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Sample records for alba bioscience limited

  1. Increasing Aridity is Enhancing Silver Fir (Abies Alba Mill). Water Stress in its South-Western Distribution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, M. [Department of Geology, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Andreu, L.; Bosch, O.; Gutierrez, E. [Departament d' Ecologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avgda. Diagonal, 645, Barcelona, 08028, Catalonia (Spain); Camarero, J.J. [Unidad de Recursos Forestales, Centro de Investigacion Agroalimentaria, Gobierno de Aragon, Apdo. 727, Zaragoza, 50080, Aragon (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    Tree populations located at the geographical distribution limit of the species may provide valuable information about the response of tree growth to climate warming across climatic gradients. Dendroclimatic information was extracted from a network of 10 silver-fir (Abies alba) populations in the south-western distribution limit of the species (Pyrenees, NE Iberian Peninsula). Ring-width chronologies were built for five stands sampled in mesic sites from the Main Range in the Pyrenees, and for five forests located in the southern Peripheral Ranges where summer drought is more pronounced. The radial growth of silver-fir in this region is constrained by water stress during the summer previous to growth, as suggested by the negative relationship with previous September temperature and, to a lesser degree, by a positive relationship with previous end of summer precipitation. Climatic data showed a warming trend since the 1970s across the Pyrenees, with more severe summer droughts. The recent warming changed the climate-growth relationships, causing higher growth synchrony among sites, and a higher year-to-year growth variation, especially in the southernmost forests. Moving-interval response functions suggested an increasing water-stress effect on radial growth during the last half of the 20th century. The growth period under water stress has extended from summer up to early autumn. Forests located in the southern Peripheral Ranges experienced a more intense water stress, as seen in a shift of their response to precipitation and temperature. The Main-Range sites mainly showed a response to warming. The intensification of water-stress during the late 20th century might affect the future growth performance of the highly-fragmented A. alba populations in the southwestern distribution limit of the species.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Bioscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    biological agents. We integrate our renowned engineering, nanotechnology, and computational capabilities to Foundations Bioscience Computing & Information Science Electromagnetics Engineering Science Geoscience Opportunities Microsensors Bioscience Leadership Computing and Information Science Engineering Science

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 5. Evolution and expression analysis of the soybean glutamate decarboxylase gene family ... Although plant GAD plays important roles in GABA biosynthesis, our knowledge concerning GAD gene family members and their evolutionary relationship remains limited.

  4. Journal of Biosciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    The Journal of Biosciences welcomes contributions containing the results of original research in any area of biology. Both brief communications (within 4 typed pages or 1500 words of text) and full-length articles are accepted. There are no page charges for printing colour photographs. Fifty reprints will be supplied free of ...

  5. Journal of Applied Biosciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Applied Biosciences provides a forum for scholars and practitioners in all spheres of biological sciences to publish their research findings or theoretical concepts and ideas of a scientific nature. Other websites related to this journal: http://m.elewa.org/Journals/about-jab/ ...

  6. Herba-Alba

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... Antioxidant activity of CE, SE, ME and UE ethanolic extract from Artemisia Herba- alba against DPPH˙ radicals. 2.2.3 ABTS assay. The scavenging activity from different technique was calculated. Table 2 and Fig.2 shows that all extracts analysis in this study inhibit ABTS radical potential. The IC50 of ABTS ...

  7. Bioscience, bioinnovations, and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisola, Matti

    2007-01-01

    Biosciences and their applications, which we call biotechnology, have affected human society in many ways. Great hopes have been set on future biotechnology. The future depends on three key issues. First, we need good science. Recent developments in biosciences have surprised us in many ways. I shall explain in this article how. Secondly, we need structured innovation systems in order to commercialize our discoveries. Europe is slow in this respect compared to our Japanese and American competitors and may lose in the competition. I shall describe the Finnish innovation chain using the rewarded Otaniemi model as an example of how commercialization can be done in a systematic way. Thirdly, we need norms to guide what to do and where to go. Bioethics is probably the most neglected of the three key issues. With modern biotechnology we are able to do things that should worry every citizen, but the ethical discussion has been largely neglected or the discussion in our pluralistic society is leading nowhere. I shall finally discuss these problems from a historical perspective.

  8. Interactions of archaeal chromatin proteins Alba1 and Alba2 with nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Črnigoj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Architectural proteins have important roles in compacting and organising chromosomal DNA. There are two potential histone counterpart peptide sequences (Alba1 and Alba2 in the Aeropyrum pernix genome (APE1832.1 and APE1823. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THESE TWO PEPTIDES WERE EXPRESSED AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH VARIOUS DNAS WERE STUDIED USING A COMBINATION OF VARIOUS EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES: surface plasmon resonance, UV spectrophotometry, circular dichroism-spectropolarimetry, gel-shift assays, and isothermal titration calorimetry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that there are significant differences in the properties of the Alba1 and Alba2 proteins. Both of these Alba proteins can thermally stabilise DNA polynucleotides, as seen from UV melting curves. Alba2 and equimolar mixtures of Alba1/Alba2 have greater effects on the thermal stability of poly(dA-dT.poly(dA-dT. Surface plasmon resonance sensorgrams for binding of Alba1, Alba2, and equimolar mixtures of Alba1/Alba2 to DNA oligonucleotides show different binding patterns. Circular dichroism indicates that Alba2 has a less-ordered secondary structure than Alba1. The secondary structures of the Alba proteins are not significantly influenced by DNA binding, even at high temperatures. Based on these data, we conclude that Alba1, Alba2, and equimolar mixtures of Alba1/Alba2 show different properties in their binding to various DNAs.

  9. Has bioscience reconciled mind and body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Carmel; Redmond, Catherine; Toole, Sinead O; Coughlan, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this discursive paper is to explore the question 'has biological science reconciled mind and body?'. This paper has been inspired by the recognition that bioscience has a historical reputation for privileging the body over the mind. The disregard for the mind (emotions and behaviour) cast bioscience within a 'mind-body problem' paradigm. It has also led to inherent limitations in its capacity to contribute to understanding the complex nature of health. This is a discursive paper. Literature from the history and sociology of science and psychoneuroimmunology (1975-2015) inform the arguments in this paper. The historical and sociological literature provides the basis for a socio-cultural debate on mind-body considerations in science since the 1970s. The psychoneuroimmunology literature draws on mind-body bioscientific theory as a way to demonstrate how science is reconciling mind and body and advancing its understanding of the interconnections between emotions, behaviour and health. Using sociological and biological evidence, this paper demonstrates how bioscience is embracing and advancing its understanding of mind-body interconnectedness. It does this by demonstrating the emotional and behavioural alterations that are caused by two common phenomena; prolonged, chronic peripheral inflammation and prolonged psychological stress. The evidence and arguments provided has global currency that advances understanding of the inter-relationship between emotions, behaviour and health. This paper shows how bioscience has reconciled mind and body. In doing so, it has advanced an understanding of science's contribution to the inter-relationship between emotions, behaviour and health. The biological evidence supporting mind-body science has relevance to clinical practice for nurses and other healthcare professions. This paper discusses how this evidence can inform and enhance clinical practice directly and through research, education and policy. © 2015 John Wiley

  10. Technetium uptake by Sinapis Alba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Ter Meer-Bekk, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Transfer factors for pertechnetate uptake was determined for Sinapis Alba cultured hydroponically. For the freshly harvested, undried plants transfer factors were found between 13 and 40 depending on the growth period. (author)

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. DALE JAMIESON. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 3-8 Commentary. Liberating primatology · SINDHU RADHAKRISHNA DALE JAMIESON · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vidita A Vaidya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 2 June 2000 pp 123-124. Clipboard: Stress, depression and hippocampal damage · Vidita A Vaidya · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Cover page gallery. Cover page gallery. Journal of Biosciences. Cover page. Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1. Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art · Search ...

  14. The Alba ray tracing code: ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Josep; Barla, Alessandro; Juanhuix, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    The Alba ray tracing code (ART) is a suite of Matlab functions and tools for the ray tracing simulation of x-ray beamlines. The code is structured in different layers, which allow its usage as part of optimization routines as well as an easy control from a graphical user interface. Additional tools for slope error handling and for grating efficiency calculations are also included. Generic characteristics of ART include the accumulation of rays to improve statistics without memory limitations, and still providing normalized values of flux and resolution in physically meaningful units.

  15. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JONAS P RAMOS. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 657-664 Article. In vitro leishmanicidal, antibacterial and antitumour potential of anhydrocochlioquinone A obtained from the fungus Cochliobolus sp. FERNANDA F CAMPOS JONAS ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Chen Fang. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 351-357 Articles. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha curcas is induced by stress · Wei Qin Huang Ming-Xing Xu Ying Zhang Xin-Shen Chen Fang · More Details ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vibha Dwivedi. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 281-297 Articles. Suppression of induced but not developmental apoptosis in Drosophila by Ayurvedic Amalaki Rasayana and Rasa-Sindoor · Vibha Dwivedi Shweta Tiwary Subhash C ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Priyakshi Mahanta. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 351-364 Articles. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data · Priyakshi Mahanta Hasin Afzal Ahmed Dhruba Kumar Bhattacharyya Ashish Ghosh.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Kamalvishnu P Gottimukkala. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 3 August 2011 pp 461-469 Articles. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin organizer SATB1 contributes towards its function as transcription regulator · Dimple Notani Praveena L Ramanujam ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. XIAOQIAN DING. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 637-645 Article. MicroRNA-146 protects A549 and H1975 cells from LPS-induced apoptosis and inflammation injury · QIANG WANG DAGANG LI YUQUAN HAN XIAOQIAN DING TAO ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MASOUD SOLEIMANI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 pp 23-30 Article. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation and apoptosis reduction · FAHIMEH HOSSEINI AGHDAEI BAHRAM M SOLTANI SADAT ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anil K Gupta. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 7 December 2002 pp 703-714 Review Article. Applications of inulin and oligofructose in health and nutrition · Narinder Kaur Anil K Gupta · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Inulin and oligofructose belong to a ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LAXMAN S MEENA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 149-154 Mini-Review. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis · PRATAP C MALI LAXMAN S MEENA · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. HIMANI DEY. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 333-344 Review. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications · USHA P KAR HIMANI DEY ABDUR RAHAMAN · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Dynamin ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Urvashi Bahadur. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 1 March 2001 pp 39-46 Articles. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure and promoter regulation by estrogen · Nandini Vasudevan Urvashi Bahadur Paturu Kondaiah.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sebastian Fettig. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 3 April 2007 pp 501-510 Articles. specific and unspecific responses of plants to cold and drought stress · Erwin H Beck Sebastian Fettig Claudia Knake Katja Hartig Tribikram Bhattarai · More Details Abstract ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Carissa Reason. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 389-398 Articles. Declines of seagrasses in a tropical harbour, North Queensland, Australia, are not the result of a single event · Skye McKenna Jessie Jarvis Tonia Sankey Carissa Reason ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRASAD A DESHPANDE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 647-656 Article. IGF1 stimulates differentiation of primary follicles and their growth in ovarian explants of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) cultured in vitro · PANCHARATNA A KATTI ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Samira Mansour. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 815-823 Review. Casuarina glauca: A model tree for basic research in actinorhizal symbiosis · Chonglu Zhong Samira Mansour Mathish Nambiar-Veetil Didier Bogusz Claudine ...

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rashmi Chhabra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 1 February 2003 pp 7-11. Effects of exogenous vitamin E supplementation on the levels of oxidants and antioxidants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease · M K Daga Rashmi Chhabra Bhavneesh ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Lidia Andreu Guillo. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 33-39 Articles. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes · Kárita Antunes Costa Lidia Andreu Guillo · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The p53 protein exerts different ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Lorena Carro. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 685-693 Articles. Micromonospora is a normal occupant of actinorhizal nodules · Lorena Carro Petar Pujic Martha E Trujillo Phillipe Normand · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Odir A Dellagostin. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 3 September 2008 pp 355-363 Articles. Purification and molecular cloning of a new galactose-specific lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds · Luciano S Pinto Celso S Nagano Taianá M Oliveira Tales R ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shweta Dubey. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 497-501. Clipboard: Putting T cells to sleep: a new paradigm for immune evasion by persistent viruses · Shweta Dubey Shahid Jameel · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Bhagyashri A Shanbhag. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 105-110 Articles. Factors influencing offspring traits in the oviparous multi-clutched lizard, Calotes versicolor (Agamidae) · Rajkumar S Radder Bhagyashri A Shanbhag.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pankaj Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 3-15 Articles. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes · Vattipally B Sreenu Pankaj Kumar Javaregowda Nagaraju Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rajiv Sarin. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 93-102. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes and environment in tumour susceptibility · Ashwin Kotnis Rajiv Sarin Rita Mulherkar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S A Ranade. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 3 September 2000 pp 291-299 Review articles. Role of polyamines and ethylene as modulators of plant senescence · S Pandey S A Ranade P K Nagar Nikhil Kumar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Devarshi U Gajjar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 6 December 2012 pp 979-987 Articles. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens epithelial cells · Anshul I Arora Kaid Johar Devarshi U Gajjar Darshini A Ganatra Forum B Kayastha ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Subrata Basu Ray. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 5 December 2001 pp 555-559. Commentary: The enigma of morphine tolerance: recent insights · Subrata Basu Ray Shashi Wadhwa · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 51-56 ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Naveen Kumar Nair. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 2 June 2012 pp 301-312 Review. Nucleic acids in circulation: Are they harmful to the host? Indraneel Mittra Naveen Kumar Nair Pradyumna Kumar Mishra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. It has been ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Veeraputhiran Subbiah. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 2 June 2008 pp 185-193 Articles. Identification of a root-specific glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis and characterization of its promoter · Virupapuram Vijaybhaskar Veeraputhiran Subbiah Jagreet ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. GEOFFREY BODENHAUSEN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 189-199. Commentary: On toxic effects of scientific journals · Antoinette Molinié Geoffrey Bodenhausen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The advent of online publishing ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ABDUR RAHAMAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 333-344 Review. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications · USHA P KAR HIMANI DEY ABDUR RAHAMAN · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Dynamin ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. A Sahni. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 673-686 Articles. The origin and early evolution of whales: macroevolution documented on the Indian Subcontinent · S Bajpai J G M Thewissen A Sahni · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Victor Smetacek. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 589-607 Perspectives. Making sense of ocean biota: How evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton · Victor Smetacek · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRATAP C MALI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 149-154 Mini-Review. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis · PRATAP C MALI LAXMAN S MEENA · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Srinivasan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 15-25. Comparative genomics using data mining tools · Tannistha Nandi Chandrika B-Rao Srinivasan Ramachandran · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. We have analysed the genomes of ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. G P Talwar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 4 September 2005 pp 435-447 Perspectives. A destiny to fulfill · G P Talwar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 34 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 909-916 Articles. A partner monoclonal antibody to Moab 730 kills ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Manjula Kalia. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 451-464. Molecular biology and pathogenesis of hepatitis E virus · Vivek Chandra Shikha Taneja Manjula Kalia Shahid Jameel · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The hepatitis E virus ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. L Singh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 739-748 Review. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) – A promising spice for phytochemicals and biological activities · R S Policegoudra S M Aradhya L Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. D Raghunath. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 593-603. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to India · D Raghunath · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The antibiotic era started in the 1940s and changed ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pankaj Verma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 2 June 2012 pp 221-226 Brief communication. Molecular typing of fecal eukaryotic microbiota of human infants and their respective mothers · Prashant K Pandey Jay Siddharth Pankaj Verma Ashish Bavdekar ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vidya Ramachandran. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 437-464. Epidemiological profile of India: Historical and contemporary perspectives · M D Gupte Vidya Ramachandran R K Mutatkar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. VINCENZO IERARDI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 623-636 Article. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic force microscopy · VINCENZO IERARDI PAOLO DOMENICHINI SILVIA REALI GIAN MARCO ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Satish K Amarnath. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 539-547. Brucellosis in India – a review · Basappa G Mantur Satish K Amarnath · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Brucellosis is an important re-emerging zoonosis with a ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Xiuhong Yang. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 1 March 2008 pp 103-112 Articles. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum · Xiuhong Yang Chao Sun Yuanlei ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Jacinta S D'souza. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 2 March 2003 pp 223-233 Articles. Purification and characterization of a Ca -dependent/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase from moss chloronema cells · Jacinta S D'souza Man Mohan Johri.

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  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. John Bernet. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 249-264 Articles. Viral mimicry of the complement system · John Bernet Jayati Mullick Akhilesh K Singh Arvind Sahu · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The complement system is a potent ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Naveen Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 5 August 2007 pp 937-945 Articles. ARC: Automated Resource Classifier for agglomerative functional classification of prokaryotic proteins using annotation texts · Muthiah Gnanamani Naveen Kumar ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JIANPING SI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 4 December 2016 pp 727-742 ARTICLE. Functional analyses of Populus euphratica brassinosteroid biosynthesis enzyme genes DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD) in the regulation of growth and ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. AA SULTAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 531-535 Brief communication. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype distribution in dhps and dhfr from Northeast India · NP SARMAH K SARMA DR BHATTACHARYYA ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. BETANIA B COTA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 657-664 Article. In vitro leishmanicidal, antibacterial and antitumour potential of anhydrocochlioquinone A obtained from the fungus Cochliobolus sp. FERNANDA F CAMPOS JONAS ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LI-MIN FENG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 547-554 Article. Thymoquinone induces cytotoxicity and reprogramming of EMT in gastric cancer cells by targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway · LI-MIN FENG XUE-FENG WANG QING-XIAN ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. P Chauhan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 729-747 Articles. India at the cross-roads of human evolution · R Patnaik P Chauhan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The Indian palaeoanthropological record, although patchy at the ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Franck Molina. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 145-155 Articles. Formal TCA cycle description based on elementary actions · Pierre Mazière Nicolas Parisey Marie Beurton-Aimar Franck Molina · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. P Dayanandan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 455-469 Articles. Structural and histochemical studies on grain-filling in the caryopsis of rice (Oryza sativa L.) S Krishnan P Dayanandan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The endosperm ...

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  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. QING-XIAN HUANG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 547-554 Article. Thymoquinone induces cytotoxicity and reprogramming of EMT in gastric cancer cells by targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway · LI-MIN FENG XUE-FENG WANG ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shobha Rao. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 481-489. Nutritional status of the Indian population · Shobha Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. High prevalence of low birth weight, high morbidity and mortality in children and poor ...

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  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LOCHNER. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule morphology ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. G Keller. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 709-728 Articles. Deccan volcanism, the KT mass extinction and dinosaurs · G Keller A Sahni S Bajpai · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Recent advances in Deccan volcanic studies indicate ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SUDHANSHU GAUTAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 613-621 Article. Small phosphatidate phosphatase ( TtPAH2 ) of Tetrahymena complements respiratory function and not membrane biogenesis function of yeast PAH1.

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  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. David L Beveridge. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 379-397 Articles. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012 · David L Beveridge Thomas E Cheatham III Mihaly Mezei · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

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  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. M T Tanuja. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 1 March 2001 pp 71-76 Articles. Incipient sexual isolation in the nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila: No-choice experiments · M T Tanuja N B Ramachandra H A Ranganath · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Amar J S Klar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 1 March 2010 pp 11-15 Perspectives. A proposal for re-defining the way the aetiology of schizophrenia and bipolar human psychiatric diseases is investigated · Amar J S Klar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SUMITRA NAIN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 481-490 Article. Promoter polymorphism MMP-1 (-1607 2G/1G) and MMP-3 (-1612 5A/6A) in development of HAND and modulation of pathogenesis of HAND · HARI OM SINGH ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shree Kumar Apte. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 2 June 2004 pp 153-161 Articles. A novel potassium deficiency-induced stimulon in Anabaena torulosa · Anuradha Alahari Shree Kumar Apte · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Potassium deficiency ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JAMUNA R SUBRAMANIAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 4 December 2016 pp 689-695 ARTICLE. Reserpine requires the D2-type receptor, dop-3 , and the exoribonuclease, eri-1 , to extend the lifespan in C. elegans · KOPAL SAHARIA RANJEET ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Mihaly Mezei. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 379-397 Articles. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012 · David L Beveridge Thomas E Cheatham III Mihaly Mezei · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. This article ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Ana M soto. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 103-118. Emergentism as a default: Cancer as a problem of tissue organization · Ana M soto Carlos Sonnenschein · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. During the last fifty years the dominant ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. VIDYANAND NANJUNDIAH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 9-10. Commentary: The smallest form of life yet? Vidyanand Nanjundiah · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 28 Issue 6 December 2003 pp 697-707 Articles. Calcium regulates ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Carlos Sonnenschein. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 103-118. Emergentism as a default: Cancer as a problem of tissue organization · Ana M soto Carlos Sonnenschein · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. During the last fifty years the ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Marta Linde-Medina. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 575-585 Brief communication. Adaptation or exaptation? The case of the human hand · Marta Linde-Medina · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. A controversy of relevance to the ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sangappa. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 2 March 2005 pp 259-268 Articles. Crystal structure of raw pure Mysore silk fibre based on (Ala-Gly)2-Ser-Gly peptide sequence using Linked-Atom-Least-Squares method · Sangappa S S Mahesh R Somashekar.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JASWANDI UJWAL DANDEKAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 585-601 Article. Fermentative metabolism impedes p53-dependent apoptosis in a Crabtree-positive but not in Crabtree-negative yeast · ABHAY KUMAR JASWANDI ...

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. R S Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 391-405. Current status of fertility control methods in India · R S Sharma M Rajalakshmi D Antony Jeyaraj · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Approximately 48.2% of couples of 15 to 49 ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHUGUANG HAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 671-681 Article. MiR-876-5p suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung cancer by directly down-regulating bone morphogenetic protein 4 · LIANG BAO LEI LV JINPING ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Jesper G Sørensen. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 4 December 2004 pp 503-511. Ecologically relevant stress resistance: from microarrays and quantitative trait loci to candidate genes – A research plan and preliminary results using Drosophila as a ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Scott F Gilbert. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 3 September 2001 pp 293-298. Commentary: New vistas for developmental biology · Scott F Gilbert Rocky S Tuan · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 27 Issue 5 September 2002 pp 445-446. Commentary: ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Partha P Majumder. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 390a-390a. Preface · Partha P Majumder A Jagannadha Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 533-545. Ethnic populations of India as seen from ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. XINHUA WANG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 671-681 Article. MiR-876-5p suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung cancer by directly down-regulating bone morphogenetic protein 4 · LIANG BAO LEI LV JINPING ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Amrita Banerjee. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 475-481 Articles. A revisit of the mode of interaction of small transcription inhibitors with genomic DNA · Dipak Dasgupta Parijat Majumder Amrita Banerjee · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Neeti Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 187-202 Articles. Spectrum of CREBBP mutations in Indian patients with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome · Neeti Sharma Avinash M Mali Sharmila A Bapat · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Adrian Surmacki. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 691-699 Articles. Differences in predatory pressure on terrestrial snails by birds and mammals · Zuzanna M Rosin Paulina Olborska Adrian Surmacki Piotr Tryjanowski · More Details ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. G V R Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 649-659 Articles. Divergence time estimates of mammals from molecular clocks and fossils: Relevance of new fossil finds from India · G V R Prasad · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MUNIASAMY NEERATHILINGAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 3 September 2016 pp 535-561 Review. Application of aptamers in diagnostics, drug-delivery and imaging · CHETAN CHANDOLA SHEETAL KALME MARCO G CASTELEIJN ARTO URTTI ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Q M I Haq. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 329-340 Articles. Mutagenesis in ORF AV2 affects viral replication in Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus · A Rouhibakhsh Q M I Haq V G Malathi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mungbean ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JEDY JOSE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 363-371 Brief communication. Amalaki Rasayana improved memory and neuronal metabolic activity in AβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease · VIVEK TIWARI KAMAL SABA ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Girish J Kotwal. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 265-271 Articles. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug · Purushottam Jha Girish J Kotwal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Vaccinia ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Saqib Mahmood. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 521-530 Articles. Role of leptin G-2548A polymorphism in age- and gender-specific development of obesity · Adeela Shahid Sobia Rana Saqib Mahmood Shahid Saeed · More Details ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHUKLA SUSHMITA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 613-621 Article. Small phosphatidate phosphatase ( TtPAH2 ) of Tetrahymena complements respiratory function and not membrane biogenesis function of yeast PAH1.

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sinha Sinha. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 525-536 Reviews. Conservation of PHO pathway in ascomycetes and the role of Pho84 · Parul Tomar Sinha Sinha · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ANANT B PATEL. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 363-371 Brief communication. Amalaki Rasayana improved memory and neuronal metabolic activity in AβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease · VIVEK TIWARI KAMAL SABA ...

  2. East Midlands healthcare and bioscience sector strategy

    OpenAIRE

    East Midlands Development Agency

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare and bioscience sector is one of four priority sectors identified in the regional economic strategy, A Flourishing Region. This document sets out a strategy for maximising the contribution of the healthcare and biosciences sector to the economic development of the East Midlands.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. T Naga Sowjanya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 539-546 Articles. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in Neurospora can disrupt genes and create novel open reading frames · Parmit K Singh ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. NILOFER NAQVI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 127-138 Article. Blocking dephosphorylation at Serine 120 residue in t-SNARE SNAP-23 leads to massive inhibition in exocytosis from mast cells · NASKAR PIEU NILOFER NAQVI NITI ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHRUTI D MARATHE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 481-490 Article. Promoter polymorphism MMP-1 (-1607 2G/1G) and MMP-3 (-1612 5A/6A) in development of HAND and modulation of pathogenesis of HAND · HARI OM SINGH ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JASMINE M SHAH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 173-187 Review. Plant reference genes for development and stress response studies · JOYOUS T JOSEPH NAJYA JABEEN POOLAKKALODY JASMINE M SHAH · More Details Abstract ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pushpa Mittra Bhargava. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 167-168. Commentary: Insufficient regulatory supervision prior to release of genetically modified crops for commercial cultivation in India · Pushpa Mittra Bhargava · More Details ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRABHJOT KAUR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 355-364 Articles. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study · Sadhana Singh Shilpi Modi Satnam Goyal ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Madhuri Thakar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 515-525. HIV infection in India: Epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis. Samir Lakhashe Madhuri Thakar Sheela Godbole Srikanth Tripathy Ramesh Paranjape.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JAMES A NIENOW. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. D BANSAL. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 531-535 Brief communication. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype distribution in dhps and dhfr from Northeast India · NP SARMAH K SARMA DR BHATTACHARYYA ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHEETAL S NARVEKAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 647-656 Article. IGF1 stimulates differentiation of primary follicles and their growth in ovarian explants of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) cultured in vitro · PANCHARATNA A KATTI ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Antonio G Valdecasas. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 835-843 Perspectives. Understanding complex systems: lessons from Auzoux's and von Hagens's anatomical models · Antonio G Valdecasas Ana M Correas Carmen R Guerrero ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. B N Singh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 263-274 Articles. Variations in morphological and life-history traits under extreme temperatures in Drosophila ananassae · Seema Sisodia B N Singh · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rahul Gaur. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 4 June 2007 pp 747-754 Articles. Diet-dependent depletion of queuosine in tRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans does not lead to a developmental block · Rahul Gaur Glenn R Björk Simon Tuck Umesh Varshney.

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Smita Deshpande. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 35-52. Molecular genetics of schizophrenia: past, present and future · Suman Prasad Prachi Semwal Smita Deshpande Triptish Bhatia V L Nimgaonkar B K Thelma · More Details ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S Ignacimuthu. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 3 September 2006 pp 339-345 Articles. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea with -amylase inhibitor gene for insect resistance · S Ignacimuthu S Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vindhya Mohindra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 373-383 Articles. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air-breathing Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758) · Ratnesh Kumar Tripathi Vindhya Mohindra ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Will D Penny. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 129-144 Articles. Dynamic causal models of neural system dynamics: current state and future extensions · Klaas E Stephan Lee M Harrison Stefan J Kiebel Olivier David Will D Penny Karl J ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. STHITAPRANJYA PATI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 85-95 Article. Acute pharmacogenetic activation of medial prefrontal cortex excitatory neurons regulates anxiety-like behaviour · STHITAPRANJYA PATI ANKIT SOOD SOURISH ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shikha Srivastava. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 63-72 Articles. High prevalence of oncogenic HPV-16 in cervical smears of asymptomatic women of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India: A population-based study · Shikha Srivastava Sadhana ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rajkumar S. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 105-110 Articles. Factors influencing offspring traits in the oviparous multi-clutched lizard, Calotes versicolor (Agamidae) · Rajkumar S Radder Bhagyashri A Shanbhag · More Details Abstract ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Gavan Holloway. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 323-335 Articles. HIV-1 Nef control of cell signalling molecules: multiple strategies to promote virus replication · Alison L Greenway Gavan Holloway Dale A McPhee Phoebe Ellis Alyssa ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. K B Saxena. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 5 November 2012 pp 811-820 Articles. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops of semi-arid tropics using next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vibha Tandon. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 493-502 Articles. Inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase gene expression by 10-23 DNAzyme · Nirpendra Singh Atul Ranjan Souvik Sur Ramesh Chandra Vibha Tandon · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  6. PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY OF THE ALBA IULIA FORTRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Muntean; Lucian Marina

    2008-01-01

    The specific character of The Fortress of Alba Iulia results from its value as anelement of historical and cultural patrimony. This value must be kept and brought into prominence,and for this it must be promoted with the help of cultural tourism. This paper presents some issuesregarding the promotional strategy of the Alba Iulia Fortress.

  7. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Boumenthal, D.K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US); Kennedy, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Moore, G.J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 5 ... Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon ... Faculty of Applied Marine Science, Cheju National University, Jeju 690-756, Republic ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 1 ... an overview of the implications of such a phenomenon for basic and applied research. ... Department of Crop Biology, Section of Plant Physiology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 38; Issue 4 ... Department of Plant Physiology, UPSC, Umeå University, S-90187 Umea, Sweden; Ecologie ... Lyon, France; Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Botany, University of Sri ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4 ... of stochastic differential equation; spectral density; Tchebycheff's inequality ... Estimation of maximum harvesting effort has a great impact on the economics of fisheries and other ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum based on differential ... a progressive maturation of chemotactic properties during the transdifferentiation of slug cell types. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2 ... The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in ... Reduction in the conductance of KIR channels evokes facilitatory effects on EPSPs ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 2 ... From about 6000 brain sub-oesophageal ganglion complexes, the neuropeptide was isolated; and purified ... Radiochemical bioassay confirmed the pheromonotropic effect of the ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1. A songbird forebrain area potentially involved in auditory discrimination and memory formation ... a set of interconnected ascending and descending auditory brain pathways that ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats ... whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Apoptosis; bee; brain; cell division; nervous system ... have a distinct morphology, physiology and behaviour that correlate with their roles in the society and are characterized by some brain polymorphisms. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc finger protein 521 is highly expressed in brain, neural stem cells and early ... Fndc5, a precursor of Irisin has inducing effects on the expression level of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brain; differential proteomics; ICAT; LCM; neuron; tandem mass spectrometry ... but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Role of sound stimulation in reprogramming brain connectivity. Sraboni Chaudhury Tapas C Nag Suman Jain Shashi Wadhwa ... Keywords. Auditory pathway; avian; brain; sound stimulation; synaptic plasticity ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amelioration of altered antioxidant status and membrane linked functions by vanadium and Trigonella in alloxan diabetic rat brains ... determined in different fractions of whole brain after 21 days of treatment. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HPLC analysis reveals the presence of beta amyloid in the OVX and HCL mice brain. Congo red staining analysis revealed the extent of amyloid deposition in OVX and hypercholesterolemia mice brain. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and early-life stress: Multifaceted interplay. NATALYA P ... Abstract. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neural development and plasticity. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the same brain areas, VBM results also showed reduced grey and white matter volumes. ... alterations and disturbed functional brain activation during empathy task in persons affected with schizophrenia. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Insights into brain development and disease from neurogenetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster ... operate in neural stem cells during normal brain development and during abnormal brain tumorigenesis. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Information for Authors ... Submission of a manuscript will be held to imply that the work reported in it is original, that .... when essential should be numbered consecutively and typed on a separate sheet.

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 4 ... the clusters obtained by a clustering algorithm applied on cancer gene expression data. ... In this context, we have used biochemical pathways, -value statistics of GO attributes, ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5 ... A genomic library was generated using HindIII and the positive clones were sequenced and ... People's Republic of China; School of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suzhou ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 ... (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. ... School of Medicine and Pharmaceutics, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122, ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 4 ... Plant Biotechnology Research Center, School of Agriculture and Biology, ... D Center, School of Life Sciences, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2 ... School of Life Sciences, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, ... of China; Plant Biotechnology Research Center, School of Agriculture and Biology, ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 2 ... R & D Center, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, ... School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 1 ... and Plant Breeding, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore 560 065, India; Biometrics and Bioinformatics Unit, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3 ... International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru 502 ... Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 027, India; RAK College of Agriculture, ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2 ... School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, ... D Center, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2 ... Department of Horticulture, Agriculture Faculty, Ilam University, Ilam, Iran; Plant Molecular Biology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-26

    Oct 26, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 5 ... the Early Pleistocene of East Africa, Western Asia and Southeast Asia, thus indirectly ... Centre of Advanced Studies in Geology, Panjab University, Chandigarh ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-06-28

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 5 ... These methods suffer from disadvantages such as the lack of availability of ... In this work, we have constructed a library of local conformation classes purely ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1 ... profiling combined with physiological analysis at two time points for soybean seedlings in ... waterlogging through the management of carbohydrate consumption and by regulating ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-07

    Aug 7, 2011 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 3 ... pathways in animal models of human disease and in patients to provide insights ... progression of metastasis, immune cell trafficking, stem cell therapy, transgenic ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-08-10

    Aug 10, 2009 ... A ubiquitous cue eliciting these plastic phenotypic responses is ... Among the conclusions that emerge from this exploration is the perspective that the plant cell is phenotypically plastic. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 3 ... Asthma is a chronic disease due to inflammation of the airways of lungs that is clinically ... ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism, rs4646994, in asthma in Pakistani patients.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 2 ... whole animal was studied after adaptation to low and high concentrations of riboflavin. ... India; Department of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biotechnology, Madurai Kamaraj ...

  4. What is provided and what the registered nurse needs--bioscience learning through the pre-registration curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Geraldine M

    2010-11-01

    Registered nurses undertaking programmes of study to become non-medical prescribers appear to have limited biological science knowledge. A case study was undertaken to determine whether the nurses entering Prescriber programmes considered studies in bioscience in their pre-registration nursing courses had been sufficient, linked to practice, and had prepared them for their roles as registered nurses. The literature identifies a continuing trend amongst nursing students describing a lack of sufficient bioscience in initial nurse education; there is limited literature on the views of experienced registered nurses. The participants in this study were 42 registered nurses from adult and mental health nursing, community and inpatient services. The results obtained from questionnaires and interviews are described. Questionnaire analysis identified that 57.1% of participants indicated bioscience in their pre-registration nursing programme had been limited and 40.5% stated the bioscience content had not prepared them for their roles on registration. Those reporting extensive coverage of bioscience were all aged over 41 years and had qualified before 1995. Greatest coverage of bioscience in pre-registration programmes was reported in relation to anatomy and physiology, with relatively limited coverage of microbiology, pharmacology or biochemistry. Respondents considered all five topics to be important. Interviews supported the questionnaire findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Branka I Ognjanović. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 5 December 2014 pp 859-866 Articles. Prooxidative effects of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in erythrocytes of rats · Marko D Prokić Milica G Paunović Miloš M Matić Nataša Z Djordjević ...

  6. Geologic Mapping Investigations of Alba Mons, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, D. A.; Berman, D. C.; Scheidt, S. P.; Hauber, E.

    2018-06-01

    Geologic mapping of the summit region and western flank of Alba Mons at 1:1M-scale is revealing sequences of volcanic, tectonic, impact, and degradation processes that have formed and modified the northernmost of the Tharsis volcanoes.

  7. East Midlands healthcare and bioscience sector strategy appendix 1: healthcare and bioscience res implementation plan

    OpenAIRE

    East Midlands Development Agency

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare and bioscience sector is one of four priority sectors identified in the regional economic strategy, A Flourishing Region. This document sets out the implementation plan for maximising the contribution of the healthcare and biosciences sector to the economic development of the East Midlands.

  8. Using Alba Emoting™ to work with emotions in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawski, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Alba Emoting™ is a physical method to help recognize, induce, express and regulate the basic emotions. This is achieved through specific breathing, postural and facial behaviours. Alba Emoting is based on psychophysiological research by Susana Bloch and her collaborators, who have applied this method mainly to train actors. Alba Emoting can be used in psychotherapy to facilitate emotion awareness, regulation and transformation. It can also help therapists better recognize their own and their clients' emotions. The application of Alba Emoting in psychotherapy is illustrated with a case example. Alba Emoting is a physical, scientific method for working with emotions. Alba Emoting can help therapists better recognize their own and their clients' emotions. Alba Emoting can help clients achieve better emotional awareness and regulation. Alba Emoting can also help clients experience and express emotions they may normally inhibit. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Polygenic eruptions on Alba Patera, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P.J.; Wilson, L.; Zimbelman, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A new model for the evolution of the martian volcano Alba Patera is constructed. Numerous digitate channel networks on the flanks of the volcano are interpreted to be carved by sapping due to the release of nonjuvenile water from unconsolidated flank deposits. The particle size of these deposits is estimated to be 3-10 microns, which, together with theoretical modelling of the disperison of explosively derived volcanic materials, leads to the conclusion that the flank deposits on Alba Patera are low-relief pyroclastic flows. The recognition of numerous late-stage summit and subterminal lava flows thus makes Alba Patera a unique martian volcano that is transitional between the older pyroclastic-dominated highland paterae and the more recent effusive central-vent volcanoes such as the Tharsis Montes. 61 refs

  10. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  11. Environmental Biosciences First Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-09-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  12. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  13. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2008-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-08-19

    Aug 19, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 3. What history tells us XVIII. When functional biologists propose mechanisms of evolution. Michel Morange. Series Volume 34 Issue 3 September 2009 pp 373-376. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 5. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome reveal novel transcripts and variants in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus. Puli Chandramouli Reddy Ishani Sinha Ashwin Kelkar Farhat Habib Saurabh J Pradhan Raman Sukumar Sanjeev ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 3. A rapidly progressing, deadly disease of Actias selene (Indianmoonmoth) larvae associated with a mixed bacterial and baculoviral infection. Marta A Skowron Beata Guzow-Krzemińska Sylwia Barańska Paulina Jędrak Grzegorz Węgrzyn. Articles Volume 40 ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 40, Issue 5. December 2015, pages 829-968. pp 829-832 Series. What history tells us XXXIX. CRISPR-Cas : From a prokaryotic immune system to a universal genome editing tool · Michel Morange · More Details Fulltext PDF.

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 35, Issue 2. June 2010, pages 163-325. pp 163-165. Clipboard: Heat shock protein 90: a capacitor or a mutator? Ritwick Sawarkar Renato Paro · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 167-169. Clipboard: The small subunit of geranyl ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 43; Issue 2 ... The ErbB signalling pathway has been studied extensively owing to its role in normal physiology ... When applied to drug studies, the efficacy of a drug can be investigated in silico ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 4 ... areas, so the data used to make such comparisons should be comparable in quality and quantity. ... data include museums, herbariums and natural resource management agencies. Issues of data precision, accuracy and sampling bias in data sets from such ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 3 .... HUWE1 (the HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing protein 1) is an ubiquitin E3 ligase which plays .... pp 487-496 Review ... Galectin-9: From cell biology to complex disease dynamics ... Application of aptamers in diagnostics, drug-delivery and imaging.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 2. Effects of quercetin on predator stress-related hematological and behavioral alterations in pregnant rats and their offspring. Mohamed ... Keywords. Prenatal stress; Anxiety-like behavior; Memory performance; Hematological analysis; Periadolescence; Quercetin ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 33, Issue 2. June 2008, pages 157-307. pp 157-158. Clipboard: Recovery from amblyopia in adults via decreased visual cortical inhibition caused by experience in an enriched environment · Liisa A Tremere Raphael Pinaud.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-02-09

    Feb 9, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2. What history tells us VIII. The progressive construction of a mechanism for prion diseases. Michel Morange. Series Volume 32 Issue 2 March 2007 pp 223-227. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 4. Helicobacter urease: Niche construction at the single molecule level ... Departments of Lifesciences and # Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore 54792, Punjab, Pakistan ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 1 ... Department of Safety and Environmental Management, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-09

    Dec 9, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 4. Phenotypic plasticity ... Articles Volume 34 Issue 4 October 2009 pp 605-611 ... Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, CP 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS, Brazil; Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Bodø University College, NO-8049 Bodø, Norway; Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, CP 474, ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. What history tells us XLII. A 'new' view of proteins. MICHEL MORANGE. Series Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 pp 11-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/042/01/0011-0014. Keywords. Allostery ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 4. Combating emerging infectious diseases in India: Orchestrating a symphony. Lalit Kant. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 425-427. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 27, Issue 1. February 2002, pages a-70. Genome Analysis. pp a-a. Preface · Alok Bhattacharya · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 1-6. SWORDS: A statistical tool for analysing large DNA sequences · Probal Chaudhuri Sandip Das.

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here two very different kinds of organisms are considered: the volvocine algae that become ... that there is a perfect correlation with size: the forms with two cell types are significantly larger than those with one. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 3 ... miR-200a-3p have been reported in the brains of Alzheimer'sdisease (AD) patients in recent researches. ... Knockdown of SIRT1 decreased theinhibitory effect of Ab25-35 on cell ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Olimpio Montero Alberto Sánchez-Guijo Luis M Lubián Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez. Articles Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 635-645 ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 31, Issue 2. June 2006, pages 177-292. pp 177-179. Clipboard: Simple laboratory tests of ecological theories: what we can learn from them, and when we should be cautious · Mike S Fowler Lasse Ruokolainen · More Details ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Bhattacharya1. School of Life Sciences and Information Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 007, India. Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1 · Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 2. Toward the 'new century' of handedness in biology: In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Francis Crick. Koji Tamura. Clipboard Volume 41 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 169-170 ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Search ... part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'.

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Genetic transformation of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) using cotyledonary node as explant and a promoterless gus::nptII fusion gene based vector. T Swathi Anuradha S K Jami R S Datla P B Kirti. Articles Volume 31 Issue 2 June 2006 pp 235-246 ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 4. Is there a role for contraceptive vaccines in fertility control? A Jagannadha Rao. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 425-427. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/026/04/0425-0427. Keywords. Fertility ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 6. A skeletochronological study of growth, longevity, and age at sexual maturity in a population of Rana latastei (Amphibia, Anura). Fabio M Guarino Silvia Lunardi Michela Carlomagno Stefano Mazzotti. Articles Volume 28 Issue 6 December 2003 pp 775-782 ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 1. Clipboard: New paradigm for ATP synthesis and consumption. C Channakeshava. Volume 36 Issue 1 March 2011 pp 3-4. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/036/01/0003-0004 ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 3. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 28, Issue 3. April 2003, pages 248-358. Viral Evasion of Host Responses. pp 248-248. Preface · Shahid Jameel · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 249-264 Articles. Viral mimicry of the complement system · John Bernet Jayati ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 6. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 27, Issue 6. November 2002, pages 552-627. Special Issue on Suppl. 3: The Biology of Entamoeba histolytica. pp 552-552a. Preface · Anuradha Lohia · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 553-557 Articles.

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6 ... and suitable teaching methods have been of great importance in the progress of knowledge. ... And what is valid for the learning of anatomy can be generalized to ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 4. Molecular cloning and expression of the C-terminus of spider flagelliform silk protein from Araneus ventricosus. Kwang Sik Lee Bo Yeon Kim Yeon Ho Je Soo Dong Woo Hung Dae Sohn Byung Rae Jin. Articles Volume 32 Issue 4 June 2007 pp 705-712 ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6. Identification and ... Alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that GbAGL2 shared high homology with AG-subfamily genes and belonged to a C-class gene family. DNA gel blot analysis showed that GbAGL2 belonged to a low-copy gene family. Reverse ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 1. P1 peptidase – a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae. Jana Rohožková Milan Navrátil ... The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 4. RET gene mutations and ... Articles Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 603-611 ... Further, 39 family members of seven index cases were analysed, wherein four of the seven index cases showed identical mutations, in 13 of 25 family members. We also ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2. Splicing ... Articles Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 281-287 ... One proband had mutation at the canonical splice site at +5 position of IVS22, and analysis of the transcripts in this family revealed skipping of exon 22 in three members of this family. In one proband ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 ... Review Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 313-320 ... Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc (Zn)-dependent endopeptidases that are collectively capable of cleaving virtually all extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates and play an important role in ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. Diverse roles of WDR5-RbBP5-ASH2L-DPY30 (WRAD) complex in the functions of the SET1 histone methyltransferase family. AAMIR ALI SHWETA TYAGI. Mini-Review Volume 42 Issue 1 ... Keywords. Cell cycle regulation; SET1 family; transcription; WRAD ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-02-24

    Feb 24, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 1. Classical embryology to molecular biology: a personal view of amphibian embryonic development. Horst Grunz. Perspectives Volume 34 Issue 1 March 2009 pp 5-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific PCR-RFLP markers and PCR primers for screening actinorhizal symbionts. Rajani Varghese Vineeta S Chauhan Arvind K Misra. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 437-442 ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1 ... In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of platelet aggregation and ... cirrhosis found in our study is of clinical importance, and the underlying mechanism of such ... Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Proctology, Stanley Medical College ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 4. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 26, Issue 4. November 2001, pages 390a-545. Population of India. pp 390a-390a. Preface · Partha P Majumder A Jagannadha Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 391-405. Current status of fertility control methods in India.

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 .... mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues ... However, due to inconsistency in the results of empirical studies, the relationship between FA and ... MMP-1 polymorphism and its relationship to pathological processes.

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2. Clipboard: Snakes and ladders: the ups and downs of animal segmentation. Ramray Bhat Stuart A Newman. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 163-166. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol bacterium on rice growth and disease resistance. Haiying Ren Ganyu Gu Juying Long Qian Yin Tingquan Wu Tao Song Shujian Zhang Zhiyi Chen Hansong Dong. Reviews Volume 31 Issue 5 ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 4. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic data sets. Monzoorul Haque Mohammed Sudha Chadaram Dinakar Dinakar Komanduri Tarini Shankar Ghosh Sharmila S Mande. Articles Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 709- ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Volume 28, Issue 4. June 2003, pages 359-528. pp 359-360. Clipboard: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new creation? M S Shaila · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 361-362. Clipboard: Blueprint of a red mould: ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 2. The roots of ancient medicine: an historical outline. B V Subbarayappa. Perspectives Volume 26 Issue 2 June 2001 pp 135-143. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/026/02/0135-0143. Author Affiliations.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Cytomixis impairs meiosis and influences reproductive success in Chlorophytum comosum (Thunb) Jacq. – an additional strategy and possible implications. S K Lattoo S Khan S Bamotra A K Dhar. Reviews Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 629-637 ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation and apoptosis reduction. FAHIMEH HOSSEINI AGHDAEI BAHRAM M SOLTANI SADAT DOKANEHIIFARD SEYED JAVAD MOWLA MASOUD SOLEIMANI. Article Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 31, Issue 1. March 2006, pages 1-176e. pp 1-2. Clipboard: Ancient Indian roots? Denise R Carvalho-Silva Tatiana Zerjal Chris Tyler-Smith · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 3-4. Commentary: Magic with moulds: Meiotic and ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 1. What impact, if any, has feminism had on science? Evelyn Fox Keller. Perspectives Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 7-13. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/029/01/0007-0013. Author Affiliations.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1. Transgene transmission in South American catfish (Rhamdia quelen) larvae by sperm-mediated gene transfer. Tiago Collares Vinicius Farias Campos Fabiana Kömmling Seixas Paulo V Cavalcanti Odir A Dellagostin Heden Luiz M Moreira João Carlos Deschamps.

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-11-09

    Nov 9, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 4. What history tells us XXII. The French neo-Lamarckians. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 515-517. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/035/04/0515-0517 ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-05-06

    May 6, 2006 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Kenneth Raper, Elisha Mitchell and Dictyostelium. Eugene R Katz. Perspectives Volume 31 Issue 2 June 2006 pp 195-200. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/031/02/0195-0200 ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-01-31

    Jan 31, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1. Biological time is fractal: Early events reverberate over a life time. David Lloyd. Perspectives Volume 33 Issue 1 March 2008 pp 9-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/01/0009- ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anandasankar Ray1 2 Wynand Van Der Goes Van Naters2 3 John R Carlson2. Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-02-10

    Feb 10, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1. What history tells us XX. Felix Haurowitz (1896–1987) – A difficult journey in the political and scientific upheavals of the 20th century. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 1 March 2010 pp 17-20 ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-11-15

    Nov 15, 2005 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. What history tells us III. André Lwoff: From protozoology to molecular definition of viruses. Michel Morange. Series Volume 30 Issue 5 December 2005 pp 591-594. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-11-23

    Nov 23, 2005 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. Commentary: Neuronal survival in epilepsy: to die or not to die? Subramaniam Ganesh Shweta Singh. Volume 30 Issue 5 December 2005 pp 561-566. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6 ... of R. solani (35 colony-forming units/g dry soil) was relatively high in the soil we studied, and ... School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 2. Integrative microbiology – the third Golden Age. Moselio Schaechter. Perspectives Volume 28 Issue 2 March 2003 pp 149-154 ...

  18. Two new prenylflavonoids from Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Li, Yuan-Dong; Zhu, Bao-Kun; Li, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Li-Bin; Li, Xian-Yi; Wang, Fei; Ren, Fu-Cai; Liao, Tou-Gen

    2018-02-01

    Two new prenylflavonoids, morusalbols A and B (1 and 2), were isolated from the branches and leaves of Morus alba, together with three known compounds, kuwanon C (3), morusin (4), morusinol (5). The structures of these two prenylflavonoids were elucidated by extensive analyzes of the spectroscopic data.

  19. Heartwood extractives of iranian morus alba wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghifar, H.; Sheikh, A.; Khalilzadeh, M.A.; Ebadi, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The composition and amount of hydrophilic and lipophilic extractives in heartwood of Morus alba wood in north of Iran were analysed n-Decane (50%), dodecane (9%) and limonene (11%) were main lipophilic components. Resorcinol (about 90%) is main hydrophilic phenolic compound. (author)

  20. Youtube for millennial nursing students; using internet technology to support student engagement with bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amy Nb; Barton, Matthew J; Williams-Pritchard, Grant A; Todorovic, Michael

    2018-06-09

    Undergraduate nursing programs typically include students with limited 'on-campus' time who need learning resources that are flexible, technologically appropriate, remotely-accessible (mobile smart devices), and above all, engaging. This has presented academics with challenges surrounding institutional security firewalls, password-access requirements, intellectual property/ownership and staff/student privacy. To overcome these challenges a collection of evidence-based YouTube videos, posted on the Biological Sciences YouTube Channel, supported by the Biosciences in Nurse Education, and underpinned by Benner's pedagogical framework, were developed with the intention of moving students from novice to competent clinical bioscience users. The videos are highly successful; with over 310,000 views, 1.5 million minutes of viewing and more than 5000 subscribers since its inception (YouTube videos was enhanced by their familiarity with the presenter and the breadth of information available in small portions, creating a solid basis for the development of bioscience-competent nursing graduates. Moreover, these open source videos provide a free resource for continual revision and professional development informed by an international minimum bioscience standard for nurses post registration. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2009-01-30

    Current research projects have focused Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP) talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene, low-dose ionizing radiation (gamma and neutron) and alpha radiation from plutonium. Trichloroethylene research has been conducted as a joint collaborative effort with the University of Georgia. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Laboratory work has been completed on several trichloroethylene risk assessment projects, and these projects have been brought to a close. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the remaining trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A comprehensive manuscript on the scientific basis of trichloroethylene risk assessment is in preparation. Work on the low-dose radiation risk assessment projects is also progressing at a slowed rate as a result of funding uncertainties. It has been necessary to restructure the proponency and performance schedule of these projects, with the project on Low-Dose Radiation: Epidemiology Risk Models transferred to DOE Office of Science proponency under a separate funding instrument. Research on this project will continue under the provisions of the DOE Office of Science funding instrument, with progress reported in accordance with the requirements of that funding instrument. Progress on that project will no longer be reported in quarterly reports for DE-FC09-02CH11109. Following a meeting at the Savannah River Site on May 8, 2008, a plan was submitted for development of an epidemiological cohort study and prospective medical surveillance system for the assessment of disease rates among workers at the Savannah River

  2. Object-oriented programming for the biosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechert, W; Joksch, B; Wittig, R; Hartbrich, A; Höner, T; Möllney, M

    1995-10-01

    The development of software systems for the biosciences is always closely connected to experimental practice. Programs must be able to handle the inherent complexity and heterogeneous structure of biological systems in combination with the measuring equipment. Moreover, a high degree of flexibility is required to treat rapidly changing experimental conditions. Object-oriented methodology seems to be well suited for this purpose. It enables an evolutionary approach to software development that still maintains a high degree of modularity. This paper presents experience with object-oriented technology gathered during several years of programming in the fields of bioprocess development and metabolic engineering. It concentrates on the aspects of experimental support, data analysis, interaction and visualization. Several examples are presented and discussed in the general context of the experimental cycle of knowledge acquisition, thus pointing out the benefits and problems of object-oriented technology in the specific application field of the biosciences. Finally, some strategies for future development are described.

  3. Nitrogen-15 reference book: medicine and biosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.

    1983-04-01

    A comprehensive bibliography on the application of the stable nitrogen isotope 15 N in medicine, animal nutrition and physiology, biosciences, and related disciplines is presented. The literature pertaining to this paper covers the period from 1977 to 1981. The references are completed by an index of all authors and a subject index with special emphasis to the used organisms, labelled compounds, and tracer techniques, respectively. (author)

  4. Geomorphology and stratigraphy of Alba Patera, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Dale M.; Pieri, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Geomorphic and stratigraphic analysis of Alba Patera suggests a volcanic construct built by lavas with rheologic properties similar to basalts. A series of evolving eruptive styles is suggested by changes in morphology and inferred progressive reductions in flow volume with higher stratigraphic position. Alba Patera's volcanic history has been summarized into four main phases. The first is characterized by extensive flood like flows presumably erupted from fissures associated with the initial intrusion of magma into the region. The second phase is associated with the emplacement of pyroclastic rock, a more speculative interpretation. The third phase produced the voluminous tabular, crested, and undifferentiated flows, probably from a more centralized vent source. The fourth and last phase is marked the effusion of levee like flows and the collapse of the summit calderas and final graben formation.

  5. Custom sample environments at the ALBA XPEEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Michael, E-mail: mfoerster@cells.es; Prat, Jordi; Massana, Valenti; Gonzalez, Nahikari; Fontsere, Abel; Molas, Bernat; Matilla, Oscar; Pellegrin, Eric; Aballe, Lucia

    2016-12-15

    A variety of custom-built sample holders offer users a wide range of non-standard measurements at the ALBA synchrotron PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) experimental station. Some of the salient features are: an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) suitcase compatible with many offline deposition and characterization systems, built-in electromagnets for uni- or biaxial in-plane (IP) and out-of-plane (OOP) fields, as well as the combination of magnetic fields with electric fields or current injection. Electronics providing a synchronized sinusoidal signal for sample excitation enable time-resolved measurements at the 500 MHz storage ring RF frequency. - Highlights: • Custom sample environment for XPEEM at ALBA. • Sample holders with electromagnets, in-plane dipole, in-plane quadruple and out-of-plane. • Sample holders with printed circuit boards for electric contacts including electromagnets. • UHV suitcase adapter. • Synchronized 500 MHz electrical excitation for time resolved measurements.

  6. Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists founded the Life Sciences Research Foundation (LSRF) in 1983 as a non-profit pass through foundation that awards post doctoral fellowships in all areas of the life sciences. LSRF scientists review hundreds of applications each year from PhDs seeking support. For example this year, our 26th, we received 800 applications and our peer review committee will choose about 50 finalists who are eligible for these awards. We have no endowment so we solicit sponsors each year. The fellowships are sponsored by research oriented companies, foundations, philanthropists, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations who believe in the value of awarding fellowships to the best and the brightest young scientists. Our web site has a complete listing of all details about LSRF (http://www.lsrf.org/). In the late 1980s the Division of Bioscience in the Office of Basic Energy Science, a granting agency of the Department of Energy, joined this partnership. Bioscience's mandate was to support non-medical microbiology and plant sciences. LSRF received a series of 5 year grants from DOE to award fellowships to our top applicants in these fields of research. We began to support DOE-Energy Bioscience post doctoral fellows in 1989. From 1989 through 2004 when DOE funding ended our partnership awarded 41 DOE-Energy Bioscience Fellows of the Life Sciences Research Foundation. Each of these was a three year fellowship. DOE-Energy Biosciences was well matched with LSRF. Our extensive peer review screened applicants in all areas of the life sciences. Most LSRF sponsors are interested in supporting fellows who work on diseases. At the time that we began our partnership with DOE we had no sponsors willing to support plant biology and non medical microbiology. For 15 years DOE played a major role in the training of the very best young scientists in these important fields of research simply through its support of LSRF post doctoral fellows. Young scientists interested in

  7. Multimedia Interactive eBooks in Laboratory Bioscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P.; Lambe, James

    2017-01-01

    Bioscience students in the UK higher education system are making increasing use of technology to support their learning within taught classes and during private study. This experimental study was designed to assess the role for multimedia interactive eBooks in bioscience laboratory classes, delivered using a blended learning approach. Thirty-nine…

  8. Uniaxial and biaxial mechanical properties of porcine linea alba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooney, Gerard M.; Moerman, Kevin M.; Takaza, Michael; Winter, Des C.; Simms, Ciaran K.

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a severe complication post-laparoscopic/laparotomy surgery that is commonly associated with the linea alba. However, the few studies on the mechanical properties of the linea alba in the literature appear contradictory, possible due to challenges with the physical dimensions of

  9. Introducing bioinformatics, the biosciences' genomic revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zanella, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    The general audience for these lectures is mainly physicists, computer scientists, engineers or the general public wanting to know more about what’s going on in the biosciences. What’s bioinformatics and why is all this fuss being made about it ? What’s this revolution triggered by the human genome project ? Are there any results yet ? What are the problems ? What new avenues of research have been opened up ? What about the technology ? These new developments will be compared with what happened at CERN earlier in its evolution, and it is hoped that the similiraties and contrasts will stimulate new curiosity and provoke new thoughts.

  10. Mechanisms of P-Glycoprotein Modulation by Semen Strychni Combined with Radix Paeoniae Alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen Strychni has been extensively used as a Chinese herb, but its therapeutic window is narrowed by the strong toxicity of the compound, which limits its effectiveness. Radix Paeoniae Alba has been reported to reduce the toxic effects and increase the therapeutic effects of Semen Strychni, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. This research aimed to explore the mechanism through which P-glycoprotein (P-gp is modulated by Semen Strychni combined with Radix Paeoniae Alba in vitro. An MTT assay was used to study cytotoxicity in an MDCK-MDR1 cell model. Rh123 efflux and accumulation were measured to assess P-gp function. The expression levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-gp protein in MDCK-MDR1 cells were investigated. A P-gp ATPase activity assay kit was applied to detect the effect on P-gp ATPase activity. Semen Strychni combined with Radix Paeoniae Alba could induce P-gp-mediated drug transport by inhibiting brucine and strychnine transport in MDCK-MDR1 cells, enhancing the P-gp efflux function, upregulating the P-gp expression and MDR1 mRNA levels, and stimulating P-gp ATPase activity.

  11. A 28-Day Repeated Dose Toxicological Study of an Aqueous Extract of Morus Alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Tennille K; Glávits, Róbert; Endres, John R; Palmer, Philip A; Clewell, Amy E; Murbach, Timothy S; Hirka, Gábor; Pasics, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    Morus alba L. (white mulberry) leaves are one of the oldest recognized traditional Chinese medicines. More recently, M alba leaves and their constituents, particularly iminosugars (or azasugars), have garnered attention for their ability to maintain normal blood glucose concentrations, an effect identified in both animal studies and human clinical trials. Reducose (Phynova Group Limited) is a commercial water-soluble extract of M alba leaves standardized to 5% 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), an iminosugar with α-glucosidase inhibition properties. Although there is an extensive history of consumption of M alba leaves by humans and animals worldwide, suggesting that the leaves and their extracts have a relatively good safety profile, we are unaware of safety assessments on an extract containing a higher amount of DNJ than that occurs naturally. The current 28-day repeated dose oral toxicity study in rats, conducted according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, was carried out to assess the safety of Reducose. Male and female Hsd.Han Wistar rats (4 groups of 10 animals/sex) were administered Reducose via gavage at doses of 0, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/d. No treatment-related mortality or adverse effects (per clinical observations, body weight/weight gain, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, or histopathology) were observed, and no target organs were identified. The no observed adverse effect level was determined to be 4,000 mg/kg bw/d for both male and female rats, the highest dose tested. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. In vitro regeneration of Basella alba L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edney, Norris Allen; Rizvi, Muhammad A.; Rizvi, Narjis F.

    1989-01-01

    Basella alba L. is a tropical vine used as a vegetable in some Asian and African countries. It has potential as a nontraditional crop for small family farms. A short day plant, it blooms during the fall, provided the temperatures are mild. In the southeastern U.S., the short days of fall are associated with subfreezing temperatures, and plants are killed before blooming. Attempts were made to regenerate the plant using tissue culture techniques. Several trials were conducted with different media, hormones, and explants. It was found that nodal segments on Gamborg medium regenerated shoots. Interaction studies of auxins and cytokinins indicated that its endogeneous auxin content might be high because callus proliferated in almost all treatments and roots initiated even when the medium was not supplemented with an auxin.

  13. Iglesia de San Casiano. Alba – Italia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dellapiana, Ugo

    1978-08-01

    Full Text Available This church in Alba has been designed according to the guidelines issued by the Vatican II Council. The development of the interior planes and volumes correspond to the religious «signs» of the New Liturgy: baptistery, altar, pulpit, tabernacle, confessionals and choir, which shapes are also reflected in the outside. The correct lighting by means of skylights contribute decisively to create a high religious character and atmosphere in the whole. The construction of the church is based on reinforced concrete walls extended in a curvilinear shape which, at the same time they serve as interior partitions, bear the very elaborate roofing. The materials used in the construction and in the interior finishings, as well as the correct sequence of spaces, help to put in evidence the function of the different rooms and hails, while at the same time underline a high religious feeling.

    Esta iglesia ha sido construida en Alba según las directrices emanadas del Concilio Vaticano II. En ella, los «signos» religiosos de la Nueva Normativa Litúrgica —baptisterio, altar, púlpito, sagrario, confesionarios y coro— conforman el desarrollo planivolumétrico interior, quedando igualmente reflejados en la configuración externa. Al carácter o ambiente religioso contribuye también, de una manera decisiva, la adecuada iluminación de los lucernarios cenitales. Está construido a base de muros de hormigón armado que, con sus prolongaciones curvilíneas, organizan los espacios interiores al tiempo que sirven de elementos portantes de la compleja cubierta. Los materiales empleados en la construcción y los tratamientos interiores, así como la adecuada secuencia de ambientes, contribuyen a resaltar la funcionalidad de los distintos espacios procurando un carácter de marcada religiosidad.

  14. Segundo Concurso Latinoamericano de Novela Alba Narrativa 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available El Fondo Cultural del Alba, a través del Centro Cultural Dulce María Loynaz, convoca al Segundo Concurso Latinoamericano de Novela Alba Narrativa 2011 , para autores menores de cuarenta años, con el propósito de estimular y promover a los jóvenes novelistas que escriben con una mirada latinoamericana y renovadora en los países de nuestra América.

  15. ANTIHEPATOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF ECLIPTA ALBA, TEPHROSIA PURPUREA AND BOERHAAVIA DIFFUSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. N.; Reddy, B. Praveen; Venkateshwarlu, V.; Kokate, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    Alcoholic and chloroform extracts of E. alba T. purpurea and B. diffusa were screened for antihepatotoxic activity. The extracts were given after the liver was damaged with CCl4. Liver function was assessed based on liver to boy weight ratio, pentobarbitone sleep time, serum levels of transaminase (SGPT, SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (SALP) and bilirubin. Alcoholic extract of E. alba was found to have good antihepatotoxic activity. PMID:22556585

  16. The potential of mangrove Avicennia marina and A. Alba from Nguling district, Pasuruan, East Java as an antioxidant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranawati, F.; Muhammad, F.; Fajri, H.; Kasitowati, R. D.; Arifin, S.

    2018-04-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive molecules due to unpaired electron in their outer orbital. Excess of free radicals inside human body as consequences of environmental exposure such cigarette smoke may lead to degenerative diseases such as diabetic, cancer etc. This negative effect can be limited by the utilization of natural antioxidant substances, especially produced from plant. Avicennia alba dan A. marina are mangrove species that widely distributed in Indonesia and are expected potential as antioxidant. The objective of this study is to evaluated Avicennia alba dan A. marina potency as antioxidant performed with DPPD (1,1-diphenyl-β-picryl hydrazyl) method. Leaf and bark of Avicennia alba dan A. marina were collected from Nguling District, Pasuruan, East Java. Results shows that based on 50% inhibition Concentration (IC50), Avicennia alba leaf were categorized had a very high antioxidant potential (IC50 14,85 ppm) whereas the bark were categorized had a weak antioxidant potential IC50 167,17 ppm). For A. marina, the leaf were categorized had a moderate antioxidant (IC50 123,23 ppm) whereas the bark were categorized had a weak antioxidant potential (IC50 198,15 ppm).

  17. Alba from Thermoplasma volcanium belongs to α-NAT's: An insight into the structural aspects of Tv Alba and its acetylation by Tv Ard1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Pathak, Chinar; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Jang, Sun-Bok; Nam, Minjoo; Im, Hookang; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2016-01-15

    The Alba superfamily proteins have been regarded as a conserved group of proteins in archaea and eukarya, which have shown to be important in nucleic acid binding, chromatic organization and gene regulation. These proteins often belong to the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) category (N(α)-acetyltransferases or N(ε)-acetyltransferases) and undergo post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structure of Alba from Thermoplasma volcanium (Tv Alba) at 2.4 Å resolution. The acetylation of Tv Alba was monitored and the N-terminal of Tv Alba has been shown to interact with acetyl coenzyme A (Ac-CoA). The chemical shift perturbation experiments of Tv Alba were performed in the presence of Ac-CoA and/or Tv Ard1, another T. volcanium protein that treats Tv Alba as a substrate. To examine the DNA binding capabilities of Tv Alba alone and in the presence of Ac-CoA and/or Tv Ard1, EMSA experiments were carried out. It is shown that although Tv Alba binds to Ac-CoA, the acetylation of Tv Alba is not related with its binding to dsDNA, and the involvement of the N-terminus in Ac-CoA binding demonstrates that Tv Alba belongs to the N(α)-acetyltransferase family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The (Mathematical) Modeling Process in Biosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Nestor V; Santos, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we introduce a general framework and discussion on the role of models and the modeling process in the field of biosciences. The objective is to sum up the common procedures during the formalization and analysis of a biological problem from the perspective of Systems Biology, which approaches the study of biological systems as a whole. We begin by presenting the definitions of (biological) system and model. Particular attention is given to the meaning of mathematical model within the context of biology. Then, we present the process of modeling and analysis of biological systems. Three stages are described in detail: conceptualization of the biological system into a model, mathematical formalization of the previous conceptual model and optimization and system management derived from the analysis of the mathematical model. All along this work the main features and shortcomings of the process are analyzed and a set of rules that could help in the task of modeling any biological system are presented. Special regard is given to the formative requirements and the interdisciplinary nature of this approach. We conclude with some general considerations on the challenges that modeling is posing to current biology.

  19. Conference scene: Select Biosciences Epigenetics Europe 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Enal S

    2011-02-01

    The field of epigenetics is now on a geometric rise, driven in a large part by the realization that modifiers of chromatin are key regulators of biological processes in vivo. The three major classes of epigenetic effectors are DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications (such as acetylation, methylation or phosphorylation) and small noncoding RNAs (most notably microRNAs). In this article, I report from Select Biosciences Epigenetics Europe 2010 industry conference held on 14-15 September 2010 at The Burlington Hotel, Dublin, Ireland. This industry conference was extremely well attended with a global pool of delegates representing the academic research community, biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the technology/tool developers. This conference represented the current state of the epigenetics community with cancer/oncology as a key driver. In fact, it has been estimated that approximately 45% of epigenetic researchers today identify cancer/oncology as their main area of focus vis-à-vis their epigenetic research efforts.

  20. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report, September - December, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  1. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year Three

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  2. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-10-15

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  3. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  4. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.

    2003-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  5. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  6. Second Quarter Report Environmental Biosciences Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2002-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  9. Strategi Venezuela Menyepakati ALBA dalam Menghadapi Ekspansi Perdagangan Amerika Serikat Dikawasan Amerika Latin

    OpenAIRE

    Pahlawan, Indra; Wahyu, Septian

    2014-01-01

    In 2004 Venezuela and Cuba have agreed on a regional collaboration in latin america called Alternative Bolivarian Para las Americas an abbreviated ALBA. This collaboration is formed as a resistance facing U.S. trade expansion to bring a mission neoliberalism. With the formation of ALBA, Venezuela is the regional co-operation leaders make strategic measures to face Neoliberalism. In 2010 ALBA has had a total of 10 member countries. As counter hegemony, ALBA also worked in three space. In the s...

  10. Potency of Mangrove Apple (Sonneratia alba as Mercury Bioindicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Reza Cordova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The anthropogenic provide a negative impact on the surrounding environment. Mangrove species, such as Sonneratia alba would get the impact of anthropogenic activities, to accumulate the pollution of heavy metals. The aim of this study were to evaluate mercury accumulation in Mangrove Apple (S. alba and to analyze mangrove apple potency as mercury bioindicator. Samples were taken in April 2016 at Pari Island, Seribu Islands by purposive sampling. The results showed that the highest concentration of Hg in the Northern of Pari Island was found in the leaves and the lowest was in the fruit. The highest concentration of Hg in the Eastern of Pari Island was found in the leaves and lowest was in the fruit. The concentrations of Hg in the Eastern area higher the Northern area (significantly different. The accumulation of Hg mainly collected on the leaves with TF> 1, but the ability of S. alba trees absorb Hg in the environment showed a small value, namely BCF <1. The ability of S. alba in sediments, contaminated with mercury showed a high value of the leaves in the East Pari Island, but the fruit of S. alba both in the North and East of the Pari Island showed a small value.  Mangrove Apple leaves has a potency as mercury bioindicator organ.

  11. New Microsatellite Loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia F. Bessega

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. Methods and Results: Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. Conclusions: These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection.

  12. New microsatellite loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessega, Cecilia F; Pometti, Carolina L; Miller, Joe T; Watts, Richard; Saidman, Beatriz O; Vilardi, Juan C

    2013-05-01

    As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. • Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. • These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection.

  13. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  14. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation s need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  15. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  16. Environmental Biosciences Report for Year 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  17. Research Concerning Morpho Characteristics of Romanian Yellow Spotted Breeded in Condition of S.C. Agrolact Farm, Alba County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    claudiu eugen Jurco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Researches regarding morpho characteristics of Romanian Yellow Spotted breed were performed on 70 cows bull daughters in testing and candidate cow bull mothers, raised and exploited in SC Agrolact SRL farm from Alba county and has as database, records of evaluation for reliability cows between 2004 -2009 from UARZ – Alba county. We can notice that the height at withers raises from 132.69 cm in first lactation to 136 cm in third lactation, and the height at rump shows an increase between the first and third lactation of 3.94 cm. The averages values of body measurements followed for the entire farm shows a number of animals of medium size (HW=136 cm; HR=139.58 cm with an average body weight of 647 kg wich suits the weight wanted limits desired for this breed (600-700 kg.

  18. Erratum Journal of Biosciences Volume 34, Number 2, November ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    (1) Page 709, Introduction, 4th line from top: 3500 m to be read as 500 m. (2) Page 710, Figure 2 caption, line 1: 3500 m to be read as 500 m. The above corrections require to be made in the printed version of the article. The article that appear on the Journal of. Biosciences Web site will contain these corrections.

  19. Challenges in Understanding Photosynthesis in a University Introductory Biosciences Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södervik, Ilona; Virtanen, Viivi; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2015-01-01

    University students' understanding of photosynthesis was examined in a large introductory biosciences class. The focus of this study was to first examine the conceptions of photosynthesis among students in class and then to investigate how a certain type of text could enhance students' understanding of photosynthesis. The study was based on pre-…

  20. Integrating anticipated nutrigenomics bioscience applications with ethical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levesque, L.; Ozdemir, V.; Gremmen, B.; Godard, B.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrigenomics is a subspecialty of nutrition science which aims to understand how gene-diet interactions influence individuals' response to food, disease susceptibility, and population health. Yet ethical enquiry into this field is being outpaced by nutrigenomics bioscience. The ethical issues

  1. Allozyme diversity in Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae), an endemic Florida mint

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.J.W. Godt; Joan L. Walker; J.L. Hamrick

    2004-01-01

    Macbridea alba is a herbaceous perennial mint endemic to the panhandle region of Florida. We used starch gel electrophoresis to describe allozyme diversity and genetic structure in this federally threatened plant. Ten populations were analyzed, with an average sample size of 47 plants (range 41-48 plants) per population. Of the 22 loci analyzed, 11 (...

  2. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  3. ECONOMIC CRISIS IMPACT ON COUNTY ALBA HOTEL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOISA Claudia Olimpia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper, dominated by the global economic crisis effects is and continues to be a critical time for global tourism industry and for Romanian too. This study tries to play on a particular case, Park Hotel, located in Alba Iulia, the impact of this phenomenon over tourist hotel services.

  4. ECONOMIC CRISIS IMPACT ON COUNTY ALBA HOTEL INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    MOISA Claudia Olimpia

    2012-01-01

    The present paper, dominated by the global economic crisis effects is and continues to be a critical time for global tourism industry and for Romanian too. This study tries to play on a particular case, Park Hotel, located in Alba Iulia, the impact of this phenomenon over tourist hotel services.

  5. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Three new alkaloids from the fruits of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Kang, Jie; Wang, Hong-Qing; Liu, Chao; Li, Bao-Ming; Chen, Ruo-Yun

    2014-01-01

    From the fruits of Morus alba, three new alkaloids, mulbaines A (1), B (2), and C (3) were isolated. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods (UV, IR, HR-ESI-MS, 1D, and 2D NMR).

  7. Macrophage activating activity of pyrrole alkaloids from Morus alba fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Beom; Chang, Bo Yoon; Jo, Yang Hee; Lee, Sang Hoon; Han, Sang-Bae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2013-01-09

    The fruits of Morus alba have been traditionally used as a tonic to enhance immune responses. The macrophage activating constituents of Morus alba fruits were purified using various column chromatography techniques. The structures of isolated compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation such as 1D and 2D NMR analysis. The macrophage activating activities of isolated compounds were evaluated by measuring the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-12 in RAW 264.7 cells. The phagocytic activity was also evaluated. Five pyrrole alkaloids, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde (1), 2-formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (2), 2-formyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (3), 2-formyl-5-(methoxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-butanoic acid (4) and Morrole A (5) were isolated from the fruits of Morus alba. Morrole A (5) is first reported in nature and other pyrrole alkaloids (1-4) are first reported from Morus species. Among the isolated compounds, compounds 3 and 4 significantly activated macrophage activity by the enhancement of nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-12 production, and the stimulation of phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Pyrrole alkaloids, including a new compound, were isolated from Morus alba fruits. These compounds activated macrophage activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Peptides extracted from Artemisia herba alba have antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Artemisia herba alba, classified into the family of Asteraceae, is an aromatic herb that is traditionally used as a purgative and antipyretic folk medicine by rural people of south Tunisia. This study reports the first identification of antimicrobial peptides from this medicinal plant that inhibited the growth of several ...

  9. Antidiabetic effect of aqueous extract of Basella alba leaves and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group V rats were also induced with diabetes and treated with Metformin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The various treatments were administered orally for a period of three weeks. The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) of the rats was determined weekly using a glucometer. The rats treated with B. alba at doses of ...

  10. Antidiabetic Activity of Plumeria Alba Linn (Apocynaceae) Root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fructose-enriched fat diet increased blood cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels in hyperlipidemic untreated rats compared to normal control rats. Administration of total extract (250 mg/kg/day) and supernatant fraction of P. alba (100 mg/kg/day) during 14 days significantly reduced lipid ...

  11. Evaluation of allelopathic effect of Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to assess the magnitude of suppressing ability of Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk. on some selected weeds of Aligarh namely, Amaranthus spinosus L., Cassia tora L. and Cassia sophera L. The research finding was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous leaf leachate and organic fractions of donor plant ...

  12. Chemical composition and antigenotoxic properties of Lippia alba essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molkary Andrea López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work evaluated the chemical composition and the DNA protective effect of the essential oils (EOs from Lippia alba against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. EO constituents were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric (GC-MS analysis. The major compounds encountered being citral (33% geranial and 25% neral, geraniol (7% and trans-β-caryophyllene (7% for L. alba specimen COL512077, and carvone (38%, limonene (33% and bicyclosesquiphellandrene (8% for the other, COL512078. The genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of EO and the compounds citral, carvone and limonene, were assayed using the SOS Chromotest in Escherichia coli. The EOs were not genotoxic in the SOS chromotest, but one of the major compound (limonene showed genotoxicity at doses between 97 and 1549 mM. Both EOs protected bacterial cells against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity. Antigenotoxicity in the two L. alba chemotypes was related to the major compounds, citral and carvone, respectively. The results were discussed in relation to the chemopreventive potential of L. alba EOs and its major compounds.

  13. Amanitin and phallotoxin concentration in Amanita phalloides var. alba mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Ismail; Sinirlioglu, Zeynep Aydin; Karahan, Selim; Bayram, Recep; Yaykasli, Kursat Oguz; Colakoglu, Serdar; Saritas, Ayhan; Severoglu, Zeki

    2013-12-15

    Although rarely seen, Amanita phalloides var. alba, a variety of A. phalloides type mushrooms, causes mushroom poisoning resulting in death. Since it is frequently confused with some edible mushrooms due to its white colored cap and macroscopic appearance, it becomes important in toxicological terms. Knowledge of the toxin amount contained in this mushroom type is invaluable in the treatment of cases involving poisoning. In this study, we examined the toxin levels of various parts of the A. phalloides var. alba mushroom growing Duzce region of Turkey. Toxin analyses were carried out for A. phalloides var. alba, which were collected from the forests Duzce region of Turkey in 2011, as a whole and also separately in its spore, pileus, gills, stipe and volva parts. The alpha amanitin, beta amanitin, gamma amanitin, phalloidin and phallacidine analyses of the mushrooms were carried out using the RP-HPLC method. A genetic analysis of the mushroom showed that it had similar genetic characteristics as A. phalloides and was a variety of it. The lowest toxins quantity was detected in spores, volva and stipe among all parts of the mushroom. The maximum amount of amatoxins was measured in the gills. The pileus also contained a high amount of amatoxins. Generally, amatoxins and phallotoxin concentrations were lower as compared to A. phalloides, but interestingly all toxins other than gamma toxin were higher in the spores of A. phalloides var. alba. The amount of toxin in all of its parts had sufficient concentrations to cause death. With this study, the amatoxin and phallotoxin concentrations in A. phalloides var. alba mushroom and in its parts have been revealed in detail for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-Melanogenic Properties of Greek Plants. A Novel Depigmenting Agent from Morus alba Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaita, Eliza; Lambrinidis, George; Cheimonidi, Christina; Agalou, Adamantia; Beis, Dimitris; Trougakos, Ioannis; Mikros, Emmanuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Aligiannis, Nektarios

    2017-03-23

    In therapeutic interventions associated with melanin hyperpigmentation, tyrosinase is regarded as a target enzyme as it catalyzes the rate-limiting steps in mammalian melanogenesis. Since many known agents have been proven to be toxic, there has been increasing impetus to identify alternative tyrosinase inhibitors, especially from natural sources. In this study, we investigated 900 extracts from Greek plants for potential tyrosinase inhibitive properties. Among the five most potent extracts, the methanol extract of Morus alba wood (MAM) demonstrated a significant reduction in intracellular tyrosinase and melanin content in B16F10 melanoma cells. Bioassay-guided isolation led to the acquisition of twelve compounds: oxyresveratrol (1), kuwanon C (2), mulberroside A (3), resorcinol (4), dihydrooxyresveratol (5), trans-dihydromorin (6), 2,4,3'-trihydroxydihydrostilbene (7), kuwanon H (8), 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (9), morusin (10), moracin M (11) and kuwanon G (12). Among these, 2,4,3'-trihydroxydihydrostilbene (7) is isolated for the first time from Morus alba and constitutes a novel potent tyrosinase inhibitor (IC50 0.8 ± 0.15). We report here for the first time dihydrooxyresveratrol (5) as a potent natural tyrosinase inhibitor (IC50 0.3 ± 0.05). Computational docking analysis indicated the binding modes of six tyrosinase inhibitors with the aminoacids of the active centre of tyrosinase. Finally, we found both MAM extract and compounds 1, 6 and 7 to significantly suppress in vivo melanogenesis during zebrafish embryogenesis.

  15. Bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry an engineering and molecular approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The field of bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry stands at the intersection of the power and generality of classical and quantum physics with the minute molecular complexity of chemistry and biology. This book provides an application of physical principles in explaining and rationalizing chemical and biological phenomena. It does not stick to the classical topics that are conventionally considered as part of physical chemistry; instead it presents principles deciphered from a modern point of view, which is the strength of this book.

  16. Relative ages of lava flows at Alba Patera, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneeberger, D.M.; Pieri, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Many large lava flows on the flanks of Alba Patera are astonishing in their volume and length. As a suite, these flows suggest tremendously voluminous and sustained eruptions, and provide dimensional boundary conditions typically a factor of 100 larger than terrestrial flows. One of the most striking features associated with Alba Patera is the large, radially oriented lava flows that exhibit a variety of flow morphologies. These include sheet flows, tube fed and tube channel flows, and undifferentiated flows. Three groups of flows were studied; flows on the northwest flank, southeast flank, and the intracaldera region. The lava flows discussed probably were erupted as a group during the same major volcanic episode as suggested by the data presented. Absolute ages are poorly constrained for both the individual flows and shield, due in part to disagreement as to which absolute age curve is representative for Mars. A relative age sequence is implied but lacks precision due to the closeness of the size frequency curves

  17. Flavonoids from the flowers of Nymphaea alba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Jambor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten flavonoids were obtained from the flowers of Nymphaea alba L. Their structures were determined mainly on the basis of spectral analyses (UV, 'H NMR, MS. The following aglycons were isolated: quercetin, kaempferol, isokaempferide and apigenin as well as the following glycosides: quercetion 4'-β-xyloside, 3-methylquercetin 3'-β-xyloside and a mixture of quercetin 3-galactoside and 3-glucoside. The structures of three compounds obtained in very small amounts were determined in part.

  18. New 2-arylbenzofuran metabolite from cell cultures of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Wu; Tao, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan; Dai, Jun-Gui

    2015-01-01

    A new 2-arylbenzofuran compound, 5-dehydroxy-moracin U (1), along with 10 known compounds (2-11), were isolated from cell cultures of Morus alba. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity assay of 1-8 showed that 2 and 8 exhibited significant inhibitory effect on LPS-induced NO production with the values of 76.4% and 98.7% at 10(- 5) M, respectively.

  19. Chemical Diversity in Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown Germplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Arie Fitzgerald Blank; Lídia Cristina Alves Camêlo; Maria de Fátima Arrigoni-Blank; José Baldin Pinheiro; Thiago Matos Andrade; Edenilson dos Santos Niculau; Péricles Barreto Alves

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform chemical characterization of Lippia alba accessions from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Federal University of Sergipe. A randomized block experimental design with two replications was applied. The analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oils was conducted using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The chemical composition of the essential oils allowed the accessions to be allocated to the following six groups: group 1: linalo...

  20. KINETICS OF ULTRASOUND ASSISTED EXTRACTION OF WEDELOLACTONE FROM Eclipta alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Charpe

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound assisted extraction of wedelolactone, a major coumestan present in Eclipta alba, is investigated in the present work.Various process parameters such as type of solvent, power, solvent to solid ratio and extraction temperature, which affect the extraction yield, are optimized. In the ultrasound-assisted extraction with final optimized conditions, i.e., methanol as solvent, 170 W power, 60:1 solvent to solid ratio, 50 °C temperature and 60% duty cycle, amaximum extraction yieldof 0.62 mg/g is obtained in 45 minutes. The kinetic model (Peleg's model has been used for the prediction of the yield of wedelolactone in the extract at a given time for all experimental conditions. The values of predicted yields show good agreement with the experimental data for all parameters, i.e., power, solvent to solid ratio and temperature. The extraction of wedelolactone from Eclipta alba is also carried out by conventional extraction methods, i.e., Soxhlet and batch extraction. Ultrasound-assisted extraction gives higher extraction yield in less time as compared to batch extraction (0.41 mg/g in 90 min and Soxhlet extraction(0.7 mg/g in 360 min. The ultrasound-assisted extraction of wedelolactone from Eclipta alba is an effective way of extraction with the advantages of lower time and higher extraction.

  1. A Chemical Investigation of the Leaves of Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Xin; Hamann, Mark T; Kang, Jie; Yu, De-Quan; Chen, Ruo-Yun

    2018-04-26

    The leaves of Morus alba L. are an important herbal medicine in Asia. The systematic isolation of the metabolites of the leaves of Morus alba L. was achieved using a combination of liquid chromatography techniques. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis and the absolute configuration was determined based on electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopic data and hydrolysis experiments. Their biological activity was evaluated using different biological assays, such as the assessment of their capacity to inhibit the aldose reductase enzyme; the determination of their cytotoxic activity and the evaluation of their neuroprotective effects against the deprivation of serum or against the presence of nicouline. Chemical investigation of the leaves of Morus alba L. resulted in four new structures 1 ⁻ 4 and a known molecule 5 . Compounds 2 and 5 inhibited aldose reductase with IC 50 values of 4.33 μM and 6.0 μM compared with the potent AR inhibitor epalrestat (IC 50 1.88 × 10 −3 μM). Pretreatment with compound 3 decreased PC12 cell apoptosis subsequent serum deprivation condition and pretreatment with compound 5 decreased nicouline-induced PC12 cell apoptosis as compared with control cells ( p < 0.001).

  2. 75 FR 64733 - Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Safflower Seed Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ...] Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Safflower Seed Meal AGENCY: Food... announcing that Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., has filed a petition proposing that the food additive regulations..., Davis, CA 95618. The petition proposes to amend the food additive regulations in part 573 Food Additives...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CSCs) has been confirmed by a number of studies on experimental animal models. Nevertheless, it was shown that CSC hypotheses have several limitations and inconsistencies regarding the explanation of CSC origin, CSC identification and ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antioxidant enzymes; diabetes; glucose metabolism; lens; polyol pathway; Trigonella foenum graecum; vanadate ... However the toxicity associated with vanadium limits its role as therapeutic agent for diabetic treatment. ... Volume 43 | Issue 1

  5. [Effects of Morus alba and Setaria italica intercropping on their plant growth and diurnal variation of photosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Xu, Nan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Shi-Dan; Mu, Shi-Nan; Liang, Ming; Sun, Guang-Yu

    2012-07-01

    A field investigation was conducted to study the effects of intercropping Morus aIba and Setaria italica on their dry matter production, land use efficiency, and diurnal variation of leaf photosynthesis. Under intercropping, the plant height, basal diameter, root length, and branch number of M. alba increased by 6.0%, 13.7%, 6.8%, and 14.8%, respectively, and the leaf yield of M. alba was increased by 31.3%, as compared with monoculture M. alba. In contrast, the plant height and root length of intercropped S. italica had no significant difference with those of monoculture S. italica. Intercropping enhanced the equivalent ratio and use efficiency of arable land. For both M. alba and S. italica in monoculture or intercropping, their leaf photosynthetic depression all occurred at midday (12 :00), but the leaf photosynthetic depression of monoculture M. alba was heavier than that of intercropped M. alba. Intercropping promoted the leaf stomatal conductance (g(s)) and water use efficiency (WUE) of M. alba at midday, increased the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of M. alba, and inhibited the decline of M. alba leaf actual photochemical efficiency of PS II (phi(PS II)), photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR), and the maximal photochemical of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) , which might contribute to alleviate the leaf photosynthetic depression of M. alba at midday. It was concluded that M. alba and S. italica intercropping could obviously improve the leaf photosynthetic capacity of M. alba.

  6. Response of Salix alba L. to heavy metals and diesel fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Response of Salix alba L. to heavy metals and diesel fuel contamination. ... Ni and Pb led to reduced accumulation of Pb. Presence of 5 g/kg of diesel fuel in soil significantly increased toxic influence of applied heavy metals by further reducing ... Key words: Cd, Ni, Pb, phytoremediation, phytoextraction, willow, Salix alba.

  7. Counter-Hegemonic Regionalism and Higher Education for All: Venezuela and the ALBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhr, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper employs new regionalism theory and regulatory regionalism theory in its analysis and theorisation of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA) as a counter-hegemonic Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) regionalism. As (initially) the regionalisation of Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution, ALBA is centred around the idea…

  8. Parasiticidal effects of Morus alba root bark extracts against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infecting grass carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is an important fish parasite that can result in significant losses in aquaculture. In order to find efficacious drugs to control Ich, the root bark of Morus alba, a traditional Chinese medicine, was evaluated for its antiprotozoal activity. The M. alba root bark w...

  9. Activation of macrophage mediated host defense against Salmonella typhimurium by Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, BoYoon; Koo, BongSeong; Lee, HyeonCheol; Oh, Joa Sub; Kim, SungYeon

    2018-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a crucial role in the initiation and subsequent direction of adaptive immune responses, as well as in the removal of pathogens that have been targeted by an adaptive immune response. Morus alba L. was reported to have immunostimulatory properties that might protect against infectious diseases. However, this possibility has not yet been explored. The present study investigated the protective and immune-enhancing ability of M. alba L. against infectious disease and the mechanisms involved. To investigate the immune-enhancing effects of M. alba L., we used a bacterial infection model. The lifespan of mice infected with a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium (1 × 10 7 colony forming units - CFU) was significantly extended when they were administered M. alba L. Furthermore, M. alba L. activated macrophages, monocytes, and neutrophils and induced Th1 cytokines (IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α) in mice infected with a sublethal dose (1 × 10 5 CFU) of S. typhimurium . M. alba L. significantly stimulated the uptake of bacteria into peritoneal macrophages as indicated by increased phagocytosis. Peritoneal macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice significantly inhibited M. alba L. induced NO production and TNF-α secretion compared with peritoneal macrophages derived from C3H/HeN mice. These results suggest that the innate immune activity of M. alba L. against bacterial infection in mice occurs through activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway.

  10. Regio-selective deglycosylation of icariin by cell suspension cultures of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Wu; Tao, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Ri-Dao; Yu, Li-Yan; Dai, Jun-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformations of icariin (1) by cell suspension cultures of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Morus alba yielded two new metabolites, icaruralins A and B (2 and 3), and one known metabolite, baohuoside I (4). Their structures were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. This is the first report that the cell suspension cultures of G. uralensis and M. alba possess deglycosylation functionality.

  11. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoli, Anna; Wooldridge, Michael A; Hearst, Marti A

    2010-04-14

    When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  12. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Divoli

    Full Text Available When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As far as species abundance largely determines the rate of generation of intraspecific endogenous genetic variation, the result obtained suggests that the latter rate is not a limiting factor for speciation. Furthermore, the observed approximate constancy of speciation rates in different taxa cannot be accounted for by assuming ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... oxyradicals invoked higher activity of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and peroxidase under ambient UV, they also imposed limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII. Exclusion of UV components (UV-B 280–315 nm; UV-A 315–400 nm) translated to enhanced photosynthesis, growth and biomass.

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EDS1 interacts with its positive co-regulator phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), resulting in mobilization of the salicylic acid defence pathway. Limited information regarding this interaction in rice is available. To study this interaction, a model of EDS1 and PAD4 proteins from rice was generated and validated with Accelrys DS ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic adenosine 5′-phosphate (cAMP) is a global regulator of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Despite decades of intensive study, the quantitative effect and regulatory function of cAMP remain the subjects of considerable debate. Here, we analyse the data in the literature to show that: In carbon-limited cultures ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-22

    Mar 22, 2007 ... Keywords. Caspases; Hsp90; Hsp70; Hsp60; Hsp27; hsr-omega. Abstract. Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... were created to analyse pathological changes in tissues. The limited data available showed that normal gastric tissue had stronger absorption than cancerous tissue over a wide region in the four patients. There was a significant decrease in total biomolecular components for cancerous tissue compared with normal tissue ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Association of genetic polymorphism in GH gene with milk production traits in .... Transgenic tobacco plants expressing BoRS1 gene from Brassica oleracea var. ... Water stress is by far the leading environmental stress limiting crop yields worldwide. .... in the brown algal order Ectocarpales: The ``codon impact parameter".

  20. Genome-Wide Identification of the Alba Gene Family in Plants and Stress-Responsive Expression of the Rice Alba Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jitendra Kumar; Wardhan, Vijay; Singh, Deepali; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2018-03-28

    Architectural proteins play key roles in genome construction and regulate the expression of many genes, albeit the modulation of genome plasticity by these proteins is largely unknown. A critical screening of the architectural proteins in five crop species, viz., Oryza sativa , Zea mays , Sorghum bicolor , Cicer arietinum , and Vitis vinifera , and in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana along with evolutionary relevant species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , Physcomitrella patens , and Amborella trichopoda , revealed 9, 20, 10, 7, 7, 6, 1, 4, and 4 Alba (acetylation lowers binding affinity) genes, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis of the genes and of their counterparts in other plant species indicated evolutionary conservation and diversification. In each group, the structural components of the genes and motifs showed significant conservation. The chromosomal location of the Alba genes of rice ( OsAlba ), showed an unequal distribution on 8 of its 12 chromosomes. The expression profiles of the OsAlba genes indicated a distinct tissue-specific expression in the seedling, vegetative, and reproductive stages. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the OsAlba genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression under multivariate environmental conditions and phytohormone treatments. The evaluation of the regulatory elements in 68 Alba genes from the 9 species studied led to the identification of conserved motifs and overlapping microRNA (miRNA) target sites, suggesting the conservation of their function in related proteins and a divergence in their biological roles across species. The 3D structure and the prediction of putative ligands and their binding sites for OsAlba proteins offered a key insight into the structure-function relationship. These results provide a comprehensive overview of the subtle genetic diversification of the OsAlba genes, which will help in elucidating their functional role in plants.

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The size was also confirmed by linearizing the circle with BsaHI, and by limited DNAseI digestion. The restriction map of the E. dispar rDNA circle showed close similarity to EhR1, the rDNA circle of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS which has two rDNA units per circle. The various families of short tandem repeats found in the ...

  2. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively

  3. Bioconcentraciones foliares de elementos minerales en Lippia alba (salvia morada)

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, María A; Burgos, Ángela M

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la salvia morada es un subarbusto aromático, que crece de modo espontáneo en América Central y del Sur. Frecuentemente es cultivada en jardines como ornamental, por su intenso aroma y sus propiedades medicinales y culinarias. No se encontraron estudios sobre parámetros nutricionales en esta especie. Objetivos: determinar las bioconcentraciones foliares de elementos minerales en Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Br. ex Britton & P. Wilson que crece naturalmente en el bioambiente del nort...

  4. Pyrrole alkaloids from the fruits of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Beom; Chang, Bo Yoon; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2014-12-15

    Phytochemical investigation of the fruits of Morus alba afforded seventeen pyrrole alkaloids including five new compounds. The structures of five new pyrrole alkaloids, named morroles B-F (4, 5, 7, 16 and 17), were determined on the basis of spectroscopic interpretations. 4-[Formyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl]butanoate (2) was synthesized by chemical reaction but first isolated from nature. Among isolated compounds, compounds 6 and 14 significantly inhibited pancreatic lipase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Advances in the pharmacological study of Morus alba L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Wang, Bao-Lian; Li, Yan

    2014-06-01

    Morus alba L. (mulberry) is a well-known deciduous tree, belonging to the genus of Morus of Moraceae famlily. Its leaves, twigs, roots (bark) and fruits are widely used in the traditional Chinese medicine. The active constituents of mulberry contained flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids, coumarins, with the significant hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, antihypertension, anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities. This review summarized the research progress of the major pharmacological activity, pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction based on CYPs and transporters of mulberry and its active constituents.

  6. SBBN 2010: 7. Congress of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Radiations in biosciences: advances and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Advance and new perspectives related to the use of ionizing and no ionizing radiations in nuclear biosciences are presented. Multidisciplinary approach, including radiopharmacy, radioprotection and dosimetry, cytogenetic, biosafety, radioecology, environmental toxicology are studied. Topics of Nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and image diagnosis, such as computerized tomography, PET scan, phantoms, biomedical radiography, are reported. Use of radioisotopes, evaluation of radiation dose rates, radiation dose distribution, radiation monitoring is considered. Environmental impact of radiation are also in human beings, animals and for several purposes are analyzed. (MAC)

  7. Effect of Na2SiO3 on heavy metal uptake by field grown Basella alba L. in Matara, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanthika R. Hettiarachchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated heavy metal uptake and the effects of Na2SiO3 on heavy metal absorption by field grown Basella alba L (Basellaceae. The concentrations of Fe, Cr, Pb and Cd in the field soils were 29755.30 ± 292.02, 32.99 ± 0.97, 26.01 ± 1.02, 0.13 ± 0.004 µg/g, respectively. These concentrations are significantly below the maximum permissible limits reported by FAO/WHO. Although Fe, Cr, Pb and Cd were present in the soil, only Fe was absorbed by B. alba; the tissue concentrations of other heavy metals were below the detection limit. The distribution of Fe from soil to different plant parts was investigated by calculating transfer factors. Low transfer factors indicated low absorption and translocation of Fe from soil to plant tissue. We also investigated the effects of Na2SiO3 on metal absorption by applying two different concentrations of Na2SiO3 (Si-100 mg/L and Si-50 mg/L alongside a control. There was a significant reduction of Fe absorption in B. alba treated with Si-100mg/L of Na2SiO3 compared to that of plants treated with Si-50 mg/L of Na2SiO3 and the control.

  8. Latest developments at the ALBA magnetic measurements laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, J.; Massana, V.; García, L.; Campmany, J.

    2018-02-01

    ALBA is a third-generation synchrotron light source that has been in operation since 2012 near Barcelona. A magnetic measurements laboratory has been associated with the facility since its very early stages and has been active for the last 20 years. In the first part of this work, the different instruments available at the laboratory are described, and a brief overview of the measurement campaigns carried out during its 20 years of history is presented. In the second part, a more detailed description of the approach to Hall probe measurements adopted at ALBA is offered, with an explanation of the methods and ancillary equipment that have been developed along the years in order to improve the accuracy of the system. In the third part, a new concept of Hall probe bench devoted to the measurement of closed structures is presented. The in-house design and building of a prototype for such a bench is described, together with its mechanical and magnetic characterization. As a conclusion, the first results obtained with this bench are discussed.

  9. Hypocholesterolemic and Antiatherosclerotic Potential of Basella alba Leaf Extract in Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekaran Baskaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is the major risk factor that leads to atherosclerosis. Nowadays, alternative treatment using medicinal plants gained much attention since the usage of statins leads to adverse health effects, especially liver and muscle toxicity. This study was designed to investigate the hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects of Basella alba (B. alba using hypercholesterolemia-induced rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 5 groups and fed with varying diets: normal diet, 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD, 2% HCD + 10 mg/kg simvastatin, 2% HCD + 100 mg/kg B. alba extract, and 2% HCD + 200 mg/kg B. alba extract, respectively. The treatment with B. alba extract significantly lowered the levels of total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increased HDL and antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GPx levels. The elevated levels of liver enzymes (AST and ALT and creatine kinase were noted in hypercholesterolemic and statin treated groups indicating liver and muscle injuries. Treatment with B. alba extract also significantly suppressed the aortic plaque formation and reduced the intima: media ratio as observed in simvastatin-treated group. This is the first in vivo study on B. alba that suggests its potential as an alternative therapeutic agent for hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis.

  10. Consumption of polyphenol-rich Morus alba leaves extract attenuates early diabetic retinopathy: the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ayman M; Abd El-Twab, Sanaa M; Abdel-Reheim, Eman S

    2017-06-01

    Beneficial effects of white mulberry against diabetes mellitus have been reported. However, the molecular mechanisms of how white mulberry can attenuate diabetic retinopathy remain poorly understood. Here, the mechanism underlying the protective effect of Morus alba leaves ethanolic extract on oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in diabetic retinopathy was investigated. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin. One week after, M. alba (100 mg/kg) was administrated to the rats daily for 16 weeks. Morus alba extract showed high content of polyphenolics and free radical scavenging activity. Oral M. alba administration significantly attenuated hyperglycemia and weight loss, and decreased sorbitol, fructose, protein kinase C, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress markers in retinas of the diabetic rats. Moreover, M. alba produced marked down-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, with concomitant up-regulation of Bcl-2 in the diabetic retinas. M. alba also reduced the expression of VEGF in the retina. These results indicate that M. alba has protective effect on diabetic retinopathy with possible mechanisms of inhibiting hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, polyol pathway activation, and VEGF expression in the retina.

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE EVOLUTION IN DYNAMICS OF BUDGET INCOMES FROM ALBA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA FLORINA RADU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine how the main taxes collected in Alba County have evolved over the last seven years and we put in evidence the evolution of total revenue received in Alba County budget. We point out also the taxes that hold the largest share of the total revenue collected. At the same time we observe the ranking of the main taxes in our county, compared to their ranking of the entire country. On the first place in our county we find VAT, the income tax is on the second, and corporate income tax follows. They are therefore the main source of income for the Alba budget.

  12. ANALIZA VENITURILOR BUGETARE LA NIVELUL JUDEłULUI ALBA ÎN PERIOADA 2006-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Florina Radu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Stat Budget Incomes from Alba County during 2006-2010The study aims to examine how the main taxes collected in Alba County have evolved overthe last five years. We wish to point out also the taxes that hold the largest share of the totalrevenue collected. Such way, on the first place we find the income tax, than VAT is on thesecond and corporate income tax followes. They are therefore the main source of incomefor the Alba county budget.

  13. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property between December 1994 and February 1995. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. This document reports the findings of this survey. The results of the independent verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property demonstrate that all contaminated areas have been remediated to radionuclide concentrations and activity levels below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  14. Applications of computational tools in biosciences and medical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2015-01-01

     This book presents the latest developments and applications of computational tools related to the biosciences and medical engineering. It also reports the findings of different multi-disciplinary research projects, for example, from the areas of scaffolds and synthetic bones, implants and medical devices, and medical materials. It is also shown that the application of computational tools often requires mathematical and experimental methods. Computational tools such as the finite element methods, computer-aided design and optimization as well as visualization techniques such as computed axial tomography open up completely new research fields that combine the fields of engineering and bio/medical. Nevertheless, there are still hurdles since both directions are based on quite different ways of education. Often even the “language” can vary from discipline to discipline.

  15. Division of Agro technology and Biosciences: Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2012-01-01

    In presenter speech, he outlined several topics regarding development of Agro technology and Biosciences Division from 31 years ago. This division started with Unit Sains Hidupan Liar under PUSPATI in 1981 and change their names to Program Isotop dan Sinaran dalam Biologi dan Pertanian under Nuclear Technology Unit (UTN) (1983). In 1990 their premise change to MINT-Tech Park. This program responsible for conducting research in agro technology using nuclear technology. Several achievements achieved by this division since established. They also succeed in mutating banana namely Novaria banana (1994), Tongkat Ali rice (1990), ground nut (2003), orchids, organic fertilizer and foliage in 2000. The vision of this division are to promote and enhance innovation and applications in nuclear technology to achieve security in food productivity, safety and quality and ecological awareness for economics competitiveness and vibrancy in agrobioindustry and community development. (author)

  16. Characterization of functional SSR markers in Prosopis alba and their transferability across Prosopis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Pomponio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of the study was to characterize functional microsatellite markers in Prosopis alba and examine the transferability to species from the Prosopis genus. Area of the study: samples were obtained from natural populations of Argentina. Material and Methods: Eleven SSR functional markers related to stress and metabolism were amplified in a sample of 152 genotypes from P.alba, P. denudans, P. hassleriP. chilensis, P. flexuosa, and interspecific hybrids. Main results: In P. alba, the PIC average value was 0.36; and 6 out of the 11 primers showed high values of polymorphism ranging from 0.40 to 0.71. The cross-species transferability was high with high percentages of polymorphic loci. Research highlights: The SSR markers developed in P.alba were easily transferred to other Prosopis species which did not have functional markers.

  17. DEVELOPMENT POLICIES IN ALBA IULIA AREA OF INFLUENCE. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. NICULA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Development Policies in Alba Iulia Area of Influence. An Integrated Approach. The paper represents an integrated and holarchical perspective on the spatial development policies and its component measures and projects related to the City of Alba Iulia, its area of influence and the all-encompassing County of Alba, Romania. The goal was to see how the development and management policies from all levels merge into a single strategic framework that might create a favourable basis for the sustainable growth of Alba Iulia and its area of influence. As this area surrounding the city is subjected to different hierarchical plans and programmes, some that are not properly correlated, it is extremely clear that this area and Areas of Influence in general need legislative stipulations made specifically for them and also a well-thought holarchical planning approach.

  18. Adventitious bud regeneration from the stigma of Sinapis alba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Zenkteler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stigmas isolated from flower buds of 'Nakielska' variety of Sinapis alba were used to develop a micropropagation method suitable for breeding of new cultivars. The origin of adventitious bud regeneration was studied on MS medium, under stimulation by bezylaminopurine (BAP in combination with 2,4-D - dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. Histological analysis showed the structure of Sinapis stigma (composed from four types of tissue: papillae, transmitting tissue, parenchyma and vascular bundles and revealed that numerous meristematic centers developed from parenchyma cells in close vicinity of vascular bundles. Buds very quickly appeared on the surface of initial explants and later formed multiplantlets that were easily rooted in the soil.

  19. Triterpenoid saponins from Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Mareni R.; Pertile, Roberto; Correa, Melissa M.; Schenkel, Eloir P.; Almeida, Maria Tereza R. de; Palermo, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    Two saponins were isolated from the leaves of Lippia alba. Their structures were established using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These new compounds were elucidated as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-28-O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl -(1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl)-16α, 23-dihydroxy-olean -12-en-28-oic acid, named as Lippiasaponin I (2) and as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-28-O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-D-xylopyranosyl- (1→4)-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-α-Larabinopyranosyl)-16α,23-dihydroxy-olean -12-en-28-oic acid, named Lippiasaponin II (3). (author)

  20. Triterpenoid saponins from Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Mareni R.; Pertile, Roberto; Correa, Melissa M.; Schenkel, Eloir P., E-mail: marenif@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Farmacia; Almeida, Maria Tereza R. de; Palermo, Jorge A. [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Dept. de Quimica Organica

    2010-07-01

    Two saponins were isolated from the leaves of Lippia alba. Their structures were established using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These new compounds were elucidated as 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-28-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->3)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl -(1->4)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-16alpha, 23-dihydroxy-olean -12-en-28-oic acid, named as Lippiasaponin I (2) and as 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-28-O-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->3)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl- (1->4)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->3)-alpha-Larabinopyranosyl)-16alpha,23-dihydroxy-olean -12-en-28-oic acid, named Lippiasaponin II (3). (author)

  1. Electromagnetic field pretreatment of Sinapis alba seeds improved cadmium phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulak, Piotr; Lata, Lesia; Plak, Andrzej; Wiącek, Dariusz; Strobel, Wacław; Walkiewicz, Anna; Pietruszewski, Stanisław; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2018-03-21

    It was hypothesized that electromagnetic field (EMF) pretreatment of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) seeds could increase the accumulation of non-essential, pollutant heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) in shoots. Seeds of white mustard were treated with either 60 or 120 mT of alternating EMF (50 Hz) for 1 minute and then grown in a Petri dish in the presence of Cd, in comparison to the control (seeds grown without EMF pretreatment). Biomass production and content of calcium (Ca) and Cd in seedling shoots were measured. The Cd content in shoots from the EMF-treated seeds was higher in both variants than in the control (by 73% and 78%, respectively; p phytoextraction, but more research is needed.

  2. Chemical Diversity in Lippia alba (Mill. N. E. Brown Germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Fitzgerald Blank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to perform chemical characterization of Lippia alba accessions from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Federal University of Sergipe. A randomized block experimental design with two replications was applied. The analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oils was conducted using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The chemical composition of the essential oils allowed the accessions to be allocated to the following six groups: group 1: linalool, 1,8-cineole, and caryophyllene oxide; group 2: linalool, geranial, neral, 1,8-cineol, and caryophyllene oxide; group 3: limonene, carvone, and sabinene; group 4: carvone, limonene, g-muurolene, and myrcene; group 5: neral, geranial, and caryophyllene oxide; and group 6: geranial, neral, o-cymene, limonene, and caryophyllene oxide.

  3. Radioactively labelled phytic acid from maturing seeds of sinapis alba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaicher, F.M.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Maturing seeds of Sinapis alba were incubated with D-[U- 14 C]glucose, sodium [1- 14 C] acetate or myo-[U 14 C] inositol in order to prepare radioactively labelled phytic acid with high specific activity. Although each substrate was utilized for the biosynthesis of phytic acid, maximum incorporation of radioactivity into phytic acid was found with myo-inositol. Radiochemical purity of the [U- 14 C]phytic acid preparations was confirmed by chromatographic techniques. Such preparations should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay of phytase. (orig.)

  4. Radioactively labelled phytic acid from maturing seeds of Sinapis alba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, F.M.; Mukherjee, K.D.

    Maturing seeds of Sinapis alba were incubated with D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucose, sodium (1-/sup 14/C) acetate or myo-(U/sup 14/C) inositol in order to prepare radioactively labelled phytic acid with high specific activity. Although each substrate was utilized for the biosynthesis of phytic acid, maximum incorporation of radioactivity into phytic acid was found with myo-inositol. Radiochemical purity of the (U-/sup 14/C)phytic acid preparations was confirmed by chromatographic techniques. Such preparations should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay should be useful for the study of interaction of phytic acid with metal ions and proteins and may serve as substrate in the assay of phytase.

  5. Characterization of functional SSR markers in Prosopis alba and their transferability across Prosopis species

    OpenAIRE

    María F. Pomponio; Cintia Acuña; Vivien Pentreath; Diego L. Lauenstein; Susana M. Poltri; Susana Torales

    2015-01-01

    Aim of study: The aim of the study was to characterize functional microsatellite markers in Prosopis alba and examine the transferability to species from the Prosopis genus. Area of the study: samples were obtained from natural populations of Argentina. Material and Methods: Eleven SSR functional markers related to stress and metabolism were amplified in a sample of 152 genotypes from P.alba, P. denudans, P. hassleriP. chilensis, P. flexuosa, and interspecific hybrids. Main res...

  6. ANALIZA VENITURILOR BUGETARE LA NIVELUL JUDEŢULUI ALBA ÎN PERIOADA 2006-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Florina Radu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Stat Budget Incomes from Alba County during 2006-2010The study aims to examine how the main taxes collected in Alba County have evolved overthe last five years. We wish to point out also the taxes that hold the largest share of the totalrevenue collected. So, on the first place we find the income tax, than VAT is the second andcorporate income tax followes. They are therefore the main source of income for the Albacounty budget.

  7. Allelopathic influence of aqueous extracts from the leaves of Morus alba L. on seed germination and seedling growth of Cucumis sativus L. and Sinapsis alba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Możdżeń

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to elucidate impact of the aqueous extracts from leaves of Morus alba L. on germination, growth and photosynthetic activity of Cucumis sativus L. and Sinapis alba L. Plants were grown for 21 days at the temperature 25°C (day and 18°C (night, within 12/12 hours photoperiod, light intensity 150 μmol·m-2·s-1 and relative humidity 60-70% (day/night. Our experiments proved that allelopathic compounds in aqueous extracts of the leaves M. alba at high concentrations, reduce power and energy of germination. Biometric analysis of seedlings and adult plants grown showed that allelopathic substances have stimulating or inhibiting function depending on the stage of treatment. Moreover, they cause changes in chlorophyll contents and activity of photosystem II (PS II.

  8. Morus alba extract modulates blood pressure homeostasis through eNOS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizzo, Albino; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Damato, Antonio; Madonna, Michele; Storto, Marianna; Capocci, Luca; Campiglia, Pietro; Sommella, Eduardo; Trimarco, Valentina; Rozza, Francesco; Izzo, Raffaele; Puca, Annibale A; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-10-01

    Morus alba is a promising phytomedicine cultivated in oriental countries that is extensively used to prevent and treat various cardiovascular problems. To date, despite its beneficial effects, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Thus, we investigate the vascular and haemodynamic effects of Morus alba extract in an experimental model focusing our attention on the molecular mechanisms involved. Through vascular reactivity studies, we demonstrate that Morus alba extract evokes endothelial vasorelaxation through a nitric oxide-dependent pathway. Our molecular analysis highlights an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. In vivo administration of Morus alba extract reduces blood pressure levels exclusively in wild-type mice, whereas it fails to evoke any haemodynamic effects in eNOS-deficient mice. Molecular analyses revealed that its beneficial action on vasculature is mediated by the activation of two important proteins that act as stress sensors and chaperones: PERK and heat shock protein 90. Finally, Morus alba extract exerts antihypertensive action in an experimental model of arterial hypertension. Through its action on eNOS signaling, Morus alba extract could act as a food supplement for the regulation of cardiovascular system, mainly in clinical conditions characterized by eNOS dysfunction, such as arterial hypertension. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nephro-protective potential of Morus alba, a prospective experimental study on animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Naveed; Khan, Mir Azam; Khan, Salimullah; Ahmad, Habib; Asif, Afzal Haq; Khan, Taous

    2016-01-01

    Morus alba L. (Moraceae) is traditionally used for the treatment of urinary incontinency due its strong diuretic properties. The present study explores the renal protective effects of M. alba, due to its free radical scavenging properties, in order to provide experimental evidence for its established use. Ethanolic extract (200 mg/kg/d) derived from M. alba fruit was employed in rabbits as a co-therapy (GM-al) with gentamicin (80 mg/kg/d) for a period of 3 weeks. Biochemical kidney functioning parameters, urinary isozymes, and histopathological examination were performed. The results showed that ethanol extract of Morus alba L. prevented alterations in serum creatinine (4.02 ± 0.14, p alba with gentamicin prevented renal functioning alterations expected with the use of gentamicin alone. Therefore, it can be concluded that M. alba to protect from kidney damage, which may be because of its free radical scavenging and diuretic properties.

  10. Formulation and evaluation of antimicrobial activity of Morus alba sol-gel against periodontal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Gunjal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontitis has a multifactorial etiology, with primary etiologic agents being pathogenic bacteria that reside in the subgingival area. Recent advances in the field of alternative medicine introduced various herbal products for the treatment of periodontitis. Aim: To assess and compare the antimicrobial activity of Morus alba sol-gel with chlorhexidine sol-gel against ATCC standard strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and Methods: Crude extract of Morus alba leaves was prepared by Soxhlet method by using ethanol as a solvent. Phytochemical screening of the crude extract of M. alba was performed to check the various chemical constituents. M. alba sol-gel and chlorhexidine sol-gel were formulated using Pluronic f127 and Pluronic f108 and compared for their antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of both the gels was performed using agar well diffusion technique. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration of M. alba sol-gel and chlorhexidine sol-gel against A. actinomycetemcomitans is 19 and 17 mm, T. forsythia is 12 and 21 mm, and P. gingivalis is 16 and 18 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Both M. alba and chlorhexidine sol-gel exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against periodontal pathogens.

  11. Enhanced Mulberroside A Production from Cell Suspension and Root Cultures of Morus alba Using Elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaikul, Jukrapun; Kitisripanya, Tharita; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Putalun, Waraporn

    2015-07-01

    Morus alba L. has been used in Asian traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic and as a whitening agent in cosmetic products. Mulberroside A is the major active compound from M. alba root bark. In this study, cell suspension and root cultures of M. alba were established, and the effect of the elicitors on the enhancement of mulberroside A production in M. alba was investigated. The cell suspension and root cultures of M. alba were exposed to elicitors and then mulberroside A contents were determined by an indirect competitive ELISA method. High levels of mulberroside A were obtained by addition of 100 and 200 μM salicylic acid with 24 h exposure time in cell suspension cultures (37.9 ± 1.5 and 34.0 ± 4.7 mg/g dry wt., respectively). Furthermore, addition of yeast extract at 2 mg/mL with 24 h exposure time can significantly increase mulberroside A contents from both cell suspension (3.2-fold) and root cultures (6.6-fold). Mulberroside A contents from both cell suspension and root cultures after treatment with elicitors are similar or higher than those found in the intact root and root bark of several years old M. alba. These results indicate that mulberry tissue cultures using the elicitation method are interesting alternative sources for mulberroside A production.

  12. Pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Morus alba in gut and airways disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munasib Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Crude extract of Morus alba at 100 mg/kg exhibited protective effect against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. In isolated rabbit jejunum, M. alba (0.3-10 mg/mL inhibited the spontaneous contractions and caused glibenclamide-sensitive inhibition of low K+ (20 mM-induced contractions, with mild effect on high K+ (80 mM. Similarly, cromakalim caused inhibition of low K+, but not of high K+, while verapamil did not differentiate in its inhibitory effect on two concentrations of K+. M. alba (3.0-30 mg/kg caused suppression of carbachol (100 µg/kg-induced increase in inspiratory pressure of anaesthetized rats. In guinea-pig trachea, M. alba completely inhibited low K+ contractions, with partial effect on high K+. M. alba (0.3-1.0 mg/mL caused leftward shift of isoprenaline-induced inhibitory concentration response curves, like papaverine. These results indicate that M. alba possesses a combination of KATP channel opening, weak Ca++-antagonist and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanisms, which explain its medicinal use in hyperactive gut and airways disorders.

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity of ethanolic extract of Morus alba leaf against periodontal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjal, Shilpa; Ankola, Anil V; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major problem with inadvertent usage. Thus, there is a need to search for new antimicrobial agents of herbal origin to combat antibiotic resistance. One such plant is Morus alba which has a long history of medicinal use in traditional Chinese medicine. To compare the antibacterial activity of ethanolic extract of M. alba leaves with chlorhexidine gluconate against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Experimental in vitro study. Crude extract from the leaves of M. alba were prepared by Soxhlet extraction method by using ethanol as a solvent. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract was assessed against A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, and compared with that of chlorhexidine gluconate by broth dilution method. P. gingivalis was the most sensitive organism against the M. alba extract with an MIC value of 1.95 mg/ml; while T. forsythia and P. gingivalis both were most sensitive organisms against chlorhexidine gluconate with MIC values of 0.00781 mg/ml. M. alba possess good antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and thus would be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease. However, chlorhexidine gluconate was found to be more effective when compared to M. alba.

  14. An occupational respiratory allergy caused by Sinapis alba pollen in olive farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, J L; Palacios, L; Ruiz-Valenzuela, L; Bartolomé, B; López-Urbano, M J; Sáenz de San Pedro, B; Cano, E; Quiralte, J

    2007-04-01

    Sinapis alba (white mustard) is a entomophilic species included in the Brassicaceae family. To date it has not been related to allergic sensitization or clinical respiratory disease. Twelve olive orchard workers had a history of rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma that occurred during control weed management and/or harvest, from January to March. They underwent skin prick tests (SPT) with S. alba pollen extract and a standard battery of aeroallergens. Sinapis alba pollen extract was prepared for performing quantitative skin tests, enzyme allergosorbent test and nasal challenge test (NCT). A portable monitoring station and an urban volumetric Hirst-type spore trap were used for the aerobiological study. Eleven patients suffered from rhinitis and bronchial asthma and one had only from rhinitis. All patients were sensitized to S. alba pollen extract, and they showed a positive NCT response. In the urban aerobiologic monitoring station the amount of S. alba pollen only exceptionally reached peaks of 21 grains/m(3), whereas in the work environment peaks of 1801 grains/m(3) were detected between 15 February and 7 April. We demonstrate the existence of a new occupational allergen for olive farmers: S. alba pollen. We point out the importance of perform aerobiological sampling within the occupational environment for the detection and quantification of the allergenic source.

  15. Is LabTutor a helpful component of the blended learning approach to biosciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Amelia; Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Lameu, Paula

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the use of LabTutor (a physiological data capture and e-learning package) in bioscience education for student nurses. Knowledge of biosciences is important for nurses the world over, who have to monitor and assess their patient's clinical condition, and interpret that information to determine the most appropriate course of action. Nursing students have long been known to find acquiring useable bioscience knowledge challenging. Blended learning strategies are common in bioscience teaching to address the difficulties students have. Student nurses have a preference for hands-on learning, small group sessions and are helped by close juxtaposition of theory and practice. An evaluation of a new teaching method using in-classroom voluntary questionnaire. A structured survey instrument including statements and visual analogue response format and open questions was given to students who participated in Labtutor sessions. The students provided feedback in about the equipment, the learning and the session itself. First year (n = 93) and third year (n = 36) students completed the evaluation forms. The majority of students were confident about the equipment and using it to learn although a few felt anxious about computer-based learning. They all found the equipment helpful as part of their bioscience education and they all enjoyed the sessions. This equipment provides a helpful way to encourage guided independent learning through practice and discovery and because each session is case study based and the relationship of the data to the patient is made clear. Our students helped to evaluate our initial use of LabTutor and found the sessions enjoyable and helpful. LabTutor provides an effective learning tool as part of a blended learning strategy for biosciences teaching. Improving bioscience knowledge will lead to a greater understanding of pathophysiology, treatments and interventions and monitoring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Improving Bioscience Research Reporting: The ARRIVE Guidelines for Reporting Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Kilkenny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the number of bioscience journals has increased enormously, with many filling specialised niches reflecting new disciplines and technologies. The emergence of open-access journals has revolutionised the publication process, maximising the availability of research data. Nevertheless, a wealth of evidence shows that across many areas, the reporting of biomedical research is often inadequate, leading to the view that even if the science is sound, in many cases the publications themselves are not “fit for purpose”, meaning that incomplete reporting of relevant information effectively renders many publications of limited value as instruments to inform policy or clinical and scientific practice [1–21]. A recent review of clinical research showed that there is considerable cumulative waste of financial resources at all stages of the research process, including as a result of publications that are unusable due to poor reporting [22]. It is unlikely that this issue is confined to clinical research [2–14,16–20].

  17. Course-based undergraduate research experiences in molecular biosciences-patterns, trends, and faculty support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jack T H

    2017-08-15

    Inquiry-driven learning, research internships and course-based undergraduate research experiences all represent mechanisms through which educators can engage undergraduate students in scientific research. In life sciences education, the benefits of undergraduate research have been thoroughly evaluated, but limitations in infrastructure and training can prevent widespread uptake of these practices. It is not clear how faculty members can integrate complex laboratory techniques and equipment into their unique context, while finding the time and resources to implement undergraduate research according to best practice guidelines. This review will go through the trends and patterns in inquiry-based undergraduate life science projects with particular emphasis on molecular biosciences-the research-aligned disciplines of biochemistry, molecular cell biology, microbiology, and genomics and bioinformatics. This will provide instructors with an overview of the model organisms, laboratory techniques and research questions that are adaptable for semester-long projects, and serve as starting guidelines for course-based undergraduate research. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Annual report and summaries of FY 1993 activities: Division of Energy Biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The mission of the Energy Biosciences program is to generate fundamental information about plants and non-health related microorganisms that will constitute the base for new biotechnologies as well as supply information to improve usages of such organisms in their current form. The collective aims are totally consistent with the Department of Energy`s objectives of developing alternate energy sources, replacements for otherwise fossil energy derived products and providing critical fundamental information for the preservation and restoration of environmental conditions affected by energy related activities. The EB program takes full advantage of its organizational locale in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences to directly interact with such disciplines as Materials Sciences, Chemistry, Engineering and Geosciences to promote cross-disciplinary research and planning activities. One of the major specific objectives of the EB program is to probe the enormous capabilities of the specified organisms to carry out biochemical conversions. The limitation to realization of entirely new products and processes via biotechnology is the lack of basic understanding of natural processes. Such knowledge will then afford the advantage of developing procedures to the benefit of people and their society in providing new products along with providing new employment possibilities. This document consists of abstracts of projects supported in FY 1993.

  19. Recent and subrecent diet of the barn owl (Tyto alba in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obuch Ján

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We completed data on the diet of the barn owl (Tyto alba predominately from pellets for the period of the last 50 years from Slovakia. We analyzed material from 251 locations and 16 territorial units. The aggregate represents 119,231 pieces of prey from 47 species of mammals (Mammalia, 95.7% and 58 species of birds (Aves, 3.9%, with a small representation of amphibians, reptiles (Amphibia and Reptilia, 0.2% and invertebrates (Invertebrata, 0.2%. The obtaining of food among the owls is limited to synanthropic environments and the surrounding agricultural landscape, and the centre of its distribution in the recent period (i.e. the past 50 years: 1965-201 5 has been concentrated mainly on the southern parts of Slovakia. In this environment the common vole (Microtus arvalis, 59.6% is the primary prey. Additional prey are rodents of the family Muridae: Mus musculus (5.6%, Micromys minutus (2.2%, Apodemus microps (2.2%, A. flavicollis (2.0%, A. sylvaticus (1 .6% and A. agrarius (1 .5%; insectivores of the family Soricidae: Sorex araneus (6.2%, S. minutus (2.4%, Crocidura leucodon (4.8% and C. suaveolens (2.8%; and the house sparrow Passer domesticus (2.9%. In the higher situated Turcianska kotlina Basin the species M. arvalis (74.3% has higher domination, and instead of the white-toothed shrews the water shrews Neomys anomalus (2.8% and N. fodiens (1 .3% are more abundantly represented. In 3 localities owls focused on hunting bats; for example, in the church in Ratková the order Chiroptera made up 35.2% of prey. From the subrecent period (i.e. from before more than 50 years ago we evaluate 4 samples from the territory of Slovakia with 15,601 pieces of prey ofT. alba. Before more than 50 years ago owls were also more abundantly represented at higher elevations in Slovakia, evidence of which is Weisz’s collection of pellets from 1 6 localities in the Ondavská vrchovina Upland in the years 1945 to 1963, but also a registry of data from the 19th and

  20. A Botanical Composition from Morus alba, Ilex paraguariensis, and Rosmarinus officinalis for Body Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Brownell, Lidia; Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Jia, Qi

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is the largest and fastest growing public health catastrophe in the world affecting both adults and children with a prevalence impacting more than one-third of United States (US) adult population. Although the long-term solution lies in lifestyle changes in the form of dieting and exercise, intervention is required for those who are already obese. Unfortunately, treatment options remain quite limited due to associated side effects of conventional therapeutics. As a natural alternative, in this study we describe the beneficial effect of a standardized composition (UP603) comprised of extracts from Morus alba, Ilex paraguariensis, and Rosmarinus officinalis in improving metabolic disorders in high fat diet (HFD) and high fat & high fructose diet (HFFD) induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Mice treated with UP603 showed dose-correlated decrease in body weight gains compared to vehicle treated HFFD group. Following 7 weeks of treatment, the changes in body weight gains from baseline were found as 6.4%, 27.3%, 2.0%, 3.1%, 0.4%, and -2.9% for normal control diet, HFFD, Orlistat, 450, 650, and 850 mg/kg UP603 treated animals, respectively. Reductions of 7.9-21.1% in total cholesterol, 25.4-44.6% in triglyceride, and 22.5-38.2% in low-density lipoprotein were observed for mice treated with 450-850 mg/kg of UP603. In a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan, percentage body fat of 18.9%, 47.8%, 46.1%, and 40.4% were found for mice treated with normal control, HFD, Orlistat, and UP603, respectively. Reductions of 65.5% and 16.4% in insulin and leptin, respectively, and 2.1-fold increase in ghrelin level were also observed for the UP603 group. Statistically significant improvements in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis scores were also observed from liver histology for mice treated with UP603. Hence, UP603, a standardized botanical composition from M. alba, I. paraguariensis, and R. officinalis could potentially be considered as a natural alternative to maintain healthy body

  1. HPLC-Based Method to Evaluate Kinetics of Glucosinolate Hydrolysis by Sinapis alba Myrosinase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastenhout, Kayla J.; Tornberg, Ruthellen H.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Amolins, Michael W.; Mays, Jared R.

    2014-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are one of several hydrolysis products of glucosinolates, plant secondary metabolites which are substrates for the thioglucohydrolase myrosinase. Recent pursuits toward the development of synthetic, non-natural ITCs have consequently led to an exploration of generating these compounds from non-natural glucosinolate precursors. Evaluation of the myrosinase-dependent conversion of select non-natural glucosinolates to non-natural ITCs cannot be accomplished using established UV-Vis spectroscopic methods. To overcome this limitation, an alternative HPLC-based analytical approach was developed where initial reaction velocities were generated from non-linear reaction progress curves. Validation of this HPLC method was accomplished through parallel evaluation of three glucosinolates with UV-Vis methodology. The results of this study demonstrate that kinetic data is consistent between both analytical methods and that the tested glucosinolates respond similarly to both Michaelis–Menten and specific activity analyses. Consequently, this work resulted in the complete kinetic characterization of three glucosinolates with Sinapis alba myrosinase, with results that were consistent with previous reports. PMID:25068719

  2. Antiosteoporotic Effect of Combined Extract of Morus alba and Polygonum odoratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarat Sungkamanee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitation of osteoporosis therapy, the alternative therapies from natural sources have been considered. In this study, we aimed to determine the antiosteoporotic effect of the combined extract of Morus alba and Polygonum odoratum leaves. Ovariectomized rats, weighing 200–220 g, were orally given the combined extract at doses of 5, 150, and 300 mg·kg−1 BW for 3 months. At the end of study, blood was collected to determine serum osteocalcin, calcium, and alkaline phosphatase level. In addition, tibia bone was isolated to determine bone oxidative stress markers, cortical bone thickness, and density of osteoblast. The combined extract decreased oxidative stress and osteoclast density but increased osteoblast density and cortical thickness. The elevation of serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin was also observed. These results suggested the antiosteoporotic effect of the combined extract via the increased growth formation together with the suppression of bone resorption. However, further studies concerning chronic toxicity and the underlying mechanism are required.

  3. Antiosteoporotic Effect of Combined Extract of Morus alba and Polygonum odoratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkamanee, Sudarat; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limitation of osteoporosis therapy, the alternative therapies from natural sources have been considered. In this study, we aimed to determine the antiosteoporotic effect of the combined extract of Morus alba and Polygonum odoratum leaves. Ovariectomized rats, weighing 200–220 g, were orally given the combined extract at doses of 5, 150, and 300 mg·kg−1 BW for 3 months. At the end of study, blood was collected to determine serum osteocalcin, calcium, and alkaline phosphatase level. In addition, tibia bone was isolated to determine bone oxidative stress markers, cortical bone thickness, and density of osteoblast. The combined extract decreased oxidative stress and osteoclast density but increased osteoblast density and cortical thickness. The elevation of serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin was also observed. These results suggested the antiosteoporotic effect of the combined extract via the increased growth formation together with the suppression of bone resorption. However, further studies concerning chronic toxicity and the underlying mechanism are required. PMID:25478061

  4. Reflective Writing as a Tool for Assessing Teamwork in Bioscience: Insights into Student Performance and Understanding of Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    To ensure a modern bioscience curriculum that responds to the current needs of stakeholders, there is a need to embed a range of generic capabilities that enables graduates to succeed in and contribute to a rapidly changing world, as well as building strong bioscience skills and knowledge. The curriculum must also prepare students for a rapidly…

  5. Foods: Where Innovation, Agriculture, Molecular Biosciences and Human Nutrition Meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Brennan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There is one commodity the world over that unites mankind—food. In 2011 the United Nations claimed that the world’s population had reached the seven billion mark, a number which is set to increase dramatically in the decades to come. Food security, supply and sustainability are of paramount concern to the future economic and social progress of humanity. It is the responsibility of the food industry, together with food scientists and technologists, to shoulder the burden of ensuring an adequate supply of nutritious, safe and sensorially acceptable foods for a range of demanding consumers. In responding to this challenge, we need to understand the link between agriculture, engineering, food processing, molecular biosciences, human nutrition, commercialisation and innovation. Access to information concerning the composition and quality of foods has never been so easy for consumers and technologists alike. A plethora of research publications are made available each month to scientists and associated interested parties. The outcomes of these research manuscripts are often distilled and disseminated into messages available to everyone through bulletin boards, forums and the popular press. Newspapers and new agencies constantly report on the latest pharma-medical finding, or news regarding food safety and security concerns. We live in an age where information is so readily available to everyone that the task of finding credible and reputable data can be difficult at times. Providing sound evidenced based research is where a peer-reviewed journal can provide clarity. [...

  6. Foods: Where Innovation, Agriculture, Molecular Biosciences and Human Nutrition Meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Charles

    2012-11-21

    There is one commodity the world over that unites mankind-food. In 2011 the United Nations claimed that the world's population had reached the seven billion mark, a number which is set to increase dramatically in the decades to come. Food security, supply and sustainability are of paramount concern to the future economic and social progress of humanity. It is the responsibility of the food industry, together with food scientists and technologists, to shoulder the burden of ensuring an adequate supply of nutritious, safe and sensorially acceptable foods for a range of demanding consumers. In responding to this challenge, we need to understand the link between agriculture, engineering, food processing, molecular biosciences, human nutrition, commercialisation and innovation. Access to information concerning the composition and quality of foods has never been so easy for consumers and technologists alike. A plethora of research publications are made available each month to scientists and associated interested parties. The outcomes of these research manuscripts are often distilled and disseminated into messages available to everyone through bulletin boards, forums and the popular press. Newspapers and new agencies constantly report on the latest pharma-medical finding, or news regarding food safety and security concerns. We live in an age where information is so readily available to everyone that the task of finding credible and reputable data can be difficult at times. Providing sound evidenced based research is where a peer-reviewed journal can provide clarity. [...].

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report for Year 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  8. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  9. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report, Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  10. Platinum bioaccumulation by mustard plants (Sinapis alba L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawienczyk, M.; Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, G.; Kowalska, J.; Asztemborska, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of hydroponically cultivated Indian mustard plants (Sinapis alba L.) to accumulate platinum was investigated. The Pt-bioaccumulation in leaves, stem and shoots of plants growing for 2 and 4 weeks at Pt-concentration of 50 and 500 μg/L was compared. The relation between dry and fresh weight was also estimated. Adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) and mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS) were applied for determination of Pt. Increasing Pt-concentration from 50 to 500 μg/L in the medium causes: (1) reduction of the root tissue hydration level at unchanged modification in aboveground parts of the plants and (2) decrease of the Pt transfer factor (TF) for roots and increase for leaves and stem. Duration of the culture influenced on Pt-accumulation in roots and in aboveground organs of mustard plants. Transfer factor for Pt between 560 and 1600 makes Indian mustard plants one at Pt-hyperaccumulators. Distribution of Pt-bioaccumulation in the plant organs may be useful for biomonitoring of platinum in the environment. (author)

  11. Atividade antimicrobiana de Lippia alba (Mill. N. E. Brown (Verbenaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaciana S. Aguiar

    Full Text Available Lippia alba (Mill. N. E. Brown (Verbenaceae, amplamente distribuída em todo o território brasileiro, é conhecida popularmente como erva cidreira e utilizada na medicina popular como analgésica, febrífuga, antiinflamatória, antigripal e nas afecções hepáticas. Extratos brutos foram preparados a partir de plantas cultivadas, de modo padronizado, em horta medicinal do Laboratório de Fitoterapia da Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuária (IPA para a verificação da atividade antimicrobiana, in vitro, pelo método de difusão em disco de papel. A concentração inibitória mínima (CIM foi determinada para os extratos que exibiram melhores atividades. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que os extratos clorofórmico, acetônico e etanólico da raiz foram ativos frente a Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Candida albicans e Monilia sitophila e os extratos hexânicos, etanólicos e metanólicos das folhas inibiram S. aureus, M. luteus, B. subtilis, M. smegmatis e M. sitophila. A menor concentração inibitória (CIM = 31,2 µg/mL, foi obtida para o extrato clorofórmico da raiz frente a B. subtilis e M. luteus.

  12. Multiple paternity in polyandrous barn owls (Tyto alba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Henry

    Full Text Available In polyandrous species females produce successive clutches with several males. Female barn owls (Tyto alba often desert their offspring and mate to produce a 2(nd annual brood with a second male. We tested whether copulating during chick rearing at the 1(st annual brood increases the male's likelihood to obtain paternity at the 2(nd annual breeding attempt of his female mate in case she deserts their brood to produce a second brood with a different male. Using molecular paternity analyses we found that 2 out of 26 (8% second annual broods of deserting females contained in total 6 extra-pair young out of 15 nestlings. These young were all sired by the male with whom the female had produced the 1(st annual brood. In contrast, none of the 49 1(st annual breeding attempts (219 offspring and of the 20 2(nd annual breeding attempts (93 offspring of non-deserting females contained extra-pair young. We suggest that female desertion can select male counter-strategies to increase paternity and hence individual fitness. Alternatively, females may copulate with the 1(st male to derive genetic benefits, since he is usually of higher quality than the 2(nd male which is commonly a yearling individual.

  13. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE BIOLOGY OF TUBEROLACHNUS SALIGNUS (GMELIN (STERNORRHYNCHA: APHIDIDAE ON (SALIX ALBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nıhal ÖZDER

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development time, survivoship and reproduction of Tuberolachnus salignus (Gmelin( Lachninae: Lachnini were studied on Salix alba at fi ve constant temperatures (17.5°C, 20°C, 22.5°C, 25°C and 27.5°C . The developmental time of immature stages ranged from 17.00 days at 17.5°C to 12.21 days at 25°C on Salix alba. The total percentage of survivorship of immature stages varied from 50% and 70% 17.5°C -20°C on S. alba. The largest r m valueoccurred with 0.2540 at 20°C on S. alba. The mean generation time of the population ranged from 13.595 days at 22.5°C to 19.60 days at 17.5°C on S. alba. The optimal temperature for Tuberolachnus salignus was 20°C.

  14. Colonization with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Promotes the Growth of Morus alba L. Seedlings under Greenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. is an important tree species planted widely in China because of its economic value. In this report, we investigated the influence of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF species, Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices, alone and together, on the growth of M. alba L. seedlings under greenhouse conditions. The growth parameters and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were evaluated 90 days after colonization with the fungi. The growth and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were significantly affected by the AMF species. The mycorrhizal seedlings were taller, had longer roots, more leaves and a greater biomass than the non-mycorrhizae-treated seedlings. In addition, the AMF species-inoculated seedlings had increased root activity and a higher chlorophyll content compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Furthermore, AMF species colonization increased the phosphorus and nitrogen contents of the seedlings. In addition, simultaneous root colonization by the two AMF species did not improve the growth of M. alba L. seedlings compared with inoculation with either species alone. Based on these results, these AMF species may be applicable to mulberry seedling cultivation.

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of methanolic extract of Morus alba Linn. (mulberry) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharani, Shendige Eswara Rao; Asad, Mohammed; Dhamanigi, Sunil Samson; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli

    2010-01-01

    The leaves of Morus alba Linn. (Family: Moraceae) commonly known as mulberry are mainly used as food for the silkworms and they are sometimes eaten as vegetable or used as cattle fodder in different parts of the world. The effect of Morus alba on the immune system was evaluated by using different experimental models such as carbon clearance test, cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia, neutrophil adhesion test, effect on serum immunoglobulins, mice lethality test and indirect haemagglutination test. Methanolic extract of Morus alba was administered orally at low dose and high dose of 100 mg/kg and 1 g/kg respectively and Ocimum sanctum (100 mg/kg, po) was used as standard drug. Morus alba extract in both doses increased the levels of serum immunoglobulins and prevented the mortality induced by bovine Pasteurella multocida in mice. It also increased the circulating antibody titre in indirect haemagglutination test. On the other hand, it showed significant increase in the phagocytic index in carbon clearance assay, a significant protection against cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia and increased the adhesion of neutrophils in the neutrophil adhesion test. Hence, it was concluded that Morus alba increases both humoral immunity and cell mediated immunity.

  16. The root barks of Morus alba and the flavonoid constituents inhibit airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hun Jai; Jin, Hong-Guang; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2013-08-26

    The root barks of Morus alba have been used in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory drug, especially for treating lung inflammatory disorders. To find new alternative agents against airway inflammation and to establish the scientific rationale of the herbal medicine in clinical use, the root barks of Morus alba and its flavonoid constituents were examined for the first time for their pharmacological activity against lung inflammation. For in vivo evaluation, an animal model of lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation in mice was used. An inhibitory action against the production of proinflammatory molecules in lung epithelial cells and lung macrophages was examined. Against lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation, the ethanol extract of the root barks of Morus alba clearly inhibited bronchitis-like symptoms, as determined by TNF-α production, inflammatory cells infiltration and histological observation at 200-400mg/kg/day by oral administration. In addition, Morus alba and their major flavonoid constituents including kuwanone E, kuwanone G and norartocarpanone significantly inhibited IL-6 production in lung epithelial cells (A549) and NO production in lung macrophages (MH-S). Taken together, it is concluded that Morus alba and the major prenylated flavonoid constituents have a potential for new agents to control lung inflammation including bronchitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO CARRY OUT MASS IN VITRO PROPAGATION OF POTENTILLA ALBA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Tikhomirova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the plant’s extensive area of distribution, Potentilla alba L. natural resources are scarce and cannot meet the modern needs of the pharmaceutical industry. Because of the mass preparation of medical raw materials by using P. alba, it entered into the list of rare and endangered species plants of the Red Data Book of the Republic of Belarus. This plant is not represented in the wild flora of Western Siberia, but there is a great need for developing a method for the mass propagation of P. alba using in vitro culture in order to obtain a high-quality planting material. At the explant stage, the technique of the P. alba introduction into in vitro culture is developed. This paper reveals the morphogenetic features of the development of P. alba explants of different types and the regenerative capacity of the tissue culture. At the micropropagation stage, the optimum culture media and the growth conditions for the regenerated plants are selected. At the stage of test-tube plants rooting and transferring them into ex vitro conditions, the most effective means of adaptation to non-sterile conditions in hydroponics are proposed.

  18. Development and validation of a rapid high performance liquid chromatography - photodiode array detection method for estimation of a bioactive compound wedelolactone in extracts of Eclipta alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanshu Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Following optimization of extraction, separation and analytical conditions, a rapid, sensitive and simple reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array (HPLC-PDA method has been developed for the identification and quantification of wedelolactone in different extracts of Eclipta alba. The separation of wedelolactone was achieved on a C18 column using the solvent system consisting of a mixture of methanol: water: acetic acid (95: 5: 0.04 as a mobile phase in isocratic elution mode followed by photo diode array detection at 352 nm. The developed method was validated as per the guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH. Calibration curve presented good linear regression (r²>0.998 within the test range and the maximum relative standard deviation (RSD, % values for intra-day assay were found to be 0.15, 1.30 and 1.1 for low (5 µg/mL, medium (20 µg/mL and high (80 µg/mL concentrations of wedelolactone. For inter-day assay the maximum RSD (% values were found to be 2.83, 1.51 and 2.06 for low, medium and high concentrations, respectively. Limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ were calculated to be 2 and 5 µg/mL respectively. Analytical recovery of wedelolactone was greater than 95%. Wedelolactone in different extracts of Eclipta alba was identified and quantified using the developed HPLC method. The validated HPLC method allowed precise quantitative analysis of wedelolactone in Eclipta. alba extracts.Desenvolveu-se método rápido, sensível e simples de Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Eficiência em fase reversa, utilizando-se arranjo de fotodiodo (HPLC-PDA, visando à separação, extração e às condições analíticas para a identificação e quantificação de wedelolactona em diferentes extratos de Eclipta alba. A separação de wedelolactona foi efetuada por meio de uma coluna C18, utilizando mistura de metanol:água:ácido acético (95:5:0.04 como fase móvel, em sistema de

  19. Identification and effect of two flavonoids from root bark of Morus alba against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in grass carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morus alba is an important plant for sericulture and has a high medicinal value. In this study, two flavonoids (kuwanons G and O) with antiparasitic activity were isolated from the root bark of M. alba by bioassay-guided fractionation. The chemical structures were determined by pectroscopic analys...

  20. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: Sinapis alba [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term Sinapis alba 名詞 一般 * * * * シロガラシ シロガラシ シロガラシ Thesaurus2015 200906047820832585 C LS06 UNKNOWN_2 Sinapis alba

  1. MOVIMIENTOS SOCIALES E INTEGRACIÓN REGIONAL: EL CASO DE LA ARTICULACIÓN DE MOVIMIENTOS SOCIALES HACIA EL ALBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Díaz Martínez

    2013-12-01

    ALBA (the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our Americas is a regional integration entity created as an alternative to the US-proposed FTAA (Free Trade Area of the Americas, ALCA in Spanish. ALBA inaugurates a period that has been referred to as post-neoliberal regionalism. Since its origin, ALBA has been accompanied by social movements with an anti-imperialistic and anti-neoliberal stance. ALBA, itself, generated a social entity: the Social Movements Council. However, in a parallel and autonomous way, the social movements created the Articulation of Social Movements toward ALBA. This article describes the characteristics of this entity for social articulation based on theoretical proposals developed in Latin America, and presents a balance of the potentialities and challenges of social movements in Latin America and their incidence in regional integration.

  2. Volcanic styles at Alba Patera, Mars: implications of lava flow morphology to the volcanic history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneeberger, D.M.; Pieri, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Alba Patera presents styles of volcanism that are unique to Mars. Its very low profile, large areal extent, unusually long and voluminous lava flows, and circumferential graben make it among Mars' most interesting volcanic features. Clues to Alba's volcanic history are preserved in its morphology and stratigraphy. Understanding the relationship of lava flow morphology to emplacement processes should enable estimates of viscosity, effusion rate, and gross composition to be made. Lava flows, with dimensions considered enormous by terrestrial standards, account for a major portion of the exposed surface of Alba Patera. These flows exhibit a range of morphologies. While most previous works have focused on the planimetric characteristics, attention was drawn to the important morphological attributes, paying particular attention to what the features suggest about the emplacement process

  3. The isolation and identification of endophytic bacteria from mangrove (Sonneratia alba) that produces gelatinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursyam, H.; Prihanto, A. A.; Warasari, N. I.; Saadah, M.; Masrifa, R. E.; Nabila, N. A.; Istiqfarin, N.; Siddiq, I. J.

    2018-04-01

    Gelatinase is an enzyme that hydrolyze gelatin into gelatin hydrolyzate. The purpose of this study was to isolate and to identify endophytic bacteria from Sonneratia alba mangrove which able to produce gelatinase enzyme. Sonneratia alba mangroves was obtained from Bajul Mati Beach, Malang Regency. The samples in this study were, stems, and leaves. Pure cultured bacteria were investigated for its capability for producing gelatinase enzyme by using gelatin media. Best producer would further be analyzed its species using microbact system. Screening process resulted in 3 positive isolates, namely code isolate of R, B, and L. R which was isolate from root of S. alba was the best producer for gelatinase. Identification process with morphology and microbact system revelaed that A. SBM is a Gram-negative bacterium that has a basil cell shape, with a diameter colony of 2.19 mm. Based on the microbact system test carried out, the bacteria is Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. New microsatellite loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessega, Cecilia F.; Pometti, Carolina L.; Miller, Joe T.; Watts, Richard; Saidman, Beatriz O.; Vilardi, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. • Methods and Results: Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. • Conclusions: These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection. PMID:25202541

  5. [Study on the fingerprint of Morus alba from different habitats by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Li, Hong-Bo; Wang, Liu-Ping; Li, Yun-Rong; Xin, Ning

    2012-12-01

    To establish HPLC fingerprint of Morus alba from different habitats by HPLC and provide basis for its quality control. HPLC analysis was performed on an Agilent XDB C18 Column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm), gradient eluted composed of acetonitrile and 0.3% phosphate acid. The column temperature was set at 35 degrees C and the flow rate was 0.5 mL/min. The detective wavelength was 290 nm. The HPLC fingerprint for 10 batches of Morus alba was studied on their similarity. There were twelve common peaks in the fingerprint. The similarity of 7 batches was above 0.9 and the other batches had low similarity. The HPLC fingerprint can be used for quality control of Morus alba with high characteristics and specificity.

  6. WINE ROAD - AN INSTRUMENT FOR THE VALORISATION OF WINE TOURISM POTENTIAL CASE STUDY: ALBA COUNTY VINEYARDS

    OpenAIRE

    UNGUREANU Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to highlight the wine-growing and wine-making potential of Alba County and the way it can be valorised. Alba county has a rich winegrowing and wine-making heritage, a fact which is due to the long-standing tradition of winegrowing on these area, as well as to the characteristics of the natural factors (relief, geology, climate, soil), favourable for obtaining high-quality wines, the reputation of which has been acquired at national and international competitions....

  7. Venezuela e ALBA: regionalismo contra-hegemônico e ensino superior para todos Venezuela and the ALBA: counter-hegemonic regionalism and higher education for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Muhr

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Partindo de um quadro teórico neo-gramsciano crítico à globalização, este artigo aplica a nova teoria do regionalismo (NTR e a teoria do regionalismo regulatório (TRR à sua análise e teorização dos tratados de comércio da Aliança Bolivariana para os Povos da Nossa América (ALBA-TCP como regionalismo contra-hegemônico na América Latina e Caribe (ALC. A ALBA está centrada na ideia de um Socialismo do Século XXI, que, como (inicialmente também a Revolução Bolivariana da Venezuela, substitui a 'vantagem competitiva' pela 'vantagem cooperativa'. Em seu caráter de conjunto de processos multidimensionais e transnacionais a ALBA-TCP opera dentro de/transversalmente a um número de setores e escalas, ao mesmo passo que as transformações estruturais são movidas pela interação de agentes do Estado e agentes não estatais. A política de Educação Superior para Todos (ESPT do governo venezuelano rejeita a agenda neoliberal globalizada de mercadorização, privatização e elitismo e reinvindica educação pública gratuita em todos os níveis como um direito humano fundamental. A ESPT está sendo regionalizado em um espaço educacional emergente da ALBA e assume um papel-chave nos processos de democracia direta e participatória, dos quais a construção popular (bottom-up da contra-hegemonia e a redefinição política e econômica da ALC dependem. Antes de produzir sujeitos empreendedores conformes ao capitalismo global, a ESPT procura formar subjetividades ao longo de valores morais de solidariedade e cooperação. Isso será ilustrado com referência a um estudo etnográfico de caso da Universidade Bolivariana da Venezuela (UBV.This paper employs new regionalism theory and regulatory regionalism theory in its analysis and theorisation of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA as a counter-hegemonic Latin American and Caribbean (LAC regionalism. As (initially the regionalisation of Venezuela's Bolivarian

  8. The challenge of the Biosciences in Nurse Education: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kari Toverud; Knutstad, Unni; Fawcett, Tonks N

    2018-03-25

    To review relevant literature that address the challenges of the biosciences in nurse education. More precisely the review aims to explore the literature, concerning students' learning, learning contexts and methodological issues and identify any significant gaps. Knowledge of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry are essential for the understanding of human beings and for full appreciation of the concepts of illness and disease. The current status would seem to be that the required competencies within bioscience subjects are difficult to acquire and students have high rates of failure. Integrative review. The research were performed on Cinahl, ERIC, Medline and British Nursing Index databases in a period from 2013 until 2017. Descriptive analytical methods were used for the initial research trawl. The search strategy resulted in 23 papers. The results of this review shed light on certain deficiencies in the research field looking at the biosciences in nurse education. There is a distinct lack of intervention studies, and thereby knowledge of how best to support students' learning in effective ways. Of note is that there are no field study approaches identified in the review sample. Many of the papers are single studies and course evaluations which may be seen as too narrow and inadequate a perspective. Students appear satisfied with the courses in the biosciences but there seems to be no correlation between satisfaction and achievement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of an Integrated Team Project as Bachelor Thesis in Bioscience Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marie-Christine; Londers, Elsje; Van der Hoeven, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    Following the decision at the KU Leuven to implement the educational concept of guided independent learning and to encourage students to participate in scientific research, the Faculty of Bioscience Engineering decided to introduce a bachelor thesis. Competencies, such as communication, scientific research and teamwork, need to be present in the…

  10. Predictors of academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper: a retrospective qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khareedi, R

    2018-05-01

    The cohort of students enrolled in the discipline-specific bioscience paper reflects a structural diversity in that it includes students of multiple ethnicities, varied age groups, differing scholastic and life experiences. These divergent identities of students are known to influence academic performance. The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study was to determine the ability of a set of variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, level of prior education, the place from which prior education was obtained, work experience and prior academic achievement to predict academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. The sample for this study was a purposive sample of all oral health students who had enrolled in the paper at the Auckland University of Technology from 2011 to 2014. The desensitised empirical data of 116 students from the University's database were subject to multivariable regression analysis. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. Prior academic achievement was a statistically significant predictor variable (P academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper and was also positively correlated (r = 0.641, P academic achievement was the only variable that was demonstrated to be correlated to and predictive of the academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 77 FR 56175 - Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 [Docket No. FDA-2012-F-0949] Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use) AGENCY: Food... 573 Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals (21 CFR part 573) to provide for...

  12. LA PALABRA DIBUJADA. ANTONIO FERNÁNDEZ-ALBA, PRIMER Y ÚLTIMO MAESTRO / The drawn word. Antonio Fernández-Alba, first and last master

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Trillo de Leyva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Távora y Fernández-Alba son figuras de referencia ineludible para quienes quieran hoy investigar el origen contemporáneo de la arquitectura peninsular y, sobre todo, de sus escuelas. Alba fue siempre una guía para los que abordamos una enseñanza alejados del aura que acompañaba a los grandes arquitectos madrileños y barceloneses. Su experimentación didáctica alteró la trayectoria de las escuelas de arquitectura españolas. Introdujo la cultura contemporánea en la universidad como si se tratara de una segunda naturaleza, de un nuevo estrato territorial de los proyectos, manteniendo al hombre como objeto central y destinatario de todo proceso proyectual. En época de virtualidad y representación automatizada, nada más adecuado que la revisión de los dibujos del maestro Fernández-Alba. Dibujos que requieren ser proyectados, pensados, antes que ejecutados, “proyectos de proyectos”, una especie de tautología que rige la mente del poeta en su continua reducción, compresión o destilación, gota a gota, del mundo real, del universo y la palabra.

  13. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM). This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. Results We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI). It is being used in the curation work flow at

  14. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ruihua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM. This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD. We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. Results We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI. It is being used in

  15. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruihua; Schindelman, Gary; Van Auken, Kimberly; Fernandes, Jolene; Chen, Wen; Wang, Xiaodong; Davis, Paul; Tuli, Mary Ann; Marygold, Steven J; Millburn, Gillian; Matthews, Beverley; Zhang, Haiyan; Brown, Nick; Gelbart, William M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-01-26

    Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM). This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI). It is being used in the curation work flow at WormBase for

  16. Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Constituents from the Essential Oil of Lippia alba (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nara O Dos; Pascon, Renata C; Vallim, Marcelo A; Figueiredo, Carlos R; Soares, Marisi G; Lago, João Henrique G; Sartorelli, Patricia

    2016-08-12

    Backgroud: Lippia alba (Verbenaceae) is a plant widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The present work deals with the chemical composition of the crude essential oil extracted from leaves of L. alba and evaluation of its antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Methods: Leaves of L. alba were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as well as by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities of crude essential oil were evaluated in vitro using MTT and broth microdilution assays, respectively. Results: Chemical analysis afforded the identification of 39 substances corresponding to 99.45% of the total oil composition. Concerning the main compounds, monoterpenes nerol/geraniol and citral correspond to approximately 50% of crude oil. The cytotoxic activity of obtained essential oil against several tumor cell lines showed IC 50 values ranging from 45 to 64 µg/mL for B16F10Nex2 (murine melanoma) and A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma). In the antimicrobial assay, was observed that all tested yeast strains, except C. albicans , were sensitive to crude essential oil. MIC values were two to four-folds lower than those determined to bacterial strains. Conclusion: Analysis of chemical composition of essential oils from leaves of L. alba suggested a new chemotype nerol/geraniol and citral. Based in biological evidences, a possible application for studied oil as an antifungal in medicine, as well as in agriculture, is described.

  17. Lawsonia inermis L. Syn. L. alba LamK. (Mehndi or Henna Hindi) of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawsonia inermis L. Syn. L. alba. LamK. (Mehndi or Henna Hindi) of. Lythraceae is a small-sized and much branched tree which is largely cultivated and groomed in the form of hedges. Flowers are white or rose-coloured, fragrant and borne on pyramidal bunches. Fruits bear numerous seeds. Hair dye is prepared from the ...

  18. Natural Durability of Citharexylum spinosum and Morus alba Woods Against Three Mold Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa M. A. Mansour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural durability of wood to mold fungi was tested under laboratory conditions with locally sourced Citharexylum spinosum and Morus alba woods. The mold fungi were Penicillium selerotigenum, Paecilomyces variotii, and Aspergillus niger. Changes in surface elemental composition were evaluated with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and the biodeterioration of wood surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The C peak element of C. spinosum wood was affected significantly (P = 0.0004 and decreased from 49.91% in the control specimens to 47%, 40.1%, and 40% with P. selerotigenum, A. niger, and P. variotii, respectively. Also, the C peak element of M. alba heartwood significantly decreased (P < 0.0001 from 51.33% in the control specimens to 41.49%, 45.66%, and 43.66% in wood inoculated with A. niger, P. variotii, and P. selerotigenum, respectively. The elements Al and Cu were observed in high percentages with M. alba heartwood inoculated by P. variotii. The methanol extract from M. alba heartwood showed good inhibition against the growth of A. niger at a concentration of 32 μg/mL, and the methanol extract from C. spinosum wood showed remarkable inhibition against the growth of P. variotii at a concentration of 8 μg/mL. The results of this study clearly showed the changes that occur in wood samples as a result of fungal infestation.

  19. Alcoholic Extract of Eclipta alba Shows In Vitro Antioxidant and Anticancer Activity without Exhibiting Toxicological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Kumar Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As per WHO estimates, 80% of people around the world use medicinal plants for the cure and prevention of various diseases including cancer owing to their easy availability and cost effectiveness. Eclipta alba has long been used in Ayurveda to treat liver diseases, eye ailments, and hair related disorders. The promising medicinal value of E. alba prompted us to study the antioxidant, nontoxic, and anticancer potential of its alcoholic extract. In the current study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxic and antioxidant effect of the alcoholic extract of Eclipta alba (AEEA in multiple cancer cell lines along with control. We have also evaluated its effect on different in vivo toxicity parameters. Here, we found that AEEA was found to be most active in most of the cancer cell lines but it significantly induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines by disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA damage. Moreover, AEEA treatment inhibited migration in both MCF 7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner. Further, AEEA possesses robust in vitro antioxidant activity along with high total phenolic and flavonoid contents. In summary, our results indicate that Eclipta alba has enormous potential in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Germination and Seed Bank Studies of Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae), a Federally Theatened Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Madsen Schulze; John L. Walker; Timothy P. Spira

    2002-01-01

    Macbridea alba (Lamiaceae) is a Federally threatened plant endemic to Florida. Seedlings are rarely observed in natural populations, but seed production has been documented. We assessed the germinability of dry-stored seeds and of experimentally buried seeds, and sampled soil to detect a persistent seed bank.More than 20% of recorded seeds...

  1. la distruzione dell'esperienza in quaderno proibito di alba de cés

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    the main works of Alba de Cespedes, Quaderno proibito. I will show how the .... un'opera abbastanza datata, che descrive un tipo di società e un mondo ... padre: romanzo sportivo nel 1935; Prigionie nel 1936; Concerto: racconti nel 1937). A.

  2. The root anchorage ability of Salix alba var. tristis using a pull-out test

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... In the last few years, Beijing Forestry University (China) and the University of Natural Resources and applied Life. Sciences (Austria) have examined the suitabilities and capabilities of soil bioengineering techniques under the local condition of Beijing. One of the plant species used was Salix alba var. tristis.

  3. Wood Anatomical Structure of Morus alba L. and Morus nigra L., Native to Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham KARAMI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Iran is a wast country with many different tree species. Among those there are two species of Morus genus including alba and nigra. Since long time ago, white mulberry�s wood (Morus alba has been used for making musical instruments especially bowl shaped instruments in Iran.. In contrast, black mulberry�s wood (Morus nigra has never been used for these types of applications. In order to investigate the possible replacement choices, this study has been carried out to investigate the anatomical differences and similarities between these two species. Wood samples of the two species have been collected from same site and microsections for light microscopic studies and maceration samples have been prepared. The anatomical characteristics were studied according to the IAWA List of Hardwoods. The most important similarities between them are: vessel solitary in short radial multiples or irregular clusters, fiber nonseptate, rays uniseriate and multiseriate type, paratracheal parenchyma, varying from vasicentric to aliform confluent, apotracheal as marginal bands, Rhombic crystals present in rays and sometimes in parenchyma. The main differences are: semi-ring porous distribution of vessels in M. alba, fewer number of vessels and presence of aliform parenchyma in M. nigra. Taking these results into consideration, the most important features of both species are similar and it could be recommended to use the nigra species as well as the alba for making musical instruments.

  4. Novel and cross-species microsatellite markers for parentage analysis in Sanderling Calidris alba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Bol, Anneke; Witte, Harry; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Haddrath, Oliver; Baker, Allan J.; Piersma, Theunis; Reneerkens, Jeroen

    We isolated and tested six novel microsatellite loci in Sanderling (Calidris alba) from Greenland for paternity analyses. In addition, we tested 11 already published microsatellite markers which were originally developed for the congeneric species, the Pectoral Sandpiper (C. melanotos). All loci

  5. Syringa oblata Lindl var. alba as a source of oleuropein and related compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenadis, N.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Boeren, J.A.; Tsimidou, M.Z.

    2007-01-01

    The leaf methanol extract of Syringa oblata Lindl var. alba was investigated as a source of oleuropein and related compounds. The extract had a high total phenol content and a radical scavenging activity similar to that of the respective extract from Olea europaea leaves. HPLC-DAD characterisation

  6. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Glamočlija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by ¹H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC. Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32% and geranial (50.94%. The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300-1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600-1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025-0.500 to 0.100-0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250-0.100 to 0.200-0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  7. Invasive sweetclover (Melilotus alba) impacts native seeding recruitment along floodplains of interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine T. Spellman; Tricia L. Wurtz

    2011-01-01

    Sweetclover (Melilotus alba) is a nonnative legume that has formed dense and extensive patches along several rivers in Alaska. Our research objective was to determine if sweetclover impacts recruitment of native seedlings in floodplain habitats. To determine if sweetclover impacted recruitment, we conducted a removal experiment along two rivers in...

  8. Alba-domain proteins of Trypanosoma brucei are cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins that interact with the translation machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mani

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei and related pathogens transcribe most genes as polycistronic arrays that are subsequently processed into monocistronic mRNAs. Expression is frequently regulated post-transcriptionally by cis-acting elements in the untranslated regions (UTRs. GPEET and EP procyclins are the major surface proteins of procyclic (insect midgut forms of T. brucei. Three regulatory elements common to the 3' UTRs of both mRNAs regulate mRNA turnover and translation. The glycerol-responsive element (GRE is unique to the GPEET 3' UTR and regulates its expression independently from EP. A synthetic RNA encompassing the GRE showed robust sequence-specific interactions with cytoplasmic proteins in electromobility shift assays. This, combined with column chromatography, led to the identification of 3 Alba-domain proteins. RNAi against Alba3 caused a growth phenotype and reduced the levels of Alba1 and Alba2 proteins, indicative of interactions between family members. Tandem-affinity purification and co-immunoprecipitation verified these interactions and also identified Alba4 in sub-stoichiometric amounts. Alba proteins are cytoplasmic and are recruited to starvation granules together with poly(A RNA. Concomitant depletion of all four Alba proteins by RNAi specifically reduced translation of a reporter transcript flanked by the GPEET 3' UTR. Pulldown of tagged Alba proteins confirmed interactions with poly(A binding proteins, ribosomal protein P0 and, in the case of Alba3, the cap-binding protein eIF4E4. In addition, Alba2 and Alba3 partially cosediment with polyribosomes in sucrose gradients. Alba-domain proteins seem to have exhibited great functional plasticity in the course of evolution. First identified as DNA-binding proteins in Archaea, then in association with nuclear RNase MRP/P in yeast and mammalian cells, they were recently described as components of a translationally silent complex containing stage-regulated mRNAs in Plasmodium. Our results are

  9. ALBA, organisation interaméricaine ou vénézuélienne ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Kourliandsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available L’«Alliance Bolivarienne des peuples de notre Amérique», ou ALBA, est de toutes les organisations interaméricaines celle dont l’identité est la plus originale. S’affirmant anti-impérialiste elle donne en effet à l’idéologie une place centrale qui commande la coopération entre ses membres. Mais l’ALBA au quotidien diffère-t-elle d’autres organisations d’intégration ? Le lien entre les différents pays qui la composent n’est-il pas au-delà de l’hommage unanime rendu à Bolivar bien davantage celui de pouvoir bénéficier du pétrole vénézuélien à un prix préférentiel ? L’ALBA, comme d’autres institutions latino-américaines, ne répond-elle pas à l’ambition d’un État, en l’occurrence ici le Venezuela, plus qu’à celle de construire un projet collectif pérenne? Ce lien entre le pétrole de son initiateur vénézuélien et l’ALBA, est une garantie pour le présent. Mais l’ALBA survivrait-elle à une alternance politique au Venezuela, ou à une chute des prix du baril affectant le nerf de l’organisation ?

  10. [Analysis of dynamic changes of flavonoids and alkaloids during different drying process of Morus alba leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yong-liang; Duan, Jin-ao; Su, Shu-lan; Qian, Ye-fei; Qian, Da-wei; Ouyang, Zhen

    2014-07-01

    To find out dynamic changes of flavonoids and alkaloids in Morus alba leaves by analyzing influence of different drying method and drying degrees, in order to provide evidence for quality evaluation of Morus alba leaves. Different drying methods, programmed temperature methods and constant temperature methods were adopted to dry Morus alba leaves samples respectively. Contents of flavonoids and alkaloids were analyzed by HPLC-PDA and LC-TQ/MS respectively. It's shown obviously that the content of flavonoids were influenced heavily by different drying methods. Methods that suitable for flavonoids were freezing-dried > shade-dried > dried > sun-dried > microwave-dried > infrared-dried; Methods that suitable for alkaloids were freezing-dried > shade-dried > dried > sun-dried > infrared-dried > microwave-dried. The 55 -65 degrees C group was shown to be the lowest in both flavonoids and DNJ while the 85 - 95 degrees C group was shown to be the best for DNJ. For fagomine, the 45 degrees C group was shown to be the lowest concentrations while the 95 - 105 degrees C group was shown to be the highest. Samples with different moisture were shown to be different in content of flavonoids and alkaloids. And samples with 10% moisture contain highest flavonoids while those with 30% - 50% moisture contain lowest flavonoids. Content of DNJ and fagomine raised as moisture decreasing. In addition, the 55 - 65 degrees C group was better than the 95 -105 degrees C one in alkaloids content. The results provide optimal drying methods and condition for drying Morus alba leaves, and foundations for uncovering biochemical transform of Morus alba leaves.

  11. Fast-growing Acer rubrum differs from slow-growing Quercus alba in leaf, xylem and hydraulic trait coordination responses to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Tomeo, Nicholas J; Hewins, Charlotte R; Rosenthal, David M

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of historic soil chemistry changes associated with acid rain, i.e., reduced soil pH and a shift from nitrogen (N)- to phosphorus (P)-limitation, on the coordination of leaf water demand and xylem hydraulic supply traits in two co-occurring temperate tree species differing in growth rate. Using a full-factorial design (N × P × pH), we measured leaf nutrient content, water relations, leaf-level and canopy-level gas exchange, total biomass and allocation, as well as stem xylem anatomy and hydraulic function for greenhouse-grown saplings of fast-growing Acer rubrum (L.) and slow-growing Quercus alba (L.). We used principle component analysis to characterize trait coordination. We found that N-limitation, but not P-limitation, had a significant impact on plant water relations and hydraulic coordination of both species. Fast-growing A. rubrum made hydraulic adjustments in response to N-limitation, but trait coordination was variable within treatments and did not fully compensate for changing allocation across N-availability. For slow-growing Q. alba, N-limitation engendered more strict coordination of leaf and xylem traits, resulting in similar leaf water content and hydraulic function across all treatments. Finally, low pH reduced the propensity of both species to adjust leaf water relations and xylem anatomical traits in response to nutrient manipulations. Our data suggest that a shift from N- to P-limitation has had a negative impact on the water relations and hydraulic function of A. rubrum to a greater extent than for Q. alba We suggest that current expansion of A. rubrum populations could be tempered by acidic N-deposition, which may restrict it to more mesic microsites. The disruption of hydraulic acclimation and coordination at low pH is emphasized as an interesting area of future study. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Vicariance and Oceanic Barriers Drive Contemporary Genetic Structure of Widespread Mangrove Species Sonneratia alba J. Sm in the Indo-West Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. S. Wee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic structure are essential for a comprehensive understanding of the evolution and biogeography of a species. Here, we investigated the genetic patterns of one of the most widespread and abundant mangrove species in the Indo-West Pacific, Sonneratia alba J. Sm., in order to gain insights into the ecological and evolutionary drivers of genetic structure in mangroves. We employed 11 nuclear microsatellite loci and two chloroplast regions to genotyped 25 S. alba populations. Our objectives were to (1 assess the level of genetic diversity and its geographic distribution; and (2 determine the genetic structure of the populations. Our results revealed significant genetic differentiation among populations. We detected a major genetic break between Indo-Malesia and Australasia, and further population subdivision within each oceanic region in these two major clusters. The phylogeographic patterns indicated a strong influence of vicariance, oceanic barriers and geographic distance on genetic structure. In addition, we found low genetic diversity and high genetic drift at range edge. This study advances the scope of mangrove biogeography by demonstrating a unique scenario whereby a widespread species has limited dispersal and high genetic divergence among populations.

  13. Oxidative stability of cnicken thigh meat after treatment of abies alba essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pavelková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the effect of the Abies alba essential oil in two different concentrations on oxidative stability of chicken thigh muscles during chilled storage was investigated. In the experiment were chickens of hybrid combination Cobb 500 after 42 days of the fattening period slaughtered.  All the broiler chickens were fed with the same feed mixtures and were kept under the same conditions. The feed mixtures were produced without any antibiotic preparations and coccidiostatics. After slaughtering was dissection obtained fresh chicken thigh with skin from left half-carcass which were divided into five groups (n = 5: C - control air-packaged group; A1 - vacuum-packaged experimental group; A2 - vacuum-packaged experimental group with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA solution 1.50% w/w; A3 - vacuum-packaged experimental group with Abies alba oil 0.10% v/w and A4 - vacuum-packaged experimental group with Abies alba oil 0.20% v/w. The Abies alba essential oil was applicate on ground chicken things and immediately after dipping, each sample was packaged using a vacuum packaging machine and storage in refrigerate at 4 ±0.5 °C. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA value expressed in number of malondialdehyde was measured in the process of first storage day of 1st, 4th, 8th, 12th and 16th day after slaughtering and expressed on the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA in 1 kg sample. The treatments of chicken things with Abies alba essential oil show statistically significant differences between all testing groups and control group, where higher average value of MDA measured in thigh muscle of broiler chickens was in samples of control group (0.4380 mg.kg-1 compared to experimental groups A1 (0.124 mg.kg-1, A2 (0.086 mg.kg-1, A3 (0.082 mg.kg-1 and A4 (0.077 mg.kg-1 after 16-day of chilled storage. Experiment results show that the treatment of chicken thigh with Abies alba essential oil positively influenced on the reduction of oxidative processes in thigh

  14. [Evaluate drug interaction of multi-components in Morus alba leaves based on α-glucosidase inhibitory activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tao; Su, Shu-Lan; Guo, Sheng; Qian, Da-Wei; Ouyang, Zhen; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2016-06-01

    Column chromatography was used for enrichment and separation of flavonoids, alkaloids and polysaccharides from the extracts of Morus alba leaves; glucose oxidase method was used with sucrose as the substrate to evaluate the multi-components of M. alba leaves in α-glucosidase inhibitory models; isobole method, Chou-Talalay combination index analysis and isobolographic analysis were used to evaluate the interaction effects and dose-effect characteristics of two components, providing scientific basis for revealing the hpyerglycemic mechanism of M. alba leaves. The components analysis showed that flavonoid content was 5.3%; organic phenolic acids content was 10.8%; DNJ content was 39.4%; and polysaccharide content was 18.9%. Activity evaluation results demonstrated that flavonoids, alkaloids and polysaccharides of M. alba leaves had significant inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase, and the inhibitory rate was increased with the increasing concentration. Alkaloids showed most significant inhibitory effects among these three components. Both compatibility of alkaloids and flavonoids, and the compatibility of alkaloids and polysaccharides demonstrated synergistic effects, but the compatibility of flavonoids and polysaccharides showed no obvious synergistic effects. The results have confirmed the interaction of multi-components from M. alba leaves to regulate blood sugar, and provided scientific basis for revealing hpyerglycemic effectiveness and mechanism of the multi-components from M. alba leaves. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Preface for the special issue of Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, BIOCOMP 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Aniello; Di Crescenzo, Antonio; Hastings, Alan

    2014-04-01

    The International Conference "BIOCOMP2012 - Mathematical Modeling and Computational Topics in Biosciences'', was held in Vietri sul Mare (Italy), June 4-8, 2012. It was dedicated to the Memory of Professor Luigi M. Ricciardi (1942-2011), who was a visionary and tireless promoter of the 3 previous editions of the BIOCOMP conference series. We thought that the best way to honor his memory was to continue the BIOCOMP program. Over the years, this conference promoted scientific activities related to his wide interests and scientific expertise, which ranged in various areas of applications of mathematics, probability and statistics to biosciences and cybernetics, also with emphasis on computational problems. We are pleased that many of his friends and colleagues, as well as many other scientists, were attracted by the goals of this recent event and offered to contribute to its success.

  16. Division of energy biosciences: Annual report and summaries of FY 1995 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanisms affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes.

  17. Determination of As in tree-rings of poplar (Populus alba L.) by U-shaped DC arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, D M; Novović, I; Vilotić, D; Ignjatović, Lj

    2009-04-01

    An argon-stabilized U-shaped DC arc with a system for aerosol introduction was used for determination of As in poplar (Populus alba L.) tree-rings. After optimization of the operating parameters and selection of the most appropriate signal integration time (30 s), the limit of detection for As was reduced to 15.0 ng/mL. This detection limit obtained with the optimal integration time was compared with those for other methods: inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), direct coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES), microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) and improved thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS). Arsenic is toxic trace element which can adversely affect plant, animal and human health. As an indicator of environment pollution we collected poplar tree-rings from two locations. The first area was close to the "Nikola Tesla" (TENT-A) power plant, Obrenovac, while the other was in the urban area of Novi Sad. In all cases elevated average concentrations of As were registered in poplar tree-rings from the Obrenovac location.

  18. Studies on middle silkgland proteins of cocoon colour sex-limited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 1. Studies on middle silkgland proteins of cocoon colour sex-limited silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Yuan-Xiang Jin Yu-Yin Chen Meng-Kui Xu Yong-Huang Jiang. Articles Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 45- ...

  19. HYSTOLOGICAL-FUNCTIONAL SPECIFITY OF NYMPHAEA ALBA L.VEGETATIVE ORGANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova V. N.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nymphaea alba L. belongs to aerohydrophytes and has all typical features of such ecological group. We found out the followings anatomic and functional features which are adaptation to the surplus of water: 1 formation of astrosklereid, which are the mechanical fabrics; 2 presence of large intercells which serve as plant fixation; 3 absence of stomas on the lower side of leaf and submarine organs that alterate the interchange of gases. The mycrochemical ash analysis of plant vegetative organs showed the presence of crystals of strontium, sulfur, potassium, ferrum, calcium, sodium, nitrogen, which vary by accumulation, form, and sizes, in vegetative organs (leaf, root and stem. We proved that quantitative, anatomical, and physiological peculiarities of Nymphaea alba L. vegetative organs uncover the mechanism of adaptation of aerohydrophytes to environment factors. The adaptative mechanisms of plant and their functioning are changed under influence of surplus of water.

  20. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  1. Pharmacognostical Standardization of Upodika- Basella alba L.: An Important Ayurvedic Antidiabetic Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Shantha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the pharmacognostic standards for the correct identification and standardization of an important Antidiabetic plant described in Ayurveda. Materials and Methods: Standardization was carried out on the leaf and stem of Basella alba L. with the help of the macro-morphological, microscopic, physicochemical and qualitative phytochemical studies. Results: Several specific characters were identified viz. clustered calcium oxalate crystals in the cortex region, absence of trichomes, succulent, thick, mucilaginous, fibrous stem. Rubiaceous type of stomata on both sides of the leaf. Quantitative microscopy along with physicochemical and qualitative phytochemical analysis were also established. Conclusion: The pharmacognostic standards could serve as the reference for the proper identification of the Basella alba L. which is an important anti-diabetic plant described in Ayurveda.

  2. Three New Isoprenylated Flavonoids from the Root Bark of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Ji-Hae; Lee, Yeong-Geun; Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Oh, Eun-Ji; Lee, Dae-Young; Lim, Dong-Wook; Han, Daeseok; Baek, Nam-In

    2016-08-24

    Phytochemical investigation of the root bark of Morus alba has led to the isolation and identification of three new isoprenylated flavonoids, namely sanggenon U (1), sanggenon V (2), and sanggenon W (3), along with four known isoprenylated flavonoids: euchrenone a₇ (4), sanggenon J (5), kuwanon E (6), and kuwanon S (7). All compounds were isolated by repeated silica gel (SiO₂), octadecyl SiO₂ (ODS), and Sephadex LH-20 open column chromatography. The structure of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic analyses, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), circular dichroism (CD), and infrared (IR). In addition, compounds 1-4 were isolated for the first time from the root bark of M. alba in this study.

  3. A new flavonoid glycoside from the root bark of Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hae; Jung, Ye-Jin; Jung, Jae-Woo; Shrestha, Sabina; Lim, Dong Wook; Han, Daeseok; Baek, Nam-In

    2014-01-01

    A new guibourtinidol glycoside, (2R,3S)-guibourtinidol-3-O-α-d-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), and three known compounds, quercetin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), syringaresinol-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3) and dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 4,9'-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba L. through repeated silica gel, octadecyl silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography for the n-BuOH fraction. The chemical structure of the compounds was elucidated based on MS, infrared, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. Compounds 2-4 were also isolated for the first time from the root bark of M. alba L. in this study.

  4. Can active learning principles be applied to the bioscience assessments of nursing students? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakon, Shannon; Craft, Judy; Christensen, Martin; Wirihana, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    To explore if active learning principles be applied to nursing bioscience assessments and will this influence student perception of confidence in applying theory to practice? A review of the literature utilising searches of various databases including CINAHL, PUBMED, Google Scholar and Mosby's Journal Index. The literature search identified research from twenty-six original articles, two electronic books, one published book and one conference proceedings paper. Bioscience has been identified as an area that nurses struggle to learn in tertiary institutions and then apply to clinical practice. A number of problems have been identified and explored that may contribute to this poor understanding and retention. University academics need to be knowledgeable of innovative teaching and assessing modalities that focus on enhancing student learning and address the integration issues associated with the theory practice gap. Increased bioscience education is associated with improved patient outcomes therefore by addressing this "bioscience problem" and improving the integration of bioscience in clinical practice there will subsequently be an improvement in health care outcomes. From the literature several themes were identified. First there are many problems with teaching nursing students bioscience education. These include class sizes, motivation, concentration, delivery mode, lecturer perspectives, student's previous knowledge, anxiety, and a lack of confidence. Among these influences the type of assessment employed by the educator has not been explored or identified as a contributor to student learning specifically in nursing bioscience instruction. Second that educating could be achieved more effectively if active learning principles were applied and the needs and expectations of the student were met. Lastly, assessment influences student retention and the student experience and as such assessment should be congruent with the subject content, align with the learning

  5. Solvent Effect on Antioxidant Activity and Total Phenolic Content of Betula alba and Convolvulus arvensi

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Azman A. Nurul; Husni Shafik; Almajano P. Maria; Gallego G. Maria

    2013-01-01

    The potential of using herbal Betula alba (BA) and Convolvulus arvensis (CA) as a natural antioxidant for food applications were investigated. Each plant extract was prepared by using pure ethanol, different concentration of ethanol aqueous solutions, including 50% and 75%, 50% methanol aqueous and water. Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using Folin–Ciocalteau method and antioxidant activity were analyzed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, trolox equivalent antioxida...

  6. Insights into some physiological and biochemical responses of Populus alba and Populus nigra to lead contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Etemadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of lead (PbCl2 increment, under hydroponic conditions up to 15, 45 and 90 mg/l in presence of EDTA, on some physiological and biochemical traits of one year old saplings of P. nigra and P. alba, were investigated. Six weeks after establishing in target concentration, the amount of lead, biomass, water, soluble sugars, proline, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde, and pigments were assessed in different organs. The results revealed that with increasing lead concentration in culture medium in the studied period, the amount of lead in saplings increased, but no effect was observed on their biomass. In both species the magnitude of lead accumulation in root was higher than leaf. P. nigra had more water and less soluble sugars than P. alba. The concentration of soluble sugars increased up to 1.5 times with lead increment in both species, but proline content increased only in P. nigra up to 2 times and remained constant in P. alba. Elevation of electrolyte leakage in saplings of P. nigra in excess lead treatment was accompanied by no change in malondialdehyde content. Concentrations of pigments were not affected by lead, and only the ratio of chlorophyll a to b in P. nigra increased in high lead concentration. In general both species accumulated high extent of lead in their organs. But it seems that P. nigra, at least with respect of enhancing plasma membrane permeability, increasing proline and the ratio of chlorophyll a to b, was more sensitive to this toxic metal in compare with P. alba.

  7. Epicuticular wax on stomata of damaged silver fir trees (Abies alba Mili.)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomislav Bačić; Ljiljana Krstin; Jadranka Roša; Željko Popović

    2011-01-01

    Condition of epistomatal wax on the abaxial surface of the current and previous-year needles of damaged silver fir trees (Abies alba Mill.), both from the polluted Risnjak and "clean" Donja Dobra sites in Gorski Kotar region, both influenced by pollutants coming from Europe, during two years, three times a year, were examined with Scanning Electron Microscope. In the course of time the wax tubules on the epistomatal rims of stomata in polluted, but also in "clean" needles surface, become fuse...

  8. El ALBA y los “anti”. Un proyecto de integración alternativo latinoamericano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo A. Abadía

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reseña del libro:Bagley, B. M. y Defort M. (Eds. (2014. ¿La hegemonía norteamericana en declive? El desafío del ALBA y la nueva integración latinoamericana del siglo XXI. ColecciónEl sur es cielo roto. Cali, Colombia: Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Sociales,Universidad Icesi. 640 pp.

  9. Anti-stress effect of ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Morus alba in chronic restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nade, Vandana S; Yadav, Adhikrao V

    2010-09-01

    Restraint stress is a well-known method to induce chronic stress which leads to alterations in various behavioral and biochemical parameters. The present work was designed to study anti-stress effects of Morus alba in chronic restraint stress (RS)-induced perturbations in behavioral, biochemical and brain oxidative stress status. The stress was produced by restraining the animals inside an adjustable cylindrical plastic tube for 3 h once daily for ten consecutive days. The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Morus alba (EASF) 25, 50, 100 mg/kg and diazepam (1 mg/kg) per day was administered 60 min prior to the stress procedure. The behavioral and biochemical parameters such as open field, cognitive dysfunction; leucocytes count; blood glucose and corticosteroid levels were determined. On day 10, the rats were sacrificed and biochemical assessment of superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GSH) in whole rat brain were performed. Chronic restraint stress produced cognitive dysfunction, altered behavioral parameters, increased leucocytes count, SOD, LPO, glucose and corticosterone levels, with concomitant decrease in CAT and GSH activities. Gastric ulceration, adrenal gland and spleen weights were also used as the stress indices. All these RS induced perturbations were attenuated by EASF of Morus alba. The results of the study suggest that in addition to its classically established pharmacological activities, the plant also has immense potential as an anti-stress agent of great therapeutic relevance. This study indicates the beneficial role of Morus alba for the treatment of oxidative stress-induced disorders.

  10. Two new phenolic constituents from the root bark of Morus alba L. and their cardioprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Gang; Zheng, Xiao-Ke; Yang, Fang-Fang; Li, Fang; Qi, Man; Zhang, Yan-Li; Zhao, Xuan; Kuang, Hai-Xue; Feng, Wei-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    A new biphenyl-furocoumarin, named morescoumarin A (1), and a new prenylated flavanone, named morflavanone A (2) were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba L., together with four known compounds (3-6). Their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic analyses and comparison with literature data. The cardioprotective effects of these compounds against doxorubicin-induced cell death were evaluated by MTT method.

  11. Terpenoid Profile of Artemisia Alba is Related to Endogenous Cytokinins in Vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krumova, S.; Motyka, Václav; Dobrev, Petre; Todorova, M.; Trendafilova, A.; Evstatieva, L.; Danova, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2013), s. 26-30 ISSN 1310-0351 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/11/0774 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Artemisia alba * in vitro * endogenous cytokinins Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.136, year: 2012 http://www.agrojournal.org/19/02-06s.pdf

  12. Pollos cuello desnudo alimentados con harina de Morus alba y Cajanus cajan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tito Solís-Barros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la investigación fue estudiar el comportamiento productivo de pollos cuello desnudo heterocigotos que se alimentaron con harina de hojas de Morus alba y granos de Cajanus cajan tostados a 120 ºC por 12 min, se utilizaron 144 pollos sexados de la estirpe T451N de 1 a 90 d de edad. Se distribuyeron según diseño de bloques al azar, en tres tratamientos, 48 pollos por tratamiento repartidos en ocho réplicas. Fueron criados en piso, en instalaciones rústicas. Se evaluaron indicadores productivos como el consumo de alimento, ganancia de peso promedio diario, conversión alimentaria y la eficiencia en el uso de los nutrientes. Los tratamientos fueron: T1=Control, T2=5% Cajanus cajan y 3% Morus alba y T3=3% C. cajan y 5% M. alba. El control consumió maíz y soya, como dieta base. La mayor ingestión de alimento (p

  13. WINE ROAD - AN INSTRUMENT FOR THE VALORISATION OF WINE TOURISM POTENTIAL CASE STUDY: ALBA COUNTY VINEYARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UNGUREANU Mihaela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to highlight the wine-growing and wine-making potential of Alba County and the way it can be valorised. Alba county has a rich winegrowing and wine-making heritage, a fact which is due to the long-standing tradition of winegrowing on these area, as well as to the characteristics of the natural factors (relief, geology, climate, soil, favourable for obtaining high-quality wines, the reputation of which has been acquired at national and international competitions. In order to render useful the wine tourism resources, the development of a specific infrastructure is needed, as well as the creation of complex tourist products, able to satisfy a wide range of tourist motivations. An efficient instrument to make productive the wine potential of a region is the „Wine Road" – a tourist trail which includes the tourist attractions of a delimited area, usually with a controlled designation of origin, and also a diverse range of tourist services (transportation, accommodation, catering leisure etc.. In Alba County, the „Wine Road" can be considered as a tourist attraction in itself, but also a means of harnessing the rich cultural-historical and natural heritage and, implicitly, the wine-growing and wine-making heritage.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of plant extracts of Avicennia alba against some important pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varahalarao Vadlapudi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this present study antimicrobial activity of aerial parts of Avicennia alba were evaluated against the resistant pathogens belong to aquatic, human and plant origin. Methods: Soxhlet extraction method was used to get the corresponding extracts of hexane, chloroform and methanol. The antimicrobial activities of the organic solvent extracts on the various test microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi investigated using agar well diffusion technique. The length of inhibition zone was measured in millimeters from the edge of the well to the edge of the inhibition zone. Methanol and chloroform extracts exhibited promising antimicrobial activity than hexane extracts. Results: The zone of inhibition of chloroform varies from (9 to 17 mm where as with methanol (11 to 28 mm at 100 mg/ml concentration. Among all microorganisms studied Erwinia caratovara and Pseudomonas syringae showed the considerable growth inhibition with chloroform and methanolic extracts. Conclusions: A. alba can be used in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by resistant pathogenic microorganisms. Further studies are being carried out in order to separate the individual components that are present in plant extracts of A. alba using column chromatography.

  15. Characterization of a New Flavone and Tyrosinase Inhibition Constituents from the Twigs of Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Tao, Guanjun; Chen, Jie; Zheng, Zong-Ping

    2016-09-02

    The twigs of Morus alba L. were found to show strong tyrosinase inhibition activity, and the responsible active components in the extract were further investigated in this study. A flavone, named morusone (1), and sixteen known compounds 2-17 were isolated from M. alba twigs and their structures were identified by interpretation of the corresponding ESI-MS and NMR spectral data. In the tyrosinase inhibitory test, the compounds steppogenin (IC50 0.98 ± 0.01 µM), 2,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalcone (IC50 0.07 ± 0.02 µM), morachalcone A (IC50 0.08 ± 0.02 µM), oxyresveratrol (IC50 0.10 ± 0.01 µM), and moracin M (8.00 ± 0.22 µM) exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibition activities, much stronger than that of the positive control kojic acid. These results suggest that M. alba twig extract should served as a good source of natural tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods as antibrowning agents or in cosmetics as skin-whitening agents.

  16. Odisolane, a Novel Oxolane Derivative, and Antiangiogenic Constituents from the Fruits of Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoung Rak; Park, Jun Yeon; Yu, Jae Sik; Lee, Sung Ok; Ryu, Ja-Young; Choi, Sang-Zin; Kang, Ki Sung; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-05-18

    Mulberry, the fruit of Morus alba L., is known as an edible fruit and commonly used in Chinese medicines as a warming agent and as a sedative, tonic, laxative, odontalgic, expectorant, anthelmintic, and emetic. Systemic investigation of the chemical constituents of M. alba fruits led to the identification of a novel oxolane derivative, (R*)-2-((2S*,3R*)-tetrahydro-2-hydroxy-2-methylfuran-3-yl)propanoic acid (1), namely, odisolane, along with five known heterocyclic compounds (2-6). The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) data analysis. Compound 1 has a novel skeleton that consists of 8 carbon units with an oxolane ring, which until now has never been identified in natural products. The isolated compounds were subjected to several activity tests to verify their biological function. Among them, compounds 1, 3, and 5 significantly inhibited cord formation in HUVECs. The action mechanism of compound 3, which had the strongest antiangiogenic activity, was mediated by decreasing VEGF, p-Akt, and p-ERK protein expression. These results suggest that compounds isolated from M. alba fruits might be beneficial in antiangiogenesis therapy for cancer treatment.

  17. Characterization of a New Flavone and Tyrosinase Inhibition Constituents from the Twigs of Morus alba L.

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    Long Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The twigs of Morus alba L. were found to show strong tyrosinase inhibition activity, and the responsible active components in the extract were further investigated in this study. A flavone, named morusone (1, and sixteen known compounds 2–17 were isolated from M. alba twigs and their structures were identified by interpretation of the corresponding ESI-MS and NMR spectral data. In the tyrosinase inhibitory test, the compounds steppogenin (IC50 0.98 ± 0.01 µM, 2,4,2′,4′-tetrahydroxychalcone (IC50 0.07 ± 0.02 µM, morachalcone A (IC50 0.08 ± 0.02 µM, oxyresveratrol (IC50 0.10 ± 0.01 µM, and moracin M (8.00 ± 0.22 µM exhibited significant tyrosinase inhibition activities, much stronger than that of the positive control kojic acid. These results suggest that M. alba twig extract should served as a good source of natural tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods as antibrowning agents or in cosmetics as skin-whitening agents.

  18. Pancreatic lipase inhibitory constituents from Morus alba leaves and optimization for extraction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji Yeon; Jo, Yang Hee; Kim, Seon Beom; Liu, Qing; Lee, Jin Woo; Mo, Eun Jin; Lee, Ki Yong; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    The leaves of Morus alba (Moraceae) have been traditionally used for the treatment of metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Thus, inhibitory effect of M. alba leaves on pancreatic lipase and their active constituents were investigated in this study. Twenty phenolic compounds including ten flavonoids, eight benzofurans, one stilbene and one chalcones were isolated from the leaves of M. alba. Among the isolated compounds, morachalcone A (20) exerted strong pancreatic lipase inhibition with IC50 value of 6.2 μM. Other phenolic compounds containing a prenyl group showed moderate pancreatic lipase inhibition with IC50 value of <50 μM. Next, extraction conditions with maximum pancreatic lipase inhibition and phenolic content were optimized using response surface methodology with three-level-three-factor Box-Behnken design. Our results suggested the optimized extraction condition for maximum pancreatic lipase inhibition and phenolic content as ethanol concentration of 74.9%; temperature 57.4 °C and sample/solvent ratio, 1/10. The pancreatic lipase inhibition and total phenolic content under optimized condition were found to be 58.5% and 26.2 μg GAE (gallic acid equivalent)/mg extract, respectively, which were well matched with the predicted value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxyresveratrol, a Stilbene Compound from Morus alba L. Twig Extract Active Against Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Peng; Jia, Ya-Nan; Peng, Ya-Lin; Yu, Yan; Sun, Si-Long; Yue, Meng-Ting; Pan, Min-Hui; Zeng, Ling-Shu; Xu, Li

    2017-12-01

    Morus alba L. (mulberry) twig is known to have an inhibitory effect on pathogens in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study, the dermophytic fungus, Trichophyton rubrum, was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of total M. alba twig extract and extracts obtained using solvents with different polarities by the method of 96-well MTT colorimetry. The main active substance was isolated and identified by tracking its activity. In addition, the inhibitory effects of active extracts and a single active substance were investigated in combination with miconazole nitrate. Our data indicated that ethyl acetate extracts of mulberry twig (TEE) exhibited a desired inhibitory activity on T. rubrum with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.000 mg/mL. With activity tracking, the main substance showing antimicrobial activity was oxyresveratrol (OXY), which was isolated from TEE. Its MIC for inhibiting the growth of T. rubrum was 0.500 mg/mL. The combined use of miconazole nitrate and OXY showed a synergistic inhibitory effect, as shown by a significant decrease in the MIC of both components. Based on the OXY content in TEE, the contribution rate of OXY to the inhibitory effect of TEE on T. rubrum was 80.52%, so it was determined to be the main antimicrobial substance in M. alba twig. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Anti-Alzheimer's disease activity of compounds from the root bark of Morus alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Eun Bi; Jo, A Ra; Oh, Seo In; Sohn, Hee Sook; Seong, Su Hui; Roy, Anupom; Choi, Jae Sue; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2017-03-01

    The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays important roles in prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among the individual parts of Morus alba L. including root bark, branches, leaves, and fruits, the root bark showed the most potent enzyme inhibitory activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-AD activity of the M. alba root bark and its isolate compounds, including mulberrofuran G (1), albanol B (2), and kuwanon G (3) via inhibition of AChE, BChE, and BACE1. Compounds 1 and 2 showed strong AChE- and BChE-inhibitory activities; 1-3 showed significant BACE1 inhibitory activity. Based on the kinetic study with AChE and BChE, 2 and 3 showed noncompetitive-type inhibition; 1 showed mixed-type inhibition. Moreover, 1-3 showed mixed-type inhibition against BACE1. The molecular docking simulations of 1-3 demonstrated negative binding energies, indicating a high affinity to AChE and BACE1. The hydroxyl group of 1-3 formed hydrogen bond with the amino acid residues located at AChE and BACE1. Consequently, these results indicate that the root bark of M. alba and its active compounds might be promising candidates for preventive and therapeutic agents for AD.