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Sample records for alara

  1. Alara in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews how the general frameworks of the ALARA procedures, ALARA Audits and Predictive ALARA Plans can be used in the non-nuclear power sector to give practical effect to the concept of optimization. The development of the use of ALARA Audits as an integral part of a Radiation Protection Adviser service and our experience of this structured approach is described. Particular attention is drawn to the use of site specific reference levels to trigger graded levels of response to increasing doses. Also several examples of the use of Cost Benefit Analysis within the ALARA Procedure are briefly described

  2. ALARA development in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, M.A.M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Col Lomas de Barrilaco (Mexico)

    1995-03-01

    Even though the ALARA philosophy was formally implemented in the early 1980`s, to some extent, ALARA considerations already had been incorporated into the design of most commercial equipment and facilities based on experience and engineering development. In Mexico, the design of medical and industrial facilities were based on international recommendations containing those considerations. With the construction of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station, formal ALARA groups were created to review some parts of its design, and to prepare the ALARA Program and related procedures necessary for its commercial operation. This paper begins with a brief historical description of ALARA development in Mexico, and then goes on to discuss our regulatory frame in Radiation Protection, some aspects of the ALARA Program, efforts in controlling and reducing of sources of radiation, and finally, future perspectives in the ALARA field.

  3. What is ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.; Dickson, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy as it applies to personnel radiation exposure has been with us for a long time. The essential tenets of this philosophy surfaced quite early in the history of the Manhattan Project. Although the terminology has suffered through various translations and the application has seen many organizations and agencies come and go, the principles remain as valid today as ever. It is regretable that some regulatory agencies claim ALARA as their newfound miracle drug and that application according to their prescriptions will result in endless rounds of cyclical improvement in radiation protection practices. Others have taken advantage of the popularity of ALARA and have bastardized the philosophy to mean whatever is expedient for their purposes. In this paper, we review briefly the history of ALARA and what it seemingly means to different interest groups and offer a balanced viewpoint that health physicists should adopt

  4. The european ALARA network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croueail, P.; Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.

    2000-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s the European Commission sponsored projects on the understanding and practical implementation of the ALARA principle. These projects helped ensure that ALARA was integrated into many organisations radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry. However there was still much to be done in the non-nuclear sector, as well as for the management of internal exposure. Therefore, the European Commission decided to set up, as of the first January 1996, a European ALARA Network (EAN) whose main goals are to: Further promote ALARA within non nuclear industry, research and the nuclear cycle; Provide a means for feedback experience and the exchange and dissemination of good radiological protection practices in these areas; Initiate proposals for research projects and workshops on topics dealing with optimisation of radiological protection for all types of occupational exposure. The Network has a Steering Committee of experts from 11 countries, with CEPN being the co-ordinator. Twice yearly, the EAN products for the international community a European ALARA Newsletter that reaches several thousand individuals or institutions, mainly in Europe. Each year since 1997, the EAN has organised an ALARA workshop attended by 60 to 80 experts from about ten countries. The first three Workshops were devoted to: ALARA and Decommissioning (1997, Saclay, France), Good Radiation Practices in Industry and Research (1998, Chilton, United Kingdam), and ALARA and Internal Exposure (1999, Munich, Germany). Each of these Workshops gave rise to sets of recommendations to the European Commission which included proposals for further research, modification of regulations, and actions to support feedback experience within the member states. (author)

  5. Alara and radiodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Wall, B.F.

    1989-01-01

    Specific items of diagnostic radiology facing the application to the ALARA approach are described, there differentiating among workers and patients. The convenience of assessing monetary values for the person. Sv in both cases is emphasized. The paper analyses some of the different steps to be considered in the optimization of diagnostic radiology installations, namely, rooms design and equipment selection, possibly modifications in installations currently working, requesting of radiological examinations, performing examinations and information exploitation. Some practical matters related to workers and patients are discussed, quoting several specific examples of optimization. The paper suggests, as conclusion, some practical guidelines of the stages to be covered along with the application of the ALARA approach

  6. ALARA training at INSTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Lefaure, C.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1990 the CEPN, the National Radiological Protection Board and the INSTN organized for the first time in Europe one teaching specifically established to radioprotection optimization. This training has allowed to spread the experience of the best european specialists while guaranteeing a wide exchange between the participants coming from different countries. At the national level the training ALARA goes on at the INSTN-Saclay. Its aim is to give base notions, the methods and the tools allowing the implementation of the ALARA concept, and to privilege the exchange between the participants coming from different horizons. 2 refs., 2 figs

  7. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1994-02-01

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI's low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan

  8. ALARA for the practical person

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The increasing significance of ALARA in recent years has spawned numerous articles and complex technological means to achieve as low as reasonably achievable. The available body of literature on ALARA has grown so large and complex that it is an overwhelming and virtually impossible task for a single individual to remain abreast of it. Regulatory requirements and interpretations of ALARA further add to the difficulties of the operational radiation protection staff seeking ALARA. The practical person can, however, promote and provide ALARA by recalling and applying certain simple principles, including the following, which will be discussed in depth: (1) ALARA is basic and fundamental to any program of radiological protection, and as such the ALARA program or practices must be specifically identifiable. (2) ALARA is a never ending quest, and much like the speed of light or halving the distance to the goal, can really never be reached in a theoretical sense. (3) ALARA is not necessarily synonymous with dose reduction, and certainly does not involve ever continuous reduction in dose. (4) There is no single monetary value applicable to a unit of dose; rather each incremental unit of dose must be examined in the total context of the exposure situation. (5) ALARA involves professional opinion and judgment; responsible and qualified professional health physicists may differ in their opinions as to what constitutes ALARA

  9. How reasonable is ALARA?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The linear extrapolation of the established dose-effect relation at higher doses was accepted as a simple working hypothesis to determine dose limits for professional radiation personnel. It has been misused, however, for calculations of population risks in the very low dose region. This lead to an overestimation of radiation hazards by the public, followed by an overregulation of radiation protection. The ALARA recommendations of ICRP - justification of radiation application, optimisation of protection, and protection of the individual, - was aimed at counterpoising this trend and elucidate the aims of radiation protection. But even the ALARA principle will only be successful if it is applied with reason. The lend more weight to reason in radiation protection, an award for FS members is proposed, as well as an anti-award for the most nonsensical action in radiation protection. (orig.) [de

  10. ALARA: Progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper has two main topics. The first part describes the establishment and work of the ALARA Center; the second part presents some results of studies at the Center with international data on doses at PWR plants. This data then is used to reach a preliminary understanding of some of the factors that are causing high doses at PWRs. This approach should help in reducing occupational exposures in a more effective manner

  11. Applied ALARA techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work

  12. Applied ALARA techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  13. ALARA/ALARP distinguished

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the United Kingdom the term ALARA, ''as low as reasonably achievable'' and the term ALARP ''as low as reasonably practicable'' are used in regulations, in conditions in licenses, in assessment principles and in guidance notes used in the nuclear industry. In fact the ALARA principle is a cornerstone on which much of radiation protection regulation is based. The words ''reasonably practicable'' in ALARP have an established meaning in UK law and are used extensively in statutes and regulations, in particular The Health and Safety Act 1974. The Select Committee of the House of Lords on the European Communities in 1986 concluded that public opinion will play a much larger part in deciding the future of nuclear power than is usual with questions of science and technology. Under the circumstances it is important to industry and the general public for the terms used in legislation to be clear and unambiguous. This paper by distinguishing the terms ALARA/ALARP, sets the scene for a more disciplined use of the terms. (author)

  14. What is Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Lochard, J.; Lombard, J.; Croft, J.; Fleishman, A.; Webb, G.

    1986-09-01

    The system of dose limitation recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection formulates three radiation protection principles: 1) the so-called justification principle which states that no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit; 2) the so-called optimisation principle which states that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; 3) the limitation of individual dose which insures that the dose equivalent to an individual shall not exceed the limits recommended by the ICRP. Acknowledging the fact that these requirements are interrelated, this report is devoted to a presentation of the second principle, assuming that the two other ones are satisfied. As defined by ICRP, the optimisation principle is strictly equivalent with the commonly known ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). ALARA may be considered altogether as a guiding principle for radiological protection management, as well as a procedure allowing the implementation of this principle

  15. EAN - The European ALARA Network; EAN - Le Reseau ALARA Europeen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Hanning, A. [Office federal de la radioprotection (BfS) (Germany); Crouail, P.; Drouet, F. [Centre d' etude sur l' evaluation de la protection dans le domaine nucleaire (CEPN) (France); Shaw, P. [Agence de protection sanitaire (HPA) (United Kingdom); Vermeersch, F. [EAN, Centre d' etude de l' energie nucleaire (SCK-CEN) (Belgium)

    2010-11-15

    The optimisation of radiation protection, or ALARA principle, which requires that exposures to ionising radiation be kept as low as reasonably achievable taking into account economic and societal factors, is the cornerstone of the radiation protection system since the late eighties. For many years now, cooperation of experts from different professional backgrounds and different organisations in the European ALARA Network (EAN) has significantly contributed to the development of the ALARA principle and its practical implementation in a range of radiation protection areas in Europe. This contribution presents the evolution and key activities of EAN as well as its mode of operation aiming at sharing experience and disseminating the ALARA culture in all relevant domains. It also describes the new challenges facing EAN and the strategic objectives of the Network for the forthcoming years. (author)

  16. Alara and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstrom, B.

    1989-01-01

    All occupational radiation doses come out as a product of dose rates and exposure time, ie man-hours. In most cases there is not very much to be done about the dose rates, but by means of work management a lot can still be achieved. Non-technical factors which have an influence on the radiation doses are, for instance, work planning and co-ordination, training and know-how, optimization of the work force, health physics practice and time scheduling. These work management factors can be put to use at any nuclear power plant, regardless modern and clean or old and hot. As ALARA through work management in most cases means minimization of man-hours, it is worth while in two senses: One can save radiation doses and one can save money at the same time

  17. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials

  18. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-06-06

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

  19. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.; Pfeffer, W.; Zeevaert, T.

    1995-01-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe

  20. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C. [CEPN, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Croft, J. [NRPB, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Pfeffer, W. [GRS, Koeln (Germany); Zeevaert, T. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-03-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe.

  1. ALARA for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is outlined in connection with nuclear power plant operations. The basis of the concept is reviewed and a specific example of ALARA action is presented. (author)

  2. Radiation worker: the ALARA key

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weedon, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is a simple concept that has come to be a complicated and expensive regulatory goal. There are essentially three factors that can be manipulated to achieve ALARA: (1) radionuclide inventory (source), (2) physical arrangement (primarily distance and shielding); (3) radiation worker performance (radiation safety responsibilities and functions). Of these three elements, item 3 is utilized the least and yet has the greatest potential for reducing exposure per dollar expended. By establishing a relationship with radiation workers consisting of credible leadership and expecting the radiation workers to be responsible for specific elements of radiological safety. Health Physics can gain a degree of cooperation and performance that will provide significant ALARA gains at a very small expense

  3. ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of the ALARA principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed through a variety of dose reduction techniques. Initiatives by the ICRP, NCRP, NRC, INPO, EPRI, and BNL ALARA Center have all contributed to a heightened interest and emphasis on dose reduction. The NCRP has formed Scientific Committee 46-9 which is developing a report on ALARA at Nuclear Power Plants. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction ($/person-Sv), quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report

  4. Gentilly - 2 NGS ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheaume, Michel R.

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide-based oral presentation given to the COG/IAEA: Fifth technical committee meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors' held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. The operation experience of Gentilly -1 and Gentilly - 2 nuclear power stations is summarized. The radiation protection philosophy is addressed, the orange/yellow/green RP qualifications are explained and the ALARA Program objectives are described. The criteria used to develop the Gentilly - 2 station ALARA Program are presented. The program is based on: strong Hydro Quebec commitments, organization (responsibilities well defined); ALARA Committee; tools; procedures; good documentation. Description of the program is given then in details. Measures for dose and radioactive sources reduction are presented. Collective doses recorded at Gentilly - 2 between 1984 and 1997 are plotted and figures are given in a table

  5. ALARA and planning of interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocaboy, A. [Electricite de France, Avoine (France)

    1995-03-01

    The implementation of ALARA programs implies integration of radiation protection criterion at all stages of outage management. Within the framework of its ALARA policy, Electricide de France (EDF) has given an incentive to all of its nuclear power plants to develop {open_quotes}good practices{close_quotes} in this domain, and to exchange their experience by the way of a national feed back file. Among the developments in the field of outage organization, some plants have focused on the planning stage of activities because of its influence on the radiological conditions of interventions and on the good succession of tasks within the radiological controlled areas. This paper presents the experience of Chinon nuclear power plant. At Chinon, we are pursuing this goal through careful outage planning. We want the ALARA program during outages to be part of the overall maintenance task planning. This planning includes the provision of the availability of every safety-related component, and of the variations of water levels in hthereactor and steam generators to take advantage of the shield created by the water. We have developed a computerized data base with the exact position of all the components in the reactor building in order to avoid unnecessary interactions between different tasks performed in the same room. A common language between Operation and Maintenance had been established over the past years, using {open_quotes}Milestones and Corridors{close_quotes}. A real time dose rate counting system enables the Radiation Protection (RP) Department to do an accurate and efficient follow up during the outage for all the {open_quotes}ALARA{close_quotes} maintenance tasks.

  6. Catawba nuclear station preoperational ALARA review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the particular emphasis placed on preoperational as los as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations at Duke Power's Catawba Nuclear Station. A strong station commitment to the ALARA philosophy, and review of existing capabilities, led to development of an aggressive two-part ALARA program. Capabilities consisted of sufficient numbers of available personnel, lengthy lead time during construction, a very detailed plastic model, and a sister plant of similar design. The program, as developed, consisted of a preoperational program, which looked at design and construction aspects of ALARA, and the operational program, dealing with the ALARA committee and operational problems. MAnagement's philosophy of holding everyone responsible for ALARA provided the motivation to organize the preoperational program to use that resource. The Health Physics group accepted responsibility for development, coordination, and reviewer training. The problem provided a base to build on as station personnel gained experience in their own crafts and radiation protection in general

  7. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA

  8. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA.

  9. Integrating ALARA into work planning and organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.R.; Robb, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents various organizational structures and systematic approaches that can be of benefit in integrating ALARA into work planning and organization. It is possible to have elegant policy statements, procedures and organizations and yet fail to implement ALARA effectively. The real key to success in ALARA work management is to recognize that ALARA is primarily a way of thinking and to secure the commitment of individuals at all levels within the organization, from senior management to workers carrying out specific tasks. The authors explain that the recommendations of ICRP Publication 60 will have an impact and will maintain the downward pressure on individual doses. 6 figs

  10. Chernobyl information: The ALARA backlash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsson, C.

    2000-01-01

    The risk information to the public failed after the Chernobyl accident, also in countries where radiation protection authorities and experts initially enjoyed public confidence. In contrast to many other large accidents, the responsibility for the information failure stays mainly with the authorities and experts themselves, not with the mass media. Many factors together caused the radiation risk information from SSI (Swedish Radiation Protection Institute), and its sister authorities in many other countries, to be confusing and inadequate, despite the best of intentions. The two major malefactors were the handling of food contamination restrictions and the short-sighted risk optimisation by applying the ALARA principle. In addition, the assurance that the Chernobyl contamination was fairly harmless made no sense to the layman, as a massive array of controlling procedures was enforced simultaneously. The food regulations became unfortunately focused on becquerel per kilogram limits instead of the primary goal, a dose reduction per year, corresponding to an yearly intake of Cs-137. The lesson learned is that the risk significant long-term intake ambition must be understood and digested by laymen and media, before any secondary limits, e.g. the activity concentration of foodstuffs expressed as becquerel per kg, for controlling or trading purposes, are introduced. As it were, the experts and authorities lost credibility, due to what people considered as ambiguities. The concept of ALARA (As Low As Readily Achievable) is in the backbone of every ionising radiation expert, and a useful strategy for optimising dose burdens during controlled situations. In connection to the Chernobyl accident many advices to the public was given based on the ALARA principle. 'Rinse leafy vegetables' sounds at first very reasonable, cheap and innocent, but if the averted dose is low, such an advice should not be given. The individual dose-reduction should be weighted against all negative

  11. Practical quantitative measures of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; Larson, H.V.

    1982-06-01

    Twenty specific quantitative measures to assist in evaluating the effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) programs are described along with their applicability, practicality, advantages, disadvantages, and potential for misinterpretation or dortion. Although no single index or combination of indices is suitable for all facilities, generally, these five: (1) mean individual dose equivalent (MIDE) to the total body from penetrating radiations; (2) statistical distribution of MIDE to the whole body from penetrating radiations; (3) cumulative penetrating whole body dose equivalent; (4) MIDE evaluated by job classification; and (5) MIDE evaluated by work location-apply to most programs. Evaluation of other programs may require other specific dose equivalent based indices, including extremity exposure data, cumulative dose equivalent to organs or to the general population, and nonpenetrating radiation dose equivalents. Certain nondose equivalent indices, such as the size of the radiation or contamination area, may also be used; an airborne activity index based on air concentration, room volume, and radiotoxicity is developed for application in some ALARA programs

  12. Preliminary ALARA design concept for SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Kim, Seung Nam; Kim, Ha Yong; Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1999-03-01

    SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is a space saving integral type nuclear rector with the thermal power of 330 MW. This report provides general design guide and authority in NSSS designs for SMART needed to maintain the occupational doses and doses to members of public ALARA to meet the regulatory requirements. Paragraph 20.1 of 10 CFR 20, ''Standards for Protection Against Radiation'', states that licensee should make every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the limits specified in Part 20 as is reasonably achievable. The ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle is incorporated into Korean radiation protection law as paragraph one Article 97 of the Atomic Energy Act. (Jan. 1995). This ALARA Design Concept for SMART provides 1) description of the organization and responsibilities needed for upper level management support and authority in order for the implementation of ALARA, 2) guidance and procedures for design, review, and evaluation needed for SMART ALARA program implementation, 3) general design guidelines for SMART NSSS and BOP designers to implement ALARA principles in design stage, and 4) training and instruction requirement of SMART NSSS and BOP designers for the familiarization of ALARA principles to be implemented in NSSS designs. (Author). 4 refs., 1 tabs.

  13. Preliminary ALARA design concept for SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Kim, Seung Nam; Kim, Ha Yong; Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1999-03-01

    SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is a space saving integral type nuclear rector with the thermal power of 330 MW. This report provides general design guide and authority in NSSS designs for SMART needed to maintain the occupational doses and doses to members of public ALARA to meet the regulatory requirements. Paragraph 20.1 of 10 CFR 20, ''Standards for Protection Against Radiation'', states that licensee should make every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the limits specified in Part 20 as is reasonably achievable. The ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle is incorporated into Korean radiation protection law as paragraph one Article 97 of the Atomic Energy Act. (Jan. 1995). This ALARA Design Concept for SMART provides 1) description of the organization and responsibilities needed for upper level management support and authority in order for the implementation of ALARA, 2) guidance and procedures for design, review, and evaluation needed for SMART ALARA program implementation, 3) general design guidelines for SMART NSSS and BOP designers to implement ALARA principles in design stage, and 4) training and instruction requirement of SMART NSSS and BOP designers for the familiarization of ALARA principles to be implemented in NSSS designs. (Author). 4 refs., 1 tabs.

  14. Preliminary ALARA design concept for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Kim, Seung Nam; Kim, Ha Yong; Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1999-03-01

    SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is a space saving integral type nuclear rector with the thermal power of 330 MW. This report provides general design guide and authority in NSSS designs for SMART needed to maintain the occupational doses and doses to members of public ALARA to meet the regulatory requirements. Paragraph 20.1 of 10 CFR 20, ''Standards for Protection Against Radiation'', states that licensee should make every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the limits specified in Part 20 as is reasonably achievable. The ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle is incorporated into Korean radiation protection law as paragraph one Article 97 of the Atomic Energy Act. (Jan. 1995). This ALARA Design Concept for SMART provides 1) description of the organization and responsibilities needed for upper level management support and authority in order for the implementation of ALARA, 2) guidance and procedures for design, review, and evaluation needed for SMART ALARA program implementation, 3) general design guidelines for SMART NSSS and BOP designers to implement ALARA principles in design stage, and 4) training and instruction requirement of SMART NSSS and BOP designers for the familiarization of ALARA principles to be implemented in NSSS designs. (Author). 4 refs., 1 tabs

  15. Overview, what is ALARA? Are we there?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) in radiation protection at nuclear power plants is a complex criterion involving decisions requiring both professional judgement and quantitation. Professional judgement has been emphasized in most plants to date. However, unless quantitative studies are made it will be difficult to judge if doses at US plants are ALARA. An ALARA assessment for each plant is suggested, which would include evaluations of both qualitative, e.g., organizational, and quantitative, e.g., cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness, efforts. 15 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Alara - from theory towards practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Lombard, J.; Stokell, P.J.; Croft, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Alara principle states that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. It is a simple concept - the idea behind it is widely used in nearly all spheres of life, i.e. to do the best one can under the given circumstances. This book aims to help define what is meant by best in the context of radiation protection. It describes a procedure that is useful in structuring one's approach to any particular situation where a decision as to the best course of action is required. It also provides practical guidance on how the concept can be incorporated into radiation protection programmes. This book has been written as a reference manual on both the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject. But it is especially targeted at those involved in radiation protection at the practical level

  17. Can practical ALARA be taught?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guest, R. Monty

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: Outside of the nuclear industry, many users of sources of ionising radiation may be characterised as 'High Frequency/Low Dose' users. It is argued here that they have special training requirements in order to understand the ICRP concept ALARA, indeed all the fundamental concepts of radiological protection and their relevance to the workplace. It is not practicable to practise dose avoidance in many situations so dose reduction becomes even more important. For example, laboratory life sciences researchers often have to use very small quantities and activities of beta emitting radioisotopes which give small or minuscule external doses to well trained workers but can give extremely serious high doses if mishandled Similarly, dentists routinely use 60- 100 kV X-ray generators to diagnose abnormalities and disease which other techniques would fail to detect. By practising simple and effective dose reduction methods, they can reduce the dose to themselves and their patients to arguably trivial levels. Method: The paper will use examples from Radiation Protection Supervisors courses run over the past 6 years for UK pharmaceutical companies and research into courses for general dental practitioners run over the past 8 years in East Anglia, England. The latter courses must meet the requirements laid down in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 and the requirements of the professional dental association, the British Dental Council, and the continuing professional development requirements of the dental registration body, the General Dental Council. Major Findings and Conclusions: The research findings show an urgent need to train dental practitioners in the concepts and practical aspects of dose avoidance and dose minimisation, social and economic factors being considered. Pharmaceutical company research Radiation Protection Supervisors are generally well trained but also need to know the practical implications of the ALARA principle

  18. ALARA trademark 1146 strippable coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-01-01

    Strippable or temporary coatings are innovative technologies for decontamination that effectively reduce loose contamination at low cost. These coatings have become a viable option during the deactivation and decommissioning of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. The ALARA trademark 1146 strippable coating was demonstrated as part of the Savannah River Site LSDDP and successfully removed transferable (surface) contamination from multiple surfaces (metal and concrete) with an average decontamination factor for alpha contamination of 6.68 and an average percentage of alpha contamination removed of 85.0%. Beta contamination removed was an average DF of 5.55 and an average percentage removed of 82.0%. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. This Innovative Technology offers a 35% cost savings over the Baseline Technology

  19. The organization of ALARA program at a DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setaro, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The organization of an ALARA Program at a DOE Facility (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), it's relationship with laboratory management, facility operators, and the radiation protection program is described. The use of chartered ALARA committees at two distinct levels is discussed

  20. ALARA implementation throughout project life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, M.J. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-03-01

    A strength of radiation protection programs generally has been endorsement and application of the ALARA principle. In Ontario Hydro, which currently operates 20 commercial size nuclear units, great strides have been made in the last three decades in reducing occupational radiation exposure per unit of electricity generated. This paper will discuss specific applications of elements of the overall ALARA program which have most contributed to dose reduction as the nuclear program has expanded. This includes such things as management commitment, ALARA application in the design phase and major rehabilitation work, the benefits of the self protection concept, a specific example of elimination (or reduction) of the source term and the importance of dose targets. Finally, it is concluded that the major opportunities for further improvements may lie in the area of information management.

  1. Maintaining occupational dose ALARA through work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    Canadian philosophy in keeping occupational dose ALARA has been to train staff in radiation safety so that they can be fully responsible for participating in minimizing the risks associated with the hazardous work. Senior managers actively promote high standards of performance in dose reduction techniques as a means for integrating ALARA into the operation and maintenance of the station by all personnel. Minimizing radiation dose is accomplished by applying cost effective work management techniques such as Job Safety Analysis, pre-job briefings and establishing and achieving radiation dose goals. Radiation dose goals are used as a management tool for involving all work groups in reducing doses as well as providing a means of assessing the effectiveness of dose reduction actions. ALARA, along with conventional safety, is used as a lever to raise the standard of quality of work and to overall build a safety culture. (author). 4 figs

  2. ALARA in practice: How is it working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; Lochard, J.

    1984-01-01

    At the first CEC scientific seminar on optimisation in 1979 (21) most of the papers were concerned with possible methodologies for quantification of the ALARA concept and difficulties in applying them. Very few gave even theoretical examples of how it could be applied in practice. In contrast, at this second seminar most of the papers are examples of how quantified techniques have been used to assist towards ALARA decisions. This rapporteurs paper examines the quantification frameworks available and how they are being used in practice on the basis of the papers presented at this meeting

  3. ALARA efforts in nordic BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, T.; Lundgren, K.; Elkert, J. [ABB Atom, Vaesteraes (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    Some ALARA-related ABB Atom projects are currently under investigation. One of the projects has been ordered by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, and two others by the Nordic BWR utilities. The ultimate objective of the projects is to identify and develop methods to significantly decrease the future exposure levels in the Nordic BWRS. As 85% to 90% of the gamma radiation field in the Nordic BWRs originates from Co-60, the only way to significantly decrease the radiation doses is to effect Co and Co-60. The strategy to do this is to map the Co sources and estimate the source strength of Co from these sources, and to study the possibility to affect the release of Co-60 from the core surfaces and the uptake on system surfaces. Preliminary results indicate that corrosion/erosion of a relatively small number of Stellite-coated valves and/or dust from grinding of Stellite valves may significantly contribute to the Co input to the reactors. This can be seen from a high measured Co/Ni ratio in the feedwater and in the reactor water. If stainless steel is the only source of Co, the Co/Ni ratio would be less than 0.02 as the Co content in the steel is less than 0.2%. The Co/Ni ratio in the reactor water, however, is higher than 0.1, indicating that the major fraction of the Co originates from Stellite-coated valves. There are also other possible explanations for an increase of the radiation fields. The Co-60 inventory on the core surfaces increases approximately as the square of the burn-up level. If the burn-up is increased from 35 to 5 MWd/kgU, the Co-60 inventory on the core surfaces will be doubled. Also the effect on the behavior of Co-60 of different water chemistry and materials conditions is being investigated. Examples of areas studied are Fe and Zn injection, pH-control, and different forms of surface pre-treatments.

  4. ALARA and radiation protection optimization status of Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, D.I.

    2000-01-01

    ALARA in Radiation Protection is specifically applied as a tool in lowering B the risk of high exposure when performing necessary activities by reducing the doses as much and as reasonably possible. Is ALARA also a matter of IMAGE? ALARA is one of the main aspects that contributes to forming the image of a certain facility. Many experiences in the world show a decrease in the collective dose per station after proper ALARA implementation. This trend is more relevant for 'adult' nuclear sites. At Cernavoda NPP the authorization process itself included implementation of an effective ALARA program. (author)

  5. Shippingport station decommissioning project ALARA Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crimi, F.P. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Properly planned and implemented ALARA programs help to maintain nuclear worker radiation exposures {open_quotes}As Low As Reasonably Achievable.{close_quotes}. This paper describes the ALARA program developed and implemented for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The elements required for a successful ALARA program are discussed along with examples of good ALARA practices. The Shippingport Atomic Power Station (SAPS) was the first commercial nuclear power plant to be built in the United States. It was located 35 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, PA on the south bank of the Ohio river. The reactor plant achieved initial criticality in December 1959. During its 25-year life, it produced 7.5 billion kilowatts of electricity. The SAPS was shut down in October 1982 and was the first large-scale U.S. nuclear power plant to be totally decommissioned and the site released for unrestricted use. The Decommission Project was estimated to take 1,007 man-rem of radiation exposure and $.98.3 million to complete. Physical decommissioning commenced in September 1985 and was completed in September 1989. The actual man-rem of exposure was 155. The project was completed 6 months ahead of schedule at a cost of $91.3 million.

  6. ALARA in radioactive waste management- Summary and recommendations of the 11. European ALARA Network Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Crouail, P.; Drouet, F.

    2008-01-01

    The 11. European ALARA Network (E.A.N.) workshop on 'ALARA in radioactive waste management' took place in Athens (Greece) in April 2008. The aim of that workshop was to focus on the implementation of the ALARA principle with regard to occupational and public exposures arising from the management of radioactive waste in all sectors (nuclear, medical, industrial, etc.). This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. Individual presentations (papers and slides) are available to download from the E.A.N. web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). Based on report backs from the groups and discussions with all the participants, five formal recommendations have been formulated. These recommendations, addressed to international organisations (International Atomic Energy Agency, European Commission, Nuclear Energy Agency), national authorities, national and local stake holders and to E.A.N. itself, deal with the following themes: international guidance on ALARA in radioactive waste management, harmonization issues at the international level, ALARA approach in non-nuclear waste management, 'broader approach' in the radioactive waste management process, stake holder involvement. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and the five recommendations produced during the workshop. (authors)

  7. Steam generator replacement from ALARA aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, I.; Breznik, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is going to consider radiological related parameters important for steam generator replacement (SGR) implementation. These parameters are identified as ALARA related parameters, owner-contractor relationship, planning, health physics with logistic services, and time required for the replacement. ALARA related parameters such as source or initial dose rate and plant system configuration define the initial conditions for the planning. There is room to optimise work planning. managerial procedures and also the staff during the implementation phase. The overview of these general considerations is based on the following background: using internationally available data and the experience of one of the vendors, i.e. Siemens-Framatome, and management experience of SG replacement which took place at Krsko NPP in the spring of 2000. Generally plant decisions on maintenance or repair procedures under radiation conditions take into account ALARA considerations. But in the main it is difficult to adjudge the results of an ALARA study, usually in the form of a collective dose estimate, because a comparison standard is missing. That is, very often the planned work is of a one-off nature so comparisons are not possible or the scopes are not the same. In such a case the collective doses for other types of work are looked at and a qualitative evaluation is made. In the case of steam generator replacement this is not the case. Over years of steam generator replacements world-wide a standard has been developed gradually. The first part of the following displays an overview of SGR and sets the Krsko SGR in perspective by applying dose analysis. The second part concentrates on the Krsko SGR itself and its ALARA aspects. (authors)

  8. Cost basis for implementing ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of implementing effective ALARA programs is discussed. A basic element of the cost benefit methodology is the valuation of a man-rem. In the program, this is derived from an assessment of radiation exposure risk and societal valuation of harmful effects. The man-rem value is used as an element in the cost benefit analysis. The analysis includes an assessment of the differential man-rem resulting from the action, implementation cost, and operational savings

  9. ALARA in the radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Lefaure, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    This part treats especially the question of the training in radiation protection. The electro nuclear sector has given an ALARA principle culture and succeeded to sensitize each level of hierarchy, but for small industry, the research and the medical world the same method appears more difficult to use. It seems better to reinforce the importance of the competent person and to include a training in radiation protection on the initial formation in numerous professional categories. (N.C.)

  10. Management organization and administration for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamentals of organizational structure and administration as applied to the goal of keeping occupational radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable are discussed, including consideration of management commitment, organizational separation of health physics functions, reporting levels, designation of responsibility and authority and adequacy of personnel and funding. Examples of good and poor organizational structures are shown, and the role and implementation of ALARA committees, effective communications, and review and audit processes are discussed. (author)

  11. ALARA Review of the SHAARS Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekana, R.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    The SHARS mobile hot cell was designed and manufactured by Necsa intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) from teletherapy units, gamma irradiators and brachytherapy units. This unit is to be used in countries with no remote infrastructure to handle SHARS. The hot cell was designed for a 3.7E+13Bq (1000Ci) activity although it was demonstrated that it can handle even more than 7.4E+13Bq (2000Ci). The unit has a biological shield which consists of river sand sandwiched between metal plates and a viewing window filled with 50% zinc bromide solution. The unit was designed to provide sufficient shielding to ensure that doses are kept ALARA (As low As Reasonably Achieved). This paper compares the modelled dose rates with the actual measured doses during operations conducted in Sudan, Tanzania and Uruguay. It also presents the key lessons learned in the application of the ALARA principle during the SHARS missions. The new working practices and additional methods are proposed in order to reduce doses in accordance with the ALARA principle. (author)

  12. The Alara principle in backfitting Borssele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurs, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive backfitting program, the Modifications Project, was carried out at the Borssele Nuclear Power Station. It involved sixteen modifications to technical systems. The scope of activities, and the dose rates encountered in places where work was to be performed, made it obvious from the outset that a high collective dose had to be anticipated. As a consequence, radiation protection within the project was organized in such a way that applicable radiation protection principles were applied in all phases of the project. From the point of view of radiation protection, the Modifications Project had to be subdivided into three phases, i.e., a conceptual design phase in which mainly the justification principle was applied; the engineering phase in which the Alara principle was employed; the execution phase in which management of the (internal) dose limits had to be observed in addition to the Alara principle. Throughout all project phases, radiation protection considerations and results were documented in so-called Alara reports and radiation protection checklists. As a result of the strictest possible observance of radiation protection principles in all phases of the project, a collective dose of 2505 mSv was achieved, which stands for a reduction by a factor of 4 compared to the very first estimate. In view of the scope and complex nature of the activities involved, and the radiation levels in the Borssele Nuclear Power Station, this is an excellent result. (orig.) [de

  13. ALARA application in Spanish NPP's. New approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnel, P.; Labarta, T.; Amor, I.

    1996-01-01

    One main objective of all nuclear installations is to underlie the principle of optimization. The focus in the application of this principle varies considerably, from cost-benefit techniques in the design phases to commitment, attitude and motivation in operation. The ALARA principle should permeate the entire organisation of the company during operation. Management should be the first link of a chain originating with explicit corporate commitment, leading to increasingly specific decisions, finally to reach those who are responsible for actual performance of each task. The safety culture is an element integrating the mentality that is to prevail throughout the organisation. The organisation shall contribute to incorporating the principle of optimization in all plant operations and all phases of activity. Management's commitment and motivation are transferred to all the workers and organisations involved. The ALARA commitment naturally extends to all outside organisations. The ultimate objective is to reduce collective doses through the promotion and enforcing of an ALARA culture and compliance with the operating collective dose objectives. (author)

  14. Optimization (ALARA) of radiation protection at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weadock, A.A.; Jones, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Maintaining worker and public exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is a key objective of the Department of Energy (DOE). Responsibility for occupational ALARA program policy and guidance resides within the DOE Office of Health. Current Office of Health initiatives related to ALARA include the development of additional regulatory guidance related to ALARA program implementation at DOE contractor facilities, the review of ALARA program status at various facilities and the production of technical reports summarizing this status, and the support of various mechanisms to improve communication among the DOE ALARA community. The Office of Health also monitors revisions to radiogenic risk estimates and radiation protection recommendations to evaluate adequacy of current DOE limits and impacts of potentially revised limits. (author)

  15. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  16. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. [comps.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  17. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. (comps.)

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, is the second in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a specific focus towards DOE facilities. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste; uranium enrichment; fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing; facility decommissioning; hot laboratories; tritium production; research, test and production reactors; weapons fabrication and testing; and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics has also been included. This volume (Volume 2 of the series) contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195, as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center

  19. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report is the second in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography may be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center. These abstracts, which have a bearing on dose reduction, consolidates information from publications pertinent to Radiological Engineers and Operational Health Physicists. Volume 2 contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195 as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface

  20. ALARA at Tyco Health care-Mallinckrodt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijpkema, J.

    2002-01-01

    How to approach the ALARA requirement? That was one of the question in the beginning of the 1990's at the Mallinckrodt site for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This question was raised after the ICRP published their guidelines in the ICRP 60 publication, with the average effective dose limit that was changed from 50 to 20 mSv per year. In the early 1990's the individual effective dose at Mallinckrodt was up to 20 mSv7year and some of the people over this number. As a first result of the discussion Mallinckrodt adopted the 20 mSv/year as being the legal limit, although it finally took over a decade to incorporate this ICRP limit into legislation. A second action was to introduce a site internal limit: if a person would exceed 75% of the legal limit, the person would be restrained from radiation work. This restriction forced everybody to look for solutions to decrease dose and area dose rate. This was the beginning and resulted in nobody exceeding 15 mSv/year after a couple of years and a lower average dose than before, with no extra employees. The second stage in the process of ALARA was a systematic approach of the decrease in personal dose. This systematic approach consists of three phases. The first phase is dose assessment followed by routine measurements. The third phase is the ALARA step. First phase, dose assessment. Normally this could be done in a meeting or even behind the desk: assess the dose per department or per group or per activity. Make a decision on which party will get high priority, medium priority and low priority. Normally this means that the department with the highest dose will get the highest priority. (Author)

  1. Alara applied to iter design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzan-Elbez, Joelle; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, Lina; Porfiri, Maria Teresa; Taylor, Neil; Gordon, Charles; Garin, Pascal; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Based on the existing data on ITER and the safety options for licensing ITER in Cadarache, the present work assesses the application of the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) principle, as it has been implemented in the design of ITER and will be applied during ITER operation, as well as the compliance of the design with EUR/96-29 directive and regulation applicable in France. The preliminary occupational radiation exposure estimate gives a value of about 250 man mSv/a, which is half the annual target for ITER and comes essentially from maintenance activities. Some examples of the approach are presented

  2. Strengthening ALARA approach in work management at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.; Kovac, Z.; Sirola, P.

    1999-01-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) occupational exposures at nuclear power plants should be included in work management as a concept. There are world-wide trends required by the utilities for improved design, operation and maintenance. Within the period of seventeen years of plant operation maintaining low radiation exposures requires additional efforts. The benefit of this effort should be reducing risks to nuclear workers, better work planning and performance. The Krsko Plant ALARA organisations has been revised recently and built on different levels of the hierarchy. The goal is to promote good industry practice and the management of work on primary systems. The established ALARA programme describes the objectives and defines the procedures and tools for its implementation. Brief presentation of the programme as well as organisational responsibilities of dedicated ALARA committee and working groups is the scope of this paper. The management tools and ALARA indicators are discussed to implement the programme and to evaluate the results.(author)

  3. ALARA and an integrated approach to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.; Edwards, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Exposures of individuals to ionizing radiation have been restricted for many years by a number of guidelines and rules developed by various advisory and regulatory groups. Accompanying these restrictions has been an evolving principle that exposures to individuals and groups should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), consistent with provision of the benefits of radiation use to society. Although the ALARA concept is a laudable goal in principle, its implementation in a clinical facility has not been a straightforward process. Problems of implementing ALARA have been confounded further by the efforts of regulatory agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept into regulations governing radiation exposures. To facilitate the implementation of ALARA as a workable construct in a clinical facility, guidelines are needed for its application to both individual and collective exposures to radiation. The provision of such guidelines, including action and inaction levels for both individual and collective exposures, are presented here

  4. Application of the ALARA concept to the field situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, La Mar J.; Ahlquist, A. John

    1978-01-01

    It has been a long accepted practice in radiation protection that exposure to radiation should not only meet legal requirements but should be as far below these requirements as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The ALARA concept is difficult to define, thus, there is a tendency by regulatory agencies (often at the request of the regulated) to attach a number to ALARA for environmental considerations. Presently, there are proposals to apply numbers to ALARA for soils contaminated by transuranics. Our actual field experience is determining ALARA for a large-scale land decontamination project suggests ALARA for contaminated soils cannot be determined on the basis of a single number. This paper will focus on the factors that were considered in determining the land had been decontaminated to ALARA. Details of the paper will include difficulties in determining contamination levels in the soil, dollar and man-power costs to remove contaminated soil, time constraints on the analytical procedures, safety considerations, depth of contamination versus costs to remove that contamination, disposal costs and considerations, and likelihood of additional undiscovered contamination. This experience suggests that numbers ought to be developed but should be used as goals or as a basis for decisions and not as blanket rules for all situations. (author)

  5. Towards the development of an ALARA culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Thezee, C.

    2000-01-01

    The ALARA principle, which states, for each exposure situation, that doses must be kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable, taking into account economic and social factors' represents the basis of the > developed to manage the radiological risk in a responsible manner. The practical implementation of the ALARA principle is complex. It requires defining transaction mechanisms which enable a responsible management of the radiological risk, taking into account, among other things, possible risk transfers in groups and the allocation of protection resources. The players who can take part in radiological risk management are numerous and have different functions: from the authorities to exposed workers, together with company managers. They all possess specific knowledge and have objectives which are not necessarily compatible. The transactions and negotiations initiated between these players during decision-taking relative to exposure management will therefore only be efficient and productive if there exists both a mutual comprehension of individual objectives and a readiness to collaborate on a common objective: keeping the residual risk at a level both acceptable to, and accepted by, the various parties involved. A fundamental element of this process therefore lies in the development among the various players concerned of a common culture with respect to radiological risks and the methods used for their management, in order to facilitate transactions by the sharing of a common language and system of values. A possible definition of > could be: >. Based on this statement, the paper presents, illustrated by the experience of the French Utility Electricite de France, the main components which should enter into consideration for the development of an ALARA culture for the management of occupational exposures. It concludes on the necessity to construct and transmit a common patrimony of a radiological risk management system comprising the scientific and technical knowledge

  6. Comments on two American justice decisions founded on ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    The role of the ALARA principle in the American justice is considered as a very important part of the law in evolution. The first decision called 'James decision' was the case of a worker who received a dose under the dose limit and was agreed in his demand. The second one,'Three Miles Island decision', was to refuse the ALARA principle as a norm because it would consider that the justice is more able to pilot a nuclear power plant than competent authorities. These two examples show that the ALARA principle must stay an operational guide and not a legal norm of precautions susceptible to impose sanctions by justice. (N.C.)

  7. Dose reduction and optimization studies (ALARA) at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been commissioned by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at LWR plants. These studies have the following objectives: identify high-dose maintenance tasks; identify dose-reduction techniques; examine incentives for dose reduction; evaluate cost-effectiveness and optimization of dose-reduction techniques; and compile an ALARA handbook on data, engineering modifications, cost-effectiveness calculations, and other information of interest to ALARA practioners

  8. Electricite de France`s ALARA policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stricker, L. [EDF - DEPT, Paris la Defense (France); Rollin, P. [EDF Radioprotection Committee, Paris (France)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, Electricite de France - EDF decided to improve the degree to which radiological protection is incorporated in overall management of the utility and set itself the objective of ensuring the same level of protection for workers from contractors as for those from EDF. This decision was taken in a context marked by a deterioration in exposure figures for French plants and by the new recommendations issued by the ICRP. This document describes the policy adopted by EDF at both corporate and plant level to meet these objectives, by: (1) setting up management systems which were responsive but not cumbersome; (2) a broad policy of motivation; (3) the development and use of suitable tools. The document then describes some quite positive results of EDF`s ALARA policy, giving concrete examples and analyzing the changes in global indicators.

  9. Environmental ALARA Program at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) follows the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) philosophy of keeping radiation doses to the general public as low as practical by minimizing radioactive releases to the environment. SRS accomplishes this goal by establishing challenging sitewide and area-specific Environmental ALARA Release Guides and trending radioactive releases against these guides on a monthly basis. The SRS Environmental ALARA Program, mandated by DOE Order 5400.5, is a dose-based program that has gone through many changes and improvements in recent years. A description of the SRS Environmental ALARA Program and its performance is presented in this paper. Recent SRS studies of the ''Zero Release'' option also are described

  10. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Nelsen, D P

    2002-01-01

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygien...

  11. Dose reduction through an ALARA program at Almaraz NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, A.; Sustacha, D.; Aneiros, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation exposure is in keeping with the rate at which nuclear power production is increased. Therefore, it becomes more and more important that nuclear power producing plants develop an effective dose optimization and minimization [as-low-as-rasonably-achievable (ALARA)] program. Although radiation exposure suffered by the workers is carefully kept below administrative limits, there is a moral obligation to keep these exposures as low as possible. This requirement becomes apparent in the ALARA principle, supported and accepted by all countries with nuclear power plants in operation. Empresarios Agrupados (a Spanish architect engineer company) collaborates with nuclear power producing plants in an effort to maintain the collective ALARA doses through the efforts of a group of engineers specializing in dose minimization and optimization techniques. This group is organized as a radiation protection and maintenance team (ALARA team)

  12. Dose control and ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yihua; Li Xutong

    1999-01-01

    With the development of NPPs in China, paying attention to dose control and ALARA at NPPs is very important. The author briefly introduces two primary tasks for exposure control at NPPs, primary consideration of ALARA and the common technical methods. It points out that adoption of some quantitative indicators is useful, but it is important to bear it in mind that these ' values of dose avoided' are situation specific

  13. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    2008-01-01

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and

  14. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelsen, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining

  15. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  16. Incremental ALARA cost/benefit computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamby, P.

    1987-01-01

    Commonwealth Edison Company has developed and is testing an enhanced Fortran Computer Program to be used for cost/benefit analysis of Radiation Reduction Projects at its six nuclear power facilities and Corporate Technical Support Groups. This paper describes a Macro-Diven IBM Mainframe Program comprised of two different types of analyses-an Abbreviated Program with fixed costs and base values, and an extended Engineering Version for a detailed, more through and time-consuming approach. The extended engineering version breaks radiation exposure costs down into two components-Health-Related Costs and Replacement Labor Costs. According to user input, the program automatically adjust these two cost components and applies the derivation to company economic analyses such as replacement power costs, carrying charges, debt interest, and capital investment cost. The results from one of more program runs using different parameters may be compared in order to determine the most appropriate ALARA dose reduction technique. Benefits of this particular cost / benefit analysis technique includes flexibility to accommodate a wide range of user data and pre-job preparation, as well as the use of proven and standardized company economic equations

  17. ALARA beyond dollars per person-rem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.; Harper, W.

    1983-01-01

    The trend in radiological assessments over the past decade is to extract more and more information from each bit of data. In the 1960's it was sufficient to calculate doses to the maximum individual and populations from exposure to critical nuclides in critical pathways. The 1970's brought the UNSCEAR and BEIR Reports and made the extension of calculated doses to predicted health effects fashionable. The 1980's may see data analysis extended still further to the use of an index of lost productivity. Advantages of these types of uses of dose calculations include the derivation of further insight into the system being analyzed and the attainment of a greater measure of comparability with impacts from agents other than radiological. The question is, where does the uncertainty in the analytical result overwhelm any possibility of its usefulness. This presentation addresses this question in the context of a performance analysis of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Estimates of uncertainty in dose calculations, health effects predictions and loss of productivity predictions are derived from examination of the open literature and the use of propagation of uncertainty techniques. The expected values and uncertainties are compounded as they would be in an ALARA analysis and the outcomes are analyzed. The advantages and disadvantages of truncating the analysis at each stage of extension are discussed. 21 references, 3 tables

  18. The European ALARA network. Development, functioning and main activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Hannig, A.

    2009-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations (ICRP 103), and in particular the detailed treatment of optimisation in the ICRP Publication 101, define optimisation of protection as a source-related process aimed at keeping the likelihood of incurred exposures, the number of people exposed and the magnitude of their individual doses as low as reasonably achievable, also below constraints, taking into account economic and societal factors. Practical implementation and further development of the ALARA principle has been achieved for many years now by the successful cooperation of experts from different European organisations; first as pioneers by establishing the European ALARA Network and then by enthusiastically supporting the activities of the network itself. This contribution presents the evolution, operation and key activities of the European ALARA Network (EAN) in the last years; the successful cooperation of experts from different professional backgrounds, advocating the ALARA principle in a range of radiation protection areas, and contributing to its further development by trading experience and networking. The interaction between the EAN and international organisations, which support the ALARA principle by including relevant activities in their work programmes, is described. (orig.)

  19. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frome, E.L.; Watkins, J.P.; Hagemeyer, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  20. An effective ALARA [As Low As Reasonably Achievable] Awareness Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Hammond, D.A.

    1990-10-01

    Following the January 1, 1989 issue of the US Department of Energy (DOE) revised Order 5480.1, Chapter XI (DOE 1985), the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program Office (APO) began an aggressive ALARA Awareness Campaign. The revised DOE Order 5480.11 (DOE 1988) required the documentation and tracking of ALARA practices and principles. This major challenge for compliance to the new requirements necessitated an enhanced awareness of the goals and objectives of the APO. The Westinghouse Hanford APO began the expansion of the ALARA Program. The ''classic concept'' of radiological exposure minimization, which began in the early 1940's, increased in scope to include the new concept of exposure minimization for all hazardous materials and conditions commensurate with sound economics and operating practices. This expansion could only be implemented by bringing about a cultural change. Therefore, the attempt to introduce this change in thinking created a second major challenge for the Westinghouse Hanford APO. The direct result of the identification of these two major goals was the creation of an effective ALARA Awareness for Westinghouse Hanford. This paper describes this program. 3 refs

  1. Computer code for quantitative ALARA evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code has been developed to simplify the determination of whether dose reduction actions meet the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) criterion. The calculations are based on the methodology developed for the Atomic Industrial Forum. The code is used for analyses of eight types of dose reduction actions, characterized as follows: reduce dose rate, reduce job frequency, reduce productive working time, reduce crew size, increase administrative dose limit for the task, and increase the workers' time utilization and dose utilization through (a) improved working conditions, (b) basic skill training, or (c) refresher training for special skills. For each type of action, two analysis modes are available. The first is a generic analysis in which the program computes potential benefits (in dollars) for a range of possible improvements, e.g., for a range of lower dose rates. Generic analyses are most useful in the planning stage and for evaluating the general feasibility of alternative approaches. The second is a specific analysis in which the potential annual benefits of a specific level of improvement and the annual implementation cost are compared. The potential benefits reflect savings in operational and societal costs that can be realized if occupational radiation doses are reduced. Because the potential benefits depend upon many variables which characterize the job, the workplace, and the workers, there is no unique relationship between the potential dollar savings and the dose savings. The computer code permits rapid quantitative analyses of alternatives and is a tool that supplements the health physicist's professional judgment. The program output provides a rational basis for decision-making and a record of the assumptions employed

  2. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3A, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, O.D.

    1995-06-01

    It has long been the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Policy that radiation doses should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ''ALARA Principle of radiation protection,'' maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA Principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater positive impact on health and safety. The objective of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ALARA/Contamination Control Improvement Project (CCIP) Program is to manage and control exposures (both individual and collective) to the work force, the general public, and the environment to levels as low as is reasonable using the aforementioned ALARA Principle

  3. Experiences in ALARA application: 7th parade of maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenta R, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The achieved experience with these activities, and all the carried out during the seventh stop but that they are not included here, carried to take a serie of decisions in the ALARA group, of which can be mentioned the following: 1. Definition of goals of collective dose and singular for works, to complete the ALARA commitment toward the occupational exposure personnel of the CLV. 2. To analyze the obtained information, as quick as possible, for using it in similar situations of work (to normalize the obtained results, when this is possible. 3. To coordinate the activities in those that participate different work groups with the end of not hindering the development of the same ones. 4. To establish ALARA responsibles of the works to fulfill functions of: pursuit of the work and information to the workers for their safety

  4. ANI/MAELU engineering inspection criteria 8.3 ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, L. [American Nuclear Insurers, West Hardford, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this criteria section is to provide guidelines for programs whose intent is to achieve occupational doses and doses to members of the public that are as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The success that has been achieved by applying ALARA concepts at nuclear power plants is clearly illustrated by the major reductions in the annual cumulative dose to workers at many sites over the last few years. This success is the combined result of the general maturity of the nuclear industry, the intensive study of dose reduction practices by industry groups, and the successful sharing of experience and practices among plants. Source term reduction should be used as a primary ALARA mechanism. Methods which should be considered include: satellite and cobalt reduction, chemistry control, decontamination, submicron filters, zinc addition, hot spot reduction and permanent or temporary shielding.

  5. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA Report for Calendar Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, S.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1993 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, and skin contaminations. The collective whole-body radiation dose to employees during 1993 was 0.58 person-sievert (58 person-rem). This dose was 11 percent lower than the projected dose of 0.65 person-sievert (65 person-rem). The Radiation Protection Section's Field Dosimetry Services group projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 0.02 sievert (2 rem) based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the limit by the end of CY 1993. There were 15 reported cases of skin contamination for PNL employees during 1993. This number of 60 percent of the projected total of 25 cases. There were an additional 21 cases of personal-effects contamination to PNL staff: Nine of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building, nine occurred at the 325 Building, one occurred in the 327 Building, one occurred in the 3720 Building, and one occurred in the 326 Building. Line management set numerous challenging and production ALARA goals for their facilities. Appendix A describes the final status of the 1993 ALARA goals. Appendix B describes the radiological ALARA goals for 1994. The Radiation Protection Section of the Laboratory Safety Dept. routinely perform audits of radiological ALARA requirements for specific facilities with significant potential for exposure. These ALARA audits are part of a comprehensive safety audit of the facility, designed to evaluate and improve total safety performance

  7. Elements for designing ALARA programmes for the maintenance and routine operations of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the three fundamental elements for designing ALARA programmes for the maintenance and routine operations of nuclear facilities. These are the need for commitment of all parties involved, the need for specific ALARA organizational structures and the systematic use of ALARA tools. (UK)

  8. Experiences in ALARA application: 7th parade of maintenance; Experiencias en la aplicacion del criterio ALARA: septima parada de mantenimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armenta R, M S [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Laguna Verde, Veracruz (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The achieved experience with these activities, and all the carried out during the seventh stop but that they are not included here, carried to take a serie of decisions in the ALARA group, of which can be mentioned the following: 1. Definition of goals of collective dose and singular for works, to complete the ALARA commitment toward the occupational exposure personnel of the CLV. 2. To analyze the obtained information, as quick as possible, for using it in similar situations of work (to normalize the obtained results, when this is possible. 3. To coordinate the activities in those that participate different work groups with the end of not hindering the development of the same ones. 4. To establish ALARA responsibles of the works to fulfill functions of: pursuit of the work and information to the workers for their safety.

  9. ALARA review for the 202-S plutonium loadout hood stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patch, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposures, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting stabilization of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility plutonium loadout hood and associated piping, and the isolation of the ER-8 ventilation system

  10. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSEN, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygiene with the tools necessary to implement an integrated safety program. The establishment of tools and processes capable of sustaining a comprehensive safety program represents a key responsibility of industrial hygiene. Fluor Hanford has built integrated safety management around three programmatic attributes: (1) Integration of radiological, chemical and ergonomic issues under a single program. (2) Continuous improvement in routine communications among work planning/scheduling, job execution and management. (3) Rapid response to changing work conditions, formalized work planning and integrated worker involvement

  11. ALARA and radiation protection optimization status of Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) in Radiation Protection is specifically applied as a tool in lowering the risk of exposure when performing necessary activities, leading to a reduction of individual and collective doses of workers as much and as reasonable possible. (authors)

  12. VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning and communication tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeersch, F.

    2006-01-01

    Human operations are required in nuclear installation, during maintenance, outage, repair and decommissioning. This leads to the exposure of the worker to radiation. It is clear that these operations must be performed according to the ALARA principle (to reduce the dose As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The person responsible for planning the job needs to evaluate different scenarios based on the exposure of the worker. This involves the manipulation of a lot of information specific to the work place such as the geometry, materials, radiological and technical boundary conditions to assess the dose. A lot of communication between the ALARA stakeholders is needed during this pre-job study. A communication that can be cumbersome and tedious when based on written documents and paper plans. The use of 3D calculation and simulation tools provide a solution to this problem. They provide an excellent means to make the above mentioned process more efficient and effective by calculating and visualising the environment and the associated radiological risk. The VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool is developed and designed by SCK-CEN as a dose assessment tool enabling the user to calculate the dose in a 3D environment for work scenarios. This software is very successful in the ALARA field. At present 22 companies in Europe use the VISIPLAN software in the field of dose assessment in maintenance and decommissioning. Recent developments and applications are discussed

  13. ALARA tools and performance indicators at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitu, C.; Popescu, V.; Simionov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Work efficiency is an area of high concern to nuclear power plant operators. Job planning has to be done so that there will be enough time for ALARA actions to be implemented. The control of the activities involving radiological risk is part of ALARA Process. An effective control supposes the implementation of a process to systematically identify the activities performed in radiological areas. Plant Performance Indicators related to ionizing radiation exposure have been established to improve station safe performance. They are assessed and reported periodically to reflect the safe operation objectives. If target values are exceeded 'abnormal condition reports' are generated. Corrective and preventive actions aim at work planning, technical aspects, and human performance. All the staff is informed about these events and corrective actions described through the training program are implemented. (authors)

  14. Designing plants for ALARA-revelation or evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The author traces the Duke Nuclear program from the late 1960s to today. He then looks at the future. The primary goal, he says, should be to continue to reduce individual exposure in order to reduce total station, industry exposure. In order to accomplish this goal in the design process, he recommends continued training of design personnel to reinforce the ALARA concepts and to provide new industry techniques and actual examples

  15. ALARA approach on Qinshan unit I lower internals recovery project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meijing; Xu Hongming; Jiang Jianqi; Chen Zhongyu

    2000-01-01

    Qinshan unit-1 is a 300 Mwe prototype PWR. It has been successfully operating for 4 fuel cycles about 10 years. Some loose parts by the failure of the guide tube of the reactor core neutron flux measurement thimble were observed on the lower structure of Core Barrel during periodical inspection after unloading all fuel assemblies. Qinshan Nuclear Power Company selected Westinghouse Electric Company as contractor to perform the reactor core barrel recovery service after negotiated with 4 world big company. QNPC and Westinghouse worked together to approach the ALARA by increasing water shielding, adding additional steel shielding, fuel pool cleaning and using the long hand tools, remote camera system. The training, mock-up exercise, good personal behavior was greatly contributed to the ALARA approaching. The collective dose and personal exposure of this job were successful controlled by implementing the preset ALARA program. The job was done by the cost of 70 man.mSv collective dose and 3.5 mSv maximum personal exposure despite of the high dose-rate which hot spot in some place is up to several hundred Sv per hour. (author)

  16. The uniform application of ALARA to all radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomroy, C.

    1988-05-01

    New information on the dosimetry and epidemiology of atomic bomb survivors suggests that risk estimates may have to be revised upwards. This has focussed increased attention on the ALARA principle. The ICRP believes that ALARA principle is the driving force in keeping average radiation doses low. In practice, the optimization process required for ALARA varies between different sectors of the nuclear industry. For instance, the power utilities have developed procedures for comparing different dose reduction options. Similarly, uranium mine operators have applied optimization techniques to questions concerning ventilation and shielding of ore trucks. Missing from this list however, is the use of a formal optimizing technique in medical and research uses of radioactivity or radiation. Nonetheless, average annual doses to these workers are quite low. An alternative approach to optimization calculation has been suggested, entailing the identification of sub-groups of workers with substantially higher doses to discover the reasons for the higher doses, and to develop means to reduce them to the overall average. Thus maintenance mechanics in nuclear reactors, by the very nature of their jobs, have more potential for higher dose. The utilities are developing procedures to reduce the maintenance mechanics' doses. If the same analysis is applied to medical workers, it is seen that isotope technicians and therapeutic radiology technicians have average doses well above the overall average. The feasibility of some form of optimization process for these categories of workers is discussed

  17. Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, B.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ''indicators''. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer's most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ''user friendly'', software and contains information from RIR's, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics

  18. Improvement of ALARA in Taiwan Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, H. M.; Chang, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The ALARA(as low as reasonable achievable ) principle is a basic spirit of radiation safety culture and the most important element of a successful radiation safety program. In recent years, the ALARA principle and practices have been widely applied to the three operating nuclear power plants in Taiwan. Through the effective communication and fully cooperation between the authority and utility, the performance goals of improving radiation safety program have been set, and the implementation plans have been proposed and followed. Taking Chinshan nuclear power station as an example, in 2004, the occupational individual dose was 1.13mSv/ person in average,no one exceeded 20mSv ,and the collective dose was 1.03man-Sv/unit which achieved the best record of BWR plant in Taiwan. The radiation reduction approaches and tools adopted by the plants include removing radiation sources, setting radiation shieding, optimizing and controlling the schedule of radiation practices, considering the occupancy factors, and better administrative management to keep exposure ALARA will be discussed in this paper

  19. The application of the ALARA principle: a first assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1984-01-01

    What can we learn from practical ALARA studies. On the methodological point of view the different works developed these last years rely upon the two basic ICRP assumptions, i.e.: the linearity of the dose-risk relationship and the optimal resource allocation principle. Furthermore, most authors seem now to assume the multidimensionality of radiological protection problems. This leads to envisage for decision-aiding techniques the enlargement of the cost-benefit method. As for the quantification process of ALARA principle, assessment techniques for both protection costs and levels of exposures of the various groups at risk are well established. Some differences can be however pointed out between authors concerning the monetary valuation of the detriment cost as well as the way to cope with time, probabilistic events and ''other factors'' not directly linked to protection costs and radiological detriment. Further consideration must be given to the exact role ALARA studies have to play in the decision-making process concerning conception and operation of installations. Particular efforts have to be put on the development of adequate data bases and also decision-aiding techniques able to take into account the multidimensionnality of factors involved in practical protection [fr

  20. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection (LANL2016a). In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective in 2014 (LANL 2014a). The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  1. Use of metrics in an effective ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, B.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting an processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific open-quotes indicators.close quotes To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. Justification is needed to defend the indicators selected and maybe even stronger justification is needed for those indicators that are available, but not chosen as a metric. Historically, the many different sources of information resided in a plethora of locations. Even the same type of metric had data located in different areas and could not be easily totaled for the entire Site. This required the end user to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that a customer can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer's most frequently asked questions. IL is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally, it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, open-quotes user friendly,close quotes software and contains information from RIR's, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics. These include quarterly performance indicator reports, monthly radiological incident reports, monthly external dose history and goals tracking reports, and the future use of performance indexing

  2. ALARA radiation considerations for the AP600 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, F.L. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The radiation design of the AP600 reactor plant is based on an average annual occupational radiation exposure (ORE) of 100 man-rem. As a design goal we have established a lower value of 70 man-rem per year. And, with our current design process, we expect to achieve annual exposures which are well below this goal. To accomplish our goal we have established a process that provides criteria, guidelines and customer involvement to achieve the desired result. The criteria and guidelines provide the shield designer, as well as the systems and plant layout designers with information that will lead to an integrated plant design that minimizes personnel exposure and yet is not burdened with complicated shielding or unnecessary component access limitations. Customer involvement is provided in the form of utility input, design reviews and information exchange. Cooperative programs with utilities in the development of specific systems or processes also provides for an ALARA design. The results are features which include ALARA radiation considerations as an integral part of the plant design and a lower plant ORE. It is anticipated that a further reduction in plant personnel exposures will result through good radiological practices by the plant operators. The information in place to support and direct the plant designers includes the Utility Requirements Document (URD), Federal Regulations, ALARA guidelines, radiation design information and radiation and shielding design criteria. This information, along with the utility input, design reviews and information feedback, will contribute to the reduction of plant radiation exposure levels such that they will be less than the stated goals.

  3. ALARA review for the deactivation of 105-N Lift Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    This ALARA review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure and to control contamination levels and airborne radioactivity concentrations, while removing water, sludge, stabilizing surfaces, and all other associated work involved in the deactivation of the 105-N Lift Station. The lift station was used as a sump and received contaminated water from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin weirs and contaminated drains in the 105-N Building. During operation water from the lift station was pumped to the 1310-N and 1325-N cribs. Deactivation of the lift station is a critical step in completing the deactivation of N-Area

  4. An evaluation of high-dose jobs for ALARA improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, J. H.; Kim, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that about 70 percent of occupational dose have incurred from maintenance jobs at outage period. To reduce occupational dose, first, the high-dose jobs at the outage period should be identified and evaluated. For this, the database program is used, which contains the ORE data of reference plants, Kori Units 3 and 4. As a result, it is found that the jobs related to steam generator are the highest dose jobs in terms of collective ORE dose. From the analysis of the job procedures of those jobs, the ALARA improvements are also derived

  5. Cost-effectiveness studies as part of an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies of cost effectiveness of engineering modifications for dose reduction at nuclear power plants conducted at BNL will be considered in this report. Since each of these items has the potential for a 50% to 60% reduction in collective dose, it appears there is large potential for dose reduction from engineering type modifications. The question that must be answered for each plant is ''which modifications or improvements are required for optimization (ALARA). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that quantified optimization need not be costly and can often be highly beneficial

  6. As low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) studies relative to the NWTS program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, L.A.; Schlegel, R.L.; Sullivan, R.P.

    1977-10-01

    The history of development of the as-low-as-is-reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and ALARA criteria for radiation exposures as applied to both off-site (environmental) and on-site (occupational) exposures at nuclear power plants are reviewed. The current status of activities within the various federal agencies directed toward developing ALARA criteria for other areas of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented. Based on the historical development, the present activities, and on discussions with numerous people involved in this area, the future development of ALARA criteria and implications for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is forecast. Environmental ALARA criteria which relate to minimizing radiation to the surrounding populaltion are discussed along with current occupational ALARA criteria and quidelines for risk-benefit assessments that are under development and recommendations to assure that evolving ALARA concepts are periodically brought up to date and that such concepts be made available to those subcontractors who have responsibility for design and operation of a repository. An annotated bibliography of some 83 sources giving information on ALARA criteria and its application is included

  7. ALARA Review of 233-S Process Hood D and D and Related Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This document is an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review of design packages for planned work at the 233-S Facility. The ALARA review was initiated in accordance with the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) Integrated Environmental, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS) workflow process

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higby, D.P.; Denovan, J.T.

    1982-12-01

    This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles

  9. As low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) studies relative to the NWTS program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, L.A.; Schlegel, R.L.; Sullivan, R.P.

    1977-10-01

    The history of development of the as-low-as-is-reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and ALARA criteria for radiation exposures as applied to both off-site (environmental) and on-site (occupational) exposures at nuclear power plants are reviewed. The current status of activities within the various federal agencies directed toward developing ALARA criteria for other areas of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented. Based on the historical development, the present activities, and on discussions with numerous people involved in this area, the future development of ALARA criteria and implications for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is forecast. Environmental ALARA criteria which relate to minimizing radiation to the surrounding populaltion are discussed along with current occupational ALARA criteria and quidelines for risk-benefit assessments that are under development and recommendations to assure that evolving ALARA concepts are periodically brought up to date and that such concepts be made available to those subcontractors who have responsibility for design and operation of a repository. An annotated bibliography of some 83 sources giving information on ALARA criteria and its application is included. (JRD)

  10. ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices - Summary and recommendations of the 12. European ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Crouail, P.; Drouet, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 12. European ALARA Network (EAN) workshop on 'ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices' took place in Vienna (Austria) in October 2009. The aim of that workshop was to consider how the implementation of ALARA3, in terms of planned and emergency situations, involving worker and public doses, is affected by the introduction of security-related measures. In the case of new equipment and procedures, there was also the question of whether exposures arising from security screening devices can be justified and optimised. This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. During their discussions, the working groups identified recommendations dealing with the following topics: the implementation of the Code of Conduct and HASS4 - ensuring ALARA; balancing security and safety - how to achieve an optimum solution; the management of an emergency exposure situation from an ALARA perspective; the justification and optimisation of the use of security devices. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and recommendations produced during the workshop. Individual presentations (papers and slides) as well as the reports from the working groups are available to download on the EAN web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). (authors)

  11. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry's attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry

  12. Computer and computer graphics support for the ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, D.; Hall, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed which support three aspects of the ALARA program at Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO): 1) Setting annual dose and skin contamination goals, 2) Analyzing trends in operational organizations' dose, numbers of skin contaminations, or radiation occurrences, and 3) Presenting graphic displays to enhance worker safety awareness. Programs have been written which search dosemetry files and produce histograms of annual occupational exposure and skin contamination histories utilizing the DISSPLA software or a desk top color graphics terminal. These programs and associated graphics are used to assemble dose and skin contamination information in a summary format so that ALARA teams can assess the past year's performance and establish reduction goals for the coming year. In addition, the graphics provide a management tool for recognizing desirable or undesirable trends in an organization's occupational dose or number of skin contaminations. Desk top graphics capabilities have been used to display safety-related data to enhance management review and worker awareness of radiological and industrial safety conditions in the work area. The following graphs are prepared on a monthly basis: 1) Numbers of skin contaminations company wide and for specific operating organizations within the company, 2) Numbers of radiation occurrences, 3) Dose histories for specific operational organizations, 4) Numbers of OSHA recordable incidents, 5) OSHA recordable incident rates and severity levels and 6) Lost workday cases

  13. Application of the ALARA process in the regulation of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    In this report the historical and conceptual basis of the ALARA process has been reviewed. The application solely of a prescriptive approach, particularly a rigorous quantitative approach to the decision-making process, has been questioned. While the Committees recognize the value of quantitative techniques they strongly emphasize that application of the ALARA concept is a much broader process for the determination of acceptable levels of protection. An ALARA process should take into account social and economic factors that are not quantifiable and involve representation of all those having a legitimate interest in the results of the process

  14. The ALARA project of the EDF nuclear park exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potoczek, J.

    1998-01-01

    To bring the exploitation of the nuclear park of EDF at the level of the best exploiters in the world in matter of collective and individual dosimetry, the ALARA principle coordinates numerous actions: to associate the temporary societies, to define common language, methods and tools for the whole park to organize a level effect in this area, to optimize the maintenance that is expansive in radiation doses, to make the different levels of management responsible on dosimetric stakes, to reduce the singular sources of exposure, to assure the organisation and exploitation of the experience back in this field and adapt consequently the system of information. The results are cheerful and the objectives for 2000 are: less than 1.2 h.Sv by year and by reactor, no intervener whom annual radiation dose is upper than 20 mSv (out of exceptional case). (N.C.)

  15. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenborg, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Murphy, D.W.; Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose

  16. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author).

  17. Application of the ALARA principle to individual occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleinikov, V.E.

    1998-01-01

    Routine individual occupational radiation monitoring is necessary to ensure that exposure are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and that the authorized dose limits are not exceeded. The type and extend of the monitoring depend on the nature and magnitude of occupational radiation exposure. Optimal choice of the wearing time for individual dosimeters, T, has important consequences for achievement of the individual monitoring objects. The choice of T depends on individual dose distribution, the lower detection limit for the detector used, the lost of an information during period of monitoring, the cost of the measurements and the benefits associated with the results. The paper describes the application of quantitative optimization techniques to optimize the wearing time for individual dosimeters. It was shown how optimal wearing time for individual dosimeters depends on dose distribution, the lower detection limit, dose limit, fading and cost of the measurements. (author)

  18. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author)

  19. The preliminary success of ALARA implementation in Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun; Chen Degan

    2000-01-01

    Based on the practical condition of the plant and in reference to advanced management experiences worldwide, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant has established its own peculiar management system for radiation protection management and ALARA implementation. The characteristics of the system are: radiation protection training to all workers, active involvement of all managers and staffs, and whole process safety control to maintenance activities. The management philosophy of 'workers are responsible for their own radiation safety' is adopted in the plant. A strict, formalized and systematic whole staff radiation protection training, evaluation, authorization and periodically refreshing mechanism had been established and executed in the plant. In the organizational point of view, the responsibilities of line managers were specified in plant procedures, ALARA coordination organization on plant level and for specific activities were established. Meanwhile, the plant highlighted the defining, following up, controlling and advertising of radiation protection targets. All these measures made radiation protection management be the responsibilities of a safety network in which whole staffs are involved. In the practical radiation protection activities, the plant focuses on works of high radiation risk and performs whole process control. In addition, professional radiation protection staff played an important and active role in technical advisory and control of radiation protection. Satisfactory results have been achieved in Daya Bay NPP in radiation protection in the past years. The collective dose including that of contractors per unit and year have been declining from 0.99 man·Sv/Unit·Year in 1995 to 0.667 man·Sv/Unit·Year in 1998, which were consistently lower than the best quartile result of PWR plants in WANO reports each year. Individual dose was also controlled at a very low level, no one was overexposed in the past years

  20. Culture of safety. Indicators of culture of safety. Stage of culture of safety. Optimization of radiating protection. Principle of precaution. Principle ALARA. Procedure ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursa, E.

    2006-01-01

    Object of research: is the theory and practice of optimization of radiating protection according to recommendations of the international organizations, realization of principle ALARA and maintenance of culture of safety (SC) on the nuclear power plant. The purpose of work - to consider the general aspects of realization of principle ALARA, conceptual bases of culture of safety, as principle of management, and practice of their introduction on the nuclear power plant. The work has the experts' report character in which the following questions are presented: The recommendations materials of the IAEA and other international organizations have been assembled, systematized and analyzed. The definitions, characteristics and universal SC features, and also indicators as a problem of parameters and quantitative SC measurements are described in details advanced. The ALARA principles - principle of precaution; not acceptance of zero risk; choice of a principle ALARA; model of acceptable radiation risk are described. The methodology of an estimation of culture of safety level and practical realization of the ALARA principle in separate organization is shown on a practical example. The SC general estimation at a national level in Republic of Moldova have been done. Taking into consideration that now Safety Culture politics are introduced only in relation to APS, in this paper the attempt of application of Safety Culture methodology to Radiological Objects have been made (Oncological Institute of the Republic of Moldova and Special Objects No.5101 and 5102 for a long time Storage of the Radioactive Waste). (authors)

  1. ALARA Council: Sharing our resources and experiences to reduce doses at Commonwealth Edison Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescek, F. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Commonwealth Edison Company is an investor-owned utility company supplying electricity to over three million customers (eight million people) in Chicago and northern Illinois, USA. The company operates 16 generating stations which have the capacity to produce 22,522 megawatts of electricity. Six of these generating stations, containing 12 nuclear units, supply 51% of this capacity. The 12 nuclear units are comprised of four General Electric boiling water (BWR-3) reactors, two General Electric BWR-5 reactors, and six Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors (PWR). In August 1993, Commonwealth Edison created an ALARA Council with the responsibility to provide leadership and guidance that results in an effective ALARA Culture within the Nuclear Operations Division. Unlike its predecessor, the Corporate ALARA Committee, the ALARA Council is designed to bring together senior managers from the six nuclear stations and corporate to create a collaborative effort to reduce occupational doses at Commonwealth Edison`s stations.

  2. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedures for maintenance site: application to replacement of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Lefaure, C.

    1989-08-01

    This report proposes generic organization and ALARA procedures for preparing a maintenance site at a NPP. After a short description of the ALARA principle, it describes the proposition for French sites. They are grouped according to the following: motivation, organisation, means. They are illustrated by the example of steam generator replacement. Three special points concerning preparation of the site are developed: education; training of operators; review of the project

  3. ALARA Review for the Sediment Relocation and Removal from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demers, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    This as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) review revision provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations during sediment relocation and removal in the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin. This document updates and supercedes the ALARA review of the sediment-related activities contained in 100-N Basin Stabilization Project As Low As Reasonably Achievable Plan (BHI 1995)

  4. An operating nuclear utility's experience with the ALARA design of a new nuclear unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This talk presents a review of how operating experience at Northeast Utilities has been factored into the design of a new nuclear unit and the development and management of the radiation protection program. Their operational experience has indicated that there are two facets to keeping radiation exposures ALARA. The first is the proper ALARA design of the unit. The other facet is the design of a comprehensive radiation protection program. The author discusses these facets in some detail

  5. Ten years of ALARA experience in commercial nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, J.L.; Seifert, K.L.; Green, R.L.; McAnany, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review ten years of extremity exposure in a growing nuclear pharmacy company and determine those practices that have been most effective in keeping exposures ALARA. The focus of this study was specifically on extremity exposure since whole body exposures have not been as significant. Methods: More than 400 dispensing employees are monitored weekly for extremity exposure. Currently, these employees handle and dispense more than 9,000 Curies (333,000 GBq) of activity ready for use in nuclear medicine procedures each week. The quarterly and annual extremity exposure histories were examined and compared with the introduction of different initiatives to limit these exposures. Changes in the total activity per unit dose were considered as well as the introduction of different compounding practices during this time. An attempt was made to also determine specifically which activities contribute most to the extremity exposure of a dispenser. Procedural changes were reviewed as well as engineering controls such as new shielding materials and designs. Results: A significant conversion of cardiac doses occurred during the time period evaluated. Tc-99m heart agents became the preferred radiopharmaceutical replacing a significant portion of Tl-201 that had been used previously. Tl-201 is still used often in conjunction with a Tc-99m agent. The significance of the switch is the high percentage of dispensed doses for cardiac studies and the higher activities of the Tc-99m agents. A combination of procedural changes and engineering controls (primarily tungsten shielding devices) have been effective in preventing the extremity exposure increase one might expect based on higher activities dispensed per unit dose and the higher energy of Tc-99m compared to Tl-201. One procedural change, the mandatory use of tongs for handling unshielded syringes of radiopharmaceuticals, resulted in a 17% reduction in the average exposure to the extremities

  6. Fuel transfer system ALARA design review - Project A.15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KUEBERTH, L.R.

    2001-01-01

    One mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is to move the SNF from the K Basins in the Hanford 100K Area to an interim dry storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the Hanford 200 East Area. The Fuel Transfer System (FTS) is a subproject that will move the SNF from the 105K East (KE) Facility to the 105K West (KW) Facility. The SNF will be treated for shipment to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility at the KW Basin. The SNF canisters will be loaded underwater into a Shielded Transfer Cask (STC) in the KE Basin. The fully loaded STC will be brought out of the water and placed into a Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO) by the STC Straddle Carrier. As the STC is removed from the water, it will be washed down with demineralized water by an manual rinse system. The CTO with the STC inside will be placed on a transport trailer and transferred to the KW Basin as an intra-facility transfer. The CTO will be unloaded from the shipping trailer at the KW Basin and the STC will be removed from the CTO. The STC will then be lowered into the KW Basin water and the fuel will be removed. The SNF will then be processed for shipment to the CVD. As soon as all of the fuel has been removed from the STC, the cask will be removed from the KW Basin water and placed into the CTO. The CTO will again be placed on the trailer for transport back to the KE Basin where the entire cycle will be repeated approximately 400 times. This document records the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) findings and design recommendations/requirements by the SNF Project noted during the Final Design Review of the STC, CTO, STC Transfer System, Annexes and Roadways for support of FTS. This document is structured so that all statements that include the word ''shall'' represent design features that have been or will be implemented within the project scope. Statements that include the words ''should'' or ''recommend'' represent ALARA design features to be evaluated for future implementation

  7. ALARA and de minimis concepts in regulation of personnel exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The ALARA process should not be limited by a de minimis level on either collective or individual dose, but should be limited or defined by an acceptable discount-rate on future costs and effects, and a monetary value for detriment, to be used in cost-effectiveness or cost-benefit calculations at dose levels well below the regulatory limits. This approach would provide the desired benefit of simplifying the decision process, it makes it more cost effective, and would avoid the inconsistencies of limits on only one of the four parameters of importance in the optimization process. These are average individual effective dose equivalent rate, number of individuals to be included in the summation, years of exposure, and costs, which include costs of analysis to reduce the exposure. This approach emphasizes that these doses to an individual may not be considered trivial by society when given to a very large population, especially if they could easily be avoided. 32 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Interpretation of ALARA in the Canadian regulatory framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utting, R. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-03-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of all aspects of atomic energy in Canada. This includes the complete nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to long-term disposal of nuclear fuel, as well as the medical and industrial utilization of radioisotopes. Clearly, the regulatory approach will differ from practice to practice but, as far as possible, the AECB has attempted to minimize the degree of prescription of regulatory requirements. The traditional modus operandi of the AECB has been to have broad general principles enshrined in regulations with the requirement that licensees submit specific operating policies and procedures to the AECB for approval. In the large nuclear facilities with their sophisticated technical infrastructures, this policy has been largely successful although in a changing legal and political milieu the AECB is finding that a greater degree of proactive regulation is becoming necessary. With the smaller users, the AECB has for a long time found it necessary to have a greater degree of prescription in its regulatory function. Forthcoming General Amendments to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations will, amongst other things, formally incorporate the concept of ALARA into the Canadian regulatory framework. Within the broad range of practices licensed by the AECB it is not practical to provide detailed guidance on optimization that will be relevant and appropriate to all licensees, however the following general principles are proposed.

  9. Application of the ALARA principle to the bleed condenser relief valve replacement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.; Kraft, J.

    1997-01-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Division's achievements in radiation dose performance can be attributed, in part, to adherence to the ALARA principle. The station's ALARA program, which is an integral part of the safety culture, derives its strength from a strong and unwavering commitment by the site Vice President. This commitment is supported by performance standards and an accountability system which holds managers and supervisors responsible for dose performance. A LAN-based hazard and dose information system with site-wide accessibility was established to facilitate work planning and exposure control. The principle of dose optimization is fully integrated into the work management process and includes work planning, progress monitoring and post-job review. An integrated performance assessment and reporting system also provides timely feedback to management on dose performance. An example of the ALARA program was the bleed condenser relieve valve replacement project. Pre-job ALARA review meetings for the project were held with supervisory staff and technicians to discuss job details and dose reduction measures. All work groups were required to prepare a detailed step be step task safety analysis (TSA). The trades and engineering staff were requested to critique the TSA and suggest ways of reducing dose. Over 30 practical ALARA suggestions were received and adopted for implementation. Daily meetings were held to review job progress and the effectiveness exposure control. A post-job ALARA review was held at the conclusion of each project to obtain feedback and lessons learned. All improvement suggestions were reviewed for implementation during subsequent installations. As a result of the ALARA initiatives, significant dose savings were achieved. The normalized dose expenditure has been reduced from 9.6 rem for the first installation to 6.9 rem for the fourth and last installation. (author)

  10. Man-rem audit - a tool for exposure ALARA at Madras Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivaramakrishnan, N.R.; Eswaran, G.; Gangamohan, M.; Sathish, A.V.; Ramasubramanian, K.V.; Gandhimathinathan, S.; Selvam, S.; Moolya, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    ALARA - acronym for As Low As Reasonably Achievable, which means making every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the dose limits as is practical. ICRP has recommended ALARA to be implemented as a formal practice into the System of Dose Limitation, which contains three parts, 1) Justification of practice 2) Optimization 3) Dose Limits. As with the human endeavor, there is always room for improvement. Keeping this in mind, ALARA program is being practiced in our Nuclear Power Plants over the years. There has been a gradual reduction of collective dose in our Nuclear Power Plants due to successful implementation of the ALARA programs. This was possible due to the rigorous application of O and M experience, feedback and active participation of workforce towards ALARA. Furthermore, ALARA is an ongoing continual improvement programme towards collective dose reduction and has enough scope for improvement at any point of time. In order to substantiate the gains of ALARA programme and to improve it further, first time Mam-rem Audit was conducted at MAPS during the month of Sep-Oct 2010. This paper gives the brief outline about the method man-rem audit, its findings, corrective action implementation and the benefits derived from it. Man-rem audit similar to financial audit, serves as a tool for finding out grey areas where improvements is required so that station collective dose can be further optimized. It is one of the identified missions to achieve excellence in area of reducing station collective dose, unplanned exposures and RPP deviation. The scope of this audit is to bring further improvements in the reduction in station collective dose, create more awareness among the employees about ALARA principles and seek valuable suggestions for improvements. Audit team consisting of senior HP persons had one to one interaction with the individuals of the respective section in the field and tried to gather the information from the individual and

  11. Department of Energy ALARA implementation guide. Response to the Health Physics Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connelly, J.M. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In the August 1993 Health Physics Society (HPS) newsletter, the HPS Scientific and Public Issues Committee published a Position Statement entitled {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.{close_quotes}. In this article, this HPS committee made the statement that they were deeply concerned by the trend for agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept as a regulatory requirements, without providing specific guidance as to what it means and how to implement it consistently. The HPS position paper was in response to the DOE notice on proposed rulemaking for Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 834, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment{close_quotes} (10 CFR 834). In the notice of proposed rulemaking for 10 CFR 834, the Department of Energy (DOE) defined ALARA as follows: {open_quotes}As used in this part, ALARA is not a dose limit, but rather a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below the applicable limit of this part as is reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (10 CFR 834.2, p. 16283 of the Federal Register). The HPS position paper continues, {open_quotes}The section goes on to elaborate on what is meant by a process without providing sufficient guidance to assure uniform applicability of the process.{close_quotes}. Although this concern is directed towards the ALARA process as it relates to the environment, the Office of Health, which is responsible for occupational workers, shares the same definition for ALARA.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA report for Calendar Year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, S.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1994 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program performance at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes data regarding performance in the area of personnel exposures to radiation, skin contaminations, control of contaminated areas, minimization of radioactive waste, and control of radioactive releases. In CY 1994: (1) The collective total effective dose equivalent to PNL employees during 1994 was 55 person-rem. The Field Dosimetry Services of the Radiological Control Department, Technical Support Section, projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 2 rem based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the projection-by the end of CY 1994. The maximum dose to any individual was 1.11 rem. (2) There were 34 instances of skin and personal-clothing contamination events for PNL employees during 1994. Eighteen of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building; eleven occurred at the 325 Building; two occurred in the 327 Building; one occurred in the 326 Building; one occurred in the 3708 Building; and one occurred in the RTL Building. (3) PNL facilities contained 12 Airborne Radioactivity Areas, and 60 Contamination Areas and High Contamination Areas. The area of the Airborne Radioactivity Areas was 383 m 2 (4125 ft 2 ). The area of the Contamination Areas was 5290 m 2 (56,947 ft 2 ). The area of the High Contamination Areas was 266 m 2 (2863 ft 2 ). (4) PNL disposed of 10.5 m 3 (371 ft 3 ) of compacted low level waste. Also disposed was 423 m 3 (14,949 ft 3 ) of noncompacted low level and mixed waste that was not subject to volume reduction. The total radioactivity of the disposed waste was 1217 Ci. (5) PNL facilities released 165.2 Ci of noble gas, 3.0E-5 Ci of airborne particulate radioactive material, and 12.2 Ci of tritium to the environment

  13. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borst, T.; Niehoff, M. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Platteville, CO (United States); Zachary, M. [Scientific Ecology Group, Platteville, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans.

  14. Methodology for making environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Speer, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    An overall evaluation concept for use in making differential cost-benefit analyses in environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations is being implemented by Rockwell Hanford Operations. This evaluation includes consideration of seven categories: (1) capital costs; (2) operating costs; (3) state of the art; (4) safety; (5) accident or upset consequences; (6) reliability, operability, and maintainability; and (7) decommissionability. Appropriate weighting factors for each of these categories are under development so that ALARA determinations can be made by comparing scores of alternative proposals for facility design, operations, and upgrade. This method of evaluation circumvents the traditional basis of a stated monetary sum per person-rem of dose commitment. This alternative was generated by advice from legal counsel who advised against formally pursuing this avenue of approach to ALARA for environmental and occupational dose commitments

  15. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Dayley, L

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included...

  16. ALARA radiation protection applications at NPP A1 decommissioning using VISPLAN planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.

    2005-01-01

    The SCK.CEN developed during the BR3 reactor decommissioning a graphical interfaced 3D dose assessment tool aimed at the above mentioned dose optimization problems. The tool was improved further and commercialized under the name VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. The use of VISIPLAN tool at NPP A1 decommissioning was advised by EDF within the IAEA TCP SLR/4008 project missions as a component of a 3D technological chain ensuring acquisition and evaluation of digitized information leading to ALARA optimisation of the developed decommissioning working procedures (see Fig. 1). VISIPLAN license was purchased by IAEA and granted to VUJE and NPP A1 within the IAEA TCP project SLR/4008, covering also the necessary basic and advanced training (at NPP A1 real decommissioning environment), and is currently used by VUJE analysts at NPP A1 decommissioning as an ALARA tool for intervention planning and optimisation. The VISIPLAN allows a fast dose assessment for work planned in a radioactive environment. The calculations are based on a 3D model of the work place. This PC-based tool is user friendly and calculates a detailed dose account for different work scenarios defined by the ALARA analyst, taking into account worker position, work duration and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes. The VISIPLAN methodology is described. The VISIPLAN tool was applied to several ALARA studies carried out by the VUJE within development and analysis of various Work Programs for NPP Al decommissioning tasks. The applications ranged from simpler to complex ALARA planning tasks covering simple shielding applications to selection of the most suitable order of complex working procedures. Removal of inner liners from underground reservoirs 6/1 and 6/2 as well as Dismantling of pipes and components from a (hostile) 60 m corridor are described. (authors)

  17. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  18. ALARA Review for the Deactivation of the 107-N Pump Well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used during the completion of deactivation work at the 107-N Building. This ALARA assessment focuses on the 107-N Building pump well. The level of contamination found in the pump well has been estimated to be approximately 830 mRad/hr beta and 680,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) alpha per large area wipe. As part of the characterization of the water and sediment, samples were taken to determine the isotopic distribution

  19. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Roecklein, A.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-03-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE's nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers'' and PNL-6577 ''Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.'' The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility

  1. Radiation protection-culture. Culture improvement in radiation protection and ALARA behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1994-12-01

    In order to that the optimization principle become an actual professional liable dynamical critter in the radiological protection topics, the hierarchic impulse and the personnel sensitiveness are determining. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) in the firm cultivation modify the behaviour and act philosophy. 7 refs., 2 figs

  2. ALARA cost/benefit analysis at Union Electric company using the ARP/AI methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a specific method for justification of expenditures associated with reducing occupational radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This methodology is based on the concepts of the Apparebt Reduction Potential (ARP) and Achievability index (AI) as described in NUREG/CR-0446, Union Eletric's corporate planning model and the EPRI Model for dose rate buildup with reactor operating life. The ARP provides a screening test to determine if there is a need for ALARA expenditures based on actual or predicted exposure rates and/or dose experience. The AI is a means of assessing all costs and all benefits, even though they are expressed in different units of measurement such as person-rem and dollars, to determine if ALARA expenditures are justified and their value. This method of cost/benefit analysis can be applied by any company or organization utilizing site-specific exposure and dose rate data, and incorporating consideration of administrative exposure controls which may vary from organization to organization. Specific example cases are presented and compared to other methodologies for ALARA cost/benefit analysis

  3. The Evaluation of personnel radiation dose and society radiation on RSG-GAS around as proposal determination of ALARA value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande Made Udiyani; Puradwi IW

    2007-01-01

    Each nuclear installation to achieve radiation safety has to meet the ALARA concepts. The ALARA value of a nuclear installation should be enacted by regulator body. ALARA value can be determined by evaluation radiation exposure and dose acceptance of nuclear installation operation. As case study in Indonesia, ALARA assessment in nuclear installation is done at RSG-GAS reactor. Intention of this research is to determine gyration reference assess ALARA by evaluate radiation dose acceptance by RSG-GAS radiation personnel and the influence of RSG-GAS operation to presentation of radiation accepted by society which living around its. ALARA of RSG-GAS determined based on evaluation of measurement data of the radiation doses which is accepted by personnel radiation. While evaluation of radiation doses which is accepted by society in the radius 5 km of the RSG-GAS conducted to data result of calculation using program package of CAP-88 and measurement result with method of carborne survey. Result of radiation dose evaluation obtained which not pass dose definition for the radiation worker that is 50 mSv/year, and for society around RSG-GAS that is 5 mSv/year. Based on the result of evaluation hence obtained value of ALARA for RSG-GAS in value of gyration 17 - 50 mSv/year. (author)

  4. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren, R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedures for maintenance site: application to replacement of steam generator; Propositions d'organisation et procedures ALARA pour la preparation des chantiers de maintenance: application au RGV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, J; Lefaure, C

    1989-08-01

    This report proposes generic organization and ALARA procedures for preparing a maintenance site at a NPP. After a short description of the ALARA principle, it describes the proposition for French sites. They are grouped according to the following: motivation, organisation, means. They are illustrated by the example of steam generator replacement. Three special points concerning preparation of the site are developed: education; training of operators; review of the project.

  6. Lessons learned in planning ALARA/health physics support for major nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, T.R.; Lesinski, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Although as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)/health physics is viewed as necessary support for nuclear power plant outage work, it can be the last area to which attention is given in preparing for a large-scope outage. Inadequate lead times cause last-minute preparations resulting in delays in planned work. The Dresden Unit 3 Recirculation Piping Replacement Project is examined from a planning viewpoint. The attention that was given the various areas of a comprehensive ALARA/health physics program is examined, and approximate recommended lead times are discussed. The discussion will follow a chronological path from project inception to the beginning stages of outage work. Initially, the scope of work needs to be assessed by individuals familiar with similar projects of equivalent magnitude. Those individuals need to be health physics professionals who understand the particular utility and/or the site's way of doing business. They should also possess a good understanding of preferred industry practices

  7. Experience of ALARA in controlling radiocaesium discharges to the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiocaesium discharges to the Irish Sea, which primarily originate from corrosion of magnox fuel in the Sellafield storage ponds, are a source of public radiation exposure mainly through the fish and shellfish consumption pathway. Experience of ALARA in the context of reducing these discharges is described. The operators, British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), in consultation with Government Departments, decided to install an ion exchange plant to remove radioactivity from pond effluents. This plant is scheduled for commissioning in 1984 and optimisation will play a major part in determining its operating regime. Meanwhile, measures have been taken to reduce discharges using skips of zeolite installed in the ponds. Experience of ALARA in determining the optimum replacement rate of skips is described. A major consideration was differential cost-benefit analysis. Following installation of skips at the rate thereby indicated, discharges are being reduced by about half. A further major reduction is expected when the ion exchange plant becomes available. (author)

  8. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  9. Preoperational ALARA walk-down at the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Carolina Power and Light Company's Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant will enter commercial operation in 19987. During its design and construction a number of reviews were performed to ensure that personnel exposures in the completed plant would be ALARA. The final review in this process consisted of a comprehensive walk-down of plant radiation controlled areas by health physics, operations, maintenance, and engineering personnel. The walk-down project was conducted over a 12-month period using detailed criteria and checklists. This article describes the project, presents examples of the criteria that were used, and list the problems that were identified for resolution as well as the good ALARA design features that were incorporated into the plant

  10. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H. [Clinton Power Station Illinois Power Co., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system`s ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed.

  11. Radiation exposure usage accountability and impact with respect to ALAP (ALARA) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    A unique method has been developed for radiation exposure usage accounting at the N Reactor. This method accounts for exposure usage by specific job and working crafts. The accounting system provides information for use in job planning, exposure resource management, and ALAP (ALARA) analysis. It provides justification for ALAP expenditures, documentation of the effectiveness of exposure reduction efforts, and can be used to establish priorities for ALAP efforts

  12. CSER 95-002: ALARA shielding for IAEA SNM container movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    This CSER qualifies use of a 5% borated, lead foil lined polyethylene 1 inch annulus as a bucket and in a small carrier to move sealed containers of plutonium. The containers are Oversize Cans or smaller containing plutonium limited in mass and H/Pu ratio by PFP storage and transportation CPS's. These ALARA shielding units reduce personnel exposure to the radiation from the containers as they are moved for assay and other required activities

  13. Interpretation of the concepts of ALARA and bat for radioactive effluent releases from nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the understanding of the important concepts of both ALARA and BAT associated with the characteristics of effluent releases from the existing nuclear installations and the abatement techniques for effluents, this paper elaborates the principle of controlling radioactive effluent concentration from nuclear installation, that is based on the BAT focusing on the abatement techniques for effluents, introduces the good practice in the projects, and optimize the effluent releases with account taken of external factors such as the site condition. (authors)

  14. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals

  15. Application of the Alara principle to the occupationally exposed workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Haider, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report sets down how the Alara (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is applied in radiation protection of the occupationally exposed personnel at light-water reactors in EC countries. In some instances the practices, experiences and results from EC countries are supplemented by the practice in other States (e.g. USA, Sweden). Commencing with a short summary of the legal situation in the Member States of the European Community with regard to Alara, the report describes the framework in which the optimization practice has been developed. The main chapters elaborate in detail how the Alara principle has been put into practice in design and operation in LWRs. The importance of qualification and training of power-plant personnel in relation to optimization of radiation protection is considered and some comparisons are drawn with the US practice. Recommendations are made where reason for modification or harmonization of practices is seen in the conclusions of the different chapters and the overall conclusions and summary of the report

  16. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  17. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  18. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  19. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S pipe trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. Isolation from REDOX and removal of the product transfer lines from the pipe trench is the second step in the decontamination and decommissioning of the entire 233-S Facility. The work scope is to isolate all piping from REDOX and then to remove all the piping/equipment from the pipe trench. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure No. 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the pipe trench and the process fluid piping is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the pipe trench and cutting of piping commences. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-009 Revision 1, 233-S Pipe Trench Decon and Pipe Removal

  20. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory

  1. ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, S.W.; Kaplan, E.; Dionne, B.J.; Khan, T.A.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    This report is the first in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at DOE facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, and searches of the DOE Energy Data Base. The abstracts included in this report relate to operational health physics as well as other subjects which have a bearing on dose reduction. Facilities covered include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fabrication, unirradiated fissile materials storage, irradiated fissile material storage, reprocessing, decommissioning, recovery, hot laboratories, tritium production, reactors (research, test and production but not power reactors), and accelerators. We have also included material in improved design, materials selection, planning, and other topics which are related to dose-reduction efforts. The report contains 68 abstracts as well as subject and author indices

  2. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, contains the third in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This report also contains abstracts from the two previous volumes. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics are also included

  3. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  4. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  5. Backfitting of the nuclear power plant Borssele. A practical application of the ALARA-principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurs, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the adjustments for the title plant and how the radiation load of employees is kept as low as possible according to the newest insights of the ALARA-principle. In this article attention is paid to the results of the project 'Modifications' which comprises 16 system engineering modifications. The maximum attention for radiation protection resulted in a collective dose of circa 2500 millisievert, which is a factor 4 lower than the first estimation of the radiation load. 7 refs

  6. Cone-beam computed tomography: Time to move from ALARA to ALADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaju, Prashant P.; Jaju, Sushma P. [Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopa(Indonesia)

    2015-12-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely recommended for dental diagnosis and treatment planning. CBCT exposes patients to less radiation than does conventional CT. Still, lack of proper education among dentists and specialists is resulting in improper referral for CBCT. In addition, aiming to generate high-quality images, operators may increase the radiation dose, which can expose the patient to unnecessary risk. This letter advocates appropriate radiation dosing during CBCT to the benefit of both patients and dentists, and supports moving from the concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) to 'as low as diagnostically acceptable' (ALADA.

  7. ALARA principle - new philosophy in radiation therapy of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjieva, T.

    2003-01-01

    The papillary thyroid carcinoma is a model for a successful multidisciplinary oncological therapy with the early stage survival similar to that for normal population. The iodine radiotherapy is a part of the complex treatment leading to these results. The radiation protection principle ALARA is created for healthy people. The authors have formulated it for the purposes of radiotherapy and have built in, as a basic philosophy, in the new radiotherapy concept. It has increased the benefit:risk ratio for the patient. In this case ALARA means: reduction of the indications for treatment with 131 I in the early stages of papillary carcinoma; achievement of tumor control with minimal possible activity in advanced cases; medicamentous, dietary and other measures, reducing the dose burden during and after the treatment, extension of the overall treatment period through a control of the tumor marker thyroglobulin; special treatment and diagnostic regime for children and adolescents, a minimum radiation invasive and economically and socially adequate algorithm for the long-time follow-up of the patients. This ensures a high life quality for the healed patients, comparable with that of the other people

  8. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  9. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project is to remove the liquid low-level waste from the five underground storage tanks located at OHF and transfer the resulting slurry to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks facility for treatment and disposal. Among the technical objectives for the OHF Project, there is a specific provision to maintain personnel exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during each activity of the project and to protect human health and the environment. The estimated doses and anticipated conditions for accomplishing this project are such that an ALARA Plan is necessary to facilitate formal radiological review of the campaign. This ALARA Plan describes the operational steps necessary for accomplishing the job together with the associated radiological impacts and planned controls. Individual and collective dose estimates are also provided for the various tasks. Any significant changes to this plan (i.e., planned exposures that are greater than 10% of original dose estimates) will require formal revision and concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page. Deviations from this plan (i.e., work outside the scope covered by this plan) also require the preparation of a task-specific ALARA Review that will be amended to this plan with concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page

  10. Practical application of the ALARA principle in management of the nuclear legacy: optimization under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham; Sneve, Malgorzata K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiological protection has a long and distinguished history in taking a balanced approach to optimization. Both utilitarian and individual interests and perspectives are addressed through a process of constrained optimisation, with optimisation intended to lead to the most benefit to the most people, and constraints being operative to limit the degree of inequity among the individuals exposed. At least, expressed simplistically, that is what the recommendations on protection are intended to achieve. This paper examines the difficulties in achieving that objective, based on consideration of the active role of optimisation in regulatory supervision of the historic nuclear legacy. This example is chosen because the application of the ALARA principle has important implications for some very major projects whose objective is remediation of existing legacy facilities. But it is also relevant because timely, effective and cost efficient completion of those projects has implications for confidence in the future development of nuclear power and other uses of radioactive materials. It is also an interesting example because legacy management includes mitigation of some major short and long term hazards, but those mitigating measures themselves involve operations with their own risk, cost and benefit profiles. Like any other complex activity, a legacy management project has to be broken down into logistically feasible parts. However, from a regulatory perspective, simultaneous application of ALARA to worker protection, major accident risk mitigation and long-term environmental and human health protection presents its own challenges. Major uncertainties which exacerbate the problem arise from ill-characterised source terms, estimation of the likelihood of unlikely failures in operational processes, and prospective assessment of radiological impacts over many hundreds of years and longer. The projects themselves are set to run over decades, during which time the

  11. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  12. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts

  13. Managing the radiological risk: ALARA, a principle, an obligation, a state of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.

    1995-01-01

    According to the 1993 data published by French nuclear operators and by the Ionizing Radiations Protection Office (OPRI), only two workers have exceeded the maximum annual permissible dose of 50 mSv. However, the respect of dose limits is not a sufficient warranty to accept the ionizing radiations exposure risk. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle is a masterpiece of the radiological protection system. Its goal is to maintain the exposures as low as reasonably achievable taking into account the socio-economical constraints. In France, the application of this principle is as compulsory as the respect of dose limits. The proper management and optimization of radiological risk requires the motivation of everybody. (J.S.). 2 refs., 3 figs

  14. Optimisation of structural shielding of accelerator control room for compliance with ALARA principle under Indian conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Masood; Singh, Brijesh

    1999-01-01

    The case of a 20 MV x-ray accelerator has been considered in this paper for optimisation. An internationally recommended value of α = US$ 1000 per person-sievert has been assumed. Cost of concrete has been assumed as US$ 82.7/m 3 . It is seen that, extra shielding is needed to satisfy the ALARA principle. Further, the amount of requisite shielding increases with the degree of occupancy and, also, if the local construction materials or the labour are cheaper than considered in this paper. Accordingly 1.5 to 4.75 HVLs may be needed as extra shielding in different situations. Therefore, a site specific and installation specific optimisation of shielding is necessary

  15. Use of rank sum method in identifying high occupational dose jobs for ALARA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong Ho; Kang, Chang Sun

    1998-01-01

    The cost-effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) dose at a nuclear power plant could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORE dose data of existing plants. It is necessary to identify what are high ORE jobs for ALARA implementation. In this study, the Rank Sum Method (RSM) is used in identifying high ORE jobs. As a case study, the database of ORE-related maintenance and repair jobs for Kori Units 3 and 4 is used for assessment, and top twenty high ORE jobs are identified. The results are also verified and validated using the Friedman test, and RSM is found to be a very efficient way of analyzing the data. (author)

  16. BNL ALARA center's development of a computerized Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Connelly, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation at DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of open-quotes good-practice documentsclose quotes will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called open-quotes Radiological Assessment and Design Systemclose quotes (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analysis, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative ratings of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  17. BNL ALARA Center's development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Masciulli, S.; Connelly, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  18. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  19. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1989-12-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  20. A corporative ALARA engineering support for all EDF sites a major improvement: the generic work areas optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiot, A.; Lebeau, J.

    2005-01-01

    ALARA studies performed by EDF plants are quite simple and empirical. Most often, feedback experience and common sense, with the help of simple calculations allow reaching useful and efficient decisions. This is particularly the case when the exposure situations are not complex, within a simple environment and with a single source, or one major source. However, in more complex cases this is not enough to guarantee that actual ALARA solutions are implemented. EDF has then decided to use its national corporate engineering as a support for its sites. That engineering support is in charge of using very efficient tools such as PANTHER-RP. The objective of the presentation is to describe the engineering process and tools now available at EDF, to illustrate them with a few case studies and to describe the goals and procedures set up by EDF. (authors)

  1. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF sites. A major improvement: the generic work areas optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiot, Alain [EDF, SPT, UTO, Le Central, Bat. 420, BP 129, 93162 Noisy-le-Grand Cedex (France); Lebeau, Jacques [Electricite de France, ALARA Project, Site Cap Ampere, 1, place Pleyel, 93282 Saint Denis Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    ALARA studies performed by EDF plants are quite simple and empirical. Most often, feedback experience and common sense, with the help of simple calculations allow reaching useful and efficient decisions. This is particularly the case when the exposure situations are not complex, within a simple environment and with a single source, or one major source. However, in more complex cases this is not enough to guarantee that actual ALARA solutions are implemented. EDF has then decided to use its national corporate engineering as a support for its sites. That engineering support is in charge of using very efficient tools such as PANTHER-RP. The objective of the presentation is to describe the engineering process and tools now available at EDF, to illustrate them with a few case studies and to describe the goals and procedures set up by EDF. (authors)

  2. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  3. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report is the third in a series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at Brookhaven National Laboratory on dose reduction at nuclear power plants. Abstracts for this report were selected from papers presented at recent technical meetings, journals and research reports reviewed at the BNL ALARA Center, and searches of the DOE/RECON data base on energy-related publications. The references selected for inclusion in the bibliography relate not only to operational health physics topics but also to plant chemistry, stress corrosion cracking, and other aspects of plant operation which have important impacts on occupational exposure. Also included are references to improved design, planning, materials selection and other topics related to what might be called ALARA engineering. Thus, an attempt has been made to cover a broad spectrum of topics related directly or indirectly to occupational exposure reduction. The report contains 252 abstracts and both author and subject indices

  4. Use of computerized, 3-dimensional solids modeling and data base management to support radiation mapping and ALARA planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauss, R.D.; Slobodien, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The RADiation Mapping and ALARA Planning System (RADMAPS) under development by GPU Nuclear Corporation in conjunction with Construction Systems Associates, Inc., integrates computerized solids modeling and data base management to provide an automated, integrated systems solution to the problems associated with acquiring, managing, and communicating plant radiological data at nuclear facilities. This presentation describes the status of the RADMAPS development and outlines plans for future expansion

  5. Excellence in occupational dose reduction in the new millennium: the first international Alara symposium in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The International Symposium ALARA 2001 on Radiological Protection Challenges in NPP's Management on the Verge of the XXI Century took place in Anaheim. California on February 5-7. In this congress, Anibal Martin, Vice-President of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, received an honorable mention from the Health Physics Society for his professional career in the nuclear arena. After being awarded the commemorative plague, Anibal martin addressed the meeting. His speech is reproduced below. (Author)

  6. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6° inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (C nH n) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry.

  7. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S P.R. can loadout and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. Disassembly of the loadout hood and its associated equipment may be done in parallel with the isolation of 233-S from REDOX via the pipe trench equipment removal. The work scope is to remove the entire loadout hood from the Product Receiver (P.R.) Can Loadout and Decon Room inside the 233-S Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the loadout hood and its associated equipment is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the loadout hood and disassembly commences. This ALARA review is for the task instruction 1997-03-18-010 Revision 0, 233-S Loadout Hood Decon and Dismantlement

  8. Application of ALARA to transport of Radio-Isotopes for Medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, H. J.; Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Van Hienen, J. F. A.; Jansma, R.; Gelder, R.; Shaw, K. B.; Gulberg, O.; Josefsson, D.; Svahn, B.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 a multi-national research project on transport safety commissioned by DG-TREN of the European Commission was completed and reported in The Evaluation of the Situation in the EC as regards Safety in the Transport of Radioactive Material and the Prospects for the Development of such Type of Transport (EC Contract No 4.1020/D/97-003. The result project was focussed on the radiological protection for routine (incident-free) shipments of radioactive material (RAM) in the public domain in four EU Member States Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the UK. This information satisfies the requirements of the Euratom Basic Safety Standards, Article 14, which calls for reasonable steps taken by EU Member States to ensure and to substantiate that the contribution to exposure from practices including transport operations involving radioactive substances, is kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), economic and social factors being taken into account. The present paper, which has been partially based on the 1999 study for the European Commission, is focussed on the application of ALARA to the shipments by road in the four countries of radioactive material used for health care, research and industry. From the analysis of the data for these shipment it has been found that these shipments result in transport worker effective doses that vary from very low values which represent a major fraction of the applicable dose limit of 20 mSv/yr. From the primarily recorded worker radiation doses collected at the national level indicate, however, that the vast majority of transport workers, i. e. drivers and handlers, receive typically annual effective doses in the range of up to 10 mSv/yr with most values being in the low dose range. The maximum recorded occupational doses of workers involved primarily in manual handling, sorting and moving of high-T1 multiple-package radioisotope shipments at depots, re-distribution centres etc. were found to be from about 10-14 mSv/yr, From the

  9. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacca, J.; Job, P. K.; Rauchas, A.; Justus, A.; Veluri, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step

  10. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, G.J.; Durham, J.S.; Hickey, E.E.; Stansbury, P.S.; Cicotte, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL's reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included

  11. Health physics experiences in achieving ALARA exposures to plant personnel at NAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, V.; Lal Chand

    2000-01-01

    Unit 1 of NAPS achieved first criticality on 12.3.1989 and Unit 2 achieved on 24.10.1991. Till the end of Feb-2000 these units have completed 1890 and 1811 full power days respectively. The performance of NAPS was expected to be better than the earlier Indian reactors in respect of safe production as well as cumulative radiation exposures. This is because of the major design improvements like: fully double containment system, elimination of 41 Ar by introducing light water in calandria vault, reduction of core based fuel failure rate, separation of high radiation equipment to no occupancy areas during normal operation, a separate purification building for the purification of both moderator and PHT systems, a better layout of equipment and plant areas, elimination of unnecessary equipment in various systems besides ensuring the reliability of equipment for safe operation, selection of materials with low corrosion and activation characteristics etc. In this paper, the operational health physics experiences at NAPS to achieve ALARA exposures to plant personnel are described briefly. (author)

  12. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel; Proposition d'organisation et procedure ALARA pour la preparation le suivi et le retour d'experience des chantiers de maintenance: application au RGV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1990-01-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example.

  13. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel; Proposition d'organisation et procedure ALARA pour le suivi et le retour d'experience des chantiers de maintenance: application au RGV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, Jacques; Lefaure, Christian

    1989-12-01

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example.

  14. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  15. Low dose radiation and ALARA: the potential risks to patients and staff from alpha-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, N.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This year a new drug containing radium-223, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, was approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration for the palliative treatment of advanced prostate cancer metastases. Other drugs containing short-lived alpha-emitters are on clinical trial in Europe. Commonly, these employ a radionuclide attached to an antibody that specifically targets tumor cells to produce a highly localized radio-therapeutic dose to the tumor. However, normal tissues within the body will also be irradiated, albeit sometimes at low dose, and the question arises as to whether this presents a significant additional risk to the patient. Similarly, medical staff that handle these radionuclides could receive intakes of the radionuclides. What is the risk to staff? To assess the risk resulting from small tissue alpha-doses the toxicological, both human and animal, database was re-examined. The results of 20 epidemiological and toxicological studies with alpha-emitting radionuclides were analysed. In all cases a polynomial function provided a better fit to the data than a linear, no thresholds function. Also, in 19 cases a threshold dose below which no cancer is seen was indicated. The position of this threshold varied according to cancer type, but was typically in the range 0.1 to 1.0Gy of tissue dose - with a mean of 0.5Gy. It is concluded that alpha-radiation induced tumorogenesis is a threshold response and that as long as tissue doses are kept below these thresholds no additional cancers would be seen in either patients receiving alpha-therapy or in staff exposed to 'spilt' radionuclide. The presence of thresholds questions the appropriateness of current ALARA practices that are mostly used to drive occupational alpha-radiation exposures to as close to zero as possible. (author)

  16. A simplified ALARA approach to demonstration of compliance with surface contaminated object regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D.; Boyle, R.W.; Cook, J.C.

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Transportation (DOT) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have jointly prepared a comprehensive set of draft guidance for consignors and inspectors to use when applying the newly imposed regulatory requirements for low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCOs). The guidance is being developed to facilitate compliance with the new LSA material and SCO requirements, not to impose additional requirements. These new requirements represent, in some areas, significant departures from the manner in which packaging and transportation of these materials and objects were previously controlled. On occasion, it may be appropriate to use conservative approaches to demonstrate compliance with some of the requirements, ensuring that personnel are not exposed to radiation at unnecessary levels, so that exposures are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In the draft guidance, one such approach would assist consignors preparing a shipment of a large number of SCOs in demonstrating compliance without unnecessarily exposing personnel. In applying this approach, users need to demonstrate that four conditions are met. These four conditions are used to categorize non-activated, contaminated objects as SCO-2. It is expected that, by applying this approach, it will be possible to categorize a large number of small contaminated objects as SCO-2 without the need for detailed, quantitative measurements of fixed, accessible contamination, or of total (fixed and non-fixed) contamination on inaccessible surfaces. The method, which is based upon reasoned argument coupled with limited measurements and the application of a sum of fractions rule, is described and examples of its use are provided

  17. ALARA review of the maintenance and repair jobs of repetitive high radiation dose at Kori Unit 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.H.; Moon, J.H.; Kang, C.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    The policy of maintaining occupational radiation dose (ORD) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requires the effective reduction of ORD in the phases of design as well as operation of nuclear power plants. It has been identified that a predominant portion of ORD arises during maintenance and repair operations at nuclear power plants. The cost-effective reduction of ORD cannot be achieved without a comprehensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing nuclear power plants. To identify the jobs of repetitive high ORD, the ORD data of Kori Units 3 and 4 over 10-year period from 1986 to 1995 were compiled into the PC-based ORD database program. As the radiation job classification structure, 26 main jobs are considered, most of which are further subdivided into detailed jobs. According to the order of the collective dose values for 26 main jobs, 10 jobs of high collective dose are identified. As an ALARA review, then, top 10 jobs of high collective dose are statistically analyzed with regard to 1) dose rate, 2) crew number and 3) job frequency that are the factors determining the collective dose for the radiation job of interest. Through the ALARA review, main reasons causing to high collective dose values are identified as follows. The high collective dose of RCP maintenance job is mainly due to the large crew number and the high job frequency. The characteristics of refueling job are similar to those of RCP maintenance job. However, the high collective doses of SG-related jobs such as S/G nozzle dam job, S/G man-way job and S/G tube maintenance job are mainly due to high radiation dose rate. (author)

  18. 1991 implementation of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) administrative radiation exposure levels: Experiences and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Baumann, B.L.

    1993-06-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure levels were implemented on January 1, 1991, by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a prime US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, located in Richland, Washington. This paper describes the radiation exposure levels which were implemented and the associated experiences and lessons learned. The issue of a report from the Committee on Biological Effectiveness of Ionizing Radiation in 1989 prompted DOE to re-evaluate its position on radiation exposure limits and the resulting doses received by occupational radiation workers. DOE requested that all it's contractors determine the impacts to operations from reduced radiation exposure levels

  19. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique

  20. Considerations concerning the Alara principle, the {alpha} value, and the Choice of attributes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sordi, G. M.

    2004-07-01

    The paper initially introduces the ALARA principle conceptually through its equations which demand the maximum net benefit, and consecutively demonstrates that it can be interpreted as discriminator between the radiation protection options which are to be avoided and those which are allowed. With respect to the alpha value, the paper demonstrates that it can be interpreted as an indicator of the velocity decrease of the involved doses. If the entities involved, that which contributes to the protection costs, and that which contributes to the detriment cost are different, substantial inequities could be committed if certain indispensable precautions are not taken. When the quantitative decision-aiding techniques are used in the analysis, these being; the multi-attribute utility analysis, or the multicriteria outranking analysis, a larger number of attributes are permitted in addition to the two obligatory attributes of protection cost and detriment cost. With this approach it is observed that those attributes which decrease when the annual protection costs increase (or the annual collective dose decreases), tends to increase the alpha value and viceversa. This phenomena leads us to various conclusions such as: a) if the quantitative decision-aiding techniques of cost-benefit, differential cost-benefit, and extended cost benefit are employed the alpha value is explicit, and therefore can be argued between the involved parties. However if the more complex quantitative analyses are used, the selection of the attributes can substantially increase or decrease the alpha value, committing inequity to one of the parties involved in benefit to the other; b) in order to avoid large distortions provoked by the use of non-obligatory attributes, these should be weighted in such a manner that the decrease provoked by some should be compensated by the increase caused by the use of non-obligatory attributes, these should be weighted in such a manner that the decrease caused by some

  1. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiot, A.; Orjol, A. [Electricite de France (EDF/UTO), 93 - Noisy le Grand (France); Lafferriere, F.; Fraissinet, E. [Electricite de France (EDF-CNPE) du Blayais, 33 - Saint Ciers sur Gironde (France)

    2006-07-01

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  2. Considerations concerning the Alara principle, the α value, and the Choice of attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sordi, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper initially introduces the ALARA principle conceptually through its equations which demand the maximum net benefit, and consecutively demonstrates that it can be interpreted as discriminator between the radiation protection options which are to be avoided and those which are allowed. With respect to the alpha value, the paper demonstrates that it can be interpreted as an indicator of the velocity decrease of the involved doses. If the entities involved, that which contributes to the protection costs, and that which contributes to the detriment cost are different, substantial inequities could be committed if certain indispensable precautions are not taken. When the quantitative decision-aiding techniques are used in the analysis, these being; the multi-attribute utility analysis, or the multicriteria outranking analysis, a larger number of attributes are permitted in addition to the two obligatory attributes of protection cost and detriment cost. With this approach it is observed that those attributes which decrease when the annual protection costs increase (or the annual collective dose decreases), tends to increase the alpha value and viceversa. This phenomena leads us to various conclusions such as: a) if the quantitative decision-aiding techniques of cost-benefit, differential cost-benefit, and extended cost benefit are employed the alpha value is explicit, and therefore can be argued between the involved parties. However if the more complex quantitative analyses are used, the selection of the attributes can substantially increase or decrease the alpha value, committing inequity to one of the parties involved in benefit to the other; b) in order to avoid large distortions provoked by the use of non-obligatory attributes, these should be weighted in such a manner that the decrease provoked by some should be compensated by the increase caused by the use of non-obligatory attributes, these should be weighted in such a manner that the decrease caused by some

  3. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiot, A.; Orjol, A.; Lafferriere, F.; Fraissinet, E.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  4. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  5. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  6. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  7. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  8. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  9. New recommendations of the ICRP and the ALARA program of the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde; Nuevas recomendaciones del ICRP y el programa ALARA de la Central Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla C, I [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Laguna Verde (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    In view of the events happened in it finishes it decade, in the nuclear environment, it is necessary that any he/she practices that it involves exhibition to the radiation, real or potential, be detailed and systematically analyzed by the light of the current knowledge, capitalizing the generated experience. They think about three fundamental aspects in the campaign of radiological cultivation: 1. New methods of evaluation of equivalent dose. 2. Limit of individual dose, base of the change and control implications, and 3. Analysis philosophies and the application of the system of dose limitation. The program ALARA of the Laguna Verde Central from its installation in 1987 observes and it implements actions trending to optimize it practice of situation of potential and planned exhibition with the purpose of fulfilling the commitment settled down in the declaration of political of this program.

  10. Characterization of workplaces in interventional radiology using active dosemeters ALARA OD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, I.; Milkovic-Kraus, S.; Mestrovic, T.; Suric-Mihic, M.; Vrtar, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Because of progressive development and extended use of interventional radiology procedures it is highly recommended that all individuals involved in the process should be aware of the potential for both stochastic and deterministic effects due to occupational exposure. Interventional radiology procedures are essentially therapeutic and are performed by various medical specialists, not only by properly educated radiologists. As the procedures are performed in such a manner that certain number of medical staff are always needed near the patient, near the x- ray unit, ensuring 'safe' working environment in such radiation x-ray field geometry is a new challenge to regular radiation protection. In this work we are not primary concerned in relatively high doses delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The patient is rather regarded as a secondary radiation source which emits scattered x-rays. The working staff, moving in mixed, primary and scattered x-ray field, is expected to be exposed to higher occupational doses due to combination of extended fluoroscopy times, elevated fluoroscopy currents and larger amount of radiographic images required. The protection of both patients and staff is to be upgraded. As passive dosemetes will give us clear knowledge only about the monthly integrated occupational dose, a reasonable doubt exists about the frequency and duration, of receiving the dose. Measuring dose rate is not a part of regular passive dosemeters monitoring systems. This is why we have developed active - electronic dosemeter device which provides us with additional dosimetry data about the frequency and duration of professional exposure burden. Digital dosemeter ALARA OD will record and integrate any occupational dose including the normal radiation background in the working area. It will record the time and duration of any fluoroscopic exposure done. This gives us the data about the dose rate of occupational radiation and frequency of

  11. Clinical application of 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: "How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-09-01

    Practice of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be protected from harmful radiation exposure if 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. This can save children from potential radiation risks including development of brain cancer and leukemia. Consecutive CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children's hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, 'Justification' of CT was evaluated and then 'Optimization' was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies avoided by applying 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. A total of 1302 consecutive CT request forms were received during the study period. Some of the request forms (n=86; 6.61%) had requests for more than one (multiple) anatomical regions, hence, a total of 1392 different anatomical CT requests were received. Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were protected from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure.The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient

  12. Application of the ALARA principle to minimize the collective dose in NPP accident management within the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorad, V.; Slepchenko, O.; Kyrylenko, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on application of the ALARA principle to minimize the collective doses (both for NPP personnel and the public) related to admission of personnel to the containment for accident management activities and depending on operation of ventilation systems. Results from assessment of radiation consequences are applied to a small - break LOCA with failure of LPIS at VVER - 1000 reactors. The public doses are evaluated using up - to - date RODOS, MACCS and HotSpot software for assessment of radiation consequences. The personnel doses are evaluated with MicroShield and InterRAS codes. The time function and optimal value of the collective dose are defined. The developed approach can be applied for minimization of the collective dose for optimization of accident management strategies at NPPs

  13. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report

  14. New recommendations of the ICRP and the ALARA program of the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla C, I.

    1991-01-01

    In view of the events happened in it finishes it decade, in the nuclear environment, it is necessary that any he/she practices that it involves exhibition to the radiation, real or potential, be detailed and systematically analyzed by the light of the current knowledge, capitalizing the generated experience. They think about three fundamental aspects in the campaign of radiological cultivation: 1. New methods of evaluation of equivalent dose. 2. Limit of individual dose, base of the change and control implications, and 3. Analysis philosophies and the application of the system of dose limitation. The program ALARA of the Laguna Verde Central from its installation in 1987 observes and it implements actions trending to optimize it practice of situation of potential and planned exhibition with the purpose of fulfilling the commitment settled down in the declaration of political of this program

  15. Lessons Learned at Envirocare of Utah's Containerized Waste Facility (CWF): Dose Minimization Through ALARA Techniques and Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, J.; Gardner, J.; Ledoux, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (Envirocare) commenced operation of its Class A Containerized Waste Facility (CWF) on October 25, 2001. The opening of this facility began a new era for Envirocare, in that; their core business had always been low level, high volume, bulk radioactive waste. The CWF commenced operations to dispose of low level, low volume, high activity, containerized radioactive waste. Due to the potential for high dose rates on the waste disposal containers, the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) plays an important role in the operation of the CWF and its mission to properly dispose of waste while minimizing doses to the workers, public, and the environment. This paper will enumerate some of the efforts made by the management and staff of the CWF that have contributed to significant dose reductions

  16. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  17. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  18. ALARA (As Low As Reasonable Achievable) procedure applied to fuel assembly fabrication with enriched reprocessing uranium (ERU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Leonam dos Santos; Degrange, Jean Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The study introduced by this paper compose the first step to the implementation of ALARA (As Low As Reasonable Achievable) for a nuclear fuel assembly factory which one of its two production lines will be designed to work with Enriched Reprocessing Uranium (ERU). This step includes the reference situation analysis is based on previsional dosimetric evaluations for individual and collective exposures of each factory operator (117 in total) working on 7 work stations, considering 6 annual production scenarios (10, 50 75, 100 and 150 ERU tons), which corresponds to an annual production of 600 tons (ERU plus enriched natural uranium ENU). The exposure indicators evolution, expressed in terms of collective dose, annual individual dose and radiological detrimental cost for workers, is also used in a complimentary way to guide the analysis. (author)

  19. An efficient but little known tool for the application of the ALARA principle: Isoe (information system on occupational exposure) (in French)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croq, M.; Mundigl, S.; Lazo, T.; D'Ascenzo, L.; Lefaure, C.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient but little known tool for the application of the ALARA principle: ISOE (Information System on Occupational Exposure). The Information System on Occupational Exposure to ionizing radiation (ISOE) is a program launched by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1992. It was developed to address the needs of nuclear power plants and safety authorities as a comparison and information tool on practices in terms of optimization (ALARA principle), in NEA member countries. To date, more than 90% of the operating nuclear power plants in the world are participating in this program, which is organized in a decentralized form, with a steering group and four technical centers (Europe, Asia, north America and IAEA). The ISOE program includes an occupational exposure database and an information exchange and communication network. The databases permit the preparation of studies and comparisons of practices, either in a factual or analytical way. Thus, the ISOE program favors exchanges to the benefit of all participants and helps to bring operational radiation protection ever closer towards the 'achievable' of ALARA. (author)

  20. IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P and A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented

  1. Proceedings of an international workshop on historic dose experience and dose reduction (ALARA) at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, J.R.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1985-06-01

    Dose reduction data and experience from 28 foreign and 10 US nuclear power plants was examined to determine causes for the wide variations in occupational dose from country to country. Major topics discussed were: steam generator and refueling maintenance problems; utility and supplier ALARA programs; effectiveness of dose-reduction modifications; attitudes and training; current and future dose-reduction research. While many parameters contribute to differences of occupational doses between plants from different nations, it is clear that most US plants have higher collective dose equivalent per reactor per megawatt-year than most other countries, even for plants of similar size and age. Worldwide, Finnish and Swedish plants, both PWR and BWR, have achieved the lowest values. Major factors which contribute to low doses include: (1) minimization of cobalt in primary system components exposed to water; (2) careful plant design, layout and component segregation and shielding; (3) plant standardization; (4) selection of components and systems for increased reliability; (5) management interest and commitment; (6) minimum number of workers and in-depth worker training; (7) careful control of primary system oxygen and pH; (8) good primary system water purity to minimize corrosion product formation; (9) use of special tools and robotics; (10) decontamination and passivation of primary systems and components; and (11) extent of backfitting and mandated inspections

  2. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    This report is the fourth in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on dose reduction at nuclear power plants. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports and searches of the DOE's Energy Data Base. The abstracts included in this report to operational health physics as well as other subjects which have a bearing on dose reduction at nuclear power plants, such as stress corrosion, cracking, plant chemistry, use of robotics and remote devices, etc. Material on improved design, materials selection, planning and other topics which are related to dose reduction efforts are also included. The report contains 327 abstracts as well as subject and author indices. All information in the current volume is also available from the ALARA Center's bulletin board service which is accessible by personal computers with the help of a modem. The last section of the report explains the features of the bulletin board. The bulletin board will be kept up-to-date with new information and should be of help in keeping people current in the area of dose reduction

  3. Practice and experience of radiation protection and optimization (ALARA) management system in Daya Bay NPP during the past 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Degan; He Yu; Yang Maochun; Gu Jingzhi

    2004-01-01

    With the practice of 10 years safe operation, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station has established and continuously improved the management system for radiation protection and optimization (ALARA) which contains 3 basic requirements: all workers are trained, all employees are engaged in totally, and work management is implemented for the whole process. At the same time, strong efforts have been made to build the 'infrastructure' as a platform for its effective operation. This article introduces the contents and characteristics of the system and basic experiences of its effective implementation. In order to implement the management system effectively, it is necessary for NPPs to strengthen the responsibility system for radiation protection and the leading role of the radiation protection personnel, especially the role of technical support and supervision during the work with high radiation risk, emphasize the organic combination and actively mutual action with the safe operation management system of the plant, and pay great attention to the formation of safety culture and the experience feedback to ensure the continuous improvement of the management system

  4. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well other topics, has been included. This volume (Volume 4 of the series) contains 209 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume

  5. The necessary guidance on the application of JUSTIFICATION and ALARA by the nuclear authorities, using 'Accountability for Reasonableness' as a decision making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veuchelen, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In all branches of law, but foremost in international nuclear law, the global economic system brings along a vast record of Soft Law covering General Principles and Standards. For a part we can find these Soft Law Principles and Standards back in the clothing of hard law, or in the licensing procedures, at the national level. The larger part however is never 'transposed' into national laws and especially the harmonization, the implementation and control of such Principles and Standards remain doubtful. In this paper the focus lies on JUSTIFICATION and ALARA, as the main nuclear safety principles, accepted world-wide. The regulatory guidance and demonstration of these Principles, indicating which (numerical) safety levels or safety objectives are mandatory and which are only guidance should be undertaken by the international regulators and authorities, but are often lacking. It is the aim of this paper to come up with a better procedural framework for a priority setting process by nuclear authorities. Establishing a fair process for priority setting is easier than agreeing on principles. We use the idea of 'Accountability for Reasonableness', developed in the field of Health Care Management. An ideal model of priority setting within the JUSTIFICATION/ALARA approach will need to specify what should be done (i.e. justified ethically) and how it can be done (i.e. based in empirical reality and on benchmarking), to reach optimal levels of nuclear safety. (author)

  6. Argon-41 ALARA, or reduction of argon-41 released from the OSTR by use of a nitrogen purging system for the rotating rack facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.; Dodd, B.; Carpenter, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    During a generally concurrent era, the NRC began emphasizing the concept of keeping all radiation doses and releases of radioactivity to the environment 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). In much the same way as the physical security regulations were expanded, the ALARA idea was defined for a number of different NRC licensee categories, but the underlying principle remained the same, namely, reduce occupational doses and releases of radioactivity. In keeping with this NRC policy (i.e., regulatory requirement), the OSTR staff conducted a study of the argon-41 production sites throughout the facility, with the idea of minimizing the production without increasing the potential for higher occupational doses to the staff. The reduction in argon-41 production and release should, after a full year's implementation, result in the 41.68 curie value documented for the past reporting year (July 1, 1980 through June 30, 1981) being cut to about 9 curies per year. This value is based on the fact that the LN purging system was used about the last four months of the stated reporting period. From a dose commitment standpoint, this should reduce the maximum projected annual dose in the unrestricted area under the worst case hypothetical conditions from the currently estimated 1.04 mrem per year to about 0.23 mrem per year

  7. ALARA notes, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the 'tyranny' of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment

  8. ALARA and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Perin, M.; Saumon, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of open-quotes hostileclose quotes environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views

  9. When RCRA meets ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to identify an inconsistency between RCRA and AEA and for distinguishing a true inconsistency from a compliance difficulty. The paper also provides examples of each situation, accommodating specific RCRA requirements to maintain adherence to radiation protection requirements. The proposed method is derived from radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure that was issued by EPA, under authority derived from Executive Order 10831, the AEA, and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970. This EPA guidance was approved by President Reagan on January 20, 1987 and closely reflects the guidance of national and international radiation standard-setting groups

  10. ALARA and work management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C. [Centre d`etude sur l`Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Perin, M. [Environmental Radiation Protection and Security Dept., Saint-Denis (France); Saumon, P. [Framatome, Lyon (France)

    1995-03-01

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of {open_quotes}hostile{close_quotes} environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views.

  11. Role of membrane technology to achieve ALARA concept in reprocessing plant: utilization of low pressure reverse osmosis for treatment of delay tank solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabby, Anil K.; Sonawane, J.V.; Rathore, N.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Roy, S.C.; Venugopalan, A.K.; Chagrani, R.D.; Dey, P.K.; Prabhakar, S.; Tiwari, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Reverse osmosis is a well-developed technology. The systems have been used in industrial settings for many years with applications to separation, concentration of product streams and waste water treatment. The technology has been used for removal of the radionuclides from low-level liquid wastes, such as waste streams at nuclear power plants. Because reverse osmosis rejects nearly all contaminants from a solution the high purity product water may be recycled within the power plant, or is usually of such low activity that it is suitable for discharge to the environment. This technology will help in achieving ALARA concept which will be beneficial for the environment. In the present study, the removal of alpha and beta activities from delay tank solution is planned

  12. Ecological aspects of the radiation-migration equivalence principle in a closed fuel cycle and its comparative assessment with the ALARA principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluektov, P.P.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Rachkov, V.I.; Sukhanov, L.P.; Voloshin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    .e. the ALARA principle. Economic factors are disregarded in constructing the RME principle (for example, the cost of SNF reprocessing to the corresponding depth). However, the RME principle may be demonstrated to broad sections of the public with achieving the necessary understanding, which is of crucial importance. The ALARA principle is not reduced to the RME principle and is a more general programme into which the RME principle may be embedded. The ALARA principle covers all the stages of creating a burial, including the design, building, operation, and closing with the subsequent monitoring. This principle regulates the stages of burial building, the location of waste, the use of remote control and protected equipment for location of waste, environmental control, measures for a decrease in the probability of emergences and their consequences, which should provide the main aim the control and a decrease in the dose load on staff and members of the public at all the stage of creating and operating the RW burial. (author)

  13. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Amendment 1 for Appendix B: Install flex-pipe on tank riser spools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This amendment to Appendix B contains the specific ALARA evaluations for installing flex-pipe on riser spools to accommodate ventilation duct connections to the north risers of each tank. The work will be a routine task that is part of the Equipment Installation and Mobilization phase of the project. The dose rates were estimated using the recent Radiological Surveillance Section radiological survey: SAAS-97-063S. Task B-6 has been added to the OHF Project ALARA review process to address a field decision to modify an approach to installing the tank ventilation system. The revised approach will incorporate 12-in. diameter, 36-in. long, stainless steel flex-pipe connected to each north riser spool to address the problem of pipe fitting multiple bends and turns expected with the 12-in. PVC duct. This improved approach will reduce the time necessary to install the duct system between the tanks and the ventilation skid. However, the task includes opening the 12-in. riser spool connections to replace the currently installed blind gaskets. Since a riser spool for each tank will be opened, there is a potential for significant personnel exposure and spread of contamination that will addressed through this ALARA review process

  14. Evaluating remote control and robotics actions in NPPs in an ALARA perspective: lessons from the evolution of steam generator tube plugging technique in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Lochard, J.; Blain, A.

    1989-01-01

    Introducing remote tooling and robotics in NPPs raises many questions. Is it better to develop specific robotic tools for each type of operation, or to conceive more generic multipurpose tool carriers. Does the introduction of remote control and robotics always reduce human involvement and collective doses. What are the impacts on individual doses distribution for the most exposed operators. Under what conditions is robotics justified from an economical point of view. Even if robotics and remote tooling actions can reduce significantly individual and collective exposures, because of their high costs of development, they will be adopted only if simultaneously the potential for operational cost savings is also clearly demonstrated. Integrating operational cost savings in the cost evaluation of the ALARA procedure is important to compare and select among different robotics and remote control actions. This paper presents how to evaluate in a systematic way dose reductions, operational costs savings as well as the conditions under which robotics and remote control actions can effectively improve occupational radiation protection in NPPs. The demonstration is based on an analysis of the evolution of the steam generator tube plugging technique developed in French PWRs

  15. Optimization (Alara) and probabilistic exposures: the application of optimization criteria to the control of risks due to exposures of a probabilistic nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper described the application of the principles of optimization recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to the restrain of radiation risks due to exposures that may or may not be incurred and to which a probability of occurrence can be assigned. After describing the concept of probabilistic exposures, it proposes a basis for a converging policy of control for both certain and probabilistic exposures, namely the dose-risk relationship adopted for radiation protection purposes. On that basis some coherent approaches for dealing with probabilistic exposures, such as the limitation of individual risks, are discussed. The optimization of safety for reducing all risks from probabilistic exposures to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels is reviewed in full. The principles of optimization of protection are used as a basic framework and the relevant factors to be taken into account when moving to probabilistic exposures are presented. The paper also reviews the decision-aiding techniques suitable for performing optimization with particular emphasis to the multi-attribute utility-analysis technique. Finally, there is a discussion on some practical application of decision-aiding multi-attribute utility analysis to probabilistic exposures including the use of probabilistic utilities. In its final outlook, the paper emphasizes the need for standardization and solutions to generic problems, if optimization of safety is to be successful

  16. ALARA Principle Application for Loading Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies from Nuclear Research Reactor WR-S Mergal-Bucharest Romania into Transportation Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Safety implementation of Spent Nuclear Fuels Assemblies (SNFA) handling procedures at the WR-S reactor site is ensured by technical perfection and reliability of equipment, monitoring of its condition, qualification and discipline of personnel as well as organization and execution of work complied with requirements of regulatory documents, process procedures, guidance and manuals. The personnel training for execution loading of SNF FAs is other important aspect for radiation protection and safely activities. Estimations carried out using Micro Shield software show that maximal dose rate upon working site when loading four FAs into basket of cask will not exceed 1.7 and 956;Sv/h, excluding natural radiation. Radiation Safety Analyses estimates for loading 70 SNFA in 18 transportation casks are: maximal individual dose: 4274.7 and 956;Sv, maximal expected collective dose persons: 17 031.2 man and 956;Sv. By application ALARA principle with technical and administrative measures the loading process developed in the following conditions: maximal individual dose: 68 and 956;Sv, the collective dose persons: 732 man and 956;Sv. The work will presented the technical measures and procedures applied in loading process.

  17. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K.; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  18. Maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for dental personnel operating portable hand-held x-ray equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGiff, Thomas J; Danforth, Robert A; Herschaft, Edward E

    2012-08-01

    Clinical experience indicates that newly available portable hand-held x-ray units provide advantages compared to traditional fixed properly installed and operated x-ray units in dental radiography. However, concern that hand-held x-ray units produce higher operator doses than fixed x-ray units has caused regulatory agencies to mandate requirements for use of hand-held units that go beyond those recommended by the manufacturer and can discourage the use of this technology. To assess the need for additional requirements, a hand-held x-ray unit and a pair of manikins were used to measure the dose to a simulated operator under two conditions: exposures made according to the manufacturer's recommendations and exposures made according to manufacturer's recommendation except for the removal of the x-ray unit's protective backscatter shield. Dose to the simulated operator was determined using an array of personal dosimeters and a pair of pressurized ion chambers. The results indicate that the dose to an operator of this equipment will be less than 0.6 mSv y⁻¹ if the device is used according to the manufacturer's recommendations. This suggests that doses to properly trained operators of well-designed, hand-held dental x-ray units will be below 1.0 mSv y⁻¹ (2% of the annual occupational dose limit) even if additional no additional operational requirements are established by regulatory agencies. This level of annual dose is similar to those reported as typical dental personnel using fixed x-ray units and appears to satisfy the ALARA principal for this class of occupational exposures.

  19. Applied ALARA Workshops Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DECKER, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System

  20. Dose response relationship and Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.

    1986-09-01

    In this paper, it will be shown how dose-response relationships allow to give quantitative figures for the detriment of irradiation. At this stage, the detriment is expressed directly as a certain number of health effects, whose valuation is not dealt with here. The present tools for quantifying, their weaknesses and their strenghts, and their scientific basis will be developed

  1. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2006-01-01

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care

  2. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program's capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure

  3. ALARA organization in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollo, R.

    1997-01-01

    EDF's nuclear power stations were built with provisions being made, as from the design stage, to limit radiation sources and the results observed over the first ten years (annual collective dose and dose per unit of less than 2 man.Sv) were considered to be very good. However, these results began to deteriorate from 1988 onwards. At the same time, considerable progress was being made by other generators of electricity, who were achieving results which were better than those achieved by our later units. Furthermore, radiological protection standards are being revised and personal dose limits will soon be lowered. (authors)

  4. Reduction of BNFL discharges: The Alara Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummery, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Although the title identified as the subject is rather broad, it is proposed to concentrate on liquid waste discharges from Sellafield to illustrate the range of considerations in practise. Such discharges arise from the nature of the work carried out at Sellafield. This comprises principally storage of spent fuel elements, magnox AGR and LWR, dismanteling and reprocessing of spent fuel and storage of recovered uranium and plutonium, manufacture of plutonium-based fuel for the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and management of the resulting wastes

  5. Individual monitoring: A tool for active ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1989-01-01

    The system of individual monitoring at CERN is presented. Following the substantial decrease of individual doses over the last decade, emphasis is now placed on monitoring rather than on dosimetric aspects. Future developments have to face a possible decrease of dose limits that are difficult to control in view of the lower detection limits for the detectors presently used. One possible solution to the problem is the increase in the wearing time for individual dosemeters. (author)

  6. Photographic program of a BWR for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, A.M.; Parry, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    High radiation areas have often been photographed in commercial nuclear plants to identify radiation sources and equipment so workers having to go into the areas become familiar with them prior to entering. This helps minimize the workers' time in a high radiation area and is useful as a visual aid in training. Previous problems encountered in using this type of file included indexing, storing for long term use and reproducing photos for use in the field. At WNP-2, a program has been adopted from Aerojet of Idaho where negatives from photographs are mounted on computer aperture cards. The cards are coded to identify the equipment, physical location in the plant, reference drawings and other data. The aperture cards are reproduced using a process called Diazo. The information is put in a data file that can be sorted by any field on the card. A paper copy of the photo can be made in seconds on a machine similar to a dry silver copier, then mounted for training or maintenance purposes. The cost of duplicating the aperture cards and/or the paper copies is a fraction of that for reproducing color glossies. The computer data file provides cross-referencing to correlate the equipment with the photograph. The results are low cost, easy storage and easy access to the photograph file. Using this program, several thousand photographs can easily be stored and used

  7. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program`s capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure.

  8. Decommissioning ALARA programs Cintichem decommissioning experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.J.; LaGuardia, T.S. [TLG Services, Inc., Bridgewater, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Cintichem facility, originally the Union Carbide Nuclear Company (UCNC) Research Center, consisted primarily of a 5MW pool type reactor linked via a four-foot-wide by twelve-foot-deep water-filled canal to a bank of five adjacent hot cells. Shortly after going into operations in the early 1960s, the facility`s operations expanded to provide various reactor-based products and services to a multitude of research, production, medical, and education groups. From 1968 through 1972, the facility developed a process of separating isotopes from mixed fission products generated by irradiating enriched Uranium target capsules. By the late 1970s, 20 to 30 capsules were being processed weekly, with about 200,000 curies being produced per week. Several isotopes such as Mo{sup 99}, I{sup 131}, and Xe{sup 133} were being extracted for medical use.

  9. N Area Post-Deactivation ALARA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides information about a wide range of radiological work activities at the N Area Deactivation Project. The report is divided into sections that are based on specific N Area scopes of work. Each section contains specific information that was of significant radiological importance in completing N Area Deactivation work. The information presented in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and in commercial industry

  10. ALARA for cask MRS by remote operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.H.; Vick, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation dose rates in a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility are high enough to warrant the evaluation of robotic systems to achieve personnel dose reductions. Robots with sufficient mobility and dexterity to perform Health Physics surveys and maintenance are currently in use. The addition of artificial intelligence computer methods to the robot removes the need for a human operator for normal surveillance activities. Use of an Expert System creates a robot with sufficient flexibility to recognize and respond to off-normal conditions such as radiation leaks

  11. High exposure rate hardware ALARA plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure and to control contamination levels and airborne radioactivity concentrations. HERH waste is hardware found in the N-Fuel Storage Basin, which has a contact dose rate greater than 1 R/hr and used filters. This waste will be collected in the fuel baskets at various locations in the basins

  12. Experience with ALARA and ALARA procedures in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamse, J.C. [N.V. Elektriciteits-Produktiemaatschappij Zuid-Nederland (Netherlands)

    1995-03-01

    The nuclear power plant Borssele is a Siemens two-loop Pressurized Water Reactor having a capacity of 480 MWe and in operation since 1973. The nuclear power plant Borssle is located in the southwest of the Netherlands, near the Westerschelde River. In the first nine years of operation the radiation level in the primary system increased, reaching a maximum in 1983. The most important reason for this high radiation level was the cobalt content of the grid assemblies of the fuel elements. After resolving this problem, the radiation level decreased to a level comparable with that of other nuclear power plants.

  13. ALARA - the contribution of the proposed new ionising radiations regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T.O.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed regulatory requirements and appropriate guidance contained in the approved code of practice on ionising radiations which are designed to support and help reach the objective of keeping radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable. This is discussed against the background of factory legislation, and the way in which the form of the proposed legislation handles this topic is illustrated. The measures required by the proposed legislation are reviewed, both as direct measures designed to create a climate of dose reduction, and as general measures designed to achieve the same end by means of a wide range of requirements. (author)

  14. ALARA implementation in 131I therapeutic capsule production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, Lalit; Swaminathan, N.; Sudheer, T.S.; Sachdev, S.S.; Arora, S.S.; Vairalkar, K.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sodium iodide 131 I solution had been invariably administered to patients for both diagnosis and therapy of thyrotoxicosis. The undue exposure to non-target organs has been over come by introducing NaI ( 131 I) in a gelatin capsule. BRIT has set up experimental facility for the preparation and the production volume has augmented into four fold due to increase in demand and the same facility is being used to cater the need. However, the adequately shielded facility (fume hood) used for (manual) dispensing activity in capsules, capsules and product vial capping, transfer of the vials into lead pots and activity measurement of each vial has resulted in significant increase in the personnel exposure. The sources had been identified and efforts were made to reduce the exposure in these operations. An annular shield was introduced around the dispenser, resulted in the reduction of radiation field at wrist level by a factor of three. Introduction of shielded automated dispenser and usage of longer tools for transfer and capping of vials has effected in two times reduction of collective wrist dose. Currently, the relocated capping station two meters away from the source certainly will bring down further exposure. (author)

  15. An ALARA-conscious hot particle control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, W.W.; Bredvad, R.S.; Bevelacqua, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 approximately twenty-five percent of the radiation dose received by the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP) Health Physics group was due to its hot particle control program. The Health Physics group initiated a review of the program with the objective of decreasing the dose expenditure for hot particle control while maintaining a high standard for hot particle detection and control. In this paper the methods and results of this evaluation are described. The components of the hot particle control program, rules of thumb, and radionuclide composition at PBNP are presented

  16. The cost of the radiation damage by the ALARA conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononovich, A.L.; Nosov, A.V.; Ivanov, A.V.; Pechkurov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    A basis for the determination of the cost of the radiation risk as a method for its optimization are given. The correlation between different components of the risk is considered. The aim for optimization as a requirement on decrease of the cumulative risk is formulated. The reliability in the use of mathematic modelling on the determination of the cost of the risk and damage is noted. The lines of approach to determination of the cost of the risk based on the direct analysis of financial expenses are proposed. The results of estimation of the cost of the risk are given. The use of suggested approach is demonstrated on a hypothetical example [ru

  17. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Richard S.; Diamond, David A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux. (orig.)

  18. Occupational doses and ALARA - recent developments in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godas, T.; Viktorsson, C. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    Sweden has traditionally experienced very slow doses to workers in the nuclear industry. However, this trend has since last year been broken mainly due to significant maintenance and repair work. This paper will describe occupational dose trends in Sweden and discuss actions that are being implemented to control this new situation.

  19. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Richard S.; Diamond, David A.; Chow, Jeanne S.

    2006-01-01

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux. (orig.)

  20. Transportation ALARA analysis for a nuclear waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, G. W.; Schneider, K.; Smith, R.I.; Ross, W.; Faletti, D.

    1988-01-01

    In planning for implementation of a safe and cost-effective transportation system, the Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop estimates of the radiation doses, both public and occupational, that would result from operation of a system postulated using current designs and practices. From that evaluation, PNL identified activities/operations that result in relatively high doses, proposed conceptual alternatives that would effectively reduce such exposures, and evaluated the cost-effectiveness of such alternatives. This study contains an analysis of routine operations and estimates of the public and worker radiation doses that would occur in a postulated generic reference spent fuel transportation system using both truck and rail modes. Total risks are not estimated (i.e., consideration of nonradiological or accident risks that will be the subject of future studies in the transportation systems study plan 9TSSP) are not included). The system encompasses spent fuel loading at the reactor, transportation of the fuel to and from a receiving and handling facility and unloading of the fuel at a repository. The analysis provides cost/dose trade-offs of the postulated reference system as well as selected potential alternatives to the transportation system

  1. Effect of design improvements on ALARA exposures in PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.N.; Mohandas, P.V.; Gupta, Ashok; Hussain, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    Design improvements in Indian PHWRs over last thirty years have remarkably reduced the occupational and public exposures. Some of the radiologically offending systems were altogether changed, equipment was judiciously relocated and at component level reduction in number and improvement in quality was carried out. As a result the collective occupational exposures could be brought down by a factor of about 4-5 and average public exposure by a factor of about 10. Since the design improvements are continuous ongoing processes further reduction in exposure will be definitely brought in the coming years. (author)

  2. ALARA in diagnosis and therapy: for an equilibrium medically reasonable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Fraboulet, P.

    1998-01-01

    After a recall about the differences of conceptions in radiation protection in the medical field it is shown how it is possible to make with efficiency an optimization approach and to lead towards an equilibrium medically acceptable between the therapeutic necessity and the protection of medical personnel. The problem of the patients radiation protection is out of this frame. (N.C.)

  3. The application of ALARA to the design and operation of the U.K. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, R.B.; Dutton, L.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    When operating a nuclear establishment, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) is required to conform with all the requirements of national legislation. In term of radiological protection, this essentially means that the requirements of ICRP 26 must be met. The three main precepts of ICRP 26 are: (i) no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produce a positive net benefit; (ii) all exposure shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; and (iii) the effective dose-equivalent to individuals shall not exceed the limits recommended for the appropriate circumstances by the Commission. This paper is concerned with compliance with the second of the above requirements

  4. Evaluation of DUF6-G-Q-STU-001 (ALARA analysis supporting approval of authorized limits)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranek, N. L.; Croff, A. G.; Cheng, J.-J.; Gillette, J. L.; Avci, H. I.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (UDS) to proceed with disposition of the inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) for which DOE has management responsibility. To accomplish this task, UDS will construct and operate facilities at two DOE-owned sites, one near Paducah, Kentucky, and another near Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert DUF 6 to uranium oxide (principally U 3 O 8 ). The off-gas treatment system for the conversion process will produce aqueous hydrogen fluoride (AqHF), also known as hydrofluoric acid, and a relatively small amount of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ), each containing some residual radioactive material. As part of its contractual charge, UDS must identify and implement a disposition for all three products generated by the DUF 6 conversion facilities: uranium oxide, AqHF, and CaF 2 . The UDS DUF 6 Conversion Product Management Plan (DUF 6 -UDS-PLN-004, September 2003) concludes that a viable commercial market exists for AqHF, which, if not sold, would have to be neutralized, producing a relatively large quantity of additional CaF 2 . Although CaF 2 has very limited market potential, there is some possibility that it also could be sold. If these potential markets could be developed, DOE would save the costs of neutralizing AqHF and/or disposing of the CaF 2 neutralization product. Accordingly, UDS has decided to seek approval from DOE for unrestricted release of both AqHF and CaF 2 that would be generated if AqHF could not be sold or if sales were interrupted. If AqHF were sold, the relatively small quantity of CaF 2 still being generated by the DUF 6 conversion process off-gas treatment system would most likely be disposed of as waste. The main product of conversion, depleted uranium oxide, will be reused to the extent possible or disposed of as waste, if no practical reuse option is found

  5. Alara and countermeasures: the approach proposed by the article 31 group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1989-01-01

    Based upon ICRP Publication 40 of 1984 and the Radiological Protection Criteria for Controlling Doses to the Public in the Event of Accidental Releases of Radioactive Material of the Commission of the European Communities of 1982, the Group of Experts according to Article 31 has derived reference Levels for the activity of foodstuffs. There have been established three categories of radionuclides - radioisotopes of iodine and strontium, alpha-emitting radioisotopes of plutonium and transplutonium elements, radionuclides of half-lives longer than 10 days - and food groups such as dairy produce, other major foodstuffs, drinking water and beverages (liquid foodstuffs) as well as baby foods ready for consumption. The values of the Derived Reference Level of activity have been calculated on the basis of a lower limit of 5 mSv committed effective dose equivalent or 50 mSv committed organ dose equivalent, age-dependent yearly food consumption rates and dose factors. The relative contamination of a foodstuff was assumed to be 10% of the full value of the Derived Reference Level of the activity for the whole of one year. The results of the calculations of the Group of Experts are compared to the maximum permitted levels according to the Council Regulation (EEC) of Dec. 22, 1987

  6. The ALARA assessment system based on virtual concurrent environment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kang, ShinYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper is intended to suggest the method and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities, it is necessary that assessment system is developed. This system has been successfully developed so that exposure dose to workers could be real-time measured and assessed in virtual decommissioning environments. It can be concluded that this system could be protected from accidents and enable workers to improve his familiarization about working environments. It is expected that this system can reduce human errors because workers are able to improve the proficiency of hazardous working environments due to virtual training like real decommissioning situations.

  7. Design improvements to achieve ALARA exposures to plant personnel at Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, S.; Mehta, H.C.; Roy, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    NAPS is the indigenously designed, constructed and commissioned, first PHWR station of standardized design for 220 MWe station of NPCIL. At NAPS, radiation fields started building up after first start up due to Cobalt-60 and this was a major concern, from collective dose point of view, for carrying out any activity specially around and with in the moderator system. Apart from this system, PHT and fueling machine areas are also vulnerable areas from radiation point of view. To reduce and control the high collective dose consumption, various design modifications; like moderator purification system modifications, changes in heavy water recovery arrangements and FT system, have been carried out at NAPS and these are discussed in this paper. (author)

  8. An ALARA approach to collective dose control at RAPS-3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, Narendra; Dhakar, P.C.; Gupta, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    At Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-3 and 4 (RAPS 3 and 4) immense efforts were put to achieve continual reduction in man rem consumption in every subsequent year and this could be done successfully through implementing design changes based on experience, reducing radiation levels by removing radioactive material from undesired locations, flushing of active system/equipment's, shielding of hot spots, minimizing D20 leaks, manpower optimization, improvement in work culture and strong management commitment etc. Radiation protection is a never ending process and scope is always available to reduce the doses at all levels. Routine radiation survey sometimes does not provide exact idea about potential of significant collective exposure that can take place when ambient radiation levels are comparable to background radiation levels

  9. Implementation of ALARA at the design stage of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, A.; Ridoux, P. [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France)

    1995-03-01

    In the 1970s, Electricite de France (EdF) had limited knowledge and experience of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Electricity generation by nuclear units was oriented towards gas-graphite reactors, even though EdF had a share in the PWR unit of CHOOZ A-1 (250 MWe, later upgraded to 320 MWe). Some facts about the origin of doses in that king of reactor were known to the research and development (R&D) support staff of EdF, which mainly comprises the French Atomic Commission (CEA), but only a few of EdF`s engineers were aware of these facts. One has to bear in mind that CHOOZ A-1 only went critical in April 1967 and was officially connected to the grid in May 1970 after some important problems had been solved. Meanwhile, the nuclear program was launched at full speed, beginning with the order for FESSENHEIM 1 in 1970, FESSENHEIM 2 and BUGEY 2 and 3 in 1971. TIHANGE 1, in which EdF had a share, went on-line in September 1975. Also, supposing that EdF had had such knowledge and experience, it is quite evident that it would have been very difficult to modify the lay-out inside the reactor building.

  10. A user friendly database for use in ALARA job dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zodiates, A.M.; Willcock, A. [Cheshire, England (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    The pressurized water reactor (PWR) design chosen for adoption by Nuclear Electric plc was based on the Westinghouse Standard Nuclear Unit Power Plant (SNUPPS). This design was developed to meet the United Kingdom requirements and these improvements are embodied in the Sizewell B plant which will start commercial operation in 1994. A user-friendly database was developed to assist the station in the dose and ALARP assessments of the work expected to be carried out during station operation and outage. The database stores the information in an easily accessible form and enables updating, editing, retrieval, and searches of the information. The database contains job-related information such as job locations, number of workers required, job times, and the expected plant doserates. It also contains the means to flag job requirements such as requirements for temporary shielding, flushing, scaffolding, etc. Typical uses of the database are envisaged to be in the prediction of occupational doses, the identification of high collective and individual dose jobs, use in ALARP assessments, setting of dose targets, monitoring of dose control performance, and others.

  11. An overview of ALARA considerations during Yankee Atomic`s Component Removal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, B.; Babineau, G.; Colby, B.; Cox, B. [Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Rowe, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In Februrary 1992, Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) permanently shutdown Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, after thirty-two years of efficient operation. Yankee`s plan decommissioning is to defer dismantlement until a low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility is available. The plant will be maintained in a safe storage condition until a firm contract for the disposal of LLRW generated during decommissioning can be secured. Limited access to a LLRW disposal facility may occur during the safe storage period. Yankee intends to use these opportunities to remove components and structures. A Component Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. A Componenet Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. The CRP includes removal of four steam generators, the pressurizer, and segmentation of reactor vessel internals and preparation of LLRW for shipment and disposal at Chem-Nuclear`s Barnwell, South Carolina facility. The CRP is projected to be completed by June 1994 at an estimated total worker exposure of less than 160 person-rem.

  12. ALARA and paediatric imaging in radiation therapy: A survey of Canadian paediatric imaging practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgerson, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is little discussion in the literature regarding paediatric imaging dose reduction with respect to conventional imaging carried out in radiotherapy departments. This is in contrast to diagnostic radiography where dose optimization when imaging children is a very current topic. For this reason Canadian radiotherapy clinics were surveyed to look at paediatric imaging practice, knowledge and perspectives with respect to imaging dose reduction. Method: As this was an exploratory study, a questionnaire was developed and sent to radiation therapy clinics across Canada, via email, to assess knowledge of paediatric imaging and dose reduction initiatives. The questionnaire focus was CT simulation and treatment verification imaging of children. Results: Practice and knowledge of paediatric imaging varied across Canada. Forty percent of clinics reported using paediatric specific protocols for CT simulation and 20% of clinics reported using paediatric specific protocols for treatment verification imaging. There was variation in imaging practices among the clinics that reported treating the most children. The survey results show that while some measures are being taken to reduce paediatric imaging dose in radiation therapy, 46.7% of the respondents felt more could be done. Conclusion: The survey demonstrates interest in dose reduction in radiation therapy imaging as well as differences in current practice and knowledge across Canada. Paediatric imaging dose reduction would appear to be an area of practice that would benefit from more study and development of standards of practice

  13. The ALARA assessment system based on virtual concurrent environment for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kang, ShinYoung

    2016-01-01

    This paper is intended to suggest the method and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities, it is necessary that assessment system is developed. This system has been successfully developed so that exposure dose to workers could be real-time measured and assessed in virtual decommissioning environments. It can be concluded that this system could be protected from accidents and enable workers to improve his familiarization about working environments. It is expected that this system can reduce human errors because workers are able to improve the proficiency of hazardous working environments due to virtual training like real decommissioning situations

  14. Radiation therapy for children: evolving technologies in the era of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.; Beltran, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of ever more sophisticated oncologic imaging and technologies providing far more precise radiation therapy have combined to increase the utilization of sophisticated radiation therapy in childhood cancer. For a majority of children with common central nervous system, soft tissue, bone, and dysontogenic neoplasms, local irradiation is fundamental to successful multi-disciplinary management. Along with more precise target volume definition and radiation delivery, new technologies provide added certainty of patient positioning (electronic portal imaging, cone beam CT) and conformality of dose delivery (3-D conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiation therapy, proton beam therapy). Each of the major areas of technology development are able to better confine the high-dose region to the intended target, but they are also associated with the potential for larger volumes of uninvolved tissues being exposed to low radiation doses. The latter issue plays a role in documented levels of secondary carcinogenesis, sometimes with greater anticipated incidence than that seen in conventional radiation therapy. Parameters related to carcinogenesis, such as dose-volume relationships and neutron contamination that accompanies high-energy photon irradiation and proton therapy, can be identified, sometimes modulated, and accepted as part of the clinical decision process in fine tuning radiation therapy in this more vulnerable age group. (orig.)

  15. The application of non-parametric statistical method for an ALARA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Ho; Herr, Young Hoi

    2003-01-01

    The cost-effective reduction of Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) at a nuclear power plant could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing plants. Through the data analysis, it is required to identify what are the jobs of repetitive high ORD at the nuclear power plant. In this study, Percentile Rank Sum Method (PRSM) is proposed to identify repetitive high ORD jobs, which is based on non-parametric statistical theory. As a case study, the method is applied to ORD data of maintenance and repair jobs at Kori units 3 and 4 that are pressurized water reactors with 950 MWe capacity and have been operated since 1986 and 1987, respectively in Korea. The results was verified and validated, and PRSM has been demonstrated to be an efficient method of analyzing the data

  16. Novel real-time 3D radiological mapping solution for ALARA maximization, D and D assessments and radiological management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubart, Philippe; Hautot, Felix [AREVA Group, 1 route de la Noue, Gif sur Yvette (France); Morichi, Massimo; Abou-Khalil, Roger [AREVA Group, Tour AREVA-1, place Jean Millier, Paris (France)

    2015-07-01

    Good management of dismantling and decontamination (D and D) operations and activities is requiring safety, time saving and perfect radiological knowledge of the contaminated environment as well as optimization for personnel dose and minimization of waste volume. In the same time, Fukushima accident has imposed a stretch to the nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast deployment and intervention, quick analysis and fast scenario definition. AREVA, as return of experience from his activities carried out at Fukushima and D and D sites has developed a novel multi-sensor solution as part of his D and D research, approach and method, a system with real-time 3D photo-realistic spatial radiation distribution cartography of contaminated premises. The system may be hand-held or mounted on a mobile device (robot, drone, e.g). In this paper, we will present our current development based on a SLAM technology (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) and integrated sensors and detectors allowing simultaneous topographic and radiological (dose rate and/or spectroscopy) data acquisitions. This enabling technology permits 3D gamma activity cartography in real-time. (authors)

  17. Novel real-time 3D radiological mapping solution for ALARA maximization, D and D assessments and radiological management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubart, Philippe; Hautot, Felix; Morichi, Massimo; Abou-Khalil, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Good management of dismantling and decontamination (D and D) operations and activities is requiring safety, time saving and perfect radiological knowledge of the contaminated environment as well as optimization for personnel dose and minimization of waste volume. In the same time, Fukushima accident has imposed a stretch to the nuclear measurement operational approach requiring in such emergency situation: fast deployment and intervention, quick analysis and fast scenario definition. AREVA, as return of experience from his activities carried out at Fukushima and D and D sites has developed a novel multi-sensor solution as part of his D and D research, approach and method, a system with real-time 3D photo-realistic spatial radiation distribution cartography of contaminated premises. The system may be hand-held or mounted on a mobile device (robot, drone, e.g). In this paper, we will present our current development based on a SLAM technology (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) and integrated sensors and detectors allowing simultaneous topographic and radiological (dose rate and/or spectroscopy) data acquisitions. This enabling technology permits 3D gamma activity cartography in real-time. (authors)

  18. Engineered design features in the HI-STAR/HI-STORM systems to maximize ALARA, safety, and community acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blessing, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Heltec International is a U.S. corporation headquartered in New Jersey, dedicated to providing capital goods and technical services to the power industry. Over 75 percent of the company's product output is destined for nuclear power plants. Holter counts among its active clients a majority of the nuclear plants in the United States, as well as Korea, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil. The company also has a growing market presence in Japan and the European Union. Leading U.S. nuclear plant owners, such as Entergy, Exelon, FPL, Southern Nuclear, PG and E and TVA have a long-term and continuous business relationship with Holtec International. This article deals with Holtec dry storage system description, the multi-purpose canister, hi-star 100 overpack, hi-storm 100 overpack and unique advantages of holtec's dry storage technology

  19. ALARA-based strengthening of radiation protection in a high dose rate nuclear power plant: A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    In the first years of operation the dose rates at Goesgen nuclear power plant increased more strongly than expected. Co-60 has been the main radiation contributor from the beginning. As an immediate step, investigations were initiated to find and remove unknown cobalt sources. System modifications and optimization in water chemistry were carried out to reduce material and activity transport within the primary system. As a result the dose rates were stabilized after a couple of years -unfortunately on a high level. To reduce the dose rate levels and the occupational radiation exposure, further long term measures were implemented. System decontamination and source replacement were considered as well as the implementation of enhanced shielding procedures and a more source oriented chemistry. As a result the dose rates have reduced significantly and the occupational radiation exposure has been decreased by more than a factor of 2 over the last two decades. The reduction of the mean individual dose turned out even better and was cut by a factor of 5. On terms of plant and personal safety, Goesgen nuclear power plant decided to improve radiation protection using a smooth step by step action plan and has been very successful with it. Currently the technical possibilities have been developed to a high standard. Further improvements will be selective only. In future the focus will be set to personal behavior and human performance, using enhanced target settings, briefings, debriefings, experience feedback and (international) experience exchange. Nevertheless it will be essential to avoid unnecessary administrative and counterproductive short term hurdles. Strengthening of radiation protection is and will be a long term and continuous process. Goesgen nuclear power plant will continue to introduce further actions one by one. (author)

  20. The International System on Occupational Exposure. An ALARA Success Story Relying on Strong Individual Commitments, Effective International Feedback and Exchanges, and a Robust Database - 20 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Christian; Doty, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Why, more than 20 years ago, did there emerge the need for an International System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)? How was it created? What were the problems and their possible solutions? Who were the main stakeholders? These are a few of the questions that the ISOE NEA Secretariat and Bureau asked Christian Lefaure, ex CEPN Deputy Director, to address in preparing a report on the history of ISOE and its progress. He had been directly involved in the brainstorming that preceded ISOE establishment, and he became the first head of the ISOE European Technical Centre, in charge of the world database development and management from 1991 to 2007. For writing this report, he made use of his own souvenirs and documentation as well as of those of tens of ISOE participants, both from major international and regional organisations (OECD/NEA, IAEA, EC and BNL), nuclear power plant utilities and national regulatory authorities. He voluntarily focused not only on the technical aspects but also on the human components of that story. This was done through personal interviews with many individuals who have played an important role at one moment of ISOE life, the analysis of answers to a questionnaire, and reviews of the minutes of many ISOE meetings that were held before and after the official establishment of the ISOE, along its lifespan to date. The most important inputs were the accounts from many individuals having very actively participated in the ISOE life at one step or another. The contacts were not always easy to make 15 or 20 years later. But in general, the questions were welcomed and the answers to the interviews and to a short questionnaire have fed this report. More than 50 individuals have answered these requests one way or another. Some have followed ISOE birth and premises; some have not seen the first steps of ISOE but have participated later on or are still participating. Some have been able to provide pictures, drawings or relevant publications. All their accounts are part of the collective memory of that important adventure shared during the last two decades by many individuals all over the world. They have allowed a more lively description than the one that would have come solely from documents, which have also been checked. This report provides excerpts of their interviews verbatim and written answers. This report is divided into three parts: Chapter 2: Why ISOE? Chapter 3: What has been the evolution of ISOE? Chapter 4: How has ISOE been perceived and is now perceived?

  1. Utilizing 3D-visualization to apply compulsory ALARA principles in nuclear power plant design and day-to-day operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, R. L.; Lake, J. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Computational Sciences and Engineering Div., Mail Stop 6085, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The development of an advanced visualization and simulation tool to support both design as well as day-to-day operation is presented. This tool exploits cutting edge computer graphics, physics-based effects modeling, virtual reality, and gaming technologies to establish a system that can eventually be used for the administrative planning and training of plant operators and design engineers. (authors)

  2. Global, regional and national nuclear risk management. Use of ALARA in decision-making on costly international cleanup effort of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, I.; Shaposhnikov, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the national risk management, it's found out that 'external' source of hazard situated at the territory of neighbor country contributes heavily to total public and environment risk of the country. In order to remove such an opportunity, it's necessary to establish for these purposes special international funds ('safety funds') intended for environment pollution international standards. They are used for helping to establish quantitative standards for contribution in such fund from different countries. The authors considered problem of the optimal international investment in risk reducing from radioactive waste dumping in water of oceans. Coordinated mechanism for management and control, international legislative and legal norms are discussed

  3. Utilizing 3D-visualization to apply compulsory ALARA principles in nuclear power plant design and day-to-day operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R. L.; Lake, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    The development of an advanced visualization and simulation tool to support both design as well as day-to-day operation is presented. This tool exploits cutting edge computer graphics, physics-based effects modeling, virtual reality, and gaming technologies to establish a system that can eventually be used for the administrative planning and training of plant operators and design engineers. (authors)

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  5. Engineering study of riser equipment contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Study was to evaluate the current equipment and operating procedures to determine if changes could be made to improve ALARA and evaluate the feasibility of implementing the proposed solutions. As part of this study input from the cognizant characterization engineers and operating sampling crews was obtained and evaluated for ALARA improvements

  6. Transforming Welfare Institutions through Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika......Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika...

  7. PAR as a way of organising a social workers labour union in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Arnfjord, Steven

    Abstract, ALARA2015012:PAR as a way of organising a social workers labour union in Greenland for consideration and inclusion in the programme for the ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress to be held at St. George Hotel and Conference Centre...

  8. Savannah River Site dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits

  9. Licensee programs for maintaining occupational exposure to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.H.

    1983-06-01

    This report defines the concept of maintaining occupational exposures to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) and describes the elements necessary for specific licensees to implement, operate, and evaluate an effective ALARA program. Examples of cost-effectiveness analysis and optimization are provided. The rationale for providing more detailed guidance to specific licensees stems from the current recommendations provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as well as from the increased regulatory emphasis on maintaining occupational exposures ALARA. The objective of this work is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with a basis for updating Regulatory Guide 8.10

  10. Virtual reality-based simulation system for nuclear and radiation safety SuperMC/RVIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, T.; Hu, L.; Long, P.; Shang, L.; Zhou, S.; Yang, Q.; Zhao, J.; Song, J.; Yu, S.; Cheng, M.; Hao, L., E-mail: liqin.hu@fds.org.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Hefei, Anhu (China)

    2015-07-01

    The suggested work scenarios in radiation environment need to be iterative optimized according to the ALARA principle. Based on Virtual Reality (VR) technology and high-precision whole-body computational voxel phantom, a virtual reality-based simulation system for nuclear and radiation safety named SuperMC/RVIS has been developed for organ dose assessment and ALARA evaluation of work scenarios in radiation environment. The system architecture, ALARA evaluation strategy, advanced visualization methods and virtual reality technology used in SuperMC/RVIS are described. A case is presented to show its dose assessment and interactive simulation capabilities. (author)

  11. Virtual reality-based simulation system for nuclear and radiation safety SuperMC/RVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, T.; Hu, L.; Long, P.; Shang, L.; Zhou, S.; Yang, Q.; Zhao, J.; Song, J.; Yu, S.; Cheng, M.; Hao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The suggested work scenarios in radiation environment need to be iterative optimized according to the ALARA principle. Based on Virtual Reality (VR) technology and high-precision whole-body computational voxel phantom, a virtual reality-based simulation system for nuclear and radiation safety named SuperMC/RVIS has been developed for organ dose assessment and ALARA evaluation of work scenarios in radiation environment. The system architecture, ALARA evaluation strategy, advanced visualization methods and virtual reality technology used in SuperMC/RVIS are described. A case is presented to show its dose assessment and interactive simulation capabilities. (author)

  12. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  13. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  14. Development of ADRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    All nuclear power plant modifications must be designed in a way that keeps the radiation dose to radiation workers and the public As Low As is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). This is not only a good design practice, it is required by the NRC in accord with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations). As a result, millions of dollars are spent each year developing, analyzing, and justifying the ALARA design of plant modifications. Providing the necessary design reviews is a major challenge to the industry. In response, Sargent and Lundy has developed ADRA (the ALARA Design Review Assistant), a microcomputer-based system that aids in developing, reviewing, and documenting good ALARA designs. ADRA is now in an early operational stage, undergoing testing at Sargent and Lundy. This paper reviews the findings and results of the ADRA development effort

  15. 75 FR 8375 - Device Improvements to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging; Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... hardware and software features should manufacturers build into CT and fluoroscopic devices in order to... ALARA concept (maintaining dose As Low As Reasonably Achievable) and utilize or provide for...

  16. Twenty years of experience in the control of low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspani, C.E.; Lescano, R.

    1997-01-01

    The steps taken in the health care institutions of the Province of Santa Fe, Argentina, are described which aim to optimize radiation protection in accordance with the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) concept

  17. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  18. Radiation protection optimization: reminders, recent advances and problem to solve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    The ALARA principle, the question of the existence of a threshold dose and what it is possible to do until the scientific proof of the existence or the no existence of a such threshold emerges. (N.C.)

  19. Health physics practices and experience at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.

    1986-01-01

    The history and development of the health physics and as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) program at Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station is described as are the fundamental elements of the program and how the program works. The benefits of this health physics/ALARA program have been determined to be (a) improved quality of manpower planning and scheduling, (b) increased efficiency of shutdown activities, (c) reduced cost of shutdown, (d) immediate awareness of adverse job exposure trends, (e) better management information on exposure-related problems, (f) improved accuracy of personnel and job dose records, and (g) in general, improved outage performance and subsequent plant operation. Experience with the health physics/ALARA program is discussed in terms of (a) savings of critical path time, (b) maintaining ALARA personnel doses, and (c) record capacity factors

  20. N-Basin water removal plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This ALARA review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations, while removing water and stabilizing surfaces in the 105-N Fuel Storage Building

  1. Korea goes as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'yukhi, Li.; Chun Vu Kha; Seon Kho Na; S'yu Khan.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to problems of development of nuclear power industry in the South Korea, which has no experience in this field and trained personnel and is characterized by high density of population. Introduction of modern standards on nuclear safety in global and local scales, advisability of organizing the ALARA - center in Korea are based. This center will enable to adopt the ALARA principles in practice of management and infrastructure development, using the international experience of developed countries

  2. Dose optimization in CT examination of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, A.; Prosch, H.

    2012-01-01

    Problems arise due to the increased clinical use of computed tomography (CT) and the high radiosensitivity of children. The ALARA concept (as low as reasonably achievable) prevails in pediatric radiology. Justified indications and full utilization of available dose optimization methods. Medical physicists and the manufacturers should support pediatric radiology in the implementation of the ALARA concept. The referring physicians and radiology staff should be integrated into training programs. Sufficient diagnostic image quality is paramount and not the pretty images. (orig.) [de

  3. Economics v pragmatics: the control of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.E. (Salford Univ. (UK). Environmental Health and Housing Div.)

    1990-01-01

    The economic principles lying behind the phrase ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) are examined with respect to the indictment of British Nuclear Fuels following certain incidents in its Sellafield Reprocessing Plant in November 1983. Based on the evidence submitted to the trial it is argued that the ALARA approach is of questionable utility to the more sensitive areas of contemporary environmental management. (author).

  4. Nuclear dismantling and asbestos elimination: the same challenge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Deboodt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ALARA principle constitutes a powerful tool for workers dosimetry management in the nuclear field. A consequence of the application of this principle could be an accentuation of the nuclear risk face to the industrial risk. Using works of asbestos elimination in nuclear medium, the present article examines how a generalization of the utilization of the ALARA principle is conceivable and how the existing obstacles could be removed. (N.C.)

  5. Status of achievements reached in applying optimization of protection in design and normal operation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Croft, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The increased emphasis in recent years on the ALARA principle and its practical implementation has opened new perspectives in the organisation of radiological protection. This change could be characterised as a shift from an 'a posteriori' control, (i.e. demonstrating that dose limits had not been exceeded), towards an 'a priori' management or dose predictive approach. Undoubtedly in both operation and design conscious efforts are made to achieve ALARA. However, there are certainly differences in various organisations' perceptions of what this practically entails and there is scope for us all to learn. If the 'ALARA Procedure' remains only a tool used at the early stage of design or as an elegant means of justifying past choices, it will have missed its main objective which is to give more rational and coherent management of practical protection at both the design and operational stages. We feel that the integration of the structured approaches of the ALARA Procedure and the ALARA Audit, into radiation protection programmes provides the best way forwad. This would require ALARA studies moving from the province of the 'experts' to the 'practitioners'. This in turn will require us to provide them with the tools to do the job. The methodology is secure but the areas of dose data collection and the costing of detriment need to be addressed further. Similarly, there is perhaps a need for the 'experts' to develop further experience of using the multiattribute and multicriteria techniques for the higher level decisions

  6. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1997-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.

    1996-01-01

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author)

  8. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1996-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. The role of work management in occupational dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, R.; Lefaure, C.; Schieber, C.

    1993-01-01

    ALARA is an important and growing part of radiological protection practice and it is clear that the management approach adopted towards radiation work can have a major influence over the degree of radiation exposure in the workplace. This paper reviews the various contributors to work management relating to the achievement of ALARA. It first addresses the institutional arrangements such as the regulatory framework, company organization and people motivation factors. The paper then considers the management of the tasks themselves and looks at how the lesson learned can be assessed and made available to a wider audience, and indeed whether it is possible to quantify the key parameters in order to aid the prediction of future exposures. Finally it outlines the key questions in the field of ALARA work management with the objective of focusing future discussions

  10. Controlling occupational radiation exposure at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Oakes, T.W.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    The historical development of the philosophy of keeping the radiation exposure of workers at light-water reactors as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is presented. A review is made of some of the ALARA activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and various nuclear installations. Data compiled by the NRC show that routine and special maintenance at light-water reactors accounts for 72 percent of all occupational exposure at these sites. The role that Oak Ridge National Laboratory has taken in ALARA research is presented, with emphasis placed on a study of valve malfunctions at light-water reactors. The valve study indicates a trend toward decreasing valve reliability over the past few years. Finally a cost--benefit analysis of radiation dose reduction is discussed. The rationale for assigning a cost per man-rem based on the radiation exposure level that is encountered is presented

  11. Radiation protection training for personnel at light-water-cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Section 19.12 Instructions to Workers, of 10 CFR Part 19, Notices, Instructions, and Reports to Workers; Inspections, requires that individuals be given instruction in radiation protection that is commensurate with the potential radiation protection problems they may encounter in restricted areas as defined in para. 19.3(e) of 10 CFR Part 19. Para. 20.1(c) of 10 CFR Part 20, Standards for Protection Against Radiation, states that occupational radiation exposure should be kept as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). Appropriate training is an essential aspect of an ALARA program. This guide describes a radiation protection training program consistent with the ALARA objective and acceptable to the NRC staff for meeting the training requirements of 10 CFR Part 19 with respect to individuals that enter restricted areas at nuclear power plants

  12. Technology platform CEIDEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragio, R. J.; Rodriguez Quesada, B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the Cofrentes NPP Radiological Protection Services fundamental objectives is to keep the workers both individual and collective doses As low As Reasonably Achievable, in compliance with the ALARA principle. According to this principle, the significant works in radiation areas are planned, prepared supervised and finally revised by the Radiation Protection Service ALARA group in conjunction with the executors, to assure that they are done at the minimum doses applying convenient dose reduction measures and techniques, industry best practices, lesson learned, etc. Therefore, a number of dose reduction measure and techniques are implemented for specific and general works and areas, especially during the refueling outages when the main maintenance activities and plant modifications are accomplished. The main ALARA techniques implemented in the last refueling outage 17 (2009) and its results, are presented in this article. (Author)

  13. Optimization of radioprotection in the nuclear power, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.

    2002-06-01

    These 3. SFRP days are devoted to the optimization of radioprotection in the context of the evolution of the regulation in this domain with the introduction of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the public health regulations. First of all, the optimization of radioprotection is a principle of action aiming at elaborating a practical organization of risk taking based on the responsibility of the different actors and leading to an individual and collective management of the radiological risk. These days are oriented towards practical applications of this optimization and in a lesser extend towards the general radioprotection policies and the technical aspects, in particular the operational dosimetry: 1 - Alara bases and regulation: bases of radioprotection optimization; optimization and Belgium regulation: the contribution of the Royal by-law from July 20, 2001; status of the French regulation; 2 - Alara policies in the nuclear power domain: maintenance of PWR reactor vessels: exploratory approach of a joint safety and radioprotection control by the nuclear safety authority; implementation of the Alara approach at the CEA: status and perspectives; optimization of activities and Alara project at EdF; the file for the intervention in radioactive environment: an Alara tool; 3 - practical applications and experience feedback: optimization in interventional vascular radiology unit; forecast evaluation and personnel exposures optimization in the experiment hall of the laser integration line at CESTA; a French system of radioprotection experience feedback for radiological incidents; the European Alara network: a growing up dialogue and improvement structure; 4 - Alara policies in the medical and first aid services: dosimetry of radiodiagnosis personnel; integration of the radioactive waste management organization to the elimination files of hospital wastes; optimization of patient's radioprotection: a calculation approach of the specific risk by sex

  14. Penetration shielding applications of CYLSEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexheimer, D.T.; Hathaway, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of penetration and discontinuity shielding is necessary to meet 10CFR20 regulations for ensuring personnel exposures are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Historically, those shielding evaluations have been done to some degree on all projects. However, many early plants used conservative methods due to lack of an economical computer code, resulting in costly penetration shielding programs. With the increased industry interest in cost effectively reducing personnel exposures to meet ALARA regulations and with the development of the CYLSEC gamma transport computer code at Bechtel, a comprehensive effort was initiated to reduce penetration and discontinuity shielding but still provide a prudent degree of protection for plant personnel from radiation streaming. This effort was more comprehensive than previous programs due to advances in shielding analysis technology and increased interest in controlling project costs while maintaining personnel exposures ALARA. Methodology and resulting cost savings are discussed

  15. 'Reasonable' regulation of low doses in the Netherlands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuur, Ciska

    2002-01-01

    As long as it is not clear exactly what the risks of low doses are, exposures should be regulated to be 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). In radiation protection, for normal situations, this means that a projected dose reduction can only be obligatory when the efforts needed to achieve the reduction are 'reasonable' in comparison with it, economical and social aspects being taken into account. In the recent Dutch regulations, 'reasonable' values have been established for the relevant parameters used in the ALARA concept and the paper discusses the values required to calculate the doses for the critical group due to a source. In some cases, the effort expended in making the ALARA dose assessments might not be reasonable in comparison with the dose reduction to be expected. The system which has been developed in the Netherlands to avoid these 'unreasonable' dose calculations, measurements and assessments is explained. (author)

  16. Recent perspectives on optimisation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Croft, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ALARA principle as a requirement in radiological protection has evolved from its theoretical roots. Based on several years work, this paper provides a backdrop to practical approaches to ALARA for the 1990s. The key step, developing ALARA thinking so that it becomes an integral part of radiological protection programmes, is discussed using examples from the UK and France, as is the role of tools to help standardise judgements for decision-making. In its latest recommendations, ICRP have suggested that the optimisation of protection should be constrained by restrictions on the doses to individuals. This paper also considers the function of such restrictions for occupational, public and medical exposure, and in the design process. (author)

  17. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in the development and coordination of the nuclear station ALARA programs

  18. General Employee Radiological Training: Study guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this class, the participant will be able to discuss his/her responsibilities for maintaining exposures to radiation and radioactive material As Low As Reasonably Achievable. The participant will be able to select the correct response from a group of responses which verifies his/her ability to: Identify natural background and man-made sources of radiation; state the whole body radiation exposure limit for non-radiological workers; state the potential biological effects from chronic radiation exposure; identify the ALARA concept and practices; state methods used to control radiological material; and state employee responsibilities for the ALARA Program

  19. Modernization of the accident localization system and relevant dose exposure on Unit 4 of KNPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtchev, G.; Neshkova, A.; Nikolov, M. [Nuclear Power Plant Kozloduy, 3321 Kozloduy (Bulgaria)

    2004-07-01

    In 2001 a modernization of the Accident Localization System (ALS) on unit 4 was accomplished. The outage duration was longer then usually and special dose budget was elaborated. All ALS work was performed by external organization. An ALARA implementation was recognized priority. The really accumulated collective doses were analyzed and conclusions drawn. A short film on CD was prepared. Two conclusions are drawn: 1. Good work management and a first attempt of effective empowerment of the workers gave satisfactory results; 2. Although the work was not typical, and performed for a first time, the ALARA implementation reduced the projected collective dose with 19%.

  20. Multicriteria analysis of protection actions in the case of transportation of radioactive materials: Regulating the transit of type A packages through the Mont Blanc Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Lombard, J.; Pages, P.

    1986-09-01

    The utility function approach (decision analysis) is one of the classical decision aiding techniques that are of interest when performing ALARA analysis. In this paper a case study will serve as an illustration of this technique. The problem which is dealt with is the set up of a regulation applying to the transit of small radioactive material packages (type A) under the Mont Blanc Tunnel which is a major route between France and Italy. This case study is therefore a good example of an ALARA approach applied to a safety problem which implies both a probabilistic risk assessment and the evaluation of very heterogeneous criteria

  1. Cost benefit analysis cost effectiveness analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.

    1986-09-01

    The comparison of various protection options in order to determine which is the best compromise between cost of protection and residual risk is the purpose of the ALARA procedure. The use of decision-aiding techniques is valuable as an aid to selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to introduce two rather simple and well known decision aiding techniques: the cost-effectiveness analysis and the cost-benefit analysis. These two techniques are relevant for the great part of ALARA decisions which need the use of a quantitative technique. The study is based on an hypothetical case of 10 protection options. Four methods are applied to the data

  2. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  3. Circles of quality in radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez F, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of Circles of quality arose in Japan like an option to capitalize the enormous potential that the workers had developed as a result of its training in the statistical tools of quality. There are presented a series of steps that could be given with the purpose of implementing a program of ALARA circles. The radiological safety is in it finishes instance responsibility of each hard-working one and there won't be a protection program that can work among apathetic people, it is in this sense where the ALARA circles can provide its maximum contribution creating a conscience of responsibility and participation

  4. DOE's process and implementation guidance for decommissioning, deactivation, decontamination, and remedial action of property with residual contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domotor, S.; Peterson, H. Jr.; Wallo, A. III

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents DOE's requirements, process, and implementation guidance for the control and release of property that may contain residual radioactive material. DOE requires that criteria and protocols for release of property be approved by DOE and that such limits be selected using DOE's As Low as is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) process. A DOE Implementation Guide discusses how the levels and details (e.g., cleanup volumes, costs of surveys, disposal costs, dose to workers and doses to members of the public, social and economic factors) of candidate release options are to be evaluated using DOE's ALARA process. Supporting tools and models for use within the analysis are also highlighted. (author)

  5. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  6. Dialogue: the health effects of low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.; Archer, V.; Radford, E.; Sterling, T.D.; Marks, S.

    1980-01-01

    This discussion deals with estimating the risk associated with low dose, chronic irradiation, and focuses primarily on the controversy surrounding Dr. Thomas Mancuso and the Hanford Study. In addition, there is some discussion of the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept

  7. United Kingdom comments on INFCE/DEP./WG-4/72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This document presents comments prepared by the UK delegation upon INFCE/DEP./WG-4/72. It details differences in approach to the ALARA concept between the US and the UK and comments on the figures presented for occupational and general public radiation exposure in the context of the THORP plant to be constructed at Windscale, UK

  8. Modernization of the accident localisation system and relevant dose exposure on unit four of KNPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valtchev, G.; Neshkova, M.; Nikilov, A.

    2005-01-01

    In 2001 a modernization of the accident localisation system (ALS) on Unit 4 was accomplished. The outage duration was longer then usually and special dose budget was elaborated. All ALS work was performed by external organisation. An ALARA implementation was recognised priority. The really accumulated collective doses were analysed and conclusions drawn. A short film on CD was prepared. (authors)

  9. The role of quantitative optimization techniques in assessment of best practicable environmental options for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    The interpretation of the Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) and ALARA concepts in radioactive waste management is given. The quantitative analysis of the financial and radiological impacts of different options for waste management is discussed. Finally, the role of quantitative multi-attribute analysis in the DOE's assessment of BPEOs for radioactive waste is described. (UK)

  10. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgogne, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  11. Analysis of the evolution of the collective dose in nuclear power plants in Spain; Analisis de la evolucion de la dosis colectiva en las centrales nucleares de Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponjuan Reyes, G.; Ruibia Rodiz, M. A. de la; Rosales Calvo, M.; Labarta Mancho, T.; Calavia Gimenez, I.

    2011-07-01

    This article presents an analysis of the evolution of occupational collective dose of the Spanish nuclear power plants during the period 2000 - 2008 within the international context, by the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) in order to have information contrasted to assessing the extent of application of the ALARA criteria in the Spanish plants and identify areas of priority attention.

  12. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinson, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC

  13. Multiple cost criteria for occupational dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, J.Z.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, feasible procedure for deciding if a proposed dose reduction measure is justified under ALARA, based on engineering economic principles of project feasibility analysis. Particular attention is given to the fixing of cost criteria: the importance of melding disparate objectives into a single parameter, and the distinction between a cost criterion and a cost consideration. (author)

  14. Approaches to the risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens in food: a critical appraisal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, J; Renwick, A G; Constable, A; Dybing, Erik; Müller, D J G; Schlatter, J; Slob, Wout; Tueting, W; Benthem, Jan van; Williams, G M; Wolfreys, A

    2006-01-01

    The present paper examines the particular difficulties presented by low levels of food-borne DNA-reactive genotoxic carcinogens, some of which may be difficult to eliminate completely from the diet, and proposes a structured approach for the evaluation of such compounds. While the ALARA approach is

  15. Occupational radiation dose assessment for a non site specific spent fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.; Eble, R.G. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) the Department of Energy has completed a phase I CISF Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the phase I CISF if a site is designated. An occupational radiation does assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the phase I CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store SNF in dual-purpose cask/canister systems (DPC's). Currently there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant ISFSI and transport cask handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend ALARA techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: Dose estimates from vendor SAR's; ISFSI experience with similar systems; Traditional methods of operations; Expected CISF cask receipt rates; and feasible ALARA techniques. 5 refs., 1 tab

  16. Technically upgraded BWR instrumentation lances reduce exposure dose to service personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenauer, Patrick; Weber, Juergen; Ketteler, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Using the case of modern in-core instrumentation employed in the Kruemmel boiling water reactor the authors show how existing nuclear technology products can be advanced by specific feedback of experience from plant operation and revision activities, and improved upon by technical measures so that the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is complied with in an exemplary way. (orig.)

  17. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule; Facteurs techniques et humains dans la reduction et l'optimisation des doses a Cogema/Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgogne, J.L. [Cogema, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    1998-07-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  18. Guidelines on how to meet the requirement to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable. Regulatory guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of Regulatory Guide G-129 (E) is to provide Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) licensees with guidelines on how to meet the forthcoming AECB regulatory requirement to keep doses received by workers and members of the public As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), social and economic factors taken into account. it is realized that the scope for realistic dose reductions will vary depending on the nature of the licensed activity. Therefore, criteria are given in section D for determining if doses can be deemed to be as low as reasonably achievable without further evaluation. The elements that the AECB considers to be essential in the approach to ALARA are described in section E and are summarized as follows: a demonstrated management commitment to the ALARA principle; the implementation of ALARA through a licensee's organization and management, provision of resources, training, establishment of action levels, documentation and other measures; and regular operational reviews. The above elements will be the focus of any AECB assessment to verify compliance with the requirement to keep radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  19. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields; Optimisation de la radioprotection des travailleurs dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  20. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  1. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules.

  2. Winning public confidence in radiation safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelcher, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluations using cost/benefit analysis and the ALARA principle should take account of psychological as well as material considerations. Safety is a basic human need which has to be met. It is also subjective and therefore has to be understood by the individual. The professional health physicist has a duty to see that radiation safety is understood by the general public. (author)

  3. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules

  4. Radiation surveillance programme and control of personnel exposure during 2001 - 2007 at RPhD, RLG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choughule, N.V.; Singh, Pratap; Sapkal, J.A.; Murali, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper brings out a detailed account on the radiological surveillance provided during the production of these radio chemicals and sources implementing ALARA. The decrease in collective dose per activity handled is the outcome of improved operation practices, radiation surveillance and safety compliance carried out at various stages of production

  5. Radiological services pact relies on teamwork and experience [dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruden, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    Virginia Power has entered into a radiological service agreement with Westinghouse. The contract commits Westinghouse to work in partnership with Virginia Power to improve performance in the areas of radiological protection, decontamination, ALARA, and radioactive waste management. It is expected that the agreement will solve the problems caused by the shortage of qualified contractor personnel during scheduled outages. (U.K.)

  6. Cartogram: A portable system for gamma cartography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, C.; Huver, M.; Gal, O.

    1999-01-01

    The Cartogram system has been specially designed for measurements and control of gamma rays during dismantling and/or maintenance of nuclear sites. It performs real time and accurate diagnosis on localisation of radionuclides, thus reducing time of radiation exposure for personnel in accordance with ALARA principles

  7. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  8. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkovic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  9. RCT: 2.05 Contamination Control, Course #8770

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report focuses on the detection and control of radioactive contamination, which are an integral part of an aggressive ALARA program and provide an indication of the effectiveness of engineering controls and proper work practices in preventing the release of radioactive material. Radioactive contamination, if undetected or not properly controlled, can be spread and contaminate areas, equipment, personnel, and the environment.

  10. Radiation safety requirements for training of users of diagnostic X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the aim of requirements regarding the use and ownership of diagnostic medical X-ray equipment is to limit radiation by abiding by the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. The ignorance of radiographers with regard to radiation safety requirements, however, is currently a cause of ...

  11. Reactor. Mind picture of the future Jules-Horowitz Reactor (RHJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustache, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives information about the future research reactor, named Reactor Jules-Horowitz (RJH). This irradiation reactor will be placed at industrialists disposal, for research concerning the competitiveness and the safety french electro-nuclear park. Principles and innovations are detailed. This reactor will respect the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable). (A.L.B.)

  12. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson, C.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC.

  13. Sampling and Characterization of 618-2 Anomalous Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) Level II review documents radiological engineering and administrative controls necessary for the sampling and characterization of anomalous materials discovered during the remediation of the 618-2 solid waste burial ground. The goals of these engineering and administrative controls are to keep personnel exposure ALARA, control contamination levels, and minimize potential for airborne contamination. Excavation of the 618-2 Burial Ground has produced many items of anomalous waste. Prior to temporary packaging and/or storage, these items have been characterized in the field to identify radiological and industrial safety conditions. Further sampling and characterization of these items, as well as those remaining from an excavated combination safe, is the subject of this ALARA Level II review. An ALARA in-progress review will also be performed prior to sampling and characterization of 618-2 anomalous materials offering risks of differing natures. General categories of anomalies requiring further characterization include the following: (1) Containers of unknown liquids and/or solids and powders (excluding transuranics); (2) Drums containing unknown liquids and/or solids; (3) Metal containers with unknown contents; and (4) Known or suspected transuranic material.

  14. Cean air and clear responsibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, K.C. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper is the text of the address given by Commissioner Kenneth C. rogers, USNRC, at the 23rd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. Mr. Rogers reviews the regulatory approach to the subject, discussing the requirements of 10CFR20 and ALARA principles. A discussion of the talk follows the text.

  15. SPR 2015. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The volume contains the abstracts of the SPR (society for pediatric radiology) 2015 meeting covering the following issues: fetal imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, cardiac imaging, chest imaging, oncologic imaging, tools for process improvement, child abuse, contrast enhanced ultrasound, image gently - update of radiation dose recording/reporting/monitoring - meaningful or useless meaning?, pediatric thoracic imaging, ALARA.

  16. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing

  17. SPR 2015. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-04-01

    The volume contains the abstracts of the SPR (society for pediatric radiology) 2015 meeting covering the following issues: fetal imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, cardiac imaging, chest imaging, oncologic imaging, tools for process improvement, child abuse, contrast enhanced ultrasound, image gently - update of radiation dose recording/reporting/monitoring - meaningful or useless meaning?, pediatric thoracic imaging, ALARA.

  18. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. This paper describes our experience and means of arriving at recommendations for ALARA

  19. Program for carrying out studies for the diagnoses in the nuclear medicine department at the Dr Gustavo Aldereguia Hospital in Cienfuegos province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Cabrera, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Considering the relation conditions existing in the Dr Gustavo Aldereguia Lima Hospital this work tries to analyze the critical ways that lead to the dossefication of radiopharmaceutical drugs that do not fit the ALARA criterion and to propose a program that in a general consensus with all medical specialists would determine the precise medical test needed to be done

  20. US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks

  1. The dose limits in radiation protection: foundations and evolution perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this article is devoted to the evolution of dose limits in radiation protection since 1928. The second part tackles the difficulties to whom the ICRP system of limitation collides with. The notions of dose limits, ALARA principle are explained and the concept of dose constraints is introduced. (N.C.)

  2. Tradeoffs between image quality and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Image quality takes on different perspectives and meanings when associated with the concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), which is chiefly focused on radiation dose delivered as a result of a medical imaging procedure. ALARA is important because of the increased radiosensitivity of children to ionizing radiation and the desire to keep the radiation dose low. By the same token, however, image quality is also important because of the need to provide the necessary information in a radiograph in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Thus, there are tradeoffs to be considered between image quality and radiation dose, which is the main topic of this article. ALARA does not necessarily mean the lowest radiation dose, nor, when implemented, does it result in the least desirable radiographic images. With the recent widespread implementation of digital radiographic detectors and displays, a new level of flexibility and complexity confronts the technologist, physicist, and radiologist in optimizing the pediatric radiography exam. This is due to the separation of the acquisition, display, and archiving events that were previously combined by the screen-film detector, which allows for compensation for under- and overexposures, image processing, and on-line image manipulation. As explained in the article, different concepts must be introduced for a better understanding of the tradeoffs encountered when dealing with digital radiography and ALARA. In addition, there are many instances during the image acquisition/display/interpretation process in which image quality and associated dose can be compromised. This requires continuous diligence to quality control and feedback mechanisms to verify that the goals of image quality, dose and ALARA are achieved. (orig.)

  3. Practical implementation of the optimization of radiation protection in a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, Octavian; Deboodt, Pascal; Vermeersch, Fernard; Nijs, Robby

    2003-01-01

    Optimization of radiological protection has been shown to be a routine feature during daily work, maintenance or decommissioning operations in the nuclear industry sector. ALARA is not only considered as a principle but corresponds also to practices that determine important steps during the planning, the operation and feedback evaluation. The application of the ALARA concept (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is not always easy to do. The first part of ALARA, the 'As Low As' part, concerns the reduction of the dose and the second part, 'Reasonably Achievable' part, concerns all economical and social factors that must be taken into account. In order to ensure the reduction of the dose, the radiation protection analyst must be able to predict dose in the working area and must also be able to investigates the effects of geometry, material or source changes. Another important issue in the dose assessment is the work organization, i.e. the distribution of the working force over the different tasks. In this paper, we will present the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool, developed by SCKCEN. This PC-based tool makes it possible to create and edit work scenarios taking into account worker positions and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes in a 3D environment. The dose calculations are based on the point-kernel technique with build-up correction. This method has proven to be fast and sufficient for most application in the field of dose assessment. The tools have proven to be valuable for applications going from design of new installation through maintenance up to decommissioning. The tools assist in geometric and source modelling, source strength evaluation, dose assessment in a 3D environment, realistic trajectory simulation and dose evaluation, to optimize the planned task and a better communication between ALARA stakeholders. New developments of VISIPLAN include new options for geometrical input, radiological characterization and trajectory definition. (authors)

  4. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie Institute

  5. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains; Optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie

  6. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook

  7. ORNL implementation of new health and safety requirements (DOE Order 5480.11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    New mandates in radiological protection outlined in DOE Order 5480. 11, include changes in the methodology for determining total radiation dose, ALARA program accountability, monitoring requirements, and standards for public entrance into controlled areas. The new order places distinct requirements concerning training at all DOE facilities. Radiation protection training requirements are addressed, including the effective communication of operations changes to all employees. This paper details the endeavors underway at ORNL in designing, developing, and delivering the training required by the new mandates. Strategies taken to reach the intended goals are explained. Efforts involve the design and implementation of the above mentioned radiation protection programs, a job-specific ALARA instructional package, and a Risk-Based Philosophy program matched to operational changes. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  8. An integrated framework for effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyun Moon; Hak, Soo Kim; Young, Ho Cho; Chang, Sun Kang

    1998-01-01

    For effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure in a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to identify repetitive high radiation jobs during maintenance and refueling operation and comprehensively assess them. An integrated framework for effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure is proposed in this study. The framework consists of three parts; data collection, statistical analysis, and ALARA findings. A PC-based database program, INSTORE, is used for data collection and reduction, and the Rank Sum Method is used in identifying high radiation jobs. As a case study, the data accumulated in Kori Units 3 and 4 have been analyzed. The results of this study show that the radiation job classifications of SG related work have much effect on annual ORE collective dose in Kori Units 3 and 4. As an example of ALARA findings, hence, the improvements for the radiation job classifications of SG related work are summarized

  9. The Texas Solution to the Nation's Disposal Needs for Irradiated Hardware - 13337

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britten, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The closure of the disposal facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, to out-of-compact states in 2008 left commercial nuclear power plants without a disposal option for Class B and C irradiated hardware. In 2012, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) opened a highly engineered facility specifically designed and built for the disposal of Class B and C waste. The WCS facility is the first Interstate Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed and operated under the Low-level Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. Due to design requirements of a modern Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) facility, traditional methods for disposal were not achievable at the WCS site. Earlier methods primarily utilized the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept of distance to accomplish worker safety. The WCS method required the use of all three ALARA concepts of time, distance, and shielding to ensure the safe disposal of this highly hazardous waste stream. (authors)

  10. Use of cost benefit analysis in the field of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.; Tattersall, P.; Sutherland, A.; Spence, E.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past decade NRPB has had a program of work on the development of cost benefit analysis (CBA) techniques in the optimisation of radiological protection. A provisional framework for including suggestions for assigning a value to unit collective dose was published for consultation in 1981/82 and after various interim statements this process culminated in formal advice in 1986. As part of this work, and as part of a project for the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) the NRPB has carried out a number of case studies to demonstrate the practical implementation of ALARA or optimisation of protection using CBA. These techniques, used in conjunction with ALARA audits, are now in general use in the NRPB's Radiation Protection Advisor Service. They have been used for a variety of medical and industrial situations, but mainly in industrial radiography as this is the part of the non-nuclear sector where occupational exposure problems predominate. Three cases are presented as representative examples

  11. Strategy proposed by Electricite de France in the development of automatic tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaing, C.; Cazin, B. [Electricite de France, Noisy le grand (France)

    1995-03-01

    The strategy proposed by EDF in the development of a means to limit personal and collective dosimetry is recent. It follows in the steps of a policy that consisted of developing remote operation means for those activities of inspection and maintenance on the reactor, pools bottom, steam generators (SGs), also reactor building valves; target activities because of their high dosimetric cost. One of the main duties of the UTO (Technical Support Department), within the EDF, is the maintenance of Pressurized Water Reactors in French Nuclear Power Plant Operations (consisting of 54 units) and the development and monitoring of specialized tools. To achieve this, the UTO has started a national think-tank on the implementation of the ALARA process in its field of activity and created an ALARA Committee responsible for running and monitoring it, as well as a policy for developing tools. This point will be illustrated in the second on reactor vessel heads.

  12. Narveos: a virtual reality simulation environment for nuclear radiating working sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenon, J.B.; Ferey, Th.; Lopez, L.; Chabal, C.; Chodorge, L.; Morganti, Ph.; Desbats, Ph.

    2008-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, any company involved in the management and/or the design and performance of interventions on equipment must find the most appropriate scenario considering several constraints: technical requirements: feasibility, kind of means to use, operating modes, tasks scheduling; economical requirements: global mission cost minimization and long-term funding; environmental requirements: waste management, contamination containment, different impacts; legal and regulatory requirements: the ALARA principle, some specific facility rules, the target state with respect to governmental decrees. Today, complex questions about interventions design with increasing reactivity, lower costs and shorter delays must be addressed. In addition, one must deal with unexpected situations during the effective realization of the interventions, and finally the experience feedback of the missions must be consolidated. One important question related to the above mentioned aspects is the choice of a human versus a remote handling or robotic intervention including ALARA consideration for decommissioning workers. (authors)

  13. Dosimetric optimization of worksite involving the installation of VATS containing highly active effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.; Busani, J.; Madigand, Y.; Pailloux, J.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of safety improvements at the CEA, CEA-FAR, concerned to formalize the ALARA initiative, has carried out for information and training purpose and to create awareness a dosimetric assessment of the worksite where new storage vats for highly active effluents are to be installed. The approach used for this worksite is global. Techniques used were all complementary, ensuring constant elaboration, experiment follow-up and feedback of a worksite at a relatively low dosimetric cost (an estimated 36 men.mSv brought down to 30 men.mSv through implementation of the ALARA principle). This type of global conception of radioprotection involving all the employees (head of project, project managers, companies, radioprotection employees...) which today proves its worth on a modest worksite must now be extended to worksites of a broader scope (several hundreds of men.mSv) where fulfillment of the dosimetric objectives is a major stake. (author)

  14. Opportunities to reduce risk associated with nuclear logging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraight, P.D.; Robinson, E.; de Fleurieu, R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear logging provides petroleum exploration and production companies with data that are critical to their decisions and operations. Because this type data is so important, environmentally conscious well-logging and service companies are constantly reviewing the risks to people and environment associated with nuclear sources with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in mind. Opportunities to additionally reduce risks, which can be accomplished only with the active involvement of oil companies, are proposed in this paper

  15. Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project assessment plan for potential worker exposure: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styers, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of the ''Assessment Plan for Potential Worker Exposure'' is to determine the potential radiological exposures to the workers as they dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) on the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project (TDDP). An evaluation of the work procedures and precautions will be made so as to maintain the exposure levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). 10 refs., 10 figs

  16. Radiation protection optimization and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    1994-09-01

    The influence quantification of bound factors to work management, and the obtained results when you apply the dosimetric economical evaluation model of the radiation protection experiments, prove that ALARA principle application musn't bound to actions on the radiation sources, but that you can find a wide act field in the irradiation work volume management topics. 53 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs., 4 appendixes

  17. Apparatus of hot cell for iodine-123 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, G.L. de; Rautenberg, F.A.; Souza, A.S.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The hot cell installation at IEN cyclotron (Brazilian-CNEN) for sup(123)I production is presented. Several devices, such as, tube furnace coupling system, tube furnace driving system, sup(123)I target transfer system, product extraction system, furnace control system, and effluent systems, were constructed and modified for implanting process engineering. The requirements of safety engineering for operation process were based on ALARA concept. (M.C.K.)

  18. Analysis of the evolution of the collective dose in nuclear power plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponjuan Reyes, G.; Ruibia Rodiz, M. A. de la; Rosales Calvo, M.; Labarta Mancho, T.; Calavia Gimenez, I.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the evolution of occupational collective dose of the Spanish nuclear power planLs during the period 2000 - 2008 within the international context, by the Nuclear SafeLy Council (CSN) in order to have information contrasted to assessing the extent of applicaLion of the ALARA criLeria in the Spanish plants and identify areas of priority attention.

  19. Application of trial risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate some of the implications inherent in the application of various proposed sets of risk acceptance criteria. A power-law model of risk aversion is utilized to estimate the equivalent number of individual deaths and is treated parametrically. The implications of ALARA requirements for cost-effective improvements are also illustrated. The risks assessed for various technological endeavors, as well as some estimated natural background risks, are compared to the trial criteria

  20. Reducing radiation exposures at nuclear power plants using virtual job planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verzilov, Y.; Husain, A.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Dose Exposure Planning Tool (ADEPT) is an innovative solution for assisting nuclear station staff to effectively minimize worker dose during inspection and maintenance activities and to improve ALARA job planning. ADEPT combines visualization and simulation of the radioactive environment at a nuclear station to estimate worker dose. It allows users to walk through a virtual job plan and receive a live radiation dose estimate for the planned work. (author)

  1. Evaluation of an external exposure of a worker during manipulation with waste packages stored in Bohunice radioactive waste treatment centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slimak, A.; Hrncir, T.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    The paper briefly describes current state of radioactive waste management as well as radioactive waste treatment and conditioning technologies used in Bohunice Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre. Radioactive Waste management includes pretreatment, treatment, conditioning, storage, transport and disposal of radioactive waste. Presented paper deals with the evaluation of an external exposure of a worker during manipulation with fibre-reinforced concrete container stored under shelter object. The external exposure of a worker was evaluated using VISIPLAN 3D ALARA code. (Authors)

  2. Basis for limiting exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, W.R.

    1979-07-01

    In view of the uncertainty about the size of the risk from radiation, it is assumed that all doses are potentially harmful with the probability of harm proportional to the dose, without threshold. Canada participates in the work of UNSCEAR, and the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board follows the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in setting its dose limits, encouraging the application of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept through its licensing and compliance activities

  3. Dose management programmes at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.; Prabhakaran, V.; Managavi, Sadashiv B.; Danannavar, Veerendra; Biju, P.; Manoj Kumar, M.; Shrikrishna, U.V.

    2001-01-01

    Kaiga Generating Station (KGS) has two units of pressurized heavy water reactors of 220 MWe each capacity. KGS-2 started power generation since 1999 and KGS-1 since 2000. Several programmes such as assessment of radioactive condition, training on radiological safety aspects, job planning in radioactive areas, etc. are conducted periodically to implement an effective dose control programmes in KGS. These efforts are briefly discussed in this report. Facilities and techniques to implement ALARA programs are also highlighted in this report. (author)

  4. Use of technology in implementing radiation protection good practices at RAPS-5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawal, S.R.; Kakkar, Amandeep; Yadav, Umed; Venkataramana, K.; Ramasomayajulu, M.; Khot, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL), is committed to perform all its activities while providing high level of radiological protection and continue to meet international standards on radiological safety. In continuation to reducing in expenditure of station collective dose/individual dose both in terms of external and internal dose is attained by adopting many new and innovative good radiological practices as per ALARA principle. Some of these improved radiological practices of RAPS-5 and 6 are discussed in this paper

  5. Building arrangement and site layout design guides for on site low level radioactive waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMullen, J.W.; Feehan, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Many papers have been written by AE's and utilities describing their onsite storage facilities, why they are needed, NRC regulations, and disposal site requirements. This paper discusses a typical storage facility and address the design considerations and operational aspects that are generally overlooked when designing and siting a low level radioactive waste storage facility. Some topics to be addressed are: 1. Container flexibility; 2. Modular expansion capabilities; 3. DOT regulations; 4. Meterological requirements; 5. OSHA; 6. Fire protection; 7. Floods; 8. ALARA

  6. Effectiveness of lead apron in external exposure reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrikrishna, U.V.; Veerendra, D.D.; Manojkumar, M.; Austine, N.X.; Jadhav, Y.S.; Jashi, K.B.; Bihari, R.R.; Venkataramana, K.

    2006-01-01

    Lead Apron as individual shielding is used primarily in Radiology for protection of personnel against ionizing radiation. Occasionally lead apron of specific design are being used in reactor environment where one-sided radiation fields are encountered. The protection provided by Apron has been evaluated using personnel dosimeter. Based on the results the utility of lead Apron has been discussed in view of ALARA. The paper discusses the results and the recommendations for use in reactor environment. (author)

  7. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  8. Radiation surveillance of exposed workers during activities of moving of the earth area of Montecillo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M. T.; Alvarez, A.; Garcia, E.; Diaz, P.; Quinones, J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives of this study was to limit the doses received by exposed workers and the public (in this case the workers of the CIEMATs buildings next to the work) by setting the appropriate criteria of optimization and protection.In addition was a theoretical evaluation of the dose inhalation, workers would have received if ALARA study protection measures has not been established. (Author)

  9. A concept of radiation safety in radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavitskij, R.V.; Vasil'ev, V.N.; Lebedev, L.A.; Blinov, N.N.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual problems of up to date radiation safety dosimetric ensurance in radiation diagnostics and radiotherapy of nontumor diseases are as follows: selection of dosimetric criteria of nonequilibrium radiation influence with an account of probable remote radiation aftereffects; determination of dose-response dependence character by low radiation doses; development of optimal technological principles for radiation diagnostics and therapy; development of organizational and methodical approaches to decreasing dose loads by radiation diagnostics and therapy of nontumor diseases; optimization of studies by ALARA principle

  10. Chemistry control at Bruce NGS 'B' from constructed to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce NGS 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro Nuclear Unit. The significance of the improved Construction installation and Quality Assurance procedures, combined with those of Operations is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met

  11. Dealing with unexpected events : efficient and safe solutions to emergent repair on NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekens Massazza, I.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Facilities are constantly challenged with unexpected events occurring on Primary Circuit components. A solution must be deployed quickly to minimize impact on the scheduled outage duration while guaranteeing safety, quality and ALARA standards. AREVA NP has demonstrated worldwide recognized capabilities and expertise through efficient management of various unexpected forced events through the time. Turnkey packaged solutions which are proposed are based on proven technics which can be quickly adapted and qualified to the specific problem, resulting in customers’ full satisfaction. (Author)

  12. Decontamination demonstration facility (D.D.F) modularization/mobility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility

  13. Nuclear analysis methods. Rudiments of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear analysis methods are generally used to analyse radioactive elements but they can be used also for chemical analysis, with fields such analysis and characterization of traces. The principles of radiation protection are explained (ALARA), the biological effects of ionizing radiations are given, elements and units used in radiation protection are reminded in tables. A part of this article is devoted to how to use radiation protection in a nuclear analysis laboratory. (N.C.)

  14. Dose reduction due to the use of pulsed miction-cystourethrography in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettinger, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The miction-cystourethrography (MCU) is the most frequently used radiographic method (30-50%) in pediatrics. The absorbed doses were significantly reduced during the last years aimed to realize the ALARA principle. The scope of the work is to study the possibility of a further dose reduction using pulsed radiation systems based on a computer-aided analysis of the dose-time curve during MCU examination.

  15. Twelfth biennial conference on reactor operating experience maintenance and modifications for availability and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the following topical sessions: (1) Formal Availability Improvement Programs; (2) Maintenance Aids and Diagnostics; (3) Nuclear Plant Inspection and Testing; (4) Secondary Cycle Improvement to Programs; (5) Recent Plant Experiences; (6) Training, Research, and Test Reactors; (7) Impact of Plant Maintenance on Availability; (8) Intragranular Stress Corrosion Cracking: Repair, Inspection, and Mitigating Techniques; (9) Availability Improvement - Recent Development and Trends; (10) Water Chemistry and Corrosion Control; and (11) ALARA: Experiences with Dose Reduction

  16. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  17. W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen buildup in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel

  18. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  19. RTP Radiation Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfred, S.L.; Mohd Fairus Abdul Farid; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Nurhayati Ramli

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Monitoring System aiming to limiting dose exposed to personnel to the lowest level referring to the concept of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). Atomic Energy Licensing (Basic Safety Radiation Protection) Regulation 2010 (Act 304) is a baseline to control employee and public radiation protection program and guideline, as well as to meet the requirement of the Occupational Safety and Health 1994 (Act 514). (author)

  20. General criteria for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxey, M.N.; Musgrave, B.C.; Watkins, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques are being developed for conversion of radioactive wastes to solids and their placement into repositories. Criteria for such disposal are needed to assure protection of the biosphere. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle should be applicable at all times during the disposal period. Radioactive wastes can be categorized into three classes, depending on the activity. Three approaches were developed for judging the adequacy of disposal concepts: acceptable risk, ore body comparison, and three-stage ore body comparison

  1. Computerized dosimetry management systems within EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, G.

    1996-01-01

    EDF, using the ALARA approach, has embarked an ambitious project of optimising the doses received in its power plants. In directing its choice of actions and the effectiveness of such actions, the French operator is using a computerized personal and collective dosimetry management system. This system provides for ongoing monitoring of dosimetry at personal, site and unit level or indeed for the entire population of EDF nuclear power plants. (author)

  2. Analysis of a radiological incident and lessons to be learned: a case of industrial radiographic incident in great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.; Lefaure, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    This note describes a case study to provide feedback analysis and lessons to be learned from a radiological incident. This one occurred in the UK. It has been published in the European ALARA Newsletter no. 2 (January 1997) and has been selected from the IRID database (Ionising Radiation Incident Database) managed by the Health and Safety Executive, National Radiological Protection Board and Environmental Agency. (authors)

  3. Radiological hazard assessment of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, D.D.; Vermeere, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    With the recent introduction of ESWL to the clinical environment, a new health physics challenge has entered the medical consulting area. The x-ray imaging systems used in the devices are of a conventional design, but in an unusual configuration that is difficult to properly assess. The scope of this paper considers specific evaluation problems, and deals with methods developed during experience with 4 units in California. Pertinent regulations are also covered, along with a synopsis of data obtained and ALARA recommendations

  4. Scientific and administrative bases of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The question of how the proper level of exposure of a worker to ionising radiation should be chosen is discussed. Both scientific and social aspects of this question are identified. Finally suggestions are put forward on how to make a ALARA programme succeed. It is concluded that such a programme could be more effective than attempts to lower the annual dose limit. (U.K.)

  5. Occupational exposure in the National Institute of Nuclear Research between 1990-1994. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar A, L.; Molina, G.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an analysis of the occupational doses of the workers is performed, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs and activities of the radiological occupational control that the Radiological Protection Department has been carrying out in order to execute the ALARA Recommendation. It is also discussed the possibility of adopting the recommendations about dose limits of ICRP 60. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs

  6. Spent nuclear fuel management system of research reactor KINR NAS of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slisenko, V.I.; Makarovskij, V.N.; Mazina, N.I.; D'yakov, A.G.; Andronov, O.B.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of work - development of optimum, technically simple and reliable system of SNF management of research nuclear reactor taking into account received statistics and experience of long-term operation of reactor. The objective of this work - to place existing system of SNF management in conformity with modern normative requirements on the basis of 'ALARA' principle and taking into account the specificity of the object of application

  7. Good practices in radiological protection at Narora Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.P.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Agrawal, Mitesh; Tiwari, S.K.; Kulhari, Praveen; Gupta, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Radiological protection performance of nuclear power plant is assessed by collective exposure, individual average exposure, external/external exposure, personnel/surface contamination and reduction of radioactive wastes. Collective exposure is reduced by integrated comprehensive ALARA program in all aspects of nuclear plant operation and maintenance has reduced collective dose many folds. In the present paper, implementation of new good practices in Radiological Protection is presented

  8. Limiting values for radioactive materials in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The contribution describes the fundamentals of radiation protection: LNT (linear, no threshold) hypotheses, ALARA (a slow as reasonably achievable), limiting values. Using the example the nuclear accident in Chernobyl the differences in contamination development in different foodstuffs in Germany is demonstrated including recommended limiting values and the radiation exposures after 30 years due to consumption of contaminated food. The natural radioactivity is about 0.3 mSv/year.

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Control performance indicator report: First quarter, calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.

    1995-07-01

    The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report is provided quarterly, inaccordance with Article 133 of the INEL Radiological Control Manual. Indicators are used as a measure of performance of the Radiological Control Program and as a motivation for improvement, not as a goal in themselves. These indicators should be used by management to assist in focusing priorities and attention and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The ALARA Committees establish ALARA goals for the INEL based on forecasts and goals provided by each facility organizational manager or supervisor.Performance goals are realistic and measurable. Stringent goals are set at least annually to reflect expected workloads and improvement of radiological performance. Goals higher than previous goals may occasionally be set due to changes in work scope or mission. The INEL Radiological Control Performance Indicators consist of: Collective dose in person-rem; average worker dose, maximum dose to a worker, and maximum neutron dose to a worker;the number of skin and clothing contaminations, including the number of contaminated wounds and facial contaminations; the number of radioactive material intakes; the area of Contamination, High Contamination, and Airborne Radioactivity Areas in square feet; and airborne radioactivity events and spills

  10. The utility perspective on the transportation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Describing interface between the transportation system and the operating plants, the author thinks there are really three, interrelated dimensions to the interface; the technical; physical interface; the business (i.e. economic) interface; and the institutional interface. A principal mission of the Nuclear Transportation Group is to help assure that these interfaces are smoothly bridged and that the resources of the utility industry are brought to bear to achieve this result. The physical interface is the most readily understood. The analysis must also consider the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) radiation exposure evaluation of the waste system design and operation. ALARA evaluations of the waste system design and operation. ALARA evaluations must be done on a systems basis to ensure that the effects of particular designs that may be beneficial in some aspects of the system do not adversely impact nuclear power plant workers or operations. Regardless of one's political persuasion or technical training, the author doesn't think there is any question that spent fuel must be moved, sooner or later, somewhere. It's in the best interests of all that those shipments be made safely, and economically, with the proper attention to doing it right and not needlessly wasting resources, including money

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report. Fourth quarter calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansing, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed information pertaining to As Low As Reasonably Achievable/Contamination Control Improvement Project (ALARA/CCIP) activities are outlined. Improved commitment to the WHC ALARA/CCIP Program was experienced throughout FY 1994. During CY 1994, 17 of 19 sitewide ALARA performance goals were completed on or ahead of schedule. Estimated total exposure by facility for CY 1994 is listed in tables by organization code for each dosimeter frequency. Facilities/areas continue to utilize the capabilities of the RPR tracking system in conjunction with the present site management action-tracking system to manage deficiencies, trend performance, and develop improved preventive efforts. Detailed information pertaining to occupational injuries/illnesses are provided. The Industrial Safety and Hygiene programs are described which have generated several key initiatives that are believed responsible for improved safety performance. A breakdown of CY 1994 occupational injuries/illnesses by type, affected body group, cause, job type, age/gender, and facility is provided. The contributing experience of each WHC division/department in attaining this significant improvement is described along with tables charting specific trends. The Radiological Control Program is on schedule to meet all RL Site Management System milestones and program commitments.

  12. Experimental inventory verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steverson, C.A.; Angerman, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) goals and Department of Energy (DOE) inventory requirements are frequently in conflict at facilities across the DOE complex. The authors wish, on one hand, to verify the presence of correct amounts of nuclear materials that are in storage or in process; yet on the other hand, we wish to achieve ALARA goals by keeping individual and collective exposures as low as social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations permit. The Experimental Inventory Verification System (EIVSystem) is a computer-based, camera-driven system that utilizes image processing technology to detect change in vault areas. Currently in the test and evaluation phase at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this system guards personnel. The EIVSystem continually monitors the vault, providing proof of changed status for objects sorted within the vault. This paper reports that these data could provide the basis for reducing inventory requirements when no change has occurred, thus helping implement ALARA policy; the data will also help describe there target area of an inventory when change has been shown to occur

  13. Operator dependency of the radiation exposure in cardiac interventions: feasibility of ultra low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emre Ozpelit, Mehmet; Ercan, Ertugrul; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Yilmaz, Akar; Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Materials and methods: A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Results: Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Conclusion: By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. (authors)

  14. The information system on occupational exposure and related IAEA activities in the Europe region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the Agency's Occupational Radiation Protection Programme, within the Division of Radiation and Waste Safety, are to encourage the global harmonization and optimization of occupational radiation protection in situations of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation; and to have in place and ensure compliance with operational health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency on its premises and in occupational activities under its supervision or control. The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) forms an integral part of this programme and the purpose of this paper is to present the current status of ISOE and the IAEA activities in the Europe region in support of the ISOE. The ISOE prograrnme will continue to be a very important part of the IAEA Occupational Radiation Protection Prograrnme as will the related activities under the Technical Co-operation prograrnme. Realizing the need for information exchange and promotion of the application of the ALARA principle in industries other than nuclear power plants, the Agency has recently initiated the creation of regional ALARA Networks. These are seen as an effective way to foster good working practices and the development of an ALARA culture. Further information on the IAEA radiation protection prograrnme can be found in the Web page: www.iaea.orgtns/rasanet. (authors)

  15. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.; Janssens, A.; Mrabit, K.; Ahier, B.

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  16. Lessons learned at TMI: cleanup for respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfitt, B.A.; Gee, E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) presented GPU Nuclear with technical challenges unprecedented in the nuclear power industry. Among these challenges were a myriad of health physics problems that had to be solved to ensure a radiologically safe environment for workers performing cleanup activities. The application of the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy has been a fundamental aspects in protecting cleanup workers. The unique conditions produced by the accident, however, have necessitated novel and innovative approaches in making this philosophy effective. The option to use respirators is based on which method will result in the lowest radiation dose to the worker. Inherent to this program has been the training of workers to overcome the perception that any internal contamination is of foremost concern and is orders of magnitude greater in biological effect than an identical external dose. It is, of course, the total dose (internal dose plus external dose) that must be minimized to implement a true ALARA philosophy. The need for considering the total radiation dose when making decisions to use respirators has been clear during the TMI-2 cleanup. Prescribing respirators is not always good for the ALARA concept

  17. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    Staff at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory have established a data base of information about current research that is likely to result in lower radiation doses to workers. The data base, concerned primarily with nuclear power generation, is part of a project that the ALARA Center is carrying out for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes its current status. A substantial amount of research on reducing occupational exposure is being done in the US and abroad. This research is beginning to have an impact on the collective dose expenditures at nuclear power plants. The collective radiation doses in Europe, Japan, and North America all show downward trends. A large part of the research in the US is either sponsored by the nuclear industry through joint industry organizations such as EPRI and ESEERCO or is done by individual corporations. There is also significant participation by smaller companies. The main emphasis of the research on dose reduction is on engineering approaches aimed at reducing radiation fields or keeping people out of high-exposure areas by using robotics. Effective ALARA programs are also underway at a large number of nuclear plants. Additional attention should be given to non-engineering approaches to dose reduction, which are potentially very useful and cost effective but require quantitative study and analysis based on data from nuclear power plants. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Control of occupational radiation exposures in TVA nuclear power plants - design and operating philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belvin, E.A.; Lyon, M.; Beasley, E.G. Jr.; Zobel, W.; Stone, G.F.

    1976-01-01

    TVA has some 21,000 MWe of nuclear generation in various phases of design, construction, or operation. When Browns Ferry was designed in the late 1960's, there were no guidelines available regarding implant radiation control features, so TVA relied on good engineering and health physics judgement in developing its design and operating criteria for radiation protection. After two years of operation at Browns Ferry, the authors experience shows that their design criteria were in most cases adequate or more than adequate. However, several areas present continuing problems relative to radiation and contamination control. In view of the recent NRC ALARA guidelines, they have instituted a program to ensure that the ALARA concept is made an integral part of their design and operating plans. Administrative documents were issued giving management support to the ALARA concept. A 4-member management audit team consisting of representatives from their design, operating, and radiation protection groups was established to review the effectiveness of radiation protection design features and operating activities on a plant-by-plant basis. Reports and recommendations from these audits are sent to top-level management staff. Their goal is to maintain an audit-appraisal system consisting of in-plant awareness of radiation and contamination conditions, assessment of trends in occupational radiation exposures, and feedback to their designers regarding problems encountered during operation and maintenance activities

  19. Occupational Doses and the Contribution to the Population Dose in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Jae; Kyu, Hwan Jeong [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the occupational exposure records in terms of the control of exposure for radiation workers and dose reduction. The study includes the estimates of the number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed. In addition, the study includes an estimate of the contribution of occupational exposure to the Korean population dose. The exposure of radiation workers in occupational field includes medical radiology, industrial applications such as radiography, nuclear power, and some research activities. Occupational exposure from medical radiology practices includes the contributions from diagnostic x-ray procedures, dental radiography, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy. The control of exposure for radiation workers, and the measures necessary to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) are specified in Subparagraph 3 and Subparagraph 4 of Article 91 (1) of the Korea Nuclear Safety Act (KNSA), respectively. Therefore, from a regulatory perspective, the exposure data of the workers are primarily for verification of the adequacy of the control of exposure, radiation protection and implementation of ALARA. The number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed, and average effective doses from occupational exposure during the period of 2009 to 2013 have been evaluated. In general, radiation workers were increasing in number annually, but the mean doses for those exposed each year showed the control of exposures were mostly considered met within the dose limit in KNSA. Nevertheless, it was shown that the continuous efforts would be needed to reduce doses and thus to implement ALARA regulatory requirements. In radiation occupations, the application of ICRP radiation protection principles will ensure good practice and decreasing exposures. Over the period of 5 years, the contributions of the annual

  20. Radiation-related impacts for nuclear plant physical modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciacca, F.; Knudson, R.; Simion, G.; Baca, G.; Behling, H.; Behling, K.; Britz, W.; Cohen, S.

    1989-10-01

    The radiation fields in nuclear power plants present significant obstacles to accomplishing repairs and modifications to many systems and components in these plants. The NRC's generic cost estimating methodology attempts to account for radiation-related impacts by assigning values to the radiation labor productivity factor. This radiation labor productivity factor is then used as a multiplier on the greenfield or new nuclear plant construction labor to adjust for the actual operating plant conditions. The value assigned to the productivity factor is based on the work-site radiation levels. The relationship among ALARA practices, work-place radiation levels, and radiation-related cost impacts previously had not been adequately characterized or verified. The assumptions made concerning the use and application of radiation-reduction measures such as system decontamination and/or the use of temporary shielding can significantly impact estimates of both labor requirements and radiation exposure associated with a particular activity. Overall guidance was needed for analysts as to typical ALARA practices at nuclear power plants and the effects of these practices in reducing work-site dose rates and overall labor requirements. This effort was undertaken to better characterize the physical modification cost and radiological exposure impacts related to the radiation environment of the work place. More specifically, this work sought to define and clarify the quantitative relationships between or among: radiation levels and ALARA practices, such as the use of temporary shielding, decontamination efforts, or the use of robots and remote tools; radiation levels and labor productivity factors; radiation levels, in-field labor hours, and worker radiation exposure; radiation levels and health physics services costs; and radiation levels, labor hours, and anti-contamination clothing and equipment. 48 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Considerations on the applicability of as low as reasonably achievable analysis to the regulation of radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with the continued use in the United States' regulations of international recommendations on radioactive materials transport which have not undergone review in accordance with US Federal Radiation Protection Guidance. This Guidance, published in the Federal Register (25 FR 4402) in 1960 by the Federal Radiation Council, called for Federal agencies to maintain radiation exposure, as far below the Federal Radiation Protection guides as practicable. The concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) seems, afirst, to be a relatively straight-forward concept. One needs only to identify what factors are pertinent and determine whether each is a cost or a benefit, where, in this case, benefit refers strictly to health effect reduction, in relation to the final product or output. These costs and benefits are then arranged in combinations employing varying magnitudes of the factors until the combination is found which maximizes the benefits while minimizing the costs. The difficulties are found to mount rapidly as one proceeds to implement this concept however. Because radiation is both beneficial and detrimental to health, the factors to be employed must include social considerations as well as economic values. The difficulty, if not impossibility, of quantifying social factors, such as the value of life or the value of personal inconvenience, into terms directly comparable with the dollar values of economic factors is the largest impediment to a conclusive demonstration of ALARA in strictly economic terms. Until society finds some mechanism for defining such terms as the value of life in economic units, the ALARA process can serve only as an input to decision-making with subjective value judgments necessarily being made

  2. Occupational Doses and the Contribution to the Population Dose in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seung Jae; Kyu, Hwan Jeong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the occupational exposure records in terms of the control of exposure for radiation workers and dose reduction. The study includes the estimates of the number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed. In addition, the study includes an estimate of the contribution of occupational exposure to the Korean population dose. The exposure of radiation workers in occupational field includes medical radiology, industrial applications such as radiography, nuclear power, and some research activities. Occupational exposure from medical radiology practices includes the contributions from diagnostic x-ray procedures, dental radiography, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy. The control of exposure for radiation workers, and the measures necessary to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) are specified in Subparagraph 3 and Subparagraph 4 of Article 91 (1) of the Korea Nuclear Safety Act (KNSA), respectively. Therefore, from a regulatory perspective, the exposure data of the workers are primarily for verification of the adequacy of the control of exposure, radiation protection and implementation of ALARA. The number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed, and average effective doses from occupational exposure during the period of 2009 to 2013 have been evaluated. In general, radiation workers were increasing in number annually, but the mean doses for those exposed each year showed the control of exposures were mostly considered met within the dose limit in KNSA. Nevertheless, it was shown that the continuous efforts would be needed to reduce doses and thus to implement ALARA regulatory requirements. In radiation occupations, the application of ICRP radiation protection principles will ensure good practice and decreasing exposures. Over the period of 5 years, the contributions of the annual

  3. Integral activation experiment of fusion reactor materials with d-Li neutrons up to 55 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Moellendorff, Ulrich von [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wada, Masayuki [Business Automation Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    An integral activation experiment of fusion reactor materials with a deuteron-lithium neutron source was performed. Since the maximum energy of neutrons produced was 55 MeV, the experiment with associated analysis was one of the first attempts for extending the energy range beyond 20 MeV. The following keywords represent the present study: d-Li neutrons, 55 MeV, dosimetry, SAND-II, spectrum adjustment, LA-150, MCNP, McDeLi, IFMIF, fusion reactor materials, integral activation experiment, low-activation, F82H, vanadium-alloy, IEAF, ALARA, and sequential charged particle reaction. (author)

  4. Construction of pilot system for the Korea information system of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Seong Ho; Park, Moon Il; Im, Bok Soo; Lee, Seon Mi; Kim, Hyung Uk; Chae, Eun Yeong

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the construction of Korea Information System of Occupational Exposure (KISOE) system is designed with occupational exposure control system based on information evaluation technology and it makes the reliability of the personal exposure by use of personal dose verification. While the operation of national based radiation worker protection system, this system are settled the control system for radiation worker and ALARA. The purpose of construction and operation of pilot system of KISOE systematically is to derive the master plan of KISOE, stable development of this system, and serve the high quality radiation use internationally

  5. Design considerations for an intelligent mobile robot for mixed-waste inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sias, F.R.; Dawson, D.M.; Schalkoff, R.J. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-06-01

    Large quantities of low-level radioactive waste are stored in steel drums at various Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the United States. Much of the stored waste qualifies as mixed waste and falls under Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that require periodic inspection. A semi-autonomous mobile robot is being developed during Phase 1 of a DOE contract to perform the inspection task and consequently reduce the radiation exposure of inspection personnel to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). The nature of the inspection process, the resulting robot design requirements, and the current status of the project are the subjects of this paper.

  6. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet (ft)) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area

  7. The Israeli Health Physics Society Annual Meeting 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The volume contains 20 abstracts of lectures covering topics such as radioactivity in food, the indoor radon problem, optimization of medical exposure, public health, alara and the various relevant radiation protection measures such as emergency planning and preparedness. Also, this is the first time for our society to include the issue of protection from harmful effects of non-ionizing radiations (NIR) emerging from their growing use in science, medicine, industry and agriculture. At last, the state of radiation protection in Israel is also reviewed

  8. Consideration of sky-shine radiation effects for the development of Korean regulatory guidance about industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Ki Chi; Bokyun Seo; Wantae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Although most of the sky-shine radiation levels in industrial radiography are below regulatory limits, sky-shine radiation could make a valuable contribution to the total radiation level near shielding facility with little shielding and open field without shielding. Therefore sky-shine radiation should be thoroughly predicted and supervised with the ALARA principle. In this study, we simulated sky-shine radiation for mobile irradiators using MCNP and newly suggested the equation for calculating sky-shine radiation. Also these results were applied to developing Korean regulatory guidance about industrial radiography and to recommending the requirement of the facility design, controlled or supervised area at work places. (author)

  9. Design aspects of radiological safety in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkulkar, D.S.; Purohit, R.G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to keep operational performance of a nuclear facility high and to keep occupational and public exposure ALARA, radiological safety provisions must be reviewed at the time of facility design. Deficiency in design culminates in deteriorated system performance and non adherence to safety standards and could sometimes result in radiological incident. Important radiological aspects relevant to safety were compiled based on operating experiences, design deficiencies brought out from past nuclear incidents, experience gained during maintenance, participation in design review of upcoming nuclear facilities and radiological emergency preparedness

  10. Caracterización de gneises glandulares del alto valle del Lozoya (Sistema Central Español) en base al quimismo de las biotitas y estado estructural del feldespato potásico

    OpenAIRE

    Tornos Arroyo, Fernando; Casquet, César

    1982-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se estudian las litologías gneísicas glandulares que afloran en la ladera este del Macizo de Peñalara (Sistema Central Español), en base a la interpretación del quimismo de las biotitas de glándulas y mesostasia y del estado estructural del feldespato potásico que forma la mayoría de estas glándulas. Se deduce a partir del estudio de las biotitas, que las glándulas se comportan como sistema cerrado para el Ti y abierto para el Al durante el metamorf...

  11. Effect of known clad and pellet reactions on the GEC ESL design of dry vault store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, D.

    1984-01-01

    The more important clad and pellet reactions and their temperature dependence are briefly reviewed, followed by an outline of the economical GEC ESL interim spent fuel storage concept that highlights: The ability of the concept to reduce the temperature of the fuel to values where the clad and pellet reactions are minimal. The containment philosophy that enables any consequences of the reactions to be safely retained to ALARA principles. The maintenance of an air storage environment that can never be lost. The utilisation of passive, naturally induced cooling regimes. The ability to continuously monitor for long-term degradation, together with ease of inspection at any time during storage

  12. Implementation of current NCRP and ICRP guidance and revised 10 CFR Part 20: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, D.B.; Seagondollar, L.W.; Watson, J.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The 24th Annual Midyear Topical Meeting of the Health Physics Society, ''Implementation of Current NCRP and ICRP Guidance and Revised 10 CFR Part 20'' was held in North Carolina on January 22--January 24, 1991. The meeting featured symposia on the Basis for Change and Regulatory Implementation, Benefits and Problems in Implementation at Various Types of Facilities, Health Physics Monitoring Requirements and Record Keeping, Exposure Management, ALARA, and Dose Limit for Embryo/Fetus -- Impact on Employer and Employee. Individual papers are referenced separately

  13. AVARIS - AREVA Valve Repair in-Situ. Innovative technology and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Concept of in-situ welding and turning machine is explained. The AVARIS processes are: Disassembly Evaluation Turning Welding Finish turning Penetration test Grinding Reassembly Result - The seats are within the dimensional and hardness tolerances. The repaired valves with AVARIS as in the case of Isar 2 in 2010 did not show any indications after one year in operation Advantages: Development based on an approved and safe technology; Capability for improving and/or modification of the hardfacing material according to specific system conditions; Minimization of dose exposure (ALARA)

  14. Radiation safety consideration in uranium industry in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.T.; El-Assaly, F.M.; El-Naggar, A.M.; Gomaa, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation protection measures are essential in mining and milling of uranium and thorium. The basic concept of radiation protection is that all exposures should be kept as low as it is reasonably achievable (ALARA). Most potential hazards arise from exposures to radioactive gases of radon and thoron and their daughter products. Thus new limits were derived by the ICRP integrating both the internal and external exposures to radon daughters. The present study evaluates the radiation protection measures carried out at three Egyptian mines (Massikat, Aradia North and South). Different recommendations were presented complying with optimization of radiation protection in accordance with the ICRP system of dose limitation

  15. Health physics society position on draft environmental protection agency recommendations for federal radiation protection guidance for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Specific recommendations of the Health Physics Society are presented. There should not be any occupational exposure to ionizing radiation without the expectation of an overall benefit from the activity causing the exposure. Such activities should be permitted only when exposure to workers is controlled under a comprehensive radiation protection program that includes several elements: adequate, practical standards; adequately trained and qualified staff; adequately designed, operated and maintained facilities and equipment; appropriate monitoring programs, dose assessment programs and occupational exposure records; appropriate methods and procedures for controlling exposures in conformance with both the applicable limits and the ALARA philosophy; and appropriate quality assurance and audit programs

  16. Dosimetric and spectrometric neutron measurements around an annular vessel containing a plutonium nitrate fissile solution

    CERN Document Server

    Tournier, B; Medioni, R; Rich, C; Mussoni, F; Camus, L; Pichenot, G; Crovisier, P; Cutarella, D; Asselineau, B; Groetz, J E

    2002-01-01

    The new ICPR60 recommendations and the consideration of the ALARA principle have led the operators of nuclear facilities to evaluate with a higher care, the doses received by workers. The aim of this paper is to present a recent study concerning mixed field characterisation at a workplace located in a reprocessing laboratory. As a first step, neutron spectrum determination was achieved by two ways: simulation using MCNP code and experimental measurements with Bonner spheres and recoil proton counters. Neutron spectrum allowed the evaluation of dosimetric quantities. Measurements were then performed with different devices routinely used in radioprotection. The describe the measurement techniques, present the results obtained, and finally compare and discuss them.

  17. Design considerations for an intelligent mobile robot for mixed-waste inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sias, F.R.; Dawson, D.M.; Schalkoff, R.J.; Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Large quantities of low-level radioactive waste are stored in steel drums at various Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the United States. Much of the stored waste qualifies as mixed waste and falls under Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that require periodic inspection. A semi-autonomous mobile robot is being developed during Phase 1 of a DOE contract to perform the inspection task and consequently reduce the radiation exposure of inspection personnel to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). The nature of the inspection process, the resulting robot design requirements, and the current status of the project are the subjects of this paper

  18. Radioprotection plan at the Abadia interim repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.G.; Rabello, P.N.P.; Tranjan Filho, A.

    1993-01-01

    The wastes from Goiania radiological accident are temporarily stored at a site near the village of Abadia de Goias, 23 km for far from downtown Goiania. Foreseeing operations inside the storage yard, a Radioprotection Plan was organize primarily with the aim of establishing procedures to reduce radiation exposure of workers to as-low-as reasonably achievable (ALARA principles and to be at the adopted regulatory exposure radiation limits. The adequacy of the storage containers and their reconditioning are the operations involved. (B.C.A.). 09 refs, 02 tabs

  19. 30 Years of NRWG activities towards harmonization of nuclear safety criteria and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    This report describes the work performed and the results achieved by the NRWG since its creation in 1972 to advise the Commission on nuclear safety matters (safety methodologies, criteria, standards, postulated accidents inside the nuclear installations, natural hazards, man-made hazards, training of personnel and use of simulator, ALARA policy to reduce the doses to the personnel and the public, emergency planning, defence in depth and integrity of the successive barriers between the radioactive products and the environment, radiological consequences of postulated accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, severe accidents analysis and management. The report also lists a number of technical subjects where NRWG has played a leading role. (author)

  20. Regulatory principles, safety policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of radiation protection. Basic radiobiological information. Current radiation protection requirements: ICRP recommendations a) limits on individual doses for workers and general public b) additional general limitation. National and international radiation protection standards. Recent extension of ICRP dose limitation system: individual dose limits for occupational and public exposure; collective doses and dose commitments; justification of a practice; the concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)'; optimization of radiation protection. Operational radiation protection: application of optimization procedures to controllable sources a) control of occupational exposure b) control of public exposure. Application of optimization procedures to uncontrollable sources. (orig.) [de

  1. New concepts in risk assessment for patients with radiological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tautz, M.; Brandt, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In radiation risk assessment it must be differentiated between somatic and genetic effect on the one hand as well as between stochastic and non-stochastic effect on the other. According to definitions of the ICRP report 26 the limit for the dose equivalent of all tissues prevents non-stochastic radiation effects. With stochastic radiation effects probably exist no threshold doses; therefore the ALARA principle must be applied concerning radiation protection. The individual risk by stochastic radiation effects in its linear, linear-quadratic and quadratic extrapolations, respectively, is discussed in detail. The effective stochastic dose equivalent (H/sub eff/) as well as collective dose and collective damage are outlined

  2. Avoiding radioactive accidents in Israel 1996-1997: summary of incidents occurred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keren, M.; Neeman, E.; Rosental, J.J.; Brenner, S. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Medical School

    1997-12-31

    Radiation Safety Division of the Ministry of the Environment is responsible for radiation protection of the Israeli public and environment from radiation hazards. Notification, justification, registration and ALARA principles are important requirements to get license to use radioactive materials or instrumentation. Some incidents investigated from January 96 to the end of June 97 by the Chief National Radiation Safety Officer (CNRSO) of the division are reported 1 tab,; e-mail: envirad at post.tau.ac.il; env{sub r}ad.netvision.net.il

  3. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  4. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1977-10-01

    Some of the major considerations in establishing management policies, staff, facilities and equipment, and operational procedures to promote radiation safety in medical or hospital care programs using radioactive materials licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are presented. It is a compendium of good practices for establishing adequate radiation safety programs in medical institutions. The information presented is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations of interest to the specific type of activity

  5. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire

  6. Cost-benefit analysis: reality or illusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The problems encountered in the application of cost-benefit analysis to the setting of acceptable radiation exposure levels are discussed, in particular the difficulty of assigning a monetary value to human life or disability, and the fact that the customary optimization of cost-benefit is not consistent with the ICRP dose limitation system, especially the ALARA principle. It is concluded that the present ICRP recommendations should remain the basis of exposure control while a carefully limited use of cost-benefit analysis may be helpful in some cases. (U.K.)

  7. Some environmental challenges which the uranium production industry faces in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2004-01-01

    Some of the environmental challenges which the uranium production industry faces in the 21st century have been discussed in the paper. They are: the use of the linear non-threshold (LNT) model for radiation protection, the concept of 'controllable dose' as an alternative to the current International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) system of dose limitation, the future of collective dose and the ALARA (As low As Reasonably Achievable) principle and the application of a risk-based framework for managing hazards. The author proposes that, the risk assessment/risk management framework could be used for managing the environmental, safety and decommissioning issues associated with the uranium fuel cycle. (author)

  8. Proposals for software analysis of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit for optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Lombard, J.; Lefaure, C.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this report is to present the principles of decision making software for radiation protection option, applying ALARA principle. The choice of optimum options is performed by applying the models of cost effectiveness and cost-benefit. Options of radiation protection are described by two indicators: a simple economic indicator: cost of radiation protection; and dosimetry indicator: collective dose related to protection. For both analyses the software enables sensitivity analysis. It would be possible to complete the software by integrating a module which would take into account combinations of two options since they are not independent

  9. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A open-quotes good practiceclose quotes is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations

  10. Work management to optimise occupational radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants worldwide have steadily decreased since the early 1990's. Regulatory pressures, technological advances, improved plant designs and operational procedures, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) culture and information exchange have contributed to this downward trend. However, with the continued ageing and possible life extensions of nuclear power plants, ongoing economic pressures, regulatory, social and political evolutions, and the potential of new nuclear build, the task of ensuring that occupational exposures are kept as low as reasonably achievable continues to present challenges to radiological protection professionals

  11. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Project summary report, Elk River Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Adams, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Elk River Reactor. Decommissioning data from available documents were input into a computerized data-handling system in a manner that permits specific information to be readily retrieved. The information is in a form that assists the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in its assessment of decommissioning alternatives and ALARA methods for future decommissionings projects. Samples of computer reports are included in the report. Decommissioning of other reactors, including NRC reference decommissioning studies, will be described in similar reports

  12. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This environmental statement assesses the impacts of the implementation of plutonium recycle in the LWR industry. It is based on assumptions that are intended to reflect conservatively an acceptable level of the application of current technology. It is not intended to be a representation of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. This generic environmental statement discusses the anticipated effects of recycling plutonium in light water nuclear power reactors. It is based on about 30 years of experience with the element in the context of a projected light water nuclear power industry that is already substantial. A background perspective on plutonium, its safety, and its recycling as a reactor fuel is presented

  13. Radiation protection considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Adorisio, C; Urscheler, C; Vincke, H

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the legal Radiation Protection (RP) framework to be considered in the design of HiLumi LHC. It details design limits and constraints, dose objectives and explains how the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) approach is formalized at CERN. Furthermore, features of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are summarized that are of relevance for RP studies. Results of FLUKA simulations for residual dose rates during Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) are compared to measurements demonstrating good agreement and providing proof for the accuracy of FLUKA predictions for future shutdowns. Finally, an outlook for the residual dose rate evolution until LS3 is given.

  14. 4. S.F.R.P. days on the optimization of radiation protection in the electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    These days are dedicated to the implementation of the radiation protection optimization in the activities of the electronuclear sector, of the industrial sector, the medical sector, the laboratories and the centers of research and the university sector. All the aspects of the practical application of the radiation protection optimization of the workers, the public and the patients will be approached. The oral communications and posters concern the following subjects: foundations of the optimization principle, new statutory context, transmission of ALARA principle, operational dosimetry, conception, operating and maintenance of the installations, the construction sites of dismantling, industrial radiology, radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  15. Radiation Protection Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorisio, C.; Roesler, S.; Urscheler, C.; Vincke, H.

    This chapter summarizes the legal Radiation Protection (RP) framework to be considered in the design of HiLumi LHC. It details design limits and constraints, dose objectives and explains how the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) approach is formalized at CERN. Furthermore, features of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are summarized that are of relevance for RP studies. Results of FLUKA simulations for residual dose rates during Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) are compared to measurements demonstrating good agreement and providing proof for the accuracy of FLUKA predictions for future shutdowns. Finally, an outlook for the residual dose rate evolution until LS3 is given.

  16. Training Workers to use Localized Ventilation for Radiological Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    Work on radiological systems and components needs to be accomplished using techniques that reduce radiation dose to workers, limit contamination spread, and minimize radioactive waste. One of the best methods to control contamination spread is to use localized ventilation to capture radioactive material and keep it from spreading. The Fluor Hanford ALARA Center teaches workers how to use ventilation in partnership with other engineered controls and this has resulted in improved work practices, minimized the impact on adjacent work operations, and decreased the amount of radioactive waste generated. This presentation will emphasize how the workers are trained to use localized ventilation for contamination control

  17. De minimis concept from a regulatory standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.H. III.

    1983-01-01

    The author maintains that the de minimis concept does not have the same legal connotations as a license exemption or a general license, nor is it the same concept as ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), and to equate this concept with any of the three is erroneous. He discusses the concept with regard to the revision of 10 CFR Part 20 regulations and concludes that incorporating de minimis into Part 20 is preferable to including it in other parts, that legal precedents for doing so exist, and that coordinating with the Environmental Protection Agency is expected in formulating the concept for inclusion in Part 20

  18. Electrical Discharge Machining A responsive process for component repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekens-Massazza, I.

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Industry is continually challenged to decrease accumulated dose during planned outages whereas the associated maintenance work required in these harsh environments is becoming more complex. In order to bridge these divergent trends, the ALARA principals must be applied during the development phase of any new tooling. Steps must also be included to qualify the specific maintenance equipment and train the site personnel, both on representative mock-ups. The goal is to ensure that the site maintenance work conforms to the customers requirements with regards to dose, quality and the outage schedule. (Author)

  19. Portable laboratories for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damljanovic, D.; Smelcerovic, M.; Koturovic, A.; Drndarevic, V.; Sobajic, M.

    1989-01-01

    The portable radiometric laboratories LARA-10, LARA-GS, LARA-86 and ALARA-10 designed, developed and produced at the Boris Kidric Institute are described. Earlier models (LARA-1, LARA-1D, LARA-2 and LARA-5) are presented in brief. The basic characteristics of the devices and methods of measurements are given. All the instruments are battery operated and almost all can also use 220V/50Hz supply. They are a very suitable facility for radiological monitoring of soil, water, food, clothes etc., when working in field conditions (author)

  20. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  1. Ethics and the medical uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbard, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    The basis of ethical practice for the medical community in general and for nuclear medicine technology in particular is described as follows: 1) Know and use current guidelines for safe work procedures; 2) Establish and maintain a quality assurance program for equipment and radiopharmaceuticals; 3) Develop work habits incorporating the philosophy of the ALARA concept (radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable); 4) Establish and use protocols for routine procedures; 5) Make exceptions to accepted practices when benefit vs risk warrants these exceptions; 6) Make periodic audits to determine if ethical standards are being applied

  2. Expert systems for assisting in design reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.; Johnson, W.J.; Weber, N.; Naser, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses Sargent and Lundy's (S and L's) use of expert system technologies to computerize the procedures used for engineering design reviews. This paper discusses expert systems and the advantages that result from using them to computerize the decision-making process. This paper also discusses the design review expert systems that S and L has developed to perform fire protection and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) design reviews, and is currently developing for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to perform 10 CFR 50.59 safety reviews

  3. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database

  4. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 μSv per hour (20 μrem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNPtrademark are reported for materials typical of those being shipped

  5. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  6. KS 2031 Radioactive waste - Disposal by the user - Code of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayaka, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    Sources of ionizing radiation are widely used in Medicine, Agriculture, Industry, Research and Education, and Security checks. The purpose of this code of practice is to recommend practices which are helpful in achieving the ALARA principle for small quantities of radioactive waste and which will ensure a degree of uniformity in radioactive waste disposal procedures. It has been prepared to supplement the radiation control legislation implemented by the Radiation Protection Board. It is possible to carry out a formal radiological hazard assessment of any proposed radioactive waste disposal activity that provides estimates of the risk to a population that is potentially exposed to ionising radiation as a result of the activity

  7. Situations of potential exposure in self-shielding electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, D.A.S.; Rios, P.B.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.

    2017-01-01

    The study discusses situations in the industrial environment that may lead to potential exposure of Occupationally Exposed Individuals and Public Individuals in self-shielding electron accelerators. Although these exposure situations are unlikely, simulation exercises can lead to improvements in the operating procedure as well as suggest changes in production line design in order to increase radiation protection at work. These studies can also be used in training and demonstrate a solid application of the ALARA principle in the daily activities of radiative installations

  8. Operation of the lithium pellet injector during D-T operations on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.W.; Gernhardt, R.C.; Mansfield, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Lithium Pellet Injector is used as an operational tool to condition the vacuum vessel walls prior to and after plasma formation as well as to support diagnostics using the resulting neutral or spectral emissions. This paper addresses the injector operational issues that have been experienced during D-T experimental operations. Reliability enhancements are discussed, such as modification to the pellet magazine, gas purging and exhaust handling. Nuclear boundary line breaks for routine magazine wheel changeout are addressed. Procedures that were developed and utilized to ensure ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) during line breaks are discussed. Lithium loading of the pellet wheel and the special techniques that are required are described

  9. Use of remote systems and automation in radioactive waste shipping and receiving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.D.; Gneiting, B.C.; Sanders, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cask handling technology development program is being pursued at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington and at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This is part of the United States Department of Energy's program to enhance nuclear waste transportation technology. The goal of the effort is two-fold; first, to develop concepts that will reduce occupational exposures at shipping cask handling facilities within As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) objectives as directed by US DOE order (1), and second, to identify any design requirements for future cask development activities that comply with 'design for automation' goals

  10. Limitation and control of radioactive liquid discharges at the Tihange power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresse, H.

    1985-01-01

    Regulations on which is based the definition of limits stipulated in the licence are recalled. As american rules apply for the last power plants built in Belgium, the criteria of 10 CFR 50 App. 1 (ALARA) were followed, not only to justify the conception of installations as in U.S., but also to define limits for the yearly discharge of various isotopes. The observed procedure is described, and the limits are indicated, as well as the hypothetical doses which could result for the different classes of critical species to be considered. The author then defined the retained principles for the control and accounting of discharged activity [fr

  11. Development and application of the basic principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The basic philosophy of radiation protection, i.e. to prevent non-stochastic effects and to reduce stochastic effects to an acceptable level, is realized in the internationally accepted three-stage system of dose reduction, viz. justification, ALARA and dose limits. Historical development of this three-stage system is described and the three components are worked out further. The application and applicability of the system is considered for radiation sources and accidents. Attention is also given to regulations, national policy and practice of radiation protection. (G.J.P.)

  12. Processeringsoptimering med Canons software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle

    2009-01-01

    . Muligheder i software optimering blev studeret i relation til optimal billedkvalitet og kontrol optagelser, for at undersøge om det var muligt at acceptere diagnostisk billedkvalitet og derved tage afsæt i ALARA. Metode og materialer Et kvantitativt eksperimentelt studie baseret på forsøg med teknisk og...... humant fantom. CD Rad fantom anvendes som teknisk fantom, hvor billederne blev analyseret med CD Rad software, og resultatet var en objektiv IQF værdi. Det humane fantom var et lamme pelvis med femur, der via NRPB’ er sammenlignelig med absorptionen ved et femårigt barn. De humane forsøgsbilleder blev...

  13. 'Sleeping with the enemy?' Expectations and reality in imaging children in the emergency setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Donald P.; Frush, Karen S.

    2008-01-01

    As an introduction to the ALARA conference titled ''Building Bridges between Radiology and Emergency Medicine: Consensus Conference on Imaging Safety and Quality for Children in the Emergency Setting,'' it is important for us to understand the landscapes of both the pediatric radiology and emergency medicine subspecialties. Recognizing potentially different practice patterns, including perspectives on pediatric care, as well as shared and sometimes unique professional pressures, can help us identify common concerns and problems and facilitate the development of strategies aimed at correcting these issues. (orig.)

  14. Situations of potential exposure in self-shielding electron accelerators; Situações de exposição potencial em aceleradores de elétrons autoblindados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, D.A.S.; Rios, P.B., E-mail: denise@inovafi.com.br [Inovafi Física aplicada à Inovação Ltda, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses situations in the industrial environment that may lead to potential exposure of Occupationally Exposed Individuals and Public Individuals in self-shielding electron accelerators. Although these exposure situations are unlikely, simulation exercises can lead to improvements in the operating procedure as well as suggest changes in production line design in order to increase radiation protection at work. These studies can also be used in training and demonstrate a solid application of the ALARA principle in the daily activities of radiative installations.

  15. Integration of Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, M.; Eggermont, G.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN initiated a programme to integrate social sciences into its scientific and technological projects. Activities were started on the following issues: (1) sustainable development; (2) ethics and decision making in nuclear waste management (transgenerational ethics/retrievability; socio-psychological aspect and local involvement); (3) law and liability (medical applications and the basic safety standards implementation); (4) decision making (emergency management); safety culture; ALARA and ethical choices in protection). Two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of the expert. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2001 are summarised

  16. Patient dose reduction during voiding cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Valerie L.

    2006-01-01

    Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) is a commonly performed examination in a pediatric uroradiology practice. This article contains suggestions on how the radiation dose to a child from VCUG can be made ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA). The pediatric radiologist should consider the appropriateness of the clinical indication before performing VCUG and utilize radiation exposure techniques and parameters during VCUG to reduce radiation exposure to a child. The medical physicist and fluoroscope manufacturer can also work together to optimize a pulsed-fluoroscopy unit and further reduce the radiation exposure. Laboratory and clinical research is necessary to investigate methods that reduce radiation exposures during VCUG, and current research is presented here. (orig.)

  17. Robotic filter handling at McGuire nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilley, J.R. Jr.; Twiggs, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The application of a robotics system for the packaging of radioactive spent filters was justified on the basis of radiation dose savings, i.e., ALARA considerations, and the benefits associated with defining additional applications of this technology once experienced is gained. This particular gantry-mounted manipulator system was chosen for its ease of relocation and potential use in other hazardous areas at the McGuire nuclear station. The initial investment is estimated to be recovered in 6 to 7 yr. The robotic system is on site at McGuire, with installation and bunker modifications currently scheduled for completion in 1988. Personnel training on the system will start shortly thereafter

  18. Air-cleaning philosophy in a nuclear-materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, F.Y.; Yoder, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant there is a major ventilation improvement project underway. To achieve the desired goals of ALARA regarding radioactivity and toxic material releases and natural phenomena insults, a comprehensive air-cleaning philosophy and policy statement was developed. Design of the upgraded systems were evaluated against these statements and we believe that upon completion of the projects that an efficient system will be demonstrated. the design permits reuse and heat recovery of ventilation air, the optimization of sampling points to reduce analytical laboratory services. This paper discusses the basis of the philosophy and the engineering features incorporated to meet this stated objective. Points of compromise are noted

  19. Radiation safety standards and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolina, E.P.; Ivanov, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation protection laws of Russia concerning medical application of ionizing radiation are considered. Main concepts of the documents and recommendations are presented. Attention was paid to the ALARA principle, safety standrds for paietients, personnel and population, radiation protection. Specific feature of the standardization of radiation factors is the establishment of two classes of norms: main dose limits and permissible levels. Maximum dose commitment is the main standard. Three groups of critical organs and three categories of the persons exposed to radiation are stated. Main requirements for radiation protection are shown

  20. How it can assist in compliance with the DOE`S new 10 CFR 835 and the NRC`S 10 CFR 20 regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.H. [NFS Radiation Protection Systems, Inc., Erwin, TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    With new government regulations on the horizon, advanced technology will become a necessity for the accurate assessment of air sampling data and maintaining internal dose ALARA. Bar coding is one advanced technology which has provided significant improvements in radiological air sampling. When combined with specific hardware and software, bar code technology can be used to automate procedures and enhance the data accuracy associated with air sampling in the workplace. This paper discusses some of the regulatory issues regarding radiological air sampling and describes how improved bar coded accountability techniques can assist in regulatory compliance.

  1. Proposed retrofit of HEPA filter plenums with injection and sampling manifolds for in-place filter testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fretthold, J.K. [EG& G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The importance of testing HEPA filter exhaust plenums with consideration for As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) will require that new technology be applied to existing plenum designs. HEPA filter testing at Rocky Flats has evolved slowly due to a number of reasons. The first plenums were built in the 1950`s, preceding many standards. The plenums were large, which caused air dispersal problems. The systems were variable air flow. Access to the filters was difficult. The test methods became extremely conservative. Changes in methods were difficult to make. The acceptance of new test methods has been made in recent years with the change in plant mission and the emphasis on worker safety.

  2. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberger, Jan; Schienbein, Marcel; Geier, Roland

    2010-01-01

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  3. Shielding considerations for an electron linear accelerator complex for high energy physics and photonics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.; Huntzinger, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation shielding considerations for a major high-energy physics and photonics research complex which comprise a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator injector, a 1.0 GeV electron linear accelerator and a 1.3 GeV storage ring are discussed. The facilities will be unique because of the close proximity of personnel to the accelerator beam lines, the need to adapt existing facilities and shielding materials and the application of strict ALARA dose guidelines while providing maximum access and flexibility during a phased construction program

  4. Radiation surveillance procedure during veterinary application of radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaldeep; Bhaktivinayagam, A.; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Radioisotopes have found wide applications in the field of biomedical veterinary nuclear medicine and research. Radiation safety issues during internal administration of radioisotopes to laboratory animals, unlike human use, are far more challenging and requires stringent, well planned and an organized system of radiation protection in the animal house facility. In this paper, we discuss our experience during veterinary research experiments involving use, handling and administration of liquid sources of 131 I. With extensive radiation protection surveillance and application of practical and essential radiation safety and hygiene practices, the radiation exposure and contamination levels during the veterinary application of isotopes can be kept ALARA

  5. Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korinko, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE

  6. 4. S.F.R.P. days on the optimization of radiation protection in the electronuclear, industrial and medical areas; 4. journees SFRP sur l'optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    These days are dedicated to the implementation of the radiation protection optimization in the activities of the electronuclear sector, of the industrial sector, the medical sector, the laboratories and the centers of research and the university sector. All the aspects of the practical application of the radiation protection optimization of the workers, the public and the patients will be approached. The oral communications and posters concern the following subjects: foundations of the optimization principle, new statutory context, transmission of ALARA principle, operational dosimetry, conception, operating and maintenance of the installations, the construction sites of dismantling, industrial radiology, radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  7. Contaminated sediment removal from a spent fuel storage canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    A leaking underground spent fuel transfer canal between a decommissioned reactor and a radiochemical separations building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was found to contain RCRA-hazardous and radioactive sediment. Closure of the Part B RCRA permitted facility required the use of an underwater robotic vacuum and a filtration-containment system to separate and stabilize the contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the radiological controls established to maintain contamination and exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) during the sediment removal

  8. Principles and guidelines for radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Four basic principles relevant to radioactive waste disposal identified. These principles cover the justification of the activity giving rise to the waste, the consideration of risk to present and future generations, the minimization of the need for intervention in the future, and the financial obligations of the licensee. The use of risk limits as opposed to dose limits associated with disposal is discussed, as are the concepts of critical group, de minimis, and ALARA, in the context of a waste disposal facility. Guidance is given on the selection of the preferred waste disposal concept from among several alternatives, and for judging proposed design improvements to the chosen concept

  9. Advances in Canadian regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, J.G.

    1993-03-01

    The new General Amendments to the Regulations, new recommendations on dose limits, developments in techniques and safety thinking, and aging of plant are all contributing to the need for a significant number of new regulatory document on a wide range of topics. this paper highlights a number of initiatives taken in response to these pressures, giving a brief background to the initiative and, where possible, outlining some of the ideas in the document licensing guides on new dose limits, dosimetry, safety analysis, reliability, fault tree analysis, reporting requirements, human factors, software, the ALARA principle, backfitting and the licensing process. (Author) 29 refs., fig., 4 tabs

  10. Radiation exposure to patients during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, J.M.; Robles, J.E.; Arbizu, J.; Castro, F. de; Berian, J.M.; Richter, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    We analyzed the radiological exposure to patients during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) using a second generator lithotriptor. Stone location is accomplished by fluoroscopy and 'quick pics' or snapshots. A prospective study over 55 patients showed a mean exposure of 32.2 R. The introduction of the ALARA criterion reduced it to 16.1 R in the following 145 patients. Mean radiation exposure to patient varies according to treatment difficulty. A mean increase of radiation exposure of 1.6 between low and high difficulty treatment groups was observed. This variation was about 96% when the physician who performed the treatment was considered. (author)

  11. A proposed framework for consistent regulation of public exposures to radionuclides and other carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for consistent regulation of carcinogenic risks to the public based on establishing de manifestis (i.e., unacceptable) and de minimis (i.e., trivial) lifetime risks from exposure to any carcinogens at levels of about 10 -1 --10 -3 and 10 -4 --10 -6 , respectively, and reduction of risks above de minimis levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). We then discuss certain differences in the way risks from exposure to radionuclides and other carcinogens currently are regulated or assessed which would need to be considered in implementing the proposed regulatory framework for all carcinogens

  12. Maintenance of BWR control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) replacement and rebuilding is one of the highest dose, most physically demanding, and complicated maintenance activities routinely accomplished by BWR utilities. A recent industry workshop sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which dealt with the effects of CRDM aging, revealed enhancements in maintenance techniques and tooling which have reduced ALARA, improved worker comfort and productivity, and have provided revised guidelines for CRDM changeout selection. Highlights of this workshop and ongoing research on CRDM aging are presented in this paper

  13. Proceedings of the 6. conference days on radioprotection optimization in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, Eric; Bernier, Marie-Odile; De Vita, Antoine; Pignot, Christine; Bardelay, Chantal; Godet, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Marie-Line; Saad, Nawal; Deboodt, Pascal P.A.; Faure, Sophie; Fusil, Laurence; Alvarez, Manuel; Tourneux, C.; Barbey, Pierre; Pigree, Gilbert; Lemarchand, Maxime; Buchaniec, Remi; Rocourt, Nathalie; Bouden, Helene; Lasselin, Stephanie; Moeneclaey, Ludivine; Rebullida, Delphine; Werquin, Marie Odile; Dubus, Francois; Ponsard, Samuel; Marques, Sophie; K-Zerho, R.; Vacher, F.; Vrammout, D.; Guillot, E.; Fucks, I.; Moukarzel, Marianne; Ryckx, Nick; Verdun, Francis R.; Lefaure, Christian; Balduyck, Sebastien; Cruz Suarez, Rodolfo; ); Bouvy, Christophe; Geets, Jean-Michel; Nactergal, Benoit; Davet, Laurent; Carlier, Pierre; Lereculey, Clement; Livolsi, Paul; PIN, Alain; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Le Faou, Yann; Courageot, Estelle; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Kutschera, Reinald; Le Meur, Gaelle; Lantheaume, Noel; Schiedts, Dominique; Nouveau, Philippe; Walterscheid, Bertrand; Humbert, Edouard; Tranchant, Philippe; Dabat-Blondeau, Charlotte; Renard, Francois; Lucas, Jean-Yves; Fritioff, Karin; Svedberg, Torgny; Carlson, Marie; Hennigor, Staffan; Schieber, Caroline; Andresz, Sylvain; Roch, Patrice; Celier, David; Aubert, Bernard; Etard, Cecile; Bouette, Aurelien; Carette, M.F.; Haddad, S.; Khalil, A.; Foulquier, J.N.; Parrot, A.; Ceyrolle, C.; Bechard, Pascal; Clero, E.; Leuraud, K.; Laurier, D.; Couzinet, M.; LE GUEN, B.; Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Franck, Didier; Quesne, Benoit; De Vita, Antoine; Chojnacki, Eric; Grandeau, E.; Dumont, N.; Cattelotte, J.; Dine, Pierre Emmanuel; Guersen, Joel; Nwatsock, Joseph Francis; Boyer, Louis; Karmouche, K.; Moyon, J.B.; Cassagnes, L.; Garcier, J.M.; Lortal, B.; Caron, J.; Karst, M.; Rage, Estelle; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine; Drubay, Damien; Ancelet, Sophie; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Sans, Philippe; Tournier, Helene; Zvorykin, Sonia

    2014-06-01

    This 6. ALARA conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) and several professional associations (ABR, AFPPE, ARRAD, ATSR, RAMIP, SFPM, SFR). The conference was the occasion to review all aspects relative to the issues of radioprotection optimization and to its implementation to workers, patients and the public in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains. A particular attention must be given to the application of the ALARA principle in all sectors relevant to radioprotection, especially in a context characterized by: big dismantling works under preparation in the French nuclear park, an increased use of X-radiation in the medical domain - involving both patients and medical personnel, new knowledge concerning the health effects of ionizing radiations, and an evolution of European and international radioprotection safety standards. All these aspects were discussed during these conference days. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Review of the evolution of workers/patients exposure in France and comparison with international data (E. Vial); 2 - Status of low dose epidemiology (M.O. Bernier); 3 - Radioprotection optimization method at the MELOX plant (A. De Vita); 4 - Elaboration method for the annual dosimetric objective of the French nuclear park (C. Pignot); 5 - Optimisation principle in the new EURATOM Directive (N. Saad); 6 - Integrated management of radiological and non-radiological risks: the inevitable challenge (P. Deboodt); 7 - Radiological and conventional risks: the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) integrated approach (S. Faure); 8 - EVEREST (Evolving towards an entry into controlled areas in street clothes, M. Alvarez); 9 - Example of multi-risk management in the medical domain (C. Tourneux); 10 - Radioprotection optimisation in the research domain (P. Barbey); 11 - Child scanning dosimetry

  14. The workers and public radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Roupioz, A.; Rabu, B.

    2003-01-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  15. Shall we be afraid by ionizing radiations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.

    1996-01-01

    A conference about ionizing radiations and the frighten they provoke was organised on the 30 May 1996 at Lyon in France. A responsible of the radiotherapy-oncology service, of the hospital center of Lyon, answered. The low doses are without effects on organs, for pregnant women if the dose is higher than 200 milli sieverts, abortion is advised; in fact the principle frighten is the carcinogens risk; the norms recommended by ICRP are to maintain the radiations doses in the a level as low as reasonably achievable. (ALARA principle)

  16. Imaging and concomitant dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    Image guidance in radiotherapy now involves multiple imaging procedures for planning, simulation, set-up inter and intrafraction monitoring. Presently ALARA (i.e. as low as reasonable achievable) is the principle of management of dose to radiation workers and patients in any diagnostic imaging procedures including image guided surgery. The situation is different in repeated radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging performed for simulation, dose planning, patient positioning and set-up corrections during preparation/execution of Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) as well as for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). Reported imaging and concomitant doses will be highlighted and discussed for the management and optimization of imaging techniques in IMRT and IGRT

  17. High Level Waste plant operation and maintenance concepts. Final report, March 27, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    The study reviews and evaluates worldwide High Level Waste (HLW) vitrification operating and maintenance (O ampersand M) philosophies, plant design concepts, and lessons learned with an aim towards developing O ampersand M recommendations for either, similar implementation or further consideration in a HLW vitrification facility at Hanford. The study includes a qualitative assessment of alternative concepts for a variety of plant and process systems and subsystems germane to HLW vitrification, such as, feed materials handling, melter configuration, glass form, canister handling, failed equipment handling, waste handling, and process control. Concept evaluations and recommendations consider impacts to Capital Cost, O ampersand M Cost, ALARA, Availability, and Reliability

  18. Construction of pilot system for the Korea information system of occupational exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Seong Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Il; Im, Bok Soo; Lee, Seon Mi; Kim, Hyung Uk; Chae, Eun Yeong [ADDLAB Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    In this study, the construction of Korea Information System of Occupational Exposure (KISOE) system is designed with occupational exposure control system based on information evaluation technology and it makes the reliability of the personal exposure by use of personal dose verification. While the operation of national based radiation worker protection system, this system are settled the control system for radiation worker and ALARA. The purpose of construction and operation of pilot system of KISOE systematically is to derive the master plan of KISOE, stable development of this system, and serve the high quality radiation use internationally.

  19. The workers and public radiation protection; La radioprotection des travailleurs et du public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), Lab. d' Analyses Medicales et de Radiotoxicologie, SCAST, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Roupioz, A. [Electricite de France (EDF Industrie), DPN, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Rabu, B. [CEA Cadarache, Lab. de Transfert de Contamination, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  20. IPR 2016. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-05-15

    The volume on the meeting of pediatric radiology includes abstract on the following issues: chest, cardiovascular system, neuroradiology, CT radiation DRs (diagnostic reference levels) and dose reporting guidelines, genitourinary imaging, gastrointestinal radiology, oncology an nuclear medicine, whole body imaging, fetal/neonates imaging, child abuse, oncology and hybrid imaging, value added imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, dose and radiation safety, imaging children - immobilization and distraction techniques, information - education - QI and healthcare policy, ALARA, the knowledge skills and competences for a technologist/radiographer in pediatric radiology, full exploitation of new technological features in pediatric CT, image quality issues in pediatrics, abdominal imaging, interventional radiology, MR contrast agents, tumor - mass imaging, cardiothoracic imaging, ultrasonography.