Investigation: Uranium From the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... in the form of uranium ores and concentrates; natural uranium metal and natural uranium compounds... Antidumping Duty Investigation: Uranium From the Russian Federation AGENCY: Import Administration... Investigation on Uranium from the Russian Federation (``Suspension Agreement'') would likely lead to...

  15. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  16. Chloric lixiviation of the Itataia ore, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira Leitao, J. de.

    1986-01-01

    Aiming to develop an uranium extraction process from phosphates rocks of the Itataia region, Brazil, the lixiviation of this ore with chloric acid was studied. The ore solubilization for several concentrations of chloric acid is presented. During the lixiviation the agitation time and mass/volume ratio were fixed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  18. Uranium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenthe, Ingmar; Drożdżyński, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

    Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

  19. Prerequisites for the formation of large hydrothermal and exogenic-epigenetic uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkovets, G.A.; Kislyakov, Ya.M.; Miguta, A.K.; MOdnikov, I.S.; Shchetochkin, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Data on ore reserves and quality of the most important uranium ore regions of the world are analyzed. Large-size hydrothermal and exogenic-epigenetic (hydrogenic) uranium deposits are considered to be the basic uranium producers. The most general prerequisits for large ore objects formation and determined by example of leading industrial-genetic types of ore deposits of both groups

  20. Geochemistry and ore prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Caignec, R.

    1954-01-01

    Applied geochemistry is a new technique which helps the geologist in detecting ore deposits. Some deposits, even when they are covered with rather thick surface structures, form around these zones where the infinitesimal content of some elements of soils or waters is notably different. These 'anomalies' may be contemporaneous to the deposit-structure (primary dispersion) or may have occurred later (secondary dispersion). Various factors rule these anomalies: ore-stability, soil homogeneity, water conditions, topography, vegetation, etc... Applied geochemistry is in fact the study of analysis techniques of metal traces in soils as well as the geological interpretation of observed anomalies. This report gives practical data on sampling methods, yields, costs and also on special problems of uranium geochemistry. (author) [fr

  1. Method for determining microamounts of uranium in solutions from copper ores, by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometry with arsenazo III.; Metodo para determinar microcantidades de uranio en disoluciones de minerales de cobre, por extraccion liquido-liquido y espectrofotometria con arsenazo III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, B.

    1972-07-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for determining small amounts of uranium in aqueous solutions from copper ores. Uranium is quantitatively separated in a single extraction by a solution of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in benzene, using ethylendiaminetetracetic acid and sodium fluoride as complexing agents, for improving the selectivity of the procedure. An aliquot of the extract is diluted with a hydrocolloidal solution of arsenazo III. Optical density is measured at 650 nm. (Author) 3 refs.

  2. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK) [de

  3. Ore sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, A.P.; Richards, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    In an ore sorting apparatus, ore particles are bombarded with neutrons in a chamber and sorted by detecting radiation emitted by isotopes of elements, such as gold, forming or contained in the particles, using detectors and selectively controlling fluid jets. The isotopes can be selectively recognised by their radiation characteristics. In an alternative embodiment, shorter life isotopes are formed by neutron bombardment and detection of radiation takes place immediately adjacent the region of bombardment

  4. Current status of purification of mine waters which arose from uranium ore mining at the Pucov and Olsi-Drahonin sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jez, J.

    1999-01-01

    The abandoned, flooded uranium mines, the uranium deposits, and the mine waters are described. At Pucov, the mine water purification consists in reduction of insoluble contents. The technology also enables uranium and radium to be removed from the mine water; this approach was practised in 1992-1997, now, however, the radionuclide levels are low enough not to require any special purification. At Olsi-Drahonin, the technology of the decontamination stations is aimed at reducing the concentrations of insolubles, uranium, and radium in the water treated. The concentration of iron is reduced as well. The decontamination facilities at the two mining sites are described in detail. (P.A.)

  5. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  6. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1946-09-30

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  7. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1946-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  8. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  10. Final environmental impact statement for standards for the control of byproduct materials from uranium ore processing (40 CFR 192). Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency is establishing public health and environmental standards (40 CFR 192) for uranium and thorium mill tailings at licensed mill sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (PL. 95-604). Mills are currently located in Colorado, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. These standards are issued to reduce and control the hazards associated with uranium and thorium mill Tailings. Controls are required both during the operational period of mills and for disposal of the tailings piles, to assure environmentally sound, long-term protection of public health and stabilization of the tailings

  11. Research Establishment progress report 1978 - uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    A report of research programs continuing in the following areas is presented: mining and treatment of uranium ores, uranium enrichment, waste treatment, reprocessing and the uranium fuel cycle. Staff responsible for each project are indicated

  12. Extraction metallurgy for coarse particle ore and acid-curing and ferric-trickle leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Suoqing

    1993-02-01

    Based on the viewpoint that only if the ground fine ore leaching method is replaced by the extraction from coarse particle ore, the face of uranium ore processing can be changed, the article presents the summary of the studying of thin-layer leaching (TLL) and of the developing a new process, acid-curing and ferric-trickle leaching (AFL) process (It is called NGJ process in China.). The operation of AFL process is similar to TLL method, but the water or acidified water is replaced by ferric solution for leaching-rising for cured ore. Ferric-trickle leaching can effectively complete the leaching reaction for uranium mineral in 'remaining leaching reaction' that is hardly to be finished in the course of curing. For the most uranium ores in China the AFL-process is competitive with the conventional leaching process. According to this analysis the AFL-process and other extractive processes for coarse particle should become basic extraction process for uranium ore in China. In other words the ore grinding is no more as an essential operation in uranium ore processing in China. Thus, many serious problems caused by ore grinding method in uranium ore processing can be solved and the uranium ore hydrometallurgy will be significantly changed

  13. An evaporated seawater origin for the ore-forming brines in unconformity-related uranium deposits (Athabasca Basin, Canada): Cl/Br and δ 37Cl analysis of fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Antonin; Banks, David A.; Mercadier, Julien; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cuney, Michel; Cathelineau, Michel

    2011-05-01

    Analyses of halogen concentration and stable chlorine isotope composition of fluid inclusions from hydrothermal quartz and carbonate veins spatially and temporally associated with giant unconformity-related uranium deposits from the Paleoproterozoic Athabasca Basin (Canada) were performed in order to determine the origin of chloride in the ore-forming brines. Microthermometric analyses show that samples contain variable amounts of a NaCl-rich brine (Cl concentration between 120,000 and 180,000 ppm) and a CaCl 2-rich brine (Cl concentration between 160,000 and 220,000 ppm). Molar Cl/Br ratios of fluid inclusion leachates range from ˜100 to ˜900, with most values between 150 and 350. Cl/Br ratios below 650 (seawater value) indicate that the high salinities were acquired by evaporation of seawater. Most δ 37Cl values are between -0.6‰ and 0‰ (seawater value) which is also compatible with a common evaporated seawater origin for both NaCl- and CaCl 2-rich brines. Slight discrepancies between the Cl concentration, Cl/Br, δ 37Cl data and seawater evaporation trends, indicate that the evaporated seawater underwent secondary minor modification of its composition by: (i) mixing with a minor amount of halite-dissolution brine or re-equilibration with halite during burial; (ii) dilution in a maximum of 30% of connate and/or formation waters during its migration towards the base of the Athabasca sandstones; (iii) leaching of chloride from biotites within basement rocks and (iv) water loss by hydration reactions in alteration haloes linked to uranium deposition. The chloride in uranium ore-forming brines of the Athabasca Basin has an unambiguous dominantly marine origin and has required large-scale seawater evaporation and evaporite deposition. Although the direct evidence for evaporative environments in the Athabasca Basin are lacking due to the erosion of ˜80% of the sedimentary pile, Cl/Br ratios and δ 37Cl values of brines have behaved conservatively at the basin

  14. Decree No. 78/84 of 5 September 1984 regulating safety and radiological protection in mines and related ore treatment and uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Decree was issued in pursuance of Decree-Law No. 426/83 of 7 December 1983 which provides that safety and radiological protection regulations shall be made for activities involving the mining of uranium and related treatment of uranium. It lays down definitions of technical radiation protection terms and sets out the requirements for permissible concentrations and internal and sets out the requirements for permissible concentrations and internal and external dose-limits for workers and members of the public. The Decree also sets up a Radiological Protection Service responsible for ensuring that the provisions of the Decree are observed. (NEA) [fr

  15. Treatment of Mo-U ore of Pocos de Caldas (Minas Gerais, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, H.F.

    Molybdenum-uranium ore compositions of surface material and deep material of Campo do Agostinho (MG, Brazil) are shown. Molybdenum extraction by natural leaching and by chemical leaching is considered as well as uranium extraction and its recovery [pt

  16. Uranium industry in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikipelov, B.V.; Chernov, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A brief historical account of the Soviet production of natural and enriched uranium is given. The geological and geographical location of major uranium deposits are mentioned. The processing of natural ores including in-situ leaching (ISL) is also briefly described. Gas centrifuges play a large part in uranium enrichment. The role of Techsnabexport for the export of nuclear materials is explained

  17. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  18. Uranium prospecting; La prospection de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roubault, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    This report is an instruction book for uranium prospecting. It appeals to private prospecting. As prospecting is now a scientific and technical research, it cannot be done without preliminary studies. First of all, general prospecting methods are given with a recall of fundamental geologic data and some general principles which are common with all type of prospecting. The peculiarities of uranium prospecting are also presented and in particular the radioactivity property of uranium as well as the special aspect of uranium ores and the aspect of neighbouring ores. In a third part, a description of the different uranium ores is given and separated in two different categories: primary and secondary ores, according to the place of transformation, deep or near the crust surface respectively. In the first category, the primary ores include pitchblende, thorianite and rare uranium oxides as euxenite and fergusonite for example. In the second category, the secondary ores contain autunite and chalcolite for example. An exhaustive presentation of the geiger-Mueller counter is given with the presentation of its different components, its functioning and utilization and its maintenance. The radioactivity interpretation method is showed as well as the elaboration of a topographic map of the measured radioactivity. A brief presentation of other detection methods than geiger-Mueller counters is given: the measurement of fluorescence and a chemical test using the fluorescence properties of uranium salts. Finally, the main characteristics of uranium deposits are discussed. (M.P.)

  19. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  20. Production of thorium nitrate from uranothorianite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.; Sartorius, R.; Sousseuer, Y.

    1959-01-01

    The separation of thorium and uranium from uranothorianite ores, either by precipitation or solvent-extraction methods, are discussed, and an industrial process for the manufacture of thorium nitrate is described. Reprint of a paper published in 'Progress in Nuclear Energy' Series III, Vol. 2 - Process Chemistry, 1959, p. 68-76 [fr

  1. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonium carbonates are commonly used as the lixiviant for in-situ leaching of uranium ores. However this leads to the deposition of ammonium ions in the uranium ore formation and the problem of ammonia contamination of ground water which may find its way into the drinking water supply. The ammonia contamination of the ore deposit may be reduced by injecting an aqueous solution of a potassium salt (carbonate, bicarbonate, halide, sulfate, bisulfate, persulfate, or monopersulfate) into the deposit after mining has ceased

  2. Uranium (U)-Tolerant Bacterial Diversity from U Ore Deposit of Domiasiat in North-East India and Its Prospective Utilisation in Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakshak; Nongkhlaw, Macmillan; Acharya, Celin; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (U)-tolerant aerobic chemo-heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the sub-surface soils of U-rich deposits in Domiasiat, North East India. The bacterial community explored at molecular level by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) resulted in 51 distinct phylotypes. Bacterial community assemblages at the U mining site with the concentration of U ranging from 20 to 100 ppm, were found to be most diverse. Representative bacteria analysed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were affiliated to Firmicutes (51%), Gammaproteobacteria (26%), Actinobacteria (11%), Bacteroidetes (10%) and Betaproteobacteria (2%). Representative strains removed more than 90% and 53% of U from 100 μM and 2 mM uranyl nitrate solutions, respectively, at pH 3.5 within 10 min of exposure and the activity was retained until 24 h. Overall, 76% of characterized isolates possessed phosphatase enzyme and 53% had PIB-type ATPase genes. This study generated baseline information on the diverse indigenous U-tolerant bacteria which could serve as an indicator to estimate the environmental impact expected to be caused by mining in the future. Also, these natural isolates efficient in uranium binding and harbouring phosphatase enzyme and metal-transporting genes could possibly play a vital role in the bioremediation of metal-/radionuclide-contaminated environments. PMID:23080407

  3. Isotope-geochemical methods for investigating ores and enclosing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezovskij, F.I.; Gnatenko, O.V.; Zhukov, F.I.

    1985-01-01

    Isotope-geochemical methods for investigating ores and enclosing rocks as applied to uranium deposits are considered. Attention is paid to precision mass-spectrometric isotope analysis mass-spectrometric isotope analysis of light elements and to sample preparation for the analysis. Interpretation of the results of sulfur, carbon, oxygen and lead isotope investigations in uranium deposits of different genetic types allows to find definite regularities in isotope variations depending on phisico-chemical ore forming conditions. It is shown that the combination of isotope-geochemical investigations permits to make a reliable conclusion on the source of ore substance means of its transportation and deposition in the process of metamorphism

  4. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species

  5. The Espinharas uranium occurrence, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.D.; Fonte, J. da; Suckau, V.; Thakur, V.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclam has been exploring for uranium in Brazil since 1976. During this period one uranium ore body has been found in the vicinity of Espinharas, a village in Paraiba State, northeast Brazil. According to present knowledge, the mineralized ore body is caused by metasomatic action. The history of discovery and the exploration work until the end of 1979 is given, showing the conceptual change with increasing knowledge of the mineralized zone. (author)

  6. The fergusonite from Ampasipoana (Madagascar). Alteration mode and uranium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervet, J.

    1958-01-01

    The author reports, comments and discusses the general characteristics of the fergusonite, a primary ore of uranium, and more particularly those of a very specific ore extracted from a large deposit located in Madagascar. These characteristics notably concern the composition and the presence and shapes of various crystals. The studied ore contains yttrium phosphate which demonstrated an attack of uranium and yttrium niobate by phosphated acid solutions, and the formation of autunite provided by the fergusonite uranium

  7. 76 FR 68404 - Uranium From the Russian Federation; Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of the Suspension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... uranium in the form of uranium ores and concentrates; natural uranium metal and natural uranium compounds... uranium metal and forms of natural uranium other than compounds are currently classifiable under HTSUS... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-821-802] Uranium From the Russian...

  8. The uranium deposit at Kvanefjeld, the Ilimaussaq intrusion, South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, H.; Rose-Hansen, J.; Leth Nielsen, B.; Loevborg, L.; Soerensen, E.; Lundgaard, T.

    1974-01-01

    The uranium-thorium deposits is located in part of an alkaline intrusion consisting of peralkaline, agpaitic nepheline syenites. The radioactive minerals are steenstrupine, uranium-rich monazite, thorite and pigmentary material. The radio-element content varies from 100 to 3000 ppm U and 300 to 15000 ppm Th. Reasonably assured ore in the main area with a grade of 310 ppm is calculated to 5800 metric tons of uranium in 18.6 million metric tons of ore. Estimated additional reserves with a grade of 292 ppm U are 29.4 million tons of ore with 8700 tons of uranium and 3.5 million tons of ore with a grade of 350 ppm yielding 1200 tons of uranium. Estimates of amounts of thorium ore are 2.6 times those of uranium. A method of recovery of the uranium based on sulphating roasting and subsequent leaching with water is described. (author)

  9. Difference of ore-bearing and non-ore-bearing pegmatite in the Guangshigou area and its research significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Wenqian; Zhang Zhanshi; Sha Yazhou; Rao Chaojun

    2011-01-01

    Guangshigou uranium deposit is one of the typical granite-pegmatite uranium deposits in China, the ore-body are located in the density zone of the outside contact zone of granite pluton. To distinguish the ore-bearing and Non-ore-bearing pegmatite is one of the most practices and have great significance for the effect of mineral exploration. Based on the field investigation and former research results, contrast research on the characteristics of the pegmatite on petrology, geophysical, geochemistry and stable isotopes have been carried out. It is pointed out that the ore-bearing pegmatite differ from the non-ore-bearing one from macro-and-micro-view in Guangshigou Uranium deposits, the main characteristics are summarized; the macro-and-micro signs are established, the genetic difference between the ore-bearing and non-ore-bearing pegmatite are discussed primarily. The achievements would be helpful for prospecting and researching of this type uranium deposits in China. (authors)

  10. Uranium deposit of Bauzot (Saone et Loire)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrat, G.H.

    1956-01-01

    The best known of the uranium ore deposits of the Morvan (a province of France) is in the form of a bundle of quartz-fluor lodes with pitchblende and B.P.G.C. ore. The pitchblende seems to have been deposited at different time in respect to the formation of the gangue minerals, but generally it is ore of the first-formed. The main concentrations of ore are always in the vicinity of dykes of basic crystalline rocks. (author) [fr

  11. Recovery of uranium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi; Taki, Tomihiro

    1988-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate by conventional process is generally uneconomic, except that uranium is recovered as a by-product. If an economical process by which uranium is recovered efficiently as a chief product is discovered, uraniferous phosphate will be used effectively as uranium ore. By using chiorination which will be expected to be favorable in comparison with conventional process, the recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate has been carried out. The paper describes the reaction machanism and general characteristics of the uranium chiorination, and the research done so for. (author)

  12. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlendsson, G.; Jensen, J.; Kofoed, S.; Paulsen, J.L.

    1983-11-01

    The draft uranium project ''Kvanefjeld'' describes the establishment and operation of an industrial plant for exploiting the uranium deposit at Kvanefjeld. The draft project is part of the overall pre-feasibility project and is based on its results. The draft project includes two alternative locations for the processing plant and the tailings deposit plant. The ore reserve is estimated at 56 million tons with an average content of 365 PPM. The mine will be established as an open pit, with a slope angle of 55deg. Conventional techniques are used in drilling, blasting and handling the ore. Waste rock with no uranium content will be disposed of in two ponds near the mine. The waste rock volume is estimated at 80 million tons. A processing plant for extracting uranium from the ore will be established. The technical layout of the plant is based on the extraction experiments performed at Risoe from 1981-83. Yearly capacity is 4.2 million tons of ore. Electrical energy will be supplied from a hydroelectric station to be built at Johan Dahl Land. Thermal energy (steam/heat) will be supplied from a coal-fired district heating plant to be built in connection with the processing plant. Expected power consumption is estimated at 225 GWh/year. Heat consumption is of the same order. In the third year the plant is expected to operate at full capacity. Operating costs will be Dkr. 121/ton of ore from years 1 through 7. Consumption of chemicals will be reduced from the 7th year, and operating costs will consequently drop to Dkr. 115/ton of ore. Calculations show that industrial extraction of the uranium deposit in Kvanefjeld is economically advantageous. In addition, the economy of the project is expected to improve by extracting byproducts from the ore. (EG)

  13. Recent development of instrumentation and methods for the assessment of the Radon 222 route in the vicinity of uranium ore mining and milling wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.; Miller, W.; Zettwog, P.

    1994-01-01

    For the last fifty years, European countries have been major producers of uranium. Now, however, most companies are no longer competitive in the world market and most of the mines are, or soon will be, in their decommissioning phase. There is a realization that many sites where mining and milling waste is deposited are in need of remedial work. Radiological considerations are expected to play a part in the decisions to be made about such work. A quantitative assessment of the exposures of critical groups of workers to radiation, based on predictive models, is needed in order to rank the various options available for site rehabilitation. Such options, which may include in situ remedial work or relocations, should be chosen in the light of a cost-benefit analysis. Almost all European countries are densely populated. As a result, one or more critical groups can usually be identified in the immediate vicinity of waste deposits, i.e. at distances of only a few hundred meters from the edge of a stockpile or pond. Some groups may even be affected by more than one source. For such critical groups, the major radiological impact occurs through the radon 222 atmospheric route. Transportation to the critical groups in the near field is dominated by the local topography and types of vegetation, and by micrometeorological effects. Areas of research and development are concentrated on a number of difficulties encountered in data acquisition and processing

  14. Using H2O2 as oxidant in leaching of uranium ores. The new research on the reaction of H2O2 with Fe2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xizhen

    1997-05-01

    The new research on the reaction of H 2 O 2 with Fe 2+ has been studied. Through determining the electric potential, pH and O 2 release during the mutual titration between H 2 O 2 solution and FeSO 4 solution, deduced the chemical equations of H 2 O 2 (without free hydroxyl) oxidizing FeSO 4 and Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 oxidizing H 2 O 2 . The research results show that acid is a catalytic agent for decomposing H 2 O 2 to be O 2 and H 2 O besides iron ions. The maximum oxidizing potential is up to about 640 mV. While using H 2 O 2 as an oxidant in uranium heap leaching and in-situ leaching, controlling electric potential can be regarded as a method for adjusting the feeding speed of H 2 O 2 to keep the electric potential below 500 mV, thus the H 2 O 2 decomposition can be reduced. (13 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.)

  15. Unconformity-related uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewers, G.R.; Ferguson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Documentation of ore deposit characterisation is being undertaken to assess the controls of uranium mineralisation associated with Proterozoic unconformities. The Turee Creek uranium prospect in Western Australia is associated with a faulted contact between the Middle Proterozoic Kunderong Sandstone and the Lower Proterozoic Wyloo Group

  16. Lime, agent to uranium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Le Bris, J.; Kremer, M.

    1958-01-01

    Choice of the process according to health requirements. Description of the process: dissolution of uranium by sulfuric leaching of ores, precipitation of uranium by lime, re-dissolution of the concentrate with nitric ions, purification by T.B.P. finally resulting in pure uranyl nitrate solution containing 400 g/litre. (author) [fr

  17. Uranium deposits of Australia to 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spannari, S.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography provides a retrospective account of Australian uranium deposits, particularly the unpublished materials in the Australian Capital Territory. Some abstracts are included. Occurrences, mineralogy, ore genesis, structural controls and the eonomic geology of uranium deposits are covered but the mining of uranium, exploration reports, surveys, environmental aspects and controversial materials are not

  18. Successful trials on pressure leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendreigh, R.

    1978-01-01

    High pressure leaching can increase uranium extraction from some low grade ores by ten per cent, and Anglo American Corporation's eighteen months of pilot plant tests point the way to commercial application. Interest in pressure leaching of uranium has been renewed with the recent increase in uranium and gold prices and costs of reagents

  19. U for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Beisa Mine is unique in South Africa - it is the only underground mine with uranium as its main product and gold as a by-product. At the rate of 1,2 Mt/a, the life of Beisa is estimated on 26 years. Beisa's metallurgical plant is designed to handle initially a monthly throughput of 100 000t of ore, from which uranium, gold and silver will be extracted

  20. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holoway, C.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Eldridge, V.M.

    1975-12-01

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  1. Uranium Extraction by stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Aiguo; Li Yu; Li Congkui; Ouyang Jiangong

    1996-01-01

    The stope leaching is an effective way to extract uranium from hard rock deposit. On the basis of test results of uranium extracting by stope leaching at ore body number 30 in deposit 101 with combination of technological features of stope leaching, the analysis and comprehensive summary are emphasized on three key techniques-ore stacking in-place after blasting in stope, sprinkling of lixiviant and uranium recovery as well. These techniques will play an active role in developing stope leaching in China

  2. Evolution of uranium formation in Precambrian of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, V.B.; Fomin, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The physical and chemical processes of uranium ore formation are used to describe the evolution of Precambrian age uranium deposits of the Ukraine. The processes controlling increasing migration of uranium in the environment are identified. These process are associated with two periods in the Precambrian: late Archean and early Proterozoic. Geochemical and isotopic evidence based on samples from uranium deposits are discussed. (author)

  3. Process for in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenscheid, W.F.; Yan, F.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to the recovery of uranium from subterranean ore deposits, and more particularly to an in-situ leaching operation employing an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide as the lixiviant. Uranium is solubilized in the lixiviant as it traverses the subterranean uranium deposit. The lixiviant is subsequently recovered and treated to remove the uranium

  4. Radon risk in ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beno, M.

    1997-01-01

    Underground workers are exposed to various clastogenic agents. One of these agents, radon, attracts attention of recent research as it causes lung cancer in the population occupationally exposed to its various concentrations especially in mine air of uranium mines or ore mines. This paper is a pilot study in which the numbers of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes of ore mines (Nizna Slana-iron ore, Hnusta-talc ore) located in east central Slovakia were followed and related to the lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. Seventy miners volunteering after an informed consent served as donors of venous blood. Twenty healthy pro-bands, age matched with the miners, which never worked underground (mostly clerks) served as donors of control blood samples. The exposure to radon and smoking has been estimated according to working-records and personal anamnesis. The findings unequivocally showed a small but statistically significant clastogenic effect of the exposure to underground environment of the mines concerned. This study has shown also a small but significant influence of smoking, which in the subgroup of miners working underground less than 1500 shifts may have acted synergically with the underground exposure. It was concluded tat: (1) Significantly higher counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of 70 miners than in an age matched control group of 20 white-collar workers were found; (2) The higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; (3) The positive dependence of the number of chromosomal aberrations from the exposure to smoking was loose and it was expressed by significantly higher chromosomal aberrations counts in the group of miners working less than 1500 shifts underground; (4) A dependence of chromosomal aberrations counts from the exposure to radon could not be assessed. At relatively low numbers of pro-bands in subgroups it was not ruled out the confounding

  5. The radon 222 transport in soils. The case of the storage of residues coming from uranium ores processing; La migration du radon 222 dans un sol. Application aux stockages de residus issus du traitement des minerais d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, C

    2000-07-01

    Uranium Mill Tailings (UMT) contain comparatively large quantities of radium-226. This radionuclide yields, by radioactive decay, the radioactive gas radon-222. Tailing piles are routinely covered to reduce the radon release-rate into the atmosphere. In order to assess the long term environmental impact of a UMT repository, mechanisms governing radon exhalation at the soil surface must be deciphered and understood. A model of radon transport in the unsaturated zone is developed for this purpose: water- and air-flow in the porous material are determined, as well as radon transport by diffusion in the pore space and advection by the gas phase. The radon transport model in the unsaturated zone - TRACI (which stands, in French, for Radon Transport within the Unsaturated Layer) - calculates moisture contents in the soil, Darcy's velocities of the liquid and gas phases, radon concentrations in the gas phase and radon flux at the soil surface. TRACI's results are compared with observations carried out on a UMT and a cover layer. Input parameters are derived from the textural analysis of the material under study, whereas upper boundary conditions are given by meteorological data. If we consider measurement errors and uncertainties on the porous medium characterisation, model's results are generally in good agreement with observations, at least on the long run. Moreover, data analysis shows hat transient phenomena are understood as well, in most situations. (author)

  6. Estimation grade of uranium from drill hole gamma logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliao, B.

    1986-01-01

    Radiometric grade of uranium deposits can be determined from drill hole gamma logs. The calculation of uranium oxide content can be obtained with good precision when the uranium ore is in radioactive equilibrium, containing only a small amount of thorium and no interference of potassium. This is the case of uranium ore from the Lagoa Real Uranium Province presented in this paper. The radioactive disequilibrium study in this province were made working over nine hundred samples analised with this special purpose in the CDTN-NUCLEBRAS laboratories. The data obtained indicated that the uranium in the ore is in perfect equilibrium with their daughter gamma emitters. Futhermore, the amount of Th and K is of no significance, so that the gamma counting represents exactly the uranium content of the ore. (author) [pt

  7. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  8. Recuperation of uranium and gold in mineral pulps by adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.B.; Amorim, L.O.

    1985-06-01

    The technological routes for the treatment of the gold and uranium ores are presented. The results obtained during the continuous tests with the uraniferous Ores of Wabo in Somalia are presented. The utilization of 99% of the uranium content in the alkaline pulp is obtained. (C.B.) [pt

  9. Trends in uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  10. The second last grain of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendreigh, R.

    1978-01-01

    High pressure leaching can increase uranium extraction from some low grade ores by ten per cent, and Anglo American Corporation's eighteen months of pilot plant tests point the way to commercial application

  11. Instrumentation for the uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Brief descriptions are presented concerning instruments used in uranium mining, including R meter, radon daughter working level counter, radon gas detectors, alpha contamination monitors, air samplers, ore grade evaluators and gamma energy analyzers

  12. Uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In 1983 the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) and the IAEA jointly published a book on Uranium Extraction Technology. A primary objective of this report was to document the significant technological developments that took place during the 1970s. The purpose of this present publication is to update and expand the original book. It includes background information about the principle of the unit operations used in uranium ore processing and summarizes the current state of the art. The publication also seeks to preserve the technology and the operating 'know-how' developed over the past ten years. This publication is one of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing that have been prepared by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management at the IAEA. A complete list of these reports is included as an addendum. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system diseases. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies uranium mine air agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from serially sacrificed rats are reported for approximately 20- to 640- working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures delivered at one-tenth the rate of previous exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone

  14. Energy analysis applied to uranium resource estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that fuel prices and ore costs are interdependent, and that in estimating ore costs (involving the cost of fuels used to mine and process the uranium) it is necessary to take into account the total use of energy by the entire fuel system, through the technique of energy analysis. The subject is discussed, and illustrated with diagrams, under the following heads: estimate of how total workable resources would depend on production costs; sensitivity of nuclear electricity prices to ore costs; variation of net energy requirement with ore grade for a typical PWR reactor design; variation of average fundamental cost of nuclear electricity with ore grade; variation of cumulative uranium resources with current maximum ore costs. (U.K.)

  15. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, V.; LeCheminant, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  16. Mid-crustal uranium and rare metal mineralisation in the Mount Isa Inlier: a genetic model for formation of orogenic uranium deposits

    OpenAIRE

    McGloin, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Uranium mineralisation near Mount Isa in northwest Queensland, Australia, is widespread yet poorly understood. Within this region in the Western Fold Belt, one hundred and ninety uranium-rare metal occurrences are known. This uranium mineralisation is similar to worldwide examples of albitite-hosted or sodium-metasomatic uranium deposits, which host albite-carbonate ore zones enriched in incompatible elements. Various metal sources and ore-forming processes have been sugg...

  17. Types of hydrogenic uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Lisitsin, A.K.; Komarova, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of uranium deposit systematics are considered. Systematization, presented in this paper, is based on a regularity that the main industrial exogenic epigenetic uranium concentrations are formed in zones of reduction geochemical barriers. Types of uranium-bearing ground waters and nature of uranium reducing agents were taken into account during systematization. Hydrogenic uranium deposits are related to 3 types: formed by ground (1 type), stratal (2 type) and vein (3 type) waters. By the nature of uranium reducing agents 2 deposit subtypes are marked out: A - in rocks with syngenetic reducing agents, B - in rocks with epigenetic reducing agents. Uranium deposits are also differentiated by nature of reducing agents distribution in ore-containing rocks [ru

  18. The Streltsovskoye uranium district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischukova, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the geology of the Streltsovskoye uranium district located in south-eastern Zabaikalie region, Chita Province, Siberia, Russia. This district hosts Russia's only currently active uranium production centre. The uranium ore was discovered from 1963 to 1967 by drilling below fluorite veins which had minor associated uranium mineralization and radioactive anomalies. The uranium occurs as large scale vein stockwork deposits of hydrothermal origin within a volcano-tectonic caldera formed by continental volcanism of Late Mesozoic age. Rocks occurring in the caldera include basalt and trachydacite, overlain by rhyolite, and with associated interbedded sediments. The ore bodies occur in steeply dipping faults, with the greatest concentrations located where faults along the margins of the caldera intersect steeply dipping, cross cutting, northeasterly and northwesterly striking faults. The Streltsovskoye caldera extends over an area of 150 km 2 and is underlain by a large batholith. The 19 identified uranium deposits occurred in structural features that cut through the caldera sequence and extend into the basement rocks. The caldera has a maximum thickness of 1400 metres. Details of several deposits are given, including descriptions of mineralization and associated alteration. (author). 10 figs

  19. Czechoslovak uranium industry - its present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubant, J.; Bezdek, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium ore mining and processing in Czechoslovakia are the responsibility of the Czechoslovak Uranium Industry state-owned corporation which comprises 12 plants, out of which 4 are mining plants (West Bohemia, Pribram, Dolni Rozinka and Hamr) and 2 are ore-dressing plants. Czechoslovak Uranium Industry employ about 22 thousand persons, out of which approximately 10 thousand are engaged in uranium ore mining and processing. At present, uranium ore is mined in 8 mines and processed in 3 chemical treatment plants. It is planned that within the 5-7 years to come, all mines will be abandoned except for the Hamr deposit, which provides now more than 60% of Czechoslovak uranium. The estimated amount of uranium in this deposit is more than 100 thousand tons; out of this, one half is verified reserves. Two chemical treatment plants, Mydlovary and Diamo, which were built to process annually 500 to 600 thousand tons of as-mined ore, will be shut down so that only the Hamr treatment plant will continue to be in operation. (Z.M.). 2 figs

  20. Application of combined shrinkage stoping and pillarless sublevel caving mining method to a uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Pillarless sublevel caving mining method was used to mining ores in a uranium mine. Because ore-rock interface changed greatly, this part of ores can not be recovered effectively in the mining process, resulting in the permanent loss of these ores. Aimed at the problem, a combined shrinkage stoping and pillarless sublevel caving mining method is presented. Practices show that the ore recovery is increased, dilution rate is declined, and mining safety is improved greatly by using the combined method. (authors)

  1. Uranium adsorption from the sulphuric acid leach liquor containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Wang Zhaoguo; Chi Renqing; Niu Xuejun

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of uranium adsorption was studied from the sulphuric acid leach liquor of a uranium ore containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406. The influence of some factors on uranium adsorption was investigated. It was shown that the resin possesses better selectivity, stability and higher capacity. It can be effectively used to recovery uranium from leach liquors of uranium ores containing more chlorides

  2. Federal Guidance Report No. 8: Guidance for the Control of Radiation Hazards in Uranium Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains background material used in the development of guidance concerning radiation protection in the mining of uranium ore, and seeks to provide guidance for long-term radiation protection in uranium mining.

  3. Application of alkaline leaching to the extraction of uranium from shale of the Vosges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Pottier, P.; Le Bris, J.

    1958-01-01

    Description of chemical treatment of Vosges shales to obtain uranium by alkaline leaching. Mineralogy aspects of ore, physical and chemical conditions of leaching, solid/liquid separation, uranium recovery by either ion exchange process or electrolytic precipitation. (author) [fr

  4. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  5. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  6. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from rats are shown for approximately 300- to 10,000-working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone. 4 tables

  7. Geological characteristics of granite type uranium deposits in middle of Inner Mongolia in comparison with south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gui

    2012-01-01

    Granites extensively distributed in middle of Inner Mongolia and South China, namely Caledonian, Hercynian and Yanshanian. Some of the intrusive are composed of granites which belong to different ages. Some of the uranium deposits were found inside the granite bodies or in sedimentary rocks and meta sedimentary rocks along the exocontact zone. Granite rock was comparing in middle Inner Mongolia and South China, including Uranium ore-forming geological conditions. ore-forming process and Ore-controlling factors. Think the Uranium ore-forming geological conditions is similar; ore-forming process is mainly for low-mid temperature hot liquid; Uranium ore bodies (uranium mineralization) was controlled by fracture. Explain granite type uranium mineralization potential is tremendous in middle of Inner Mongolia. (author)

  8. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM LOW GRADE URANIUM BEARING ORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, H.B.; Pesold, W.F.; Hirshon, J.M.

    1959-06-01

    Recovery of U, Fe, and Al from Chattanooga shale is described. Ground shale (-4 to +325 mesh) is roasted to remove organic and volatile matter. The heated shale is then reacted with a chlorinating agent (CCl/sub 4/, COCl/sub 2/, Cl, and SCl) at 600 to 1000 C. The metal chloride vapor is separated from entrained solids and then contacted with a liquid alkali metal chloride which removes U. The U is reeovered by cooling and dissolving the bath followed by acidification and solvent extraction. A condensed phase of Al, Fe, and K chlorides is treated to separate Al as alumina by passing through a Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ bed. The remaining FeCl/sub 3/ is oxidized by O/sub 2/ at 1000 C to form Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cl/sub 2/. Alternatively, vapor from the U separation step may be passed to a liquid KCl bath at 500 to 650 C. The resulting mixture is oxidized to form Cl/sub 2/ and Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The Al and Fe are separated by reaction with NaOH at high temperatures and pressures. (T.R.H.)

  9. Economical indexes of uranium hydrometallurgical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.; Efimova, Z.I.; Sokolova, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating capitalized and operating costs and total uranium concentrate production costs for evaluation of technical-and-economic indices and the new plant commissioning conditions are considered. Data on costs of uranium concentrate production using different techniques (sulfuric acid, soda, underground and concentrated leaching) are presented. The structure of capitalized costs and operating expenditures for the ore mining and reprocessing is indicated

  10. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1983-01-01

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO 2 are described

  11. Depleted Uranium | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Depleted uranium is the material left after most of the highly radioactive uranium-235 is removed from uranium ore for nuclear power and weapons. DU is used for tank armor, armor-piercing bullets and as weights to help balance aircraft. DU is both a toxic chemical and radiation health hazard when inside the body.

  12. Development of uranium industry in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iuhas, Tiberiu

    2000-01-01

    The management of the uranium resources is performed in Romania by the National Uranium Company. The tasks to be done are: 1. management and protection of rare and radioactive metal ores in the exploitation areas; 2. mining, preparation, refining and trading the radioactive ores, as well as reprocessing the uranium stock from the uranium concentrate in the national reserve; 3. performing geologic and technologic studies in the exploitation areas; 4. performing studies and projects concerning the maintenance of the present facilities and unearthing new ores; 5. building industrial facilities; 6. carrying out technological transport; 7. importation-exportation operations; 8. performing micro-production activity in experimental research units; 9. personnel training; 10. medical assistance for the personnel; 11. environment protection. The company is organized as follows: 1.three branches for uranium ore mining, located at Suceava, Bihor and Banat; 2. one branch for geologic survey, located at Magurele; 3. one branch for uranium ore preparation and concentration and for refining uranium concentrates, located at Feldioara; 4. One group for mine conservation, closure and ecology, located at Bucuresti. The final product, sintered powder of UO 2 produced at Feldioara plant, was tested in 1994 by the Canadian partner and met successfully the required standards. The Feldioara plant was certified as supplier of raw material for CANDU nuclear fuel production and as such, Romania is the only authorized producer of CANDU nuclear fuel in Europe and the second in the world, after Canada. Maintaining the uranium production in Romania is justified by the existence of uranium ore resources, the declining of natural gas resources, lower costs per kWh for electric nuclear power as compared to fossil-fuel power production, the possibility for Romania to become an important supplier of CANDU nuclear fuel, the low environmental impact and high costs for total shutdown of activity, high

  13. Extraction of metals from ores by bacterial leaching: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The principal organism effecting bacterial leaching of ferrous and sulfide ores is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, though other thiobacilli and other bacteria may be involved. The process depends on (a) direct solubilization of metal sulfides by bacterial oxidation; (b) dissolution of metal sulfides or oxides by ferric iron produced by bacterial pyrite oxidation. Mining spoil dumps and low grade ores can be leached for copper or uranium by cheap low-level technology. Dump leaching enables maximum recovery of valuable metal from any ore, but makes possible exploitation of very low grade Cu and U ores. Continuous extraction processes are possible where a continuously growing bacterial culture is fed with pyritic ores (or FeSO 4 or other sulfide) and continuous metal solubilization proceeds. Intimate contact between the bacteria and the ore to be leached (especially with uranium oxide ores) is not always necessary: leaching of UO 2 ores probably depends only on ferric iron reaction with the ore. Degradation of pyrite-containing rocks may also be developed as part of future recovery processes for petroleum from oil shales. Two-stage leaching systems present the best prospect for developing a higher-level technology for metal extraction. State 1: bacterial generation of Fe 3+ from pyrite or a Fe 2+ source; Stage 2: chemical leaching of ore by Fe 3+ in acid solution. Two-stage processes can be surface processes using crushed or milled ores or can be applied to underground solution mining, when an ore (e.g. uranium) can be leached by pumping Fe 3+ solutions through shattered underground deposits, metal recovered (e.g. solvent extraction) and Fe 3+ regenerated by bacterial oxidation at the surface. The use of controlled continuous microbial cultures to generate either bacteria or ferric iron is outlined

  14. Current uranium activities in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghal, M.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The rocks of Siwaliks group in Pakistan, extending from Kashmir in the east through Potwar Plateau, Bannu Basin and Sulaiman range up to the Arabian Sea in the west have been extensively explored for uranium. The Dhok Pathan Formation, which is younger member of the middle Siwaliks has been aeroradiometrically surveyed and extensively prospected on foot. A large number of anomalies were encountered in Kashmir, Potwar Plateau, Bannu Basin and Sulaiman range. While exploratory work in Sulaiman range and Bannu Basin yielded a few workable deposits, none of the anomalous areas yielded an ore grade concentration in Potwar Plateau. As conventional exploration activities in Potwar Plateau did not yield any ore grade concentration therefore a resource potential evaluation programme through geological modeling was started under the guidance of an IAEA expert. The volcanic material found in the middle Siwaliks is considered to be the main source of uranium and siliceous cement in the sandstones. These findings have considerably increased uranium potential in Siwaliks. The tectonic deformation during and after the deposition of Siwaliks is considered to be the main reason for mobilization of uranium, while permeability barriers and upward movement of oil products may provide trappings for the mobilized uranium. Through this survey south western part of Potwar Plateau being relatively less deformed is considered to provide conducive environments for concentration of uranium. Low grade uranium concentrations have also been discovered in carbonatites in northern part of Pakistan. Preliminary exploration in Sallai Patti carbonatite through drilling supplemented by trenching, pitting and aditing, subsurface continuation of surface concentrations has been confirmed. The ore contains about 200 ppm of uranium and 3 to 4% phosphate in addition to magnetite, rare metals and rare earths. It has been demonstrated on laboratory/pilot scale that the concentrations of uranium and phosphate

  15. Study on designing a complete pilot plant for processing sandstone ores in Palua-Parong area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Quang Thai; Tran Van Son; Tran The Dinh; Trinh Nguyen Quynh; Vu Khac Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Design work is the first step of the construction and operation of pilot plant. Thus, the project Study on designing a complete pilot plant for processing sandstone ores in Palua - Parong area was conducted to design a pilot plant for testing entire technological process to obtain yellowcake. Based on a literature review of uranium ore processing technology in the world, information of ore and previous research results of uranium ore in PaLua - PaRong area at the Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements, a suitable technological flowsheet for processing this ore has been selected. The size, location of the pilot plant and planed experiments has been selected during the implementation of this project, in which basic parameters, designed system of equipment, buildings, ect. were also calculated. (author)

  16. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  17. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  18. Uranium mining in Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scales, M.

    2006-01-01

    The mines of northern Saskatchewan make Canada the worlds leading uranium producer in Canada supplied 29% of global demand, or 11.60 million tonnes of the metal in 2004. Here are two bright ideas - how to mine an orebody by neither pit nor underground method, and how to mine high-grade ore without miners - that Cogema and Cameco are pursuing in the Athabasca Basin

  19. Bioprocessing of ores: Application to space resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Karl R.

    1992-01-01

    The role of microorganisms in the oxidation and leaching of various ores (especially those of copper, iron, and uranium) is well known. This role is increasingly being applied by the mining, metallurgy, and sewage industries in the bioconcentration of metal ions from natural receiving waters and from waste waters. It is concluded that bioprocessing using bacteria in closed reactors may be a variable option for the recovery of metals from the lunar regolith. Obviously, considerable research must be done to define the process, specify the appropriate bacteria, determine the necessary conditions and limitations, and evaluate the overall feasibility.

  20. Uranium in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facer, J.F. Jr.

    1979-05-01

    United States production of coal in 1977 was 695 million short tons of which 477 million tons were burned in power plants. The ash from these power plants was about 67 million tons containing an estimated 900 tons U 3 O 8 , assuming 14 percent ash from the type of coal used by utilities and 12 ppM U contained in ash. Perhaps 1 to 3 percent of the domestic uranium requirement could be met from coal ash, provided processing technology could be developed for uranium recovery at acceptable costs. However, the environmental problems for disposal of the slimy leached ash would be enormous. The average uranium grade of coal in the United States is less than half of that of the Earth's crust. Burning the coal concentrates the contained uranium in the ash from 2 to 20 times. However, even at 20 times concentration, the percent uranium in coal ash is less than 1/100 of the grade of the uranium ore being processed today from conventional deposits. Although it is conceivable that some coal ash might contain enough uranium to make the ash an economic source of uranium, this is not now the case for ash from any major coal-fired power plant in the United States. During 1963 to 67, about 180,000 tons of uranium-bearing carbonaceous rock from the southwestern part of the Williston Basin were mined and processed to recover about 1 million pounds of U 3 O 8 . None of this material has been mined since 1967. The uranium reserves of the area are small, and the environmental problems with calcining the lignitic material may be prohibitive. Some other uraniferous coal and lignite could be mined and processed as a uranium ore, but less than half of one percent of the domestic $30 reserves are in coal. A few samples of mid-continent coal have been reported to contain about 100 ppM U but little is known about the size of such deposits or the likelihood that they will be mined and used for power plant fuel to produce a high-uranium ash

  1. Uranium production from low grade Swedish shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, O.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the present nuclear programmes a steep increase in uranium demand is foreseen which will pose serious problems for the uranium industry. The annual additions to uranium ore reserves must almost triple within the next 15 years in order to support the required production rates. Although there are good prospects for the discovery of further conventional deposits of uranium there is a growing interest in low grade uranium deposits. Large quantities of uranium exist in black shales, phosphates, granites, sea water and other unconventional sources. There are however factors which limit the utilization of these low grade materials. These factors include the extraction costs, the environmental constrains on mining and milling of huge amounts of ore, the development of technologies for the beneficiation of uranium and, in the case of very low grade materials, the energy balance. The availability of by-product uranium is limited by the production rate of the main product. The limitations differ very much according to types of ores, mining and milling methods and the surroundings. As an illustration a description is given of the Swedish Ranstad uranium shale project, its potential, constraints and technical solutions

  2. Microbial oxidation and reduction of inorganic sulphur compounds in relation to the development and control of microorganisms active in leaching operations. Part of a coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuovinen, O.H.

    1977-01-01

    The project considers the use of Thiobacillus ferroxidans type bacteria for the leaching of metals from ores. The various ways by which Thiobacillus ferroxidans utilizes inorganic sulfur compounds for oxidation, energy, growth and synthesis of cellular material were studied. The report briefly describes the scope and background of the project, and a list of publications describing experimental methods and research materials used is given. Unpublished work commenced during the Research Contract includes three major projects: (1) Transition of Thiobacillus ferroxidans from heterotrophic growth on fucose to autotropic growth on ferrous-iron; (2) development of a method to determine the ATP-content of bacteria attached to ore particles; (3) microbiological and chemical interactions of inorganic sulfur compounds. These three projects are summarized briefly

  3. Mortimer Hills pegmatite uranium prospect: a Rossing-type uranium deposit in the Gascoyne Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A uraninite-bearing pegmatite of large dimensions in the Gascoyne Province is described. The pegmatite is compared with the Rossing uranium ore body of South West Africa and the two are shown to have common characteristics. Exploration recommendations for Rossing-type uranium mineralization in the Gascoyne Province are made

  4. The characteristics of uranium mineralization and genesis of Nuheting uranium deposit in Erlian basin Inner Mongolian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Lin; Huang Shutao; Yang Guisheng

    1995-10-01

    The Nuheting uranium deposit is located at the northern margin of Erlian basin in Inner Mongolian. Uranium mineralizations are localized in the Erlian formation of upper Cretaceous system. Main types of ore are argillite, argillaceous siltstone and argillaceous graywacke. There are 3 main mineral associations in places with uranium: uranium-gypsum-celestione; uranium-pyriteorganic matter; uranium-pyrite, marcasite and other metalliferous sulfides. Uranium is mainly adsorbed and pitchblende in minor amount can also be found. The formation of economic uranium orebody is related with migration of oil and gas, because there are organic matter of aromatic hydrocarbon and moving hydrocarbon in uranium ore. The U-Pb isotopic ages of ore and pitchblende are 85, 40 and 10 Ma, which indicate that Nuheting uranium deposit was formed in long-term geological process and principally underwent three main stages: Sedimentary diagenesis; migration of oil and gas; and stage of supergene reworking. Therefore, the deposit should be classified as polygenetic type. (9 tabs.; 3 figs)

  5. Search for uranium: a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutt, E.W. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The history of uranium mining in the USA is reviewed. It is postulated that some two million tons of U 3 O 8 will be needed to provide fuel for US nuclear power plants through the year 2000. World resources of U ores are reviewed. The functions of the ERDA National Uranium Resources Evaluation Program (NURE), including aerial surveying, in relation to the assessment of potential uranium reserves in the USA are discussed. The scope of ERDA research and development programs are briefly reviewed. (U.S.)

  6. Providing radiation safety for the environment and people at uranium ore mining and primary processing operations and treatment of radioactive wastes in the Navoi mining and metallurgy combinat, Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchersky, N.I.

    1997-01-01

    The rise of the uranium industry in the Republic of Uzbekistan is closely connected with the discovery of a number of significant uranium deposits of sheet sandstone type in the Kyzylkum desert area, between the Amu-Darya and Syr-Darya rivers. Based on these deposits, in 1958 the construction of Navoi Mining and Metallurgical Combinat (NMMC) commenced. In 1965 the Hydrometallurgical Plant No. 1 (HMP-1), located in the industrial zone near the Navoi town, started producing the uranium protoxide-oxide (yellow cake). The structure of the NMMC uranium production operations includes HMP-1 and three mining facilities. Conventional open-pit and underground uranium mining were shut down here in 1994 and at present all the uranium is extracted by in situ leaching (ISL). The radiation and hygiene sanitary monitoring aimed at collecting information on the radiation conditions at the working places and in the environment, on the current and expected irradiation doses taken by the personnel and various population groups inhabiting the area involved in the activities of the existing, liquidated or temporarily closed NMMC facilities constitutes an integral part of the radiation safety providing system. No radioactive contamination of any environmental objects has been detected outside the sanitary zones and production sites. The radionuclides content in the atmosphere, on the ground surface, in the underground water was found to be at the background level. Current annual average exposure doses of the limited critical population groups were detected to be essentially lower than the current international standards and were about 1 mSv per year

  7. Uranium exploration and mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wutzler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium minerals were discovered in Australia in the years 1850 to 1900 already, but most of them were not recognised as such. It was not until 1894 that the first significant uranium find was made in Carcoar, west of Sydney. At that time, the uranium output of the world, which only amounted to a few hundred cwts, was for the most part obtained from mining areas close to the border between Saxony and Bohemia. In South Australia, uranium ore was mined experimentally for the production of radium at Radium Hill from 1906 onwards and at Mt. Painter from 1910 onwards. It was not until World War II, however, that uranium gained importance as a valuable raw material that could also be used for military purposes. The second phase of uranium mining in Australia commenced in 1944. Within ten years Australia's presumed uranium potential was confirmed by extensive exploration. The development of uranium mining in Australia is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  8. Extraction process of U from its ores using solutions of alkaline earth carbonates and bicarbonates in presence of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floreancig, Antoine; Schuffenecker, Robert.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for extracting uranium from its ores, either directly in the ore deposit or after such ore bodies have been taken from the ground, comprising an oxidation-leaching stage followed by a recovery stage. The characteristic of this process is that in the leaching process, carbonate and bicarbonate solutions of an alkaline-earth metal are used under a pressure of carbon dioxide between zero and 60 bars and at a temperature of zero to 100 0 C [fr

  9. Uranium mining in India - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    The mining of uranium in India in the past, present and future is discussed. Uranium Corporation of India Ltd under the administrative control of Department of Atomic Energy was formed with a specific objective of mining and milling of uranium ore in the country. Uranium recovery plants, expansion mill, bye products recovery plant were set up. Underground mining, tailing disposal, land acquisition, rehabilitation and reclaimation are discussed. Cost reduction measures in mining operations are also discussed. (N.B.)

  10. The chemical industry of uranium in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1955-01-01

    The actual CEA program is concerned with the construction of two large graphite reactors, each of those containing at least one hundred tons of uranium metal with nuclear purity. The uranium for these two reactors will be regularly supplied by new resources discovered in France and Madagascar in the last five years. The working and treatment of such ore have led to the creation of an important french industry of which the general outline and principle are described. The operated ores have got different natures and concentration, individual characteristics are described for the main ores.The most high-grade ore are transported to a central plant in Bouchet near Paris; the low-grade ore are concentrated by physical methods or chemical processes of which principles and economy are studied with constancy. The acid processes are the only used until now, although the carbonated alkaline processes has been studied in France. The next following steps after the acid process until the obtention of uranium rich concentrate are described. The purification steps of uranium compounds to nuclear purity material are described as well as the steps to elaborate metal of which the purity grade will be specify. Finally, the economic aspects of uranium production difficulty will be considered in relation with technical progresses which we can expect to achieve in the future. (M.P.)

  11. Geology and ore deposits of the Section 23 Mine, Ambrosia Lake District, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, H.C.; Santos, E.S.

    1982-01-01

    The section 23 mine is one of about 18 large uranium mines opened in sandstones of the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Ambrosia Lake mining district during the early 1960s. The Ambrosia Lake district is one of several mining districts within the Grants mineral belt, an elongate zone containing many uranium deposits along the southern flank of the San Juan basin. Two distinct types of ore occur in the mine. Primary ore occurs as peneconcordant layers of uranium-rich authigenic organic matter that impregnates parts of the reduced sandstone host rocks and which are typically elongate in an east-southeast direction subparallel both to the sedimentary trends and to the present-day regional strike of the strata. These are called prefault or trend ores because of their early genesis and their elongation and alinement. A second type of ore in the mine is referred to as postfault, stacked, or redistributed ore. Its genesis was similar to that of the roll-type deposits in Tertiary rocks of Wyoming and Texas. Oxidation, related to the development of a large tongue of oxidized rock extending from Gallup to Ambrosia Lake, destroyed much of the primary ore and redistributed it as massive accumulations of lower grade ores bordering the redox interface at the edge of the tongue. Host rocks in the southern half of sec. 23 (T. 14 N., R. 10 W.) are oxidized and contain only remnants of the original, tabular, organic-rich ore. Thick bodies of roll-type ore are distributed along the leading edge of the oxidized zone, and pristine primary ore is found only near the north edge of the section. Organic matter in the primary ore was derived from humic acids that precipitated in the pores of the sandstones and fixed uranium as both coffinite and urano-organic compounds. Vanadium, molybdenum, and selenium are also associated with the ore. The secondary or roll-type ores are essentially free of organic carbon and contain uranium both as coffinite and

  12. International uranium production. Namibian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Rossing uranium deposit is the only one currently being mined in Namibia. Construction began in 1974 and production started in 1979. Current production is close to 4800 s.t. U3O8 per annum. About 160 000 mt of ore and waste are removed from the open pit every day. Each truck load is radiometrically scanned to determine ore grade and is discharged either directly into the primary crusher or into low-grade stockpiles. The uranium is extracted in a sulphuric acid leaching plant and upgraded in an ion exchange and solvent extraction plant. An ion exchange plant recovers uranium from the tailings solution. Three thousand people are employed at the mine, most living in the nearby town site. Employee training and development are emphasized. Employee health is carefully monitored; no occupationally-related disease has been reported. Rossing contributes one third of the GNP of Namibia. (L.L.)

  13. Training manual for uranium mill workers on health protection from uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, N.; Brodsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report provides information for uranium mill workers to help them understand the radiation safety aspects of working with uranium as it is processed from ore to yellowcake at the mills. The report is designed to supplement the radiation safety training provided by uranium mills to their workers. It is written in an easily readable style so that new employees with no previous experience working with uranium or radiation can obtain a basic understanding of the nature of radiation and the particular safety requirements of working with uranium. The report should be helpful to mill operators by providing training material to support their radiation safety training programs

  14. The Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production

  15. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  16. Multiple relational analysis method for uranium mineral metallogenic prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangping; He Xiangping; Liu Yajie

    1998-10-01

    After introduction of the basic principle of relational analysis, multiple relational analysis method for uranium mineral resources are proposed. Multiple relational analysis prediction method is especially efficient where known ore deposits or ore-bearing units are scarce. Where other prediction methods fail, multiple relational analysis method proves to work well with reliability and accuracy. It is fully illustrated with the examples presented

  17. Development document for the effluent limitations and guidelines for the ore mining and dressing point source category. Volume I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrett, B.M.; Kirby, R.G.

    1978-07-01

    To establish effluent limitation guidelines and standards of performance, the ore mining and dressing industry was divided into 41 separate categories and subcategories for which separate limitations were recommended. This report deals with the entire metal-ore mining and dressing industry and examines the industry by ten major categories: iron ore; copper ore; lead and zinc ores; gold ore; silver ore; bauxite ore; ferroalloy-metal ores; mercury ores; uranium, radium and vanadium ores; and metal ores, not elsewhere classified ((ores of antimony, beryllium, pltinum, rare earths, tin, titanium, and zirconium). The subcategorization of the ore categories is based primarily upon ore mineralogy and processing or extraction methods employed; however, other factors (such as size, climate or location, and method of mining) are used in some instances. With the best available technology economically achievable, facilities in 21 of the 41 subcategories can be operated with no discharge of process wastewater to navigable waters. No discharge of process wastewater is also achievable as a new source performance standard for facilities in 21 of the 41 subcategories

  18. Legacies of the uranium ore mining industry and their restoration. A survey of Africa, Asia and Australia; Hinterlassenschaften des Uranerzbergbaus und deren Sanierung. Ein Ueberblick ueber Afrika, Asien und Australien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggitt, P. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria). Waste and Environmental Safety Section; Lersow, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Geotechnik (DGGT) e.V., Breitenbrunn/Erzgebirge (Germany). Arbeitskreis ' Tailings' ; Maerten, H. [UIT GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Heathgate Resources Pty. Ltd., Adelaide, SA (Australia); Quasar Resources Pty. Ltd., Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2008-03-13

    Management of the environment in the uranium mining industry has an eventful history of more than 50 years. In addition to examples of successful restoration of mining and preparation sites in some countries there are also numerous cases, in which no or defective restoration left behind serious waste deposits. In the course of the renaissance of the uranium industry there is increasing interest in the rehabilitation of such waste sites. There is still an urgent requirement to eradicate the environmental effects of the old mining industry. Previous deposits could be of interest for renewed working under the present economic boundary conditions. Restoration as an integral part of the current and future uranium mining industry with the application of modern international safety standards is extremely important. The contribution provides a survey of restoration projects of the old mining industry in various parts of the world and shows how the International Atomic Energy Agency, the national supervisory and approval authorities as well as the mining companies collaborate closely at many sites on solution of the difficult problems. (orig.)

  19. Thorium content of a mineral ore from Morro do Ferro by fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de.

    1980-10-01

    The feasibility to determine thorium concentrations by fission track technique in samples of mineral ore has been demonstrated. The literature registers only the application of the fission track technique to mineral ore in the case where the fissionable element is uranium. The technique was applied to determine the thorium concentration of an ore sample from Morro do Ferro, taking advantage of the high thorium to uranium ratio in that mineral. The sample analysed presented a thorium concentration of 2467 +- 400 mg Th/Kg ore. The so called wet method was adopted by using the Bayer made Makrofol KG 10μm thick, as the detector foil, immersed in the thorium solution. The technique is also useful to determine thorium concentrations in environmental samples because of the following aspects: high sensitivity; fast chemical separation of interfering elements; low cost; and operational simplicity. (Author) [pt

  20. Retrospective - the beginnings of the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a historical perspective of the uranium industry, from the discovery of uranium in 1789 to the discovery of fission in 1939. It is the first in a series of articles. In this part of the series, the initial discovery of uranium is mentioned. Early ore discoveries, especially in the USA, are also noted, and the market conditions at the end of the 19th century are reviewed. Shortly after the discovery of radium in 1898 and natural radioactivity, the connection between uranium and radium was noted, and this is outlined in the article. Due to the intimate relationship between the two elements, radium product and radium markets are also reviewed

  1. The delayed neutron method of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of delayed neutron analysis (DNA) is discussed. The DNA rig installed on the MOATA reactor, the assay standards and the types of samples which have been assayed are described. Of the total sample throughput of about 55,000 units since the uranium analysis service began, some 78% has been concerned with analysis of uranium ore samples derived from mining and exploration. Delayed neutron analysis provides a high sensitivity, low cost uranium analysis method for both uranium exploration and other applications. It is particularly suitable for analysis of large batch samples and for non-destructive analysis over a wide range of matrices. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Restrictions on the transnational movement of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, M.A.; Kraemer, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyses the United States policy on uranium imports. Recently, the US has moved closer to placing legislative restrictions on enrichment by DOE of foreign-origin uranium and has imposed a ban on the import of South African uranium ore and uranium oxide. American uranium producers have also sought relief in the courts against competition from abroad. The impetus for these events comes from a glut of uranium on world markets coupled with the existence of uranium mines outside the US with significant cost advantages over US producers. The remedies sought by the latter, if adopted, hold the potential for broad disruption of significant commercial interests in international trade in nuclear materials and could adversely affect US nonproliferation objectives (NEA) [fr

  3. Analysis of nuclear reaction products and materials; Preliminary treatment of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedyartomo.

    1976-01-01

    Pre-treatment of samples is necessary to be done in order to achieve the efficient steps and accurate results of uranium analysis. The pre-treatment is particularly affected by the type of sample, the uranium concentration predicated in the sample, and the uranium analytical method which will be applied. A brief discussion about the pre-treatment of uranium analysis in the uranium ore processing and the reprocessing of spent fuel is given. (author)

  4. Technological pretreatment of the synchysite non-oxidized ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhtsetseg, B.; Burmaa, G.

    2013-06-01

    Mongolia has rich deposits of rare, precious, and poly-metallic ores. Nowadays, it is important to research separation of rare earth elements oxides concentrates from the ores, analyze their unique physical chemical characteristics, and purified it. Our investigation on raw materials focuses on rare earth non-oxidized ores. Main mineral in this rock sample is Synchysite (LnCa(CO3)2F. We did technological and thermal pretreatment: direct sulphurization (H2SO4), sulphurization with subsequent roasting (800°C+H2SO4), sulphurization prior to roasting (H2SO4+650°C). Sulphurization method based on dissolution of rare earth mineral into sulfuric acid (93%) according to the reaction. The amount of rare earth element oxides is almost 10 times greater (29.16%) after direct sulphurization process, almost 8 times greater (21.14%) after sulphurization with subsequent roasting, and almost 20 times greater (44.62%) after sulphurization prior to roasting process. After those technological pretreatment raw material's micro elements Thorium and Uranium contents are reduced as follows: H2SO4>800°C+H2SO4>H2SO4+650°C. These results show that cerium group rare earth elements have very good solubility in water at +2°C temperature and decreasing micro elements content uranium and thorium good pretreatment condition is prior to roasting (H2SO4+650°C) of synchysite non-oxidized ore.

  5. Uranium and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural applications of chemical fertilizers are a worldwide practice. The specific activity of uranium-238 and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers depends on the phosphate ore from which the fertilizer produced and on the chemical processing of the ore. Composite phosphate fertilizers samples where collected and the uranium-238 specific activity, in Bq/kg, and As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se concentration, in ppm, were measured. The annual addition of these elements in soil due to fertilization were calculated and discussed. (author)(tk)

  6. Chapter 1. General information about uranium. 1.8. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Uranium is produced from uranium ores, containing 0.05 - 0.5% uranium. Practically, ores are not concentrated, excluding organic method of radiometric sorting, based on radium emission, always attendant to uranium. Basically, ores are leached by sulphuric acids and sometimes by nitrogen or soda solutions with uranium conversion to acid solution as UO 2 SO 4 or complex anions [UO 2 (SO 4 ) 3 ] 4- , and to soda solution - as [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- . For uranium extraction and concentration from solutions and slurries, and also for purification, sorption by ion-exchange resins and extraction by organic solutions are applied. Later, ammonium and sodium uranates or hydroxide U(OH) 4 are precipitated from solutions through alkali addition. For compound production of a high purity level, technical products are dissolved in nitrogen acid and go through the refining operations, the final products of which are UO 3 and U 3 O 8 ; these oxides at 650-800 deg C are reduced by hydrogen or dissociated ammonia to U O 2 , with its later conversion to UF 4 by gaseous anhydrous hydrogen fluoride reprocessing at 500-600 deg C. In industry, the basic method of uranium extraction from UF 4 is its calcium-thermal or magnesium-thermal reduction, with uranium output as ingots in weights up to 1.5 t.

  7. Uranium mineralization in the central region of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, M.G.; Olivera, J.; Fernandez, P.

    1995-01-01

    The present work shows different geological and geophysical index for uranium mineralization found at Loma Alta iron ore deposit, located in the central region of Cuba. In this deposit was carried out pull work of iron ore. The tunnels were radiometrically documented in the wall and the floor observing some anomalies of the gamma ray intensity (up to 1700 c.p.s.) associated with the poor iron ore. In those points were collected solid sample. The obtained results were very important (uranium concentrations values up to 3500 ppm)

  8. Geological history of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niini, Heikki

    1989-01-01

    Uranium is widely distributed in continental geological environments. The order of magnitude of uranium abundance in felsitic igneous rocks is 2-15 ppm, whereas it is less than 1 ppm in mafic rocks. Sedimentary rocks show a large range: from less than 0.1 ppm U in certain evaporites to over 100 ppm in phosphate rocks and organogenic matter. The content of U in seawater varies from 0.0005 to 0.005 ppm. The isotopic ratio U-238/U-235 is presently 137.5+-0.5, having gradually increased during geological time. The third natural isotope is U-234. On the basis of three fundamental economic criteria for ore reserves assessment (geological assurance, technical feasibility, and the grade and quantity of the deposits), the author finally comes to the following conclusions: Although the global uranium ores are not geologically renewable but continuously mined, they still, due to exploration and technical development, will tend to progressively increase for centuries to come

  9. Non-polluting treatment of alkaline uranium effluents contaning SO42- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Bernard.

    1978-01-01

    New non-polluting process for treating uranium effluents from the alkaline digestion of an uranium ore containing sulfur, which makes it possible, on the one hand, to extract uranium and SO 4 2- contained in these effluents allowing the recycling of the sole alkaline carbonates and/or bicarbonates involved, towards the digestion of the ore and on the other hand the separation of the mixture uranium and SO 4 2- ions extracted simultaneously to obtain relatively pure uranium in oxide form [fr

  10. Mill tailings based composites as paste backfill in mines of U-bearing dolomitic limestone ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Panchal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the development of paste backfill using mill tailings generated during the processing of a uranium ore deposit hosted in dolomitic limestone. The tailings have been characterized in terms of the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties. Time-dependent rheological behaviors and geotechnical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB are also determined. The studies show that the mill tailing has the potential to form paste and the CPB has adequate strength to provide support to mine pillars, roofs, and walls. Keywords: Mining engineering, Uranium ore deposit, Tailings, Cemented paste backfill (CPB, Rheology, Compressive strength

  11. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, S.; Reades, D.W.; Cherry, J.A.; Chambers, D.B.; Case, G.G.; Ibbotson, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  12. Oxidants for uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Ring, B.

    2007-01-01

    Most uranium ores are leached with sulfuric acid under oxidising conditions. This paper reviews the oxidants that have been traditionally used in uranium leaching and discusses their merits in the context of overall flow sheet considerations. Options for alternative oxidants are also discussed. In acid leaching, ferric ion in solution oxidises insoluble uranium(IV) to soluble uranium (VI). Though ferric ion may be added directly, usually an oxidant is added to the circuit to convert ferrous ion to ferric ion in the liquor so that leaching can continue. The most common oxidants are pyrolusite and sodium chlorate. Pyrolusite is relatively cheap but introduces manganese ions into the liquor and consumes twice as much acid as sodium chlorate. Sodium chlorate is a slow reacting oxidant at low temperatures and acidities, and introduces chloride into the leach liquor. Caro's acid, is a non-polluting reagent that was used successfully at the Nabarlek uranium mine, and provided very good control of oxidising conditions. Other oxidants that are now being considered to overcome the disadvantages of pyrolusite and sodium chlorate are oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and SO 2 /O 2 . Some performance data for these oxidants are presented

  13. Decree of the 23-rd of June 2015 related to installations implementing radioactive materials, radioactive wastes or solid residues of uranium, thorium or radium ore submitted to authorization according to entry 1716, to entry 1735 and to entry 2797 of the nomenclature of classified installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.

    2015-01-01

    This decree defines general prescriptions applicable to installations implementing radioactive materials, to installations used as depository, warehousing or storage of radioactive materials under the form of solid residues of radium, thorium or uranium ore, as well as some processing products, and to installations used for the management of radioactive wastes in an industrial or commercial facility. The decree contains general arrangements about authorisation request, financial guarantees and conditions of exploitation. It addresses measures and arrangements for the management of installations, for the management of radioactive materials and wastes, for the prevention of atmospheric pollution, for the protection of water resources and aquatic media. It also contains general rules for waste management, specific rules for radioactive waste management. It addresses measures and arrangements regarding the prevention of technological risks, the monitoring of installations and of their impact. An appendix addresses the various aspects of the quality management system: organisation and personnel, risk identification and assessment, process management and exploitation monitoring, management of modifications, planning of emergency situation, return on experience, performance monitoring. A last appendix addresses the monitoring of underground waters

  14. Discussion on the genesis of Zhongchuan uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yulong; Zhang Chengzhong

    2008-01-01

    Through elaborating the geological setting, deposit and orebody geological charactors and hydrological features, the ore controlling factors are analysed and the genesis of Zhongchuan uranium deposit is discussed in the way of deposit occurrence, mineral asembleage and matalization ages. It is believed that uranium deposit was formed under the regional uplifting background with the exogenous mechanism and its genesis belongs to surface leaching. (authors)

  15. Aeromagnetic gradient survey used in sandstone type uranium deposits prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaolu; Chang Shushuai

    2014-01-01

    The principle, advantage and data processing of aeromagnetic gradient survey approach is introduced in this paper which was used in sandstone type uranium deposits prospecting to study the shallow surface faults, uranium ore-forming environment and depth of magnetic body, which proved to be a good results. (authors)

  16. Complexing and hydrothermal ore deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Helgeson, Harold C

    1964-01-01

    Complexing and Hydrothermal Ore Deposition provides a synthesis of fact, theory, and interpretative speculation on hydrothermal ore-forming solutions. This book summarizes information and theory of the internal chemistry of aqueous electrolyte solutions accumulated in previous years. The scope of the discussion is limited to those aspects of particular interest to the geologist working on the problem of hydrothermal ore genesis. Wherever feasible, fundamental principles are reviewed. Portions of this text are devoted to calculations of specific hydrothermal equilibriums in multicompone

  17. Uranium exploration and evaluation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowie, S.H.U.

    1977-01-01

    Ground, carborne and airborne surveys for uranium commenced with GM-counters and developed to total-count scintillation counters which have subsequently been replaced to some extent by gamma spectrometers. Stabilisation of the last mentioned is important and has only been achieved recently. Hydrogeochemistry has been revitalised by the introduction of neutron activation analysis and has considerable promise of success in the discovery of surface and near-surface uranium deposits. Soil, stream sediment and lake sediment analyses also have potential particularly in follow-up surveys. One of the most encouraging methods of detecting relatively deeply buried uranium ore bodies is by measuring the radon content of air retained in soil or sub-soil; also that dissolved in stream or lake water. Helium, particularly 4 He, which is also a decay product of uranium but which has an infinite half-life could be measured along with radon. Theoretically this could not only give additional information on buried ore bodies, but on the depth of burial. Another possible technique for use in the detection of buried ore bodies is that of measuring the increased heat flow at surface which, in favourable circumstatnces, should be associated with significant uranium occurrences. Measurement of heat flow could either be by surface thermal sensors or by thermal infra-red scanning techniques from aircraft. For the purposes of preliminary surveys of large areas, airborne geochemical techniques offer considerable scope. Possibilities include the measurement of 222 Rn in the atmosphere. Alternatively, one or more of the decay products of radon could be measured. These are 210 Pb, 210 Bi and 210 Po. It is concluded that there is ample evidence to suggest that the more widespread application of known exploration methods, together with new techniques that can already be envisaged, will result in important new discoveries of uranium reserves

  18. A study about the possible mining and benefit of the uranium ores of the ''Las Margaritas'' deposit, in Sierra de Pena Blanca, municipality of Villa Aldama, State of Chihuahua, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    Considering all the characteristics of the deposit as well as its location in relation to the others, the necessary personnel, the extraction yield the structural conditions, etc. we can say that an advisable method of exploitation is the open pit method because in that way we can resolve a great number of problems, principally the high radiation to which the personnel would be exposed in a subterraneous work. The deposit reserves are 1,221,868 tons of ore with an average of 880 grams of U 3 O 8 per ton. During the exploitation at open pit 1,147,025 tons will be extracted and through subterraneous work other 50,406 tons will be recuperated. The exploitation will cost $84.00 Mexican currency per ton. According to the experimental studies about the mineral which will be treated it has been concluded that the conventional acid leaching is the appropriate treatment to be followed since the recoveries were of 88 to 95%. However, it is suggested to make more studies about the metallurgical aspect and industrial engineering studies in order to lower costs, since these are theoretical and can be improved in the practice. (author)

  19. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  20. Uranium demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The estimated world resources of uranium as well as the estimated consumption of uranium over the next 25 years are briefly discussed. Attention is given to the prospecting of uranium in South Africa and elsewhere in the world

  1. Study of the post-closure provisions for managing solid tailings from the extraction and processing of uranium ores resulting from the industrial activities of the COMUF company at Mounana, Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loueyit, C.J.; Keiffer, B.; Fourcade, S.; Nzengue, J.C.; Bernhard, S.

    2002-01-01

    Between 1961 and 1999 COMUF extracted about 28 000 metric tons of uranium from the Mounana mining district. This production generated about 7.5 million tons of processing tailings that are stored in areas close to the installations. In the context of the European programme 'SYSMIN', the government of the Gabonese Republic commissioned a study to specify the measures to be taken for the restoration of the Mounana mining site and the radiological monitoring to be put in place after the COMUF installations close down. The methodology applied and the restoration and monitoring work undertaken must respect the requirement for an annual added effective dose of less than 1 mSv for persons in the critical population groups. (author)

  2. Granite-related hypothermal uranium mineralization in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Wu, J.; Pan, J.; Zhu, M.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important geological types, granite-related uranium deposits account for about 29% of the total discovered natural uranium resources in China. Most of the granite-related uranium deposits located in Taoshan - Zhuguang uranium metallogenic belt, South China. In addition to the typical pitchblende vein-type uranium mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, a new type of granite-related uranium mineralization with characteristics of hypothermal matallogenic system was discovered in South China by current studies. However, hypothermal is contact thermal to epithermal mineralization, and not the conventional intrusive high temperature mineralization. Hypothermal uranium mineralization is presented by disseminated uraninite or pitchblende stockwork in fissures in granites normally with extensive alkaline alteration. The high temperature mineral assemblage of uraninite associate with scheelite and tourmaline was identified in hypothermal uranium mineralization. Fluid inclusion studies on this type mineralization indicated the middle to high temperature (>250℃) mineralization with the mixing evidence of ore forming solution derived from deep level, and the boiling and mixing of ore forming solution are regarded as the dominant mineralization mechanism for the precipitating of uranium. In contrast to the mineralization ages of 67 Ma to 87 Ma for typical pitchblende vein mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, the mineralization age is older than 100 Ma for hypothermal uranium mineralization in granite. In the Shituling deposit, Xiazhuang uranium ore field, uraninite and pitchblende micro veins with extensive potassic alteration, chloritization and sericitization are hosted in fissures of Indo-Chinese epoch granites with the uranium mineralization age of 130 Ma to 138 Ma with a mineralization temperature of 290℃ to 330℃ indicated. Other examples sharing the similar characters of hypothermal uranium mineralization have been recognized in

  3. The Midwest uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melis, L.A.; Fraser, K.S.; Lakshmanan, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a milling circuit for the complex Midwest orebody, containing a high-arsenic uranium ore typical of that found in northern Saskatchewan. The results of preliminary bench-scale testwork are summarized. Data from a pilot-plant program carried out at the Ontario Research Foundation are provided for the selected mill flowsheet. Also described are waste circuits which have been established to produce effluents of acceptable quality. Pilot-plant testing of sub-aerial tailings deposition is also described. The applicability of manufacturers' equipment for the various circuits in the flowsheet is discussed

  4. Limno-chemical and microbiology aspects in Uranium Pit Mine Lake (Osamu Utsumi), in Antas and Bortolan reservoirs under the influence of effluent Ore Treatment Unit, Caldas - Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronqui, Leilane B.; Nasciment, Marcos R.L. do; Roque, Claudio V.; Bruschi, Armando; Borba Junior, Palvo J.; Nascimento, Heliana A. F. do; Almeida, Tito C.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Due to high natural radioactivity there in Pocos de Caldas Plateau (Minas Gerais State, Brazil) and the existence of the first uranium mine in Brazil (Pit Mine Osamu Utsumi - Mineral Treatment Unit/Brazilian Nuclear Industries, MTU/BNI), which is characterized by an open-pit mine presents as increased environmental liability the formation of acid mine drainage, this study was conducted to evaluate the limno-chemicals and microbiology aspects (protozooplankton and bacterioplankton) belonging to uranium pit mine lake (PM) and evaluate the possible effects of acid effluents treated and discharged by MTU/BNI in Antas reservoir-AR and downstream of this, the Bortolan reservoir-BR. Besides the realization of abiotic and microbiology analysis of protozooplankton and bacterioplankton; was held standardization and deployment of the Fluorescence 'In Situ' Hybridization (FISH) technical using oligonucleotide probes for extremophile Archaea and Bacteria. According to the results, the PM showed the highest values for the chemical variables, lower pH values, lower protozooplankton density, however, protozooplanktonic high biomass showing the presence of tolerant species in this extreme environment. Antas and Bortolan reservoirs showed differences in the abiotic and biotic variables, AR showed suffer greater interference of acid effluents released at P41point and downstream of this at P14 point, lower protozooplankton biomass, lower bacterial density and pollution characteristics of inorganic sources. Using the FISH technique standard in this study to water bodies evaluated, it was possible to detect the presence of the extremophile bacteria of the Archaea domain in the three water bodies. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the pit mine lakes limnology which have become a major concern due to increased mining in the open. (author)

  5. Limno-chemical and microbiology aspects in Uranium Pit Mine Lake (Osamu Utsumi), in Antas and Bortolan reservoirs under the influence of effluent Ore Treatment Unit, Caldas - Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronqui, Leilane B.; Nasciment, Marcos R.L. do; Roque, Claudio V.; Bruschi, Armando; Borba Junior, Palvo J.; Nascimento, Heliana A. F. do, E-mail: leilanebio@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: abruschi@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jouber_borba@hotmail.com, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Almeida, Tito C.M. de, E-mail: titoalmeida2008@gmail.com [Universidade do Vale do Itajai (CTT-Mar/UNIVALI), SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar

    2013-07-01

    Due to high natural radioactivity there in Pocos de Caldas Plateau (Minas Gerais State, Brazil) and the existence of the first uranium mine in Brazil (Pit Mine Osamu Utsumi - Mineral Treatment Unit/Brazilian Nuclear Industries, MTU/BNI), which is characterized by an open-pit mine presents as increased environmental liability the formation of acid mine drainage, this study was conducted to evaluate the limno-chemicals and microbiology aspects (protozooplankton and bacterioplankton) belonging to uranium pit mine lake (PM) and evaluate the possible effects of acid effluents treated and discharged by MTU/BNI in Antas reservoir-AR and downstream of this, the Bortolan reservoir-BR. Besides the realization of abiotic and microbiology analysis of protozooplankton and bacterioplankton; was held standardization and deployment of the Fluorescence 'In Situ' Hybridization (FISH) technical using oligonucleotide probes for extremophile Archaea and Bacteria. According to the results, the PM showed the highest values for the chemical variables, lower pH values, lower protozooplankton density, however, protozooplanktonic high biomass showing the presence of tolerant species in this extreme environment. Antas and Bortolan reservoirs showed differences in the abiotic and biotic variables, AR showed suffer greater interference of acid effluents released at P41point and downstream of this at P14 point, lower protozooplankton biomass, lower bacterial density and pollution characteristics of inorganic sources. Using the FISH technique standard in this study to water bodies evaluated, it was possible to detect the presence of the extremophile bacteria of the Archaea domain in the three water bodies. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the pit mine lakes limnology which have become a major concern due to increased mining in the open. (author)

  6. History of the use of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium was found 200 years ago, though the first use for it - in colouring glass yellow, orange or green - was only found 40 years later. When its radioactivity was discovered in 1896, interest in research into uranium increased and for a brief period it was used for improving the ductility of steel. The isolation of radium from uranium ore in 1904 caused a boom for uranium mining for radium. It found use in healing skin cancer, for various 'health' preparations like radon-containing water, and for making self-luminous paints. The discovery of fission 50 years ago increased the use of uranium into large industrial-scale applications. For fission weapons highly enriched U-235 and Pu-239 were needed. Today the main use is for uranium enriched to about 3 per cent U-235 for light water power reactors. Other important uses are for submarines, icebreakers and satellites

  7. Uranium reserves and exploration activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meehan, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The strategy that ERDA plans to employ regarding resource appraisal is outlined. All types of uranium occurrences will be evaluated as sources of domestic ore reserves. Industry's exploration efforts will be compiled. These data will include information on land acquisition and costs, footage drilled and costs, estimates of exploration activities and expenditures, exploration for non-sandstone deposits, exploration in non-established areas, and foreign exploration plans and costs. Typical data in each of these areas are given

  8. Recovery of uranium resources from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurushima, Morihiro

    1980-01-01

    After the oil crisis in 1973, the development of atomic energy has become important as substitute energy, and the stable acquisition of uranium resources is indispensable, in order to promote smoothly the use of atomic energy. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry has engaged actively in the project ''The survey on the technical development of the system for recovering uranium and others from sea water'' since 1974. 80% of the uranium resources in the world is distributed in USA, Canada, South Africa, Australia and Niger, and in near future, the price of uranium ores may be raised. Japan must promote powerfully the development of foreign uranium resources, but also it is very important to get domestic uranium by efficiently recovering the uranium dissolved in sea water, the amount of which was estimated at 4 billion tons, and its practical use is expected in 1990s. The uranium concentration in sea water is about 3 g in 1000 t sea water. The processes of separation and recovery are as follows: (1) adsorption of uranium to titanic acid powder adsorbent by bringing sea water in contact with it, (2) dissolving the collected uranium with ammonium carbonate, the desorption agent, (3) concentration of uranium solution by ion exchange method or ion flotation method to 2800 ppm. The outline of the model plant is explained. (Kako, I.)

  9. Hom-associative Ore extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, P.; Richter, J.; Silvestrov, S.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce hom-associative Ore extensions as non-associative, non-unital Ore extensions with a hom-associative multiplication, as well as give some necessary and sufficient conditions when such exist. Within this framework, we also construct a family of hom-associative Weyl algebras as generalizations of the classical analogue, and prove that they are simple.

  10. A study of U-Pb isotopic evolutionary system in Chanziping uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weichang; Huang Shijie; Xia Yuliang.

    1988-01-01

    Chanziping uranium deposit occurred in the black siliceous slate of Lower cambrian. The uranium mineralization was controlled by both interstratified fault belt and the ore-bearing beds. Based on the study of the U-Pb isotopic system of the various rocks, ores and minerals in the ore-bearing beds, the authors find out the obvious disequilibrium of U-Pb isotopic composition in most rock samples which indicates the loss of uranium form the ore-bearing beds and surrounding granite. Its counting loss ranges from 30 to 80%. The age of rich ores of the U-Pb concordance diagram and the U-Pb three stage model are t 1 = 523 ± 19M. Y. , t 2 = 22 ± 2 M.Y.. The isochronal ages for pitchblend are 75 ± 4 M.Y., 43 ± 7 M.Y., and for rock is 416 M.y.. These data shows that the uranium in ore-bearing beds was mainly derived from the ore-bearing beds itself and partly from the surrounding granite. The ore deposit can be considered to be of stratabound uranium deposit of sedimentation and late transformation type

  11. Radon problem in uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Raghavayya, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radon emission is invariably associated with the mining and processing of uranium ores. Radon (sup(222)Rn) enters mine atmosphere through diffusion from exposed ore body, fractures and fissures in the rocks and is also brought in by ground water. Being the progenitor of a series of short lived radioisotopes it contributes over 70% of the radiation dose to mine workers and thus accounts for nearly 30% of the total radiation doses received by workers in the whole nuclear industry. This paper summarises the data on radon emanation from the ore body, backfilled sands and mine water. Radon and its progeny concentrations in different haulage levels and stopes of the Jaduguda uranium mine are presented to emphasise the need for a well planned ventilation system to control radiation exposure of miners. Results of radon monitoring from a few exploratory uranium mines are included to indicate the need for a good ventilation system from inception of the mining operations. Relative contribution of mine exhaust and tailings surfaces to the environmental radon are also given. Some instruments developed locally for monitoring of radon and its progeny in mines and in the environment are briefly described to indicate the progress made in this field. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  12. A study of the efficiency of different spectrochemical buffers applied to the uranium ore analysis; Estudio de la eficiencia de diversos reguladores espectroqimicos aplicados al analisis de minerales de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M.; Diaz Guerra, J. P.

    1981-07-01

    A direct-reading emission spectroscopy method allowing the determination of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si and Ti in geological materials, that are of interest for the prospecting and recovery of uranium, is proposed. Direct-current are between graphite electrodes Is used as the excitation source. Efficiency of Ag{sub 2}O, BaCO{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuF{sub 2}, CuO, Ga{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Ge0{sub 2}, graphite, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, H{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Ni, PbS, Sb{sub 2}o{sub 4} , SrC0{sub 3}, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO as spectrochemical buffers has been studied. It has been inferred that through a sample dilution with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, SrC0{sub 3} and graphite powder in the rations 1:10:10:20, respectively, the highest reduction of the matrix effects is achieved. Phosphorus determination Is better performed with PbS as spectrochemical buffer Instead of the indicated above. The action of the selected compounds Is completed by using Co, In, Li and Sr as internal standards, and, as a whole, satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility are attained. (Author) 7 refs.

  13. Sustainability of Water Cooled Reactors - Energy Balance for Low Grade Uranium Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.

    2011-01-01

    The opponents of nuclear power claim that as uranium resources get exhausted the energy needed to mine low grade uranium ore will be larger than the energy that can be obtained from fission in a nuclear power plant. This would result in loss of sustainability of nuclear power, with the negative energy balance expected within the next 40-60 years. Since the opponents state clearly that the ore containing less than 0.013% U 3 O 8 cannot yield positive energy balance, the study of the Institute of Atomic Energy in Poland referenced three mines of decreasing ore grade: Ranger 0.234% U 3 O 8 , Rossing 0.028% U 3 O 8 and Trekkopje 0.00126% U 3 O 8 , that is with ore grade below the postulated cut off value. The study considered total energy needs for uranium mining, including not only electricity needed for mining and milling, for water treatment and delivery, but also fuel for transportation and ore crushing, explosives for rock blasting, chemicals for uranium leaching and the energy needed for mine reclamation after completed exploitation. It has been shown that the energy estimates of nuclear opponents are wrong for Ranger mine and go off much further for the mines with lower uranium ore grades. The reasons for erroneous reasoning of nuclear opponents have been found. Their errors arise from treating the uranium ore deposits as if their layout and properties were the same as those of uranium ore mined in the US in the 70-ies. This results in an oversimplified formula, which yields large errors when the thickness of the overlayer is less than it was in the US. In addition the energy needs claimed for mine reclamation are much too high. The study showed that the energy needed for very low grade uranium ore mining and milling increases but the overall energy balance of the nuclear fuel cycle remains strongly positive. (author)

  14. Uranium and gold in Serra da Jacobina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    The study in details of the conglomerates of Serra do Corrego Formation is presented. In the Canavieira Gold Mine we made the radiometric research of the work front, sistematic sampling and gamma-ray of drilled holes. Many ore products from the jig of Canavieira Mine were analysed to determine a representative uranium content

  15. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-19

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal.

  16. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal

  17. Uranium indicator plants of the Colorado plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massingill, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of botanical prospecting for uranium deposits have been applied on the Colorado Plateau. The first, based on a chemical analysis of deep-rooted plants that absorb uranium from ore bodies, detects small but measurable amounts of the element in plants rooted in ore. A second method involves mapping the distribution of indicator plants because these plants are dependent--either directly or indirectly--upon the presence of abnormally high levels of elements in the parent soil or rock. Botanical prospecting studies made in ten districts have been productive. In the Thompson district, Grand County, Utah, five ore bodies were found solely on the basis of indicator plant data. 15 refs

  18. Preparation of the pur uranium-metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.; Vertes, P.

    1955-01-01

    A detailed description of the chemical processes used to prepare in the factory of Bouchet of the CEA (Seine-Et-Oise) pur metal uranium with either relatively rich ores, or extracts coming of physical or chemical treatment of poor ores. The nitric treatment of ores succeeds to the production of uranate of impure sodium carbonate. This last last product is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranyl nitrate is extracted by tributyl-phosphate diluted in an inert solvent. The uranyl nitrate pure is re-extracted and successively transformed in uranium peroxide, in orange oxide then in brown oxide which is transformed in fluoride by the anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Uranate fluoride is then reduced in metal by the pure calcium with an yield superior to 99%. (authors) [fr

  19. Study for uranium advantage as byproduct of the phosphorite from Brazilian Northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.G. de.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution and recovery of uranium contained in marine phosphates from Northeast Brazil were investigated by treating these ores with hydrochloric acid. The average content of uranium in the phosphorite was found to be about 0.03%. The leaching of phosphate from the ore and the amount of solubilized uranium supplied the basic information for the uranium recovery. The solutions, obtained in laboratory, leaching the phosphorite with hydrochloric acid contained 40.70 mg:U/l. An analytical method to control the uranium solubilization was outlined. A liquid-liquid extraction of uranium from these leaching solutions was performed using mixture of 3.3% di-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphoric acid and 2.2% TBP in kerosene. After extraction the phosphoric acid free from uranium is sent to the calcium hydrogeno-phosphate production. The uranium is stripped from the organic phase by alkaline treatment and then precipitated as diuranate. (Author) [pt

  20. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)