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Sample records for alara

  1. Alara in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews how the general frameworks of the ALARA procedures, ALARA Audits and Predictive ALARA Plans can be used in the non-nuclear power sector to give practical effect to the concept of optimization. The development of the use of ALARA Audits as an integral part of a Radiation Protection Adviser service and our experience of this structured approach is described. Particular attention is drawn to the use of site specific reference levels to trigger graded levels of response to increasing doses. Also several examples of the use of Cost Benefit Analysis within the ALARA Procedure are briefly described

  2. ALARA development in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though the ALARA philosophy was formally implemented in the early 1980's, to some extent, ALARA considerations already had been incorporated into the design of most commercial equipment and facilities based on experience and engineering development. In Mexico, the design of medical and industrial facilities were based on international recommendations containing those considerations. With the construction of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station, formal ALARA groups were created to review some parts of its design, and to prepare the ALARA Program and related procedures necessary for its commercial operation. This paper begins with a brief historical description of ALARA development in Mexico, and then goes on to discuss our regulatory frame in Radiation Protection, some aspects of the ALARA Program, efforts in controlling and reducing of sources of radiation, and finally, future perspectives in the ALARA field

  3. Alara and decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In applying ALARA somebody has to determine what is reasonable. A decision has to be made. Decision Analysis is a procedure for structuring decision problems, and therefore it might be expected to be of use in the application of the ALARA principle. This paper explores the contribution that Decision Analysis may make in this context, particularly discussing the application of multi-attribute value theory. An example of using the theory on a problem of radioactive waste disposal is given, and the potential of an increased use of Decision Analysis in making the ALARA principle work, is discussed

  4. What is ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy as it applies to personnel radiation exposure has been with us for a long time. The essential tenets of this philosophy surfaced quite early in the history of the Manhattan Project. Although the terminology has suffered through various translations and the application has seen many organizations and agencies come and go, the principles remain as valid today as ever. It is regretable that some regulatory agencies claim ALARA as their newfound miracle drug and that application according to their prescriptions will result in endless rounds of cyclical improvement in radiation protection practices. Others have taken advantage of the popularity of ALARA and have bastardized the philosophy to mean whatever is expedient for their purposes. In this paper, we review briefly the history of ALARA and what it seemingly means to different interest groups and offer a balanced viewpoint that health physicists should adopt

  5. ALARA training at INSTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990 the CEPN, the National Radiological Protection Board and the INSTN organized for the first time in Europe one teaching specifically established to radioprotection optimization. This training has allowed to spread the experience of the best european specialists while guaranteeing a wide exchange between the participants coming from different countries. At the national level the training ALARA goes on at the INSTN-Saclay. Its aim is to give base notions, the methods and the tools allowing the implementation of the ALARA concept, and to privilege the exchange between the participants coming from different horizons. 2 refs., 2 figs

  6. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI's low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan

  7. ALARA: Progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has two main topics. The first part describes the establishment and work of the ALARA Center; the second part presents some results of studies at the Center with international data on doses at PWR plants. This data then is used to reach a preliminary understanding of some of the factors that are causing high doses at PWRs. This approach should help in reducing occupational exposures in a more effective manner

  8. Applied ALARA techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work

  9. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials

  10. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-06-06

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

  11. Gentilly - 2 NGS ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a slide-based oral presentation given to the COG/IAEA: Fifth technical committee meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors' held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. The operation experience of Gentilly -1 and Gentilly - 2 nuclear power stations is summarized. The radiation protection philosophy is addressed, the orange/yellow/green RP qualifications are explained and the ALARA Program objectives are described. The criteria used to develop the Gentilly - 2 station ALARA Program are presented. The program is based on: strong Hydro Quebec commitments, organization (responsibilities well defined); ALARA Committee; tools; procedures; good documentation. Description of the program is given then in details. Measures for dose and radioactive sources reduction are presented. Collective doses recorded at Gentilly - 2 between 1984 and 1997 are plotted and figures are given in a table

  12. Education and training for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of ALARA or the optimisation of Radiation Protection is an important feature of the task of the Radiation Protection Professionals. The teaching of the subject is an equally important part of the education and training curriculum. This paper commences with a general view of the educational process and concludes with specific comments on the educational needs. The concept of ALARA is suggested to be central to the safety culture of radiation protection practice. It is considered to be a part of the scientific culture which is well recognised but not well understood. These topics are reviewed and the conclusions applied to a proposal for a syllabus for the teaching of ALARA and this is compared with the content of courses on the subject. (Author)

  13. Accountability system ALARA/optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report makes part of a series of eight reports which have been drawn up in behalf of the dutch Policy Notition Radiation Standards (BNS). The aim of the project with which this report deals, is to assess an accountability system for application of ALARA (As Low As Reasonable Achievable)/optimisation and from these forthcoming bottlenecks. Herein (for this subproject) ALARA is defined as optimization of radiation protection below a risk limit which is to be assessed in another framework. In ch. 2 this discussed further. First it is indicated which categories applications/activities are to be distinguished. Then the elements of the accountability system are elaborated further. In ch. 3 a discussion is given of the actual legislation, the actual policy (national and international), the practice developed with regard to ALARA/optimization and the boundary condition forthcoming from these. In ch. 4 finally the results of ch. 2 are enlightened upon governmental consequences against the background of the actual situation, outlined in ch. 3. In behalf of the insight in the actual practice of ALARA/optimization and the governmental consequences of the in ch. 2 elaborated system interviews have been made with radiation-protection specialists. These are summarized in appendix 2. (H.W.)

  14. Catawba nuclear station preoperational ALARA review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the particular emphasis placed on preoperational as los as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations at Duke Power's Catawba Nuclear Station. A strong station commitment to the ALARA philosophy, and review of existing capabilities, led to development of an aggressive two-part ALARA program. Capabilities consisted of sufficient numbers of available personnel, lengthy lead time during construction, a very detailed plastic model, and a sister plant of similar design. The program, as developed, consisted of a preoperational program, which looked at design and construction aspects of ALARA, and the operational program, dealing with the ALARA committee and operational problems. MAnagement's philosophy of holding everyone responsible for ALARA provided the motivation to organize the preoperational program to use that resource. The Health Physics group accepted responsibility for development, coordination, and reviewer training. The problem provided a base to build on as station personnel gained experience in their own crafts and radiation protection in general

  15. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA

  16. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA.

  17. Integrating ALARA into work planning and organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents various organizational structures and systematic approaches that can be of benefit in integrating ALARA into work planning and organization. It is possible to have elegant policy statements, procedures and organizations and yet fail to implement ALARA effectively. The real key to success in ALARA work management is to recognize that ALARA is primarily a way of thinking and to secure the commitment of individuals at all levels within the organization, from senior management to workers carrying out specific tasks. The authors explain that the recommendations of ICRP Publication 60 will have an impact and will maintain the downward pressure on individual doses. 6 figs

  18. Chernobyl information: The ALARA backlash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk information to the public failed after the Chernobyl accident, also in countries where radiation protection authorities and experts initially enjoyed public confidence. In contrast to many other large accidents, the responsibility for the information failure stays mainly with the authorities and experts themselves, not with the mass media. Many factors together caused the radiation risk information from SSI (Swedish Radiation Protection Institute), and its sister authorities in many other countries, to be confusing and inadequate, despite the best of intentions. The two major malefactors were the handling of food contamination restrictions and the short-sighted risk optimisation by applying the ALARA principle. In addition, the assurance that the Chernobyl contamination was fairly harmless made no sense to the layman, as a massive array of controlling procedures was enforced simultaneously. The food regulations became unfortunately focused on becquerel per kilogram limits instead of the primary goal, a dose reduction per year, corresponding to an yearly intake of Cs-137. The lesson learned is that the risk significant long-term intake ambition must be understood and digested by laymen and media, before any secondary limits, e.g. the activity concentration of foodstuffs expressed as becquerel per kg, for controlling or trading purposes, are introduced. As it were, the experts and authorities lost credibility, due to what people considered as ambiguities. The concept of ALARA (As Low As Readily Achievable) is in the backbone of every ionising radiation expert, and a useful strategy for optimising dose burdens during controlled situations. In connection to the Chernobyl accident many advices to the public was given based on the ALARA principle. 'Rinse leafy vegetables' sounds at first very reasonable, cheap and innocent, but if the averted dose is low, such an advice should not be given. The individual dose-reduction should be weighted against all negative

  19. ALARA and planning of interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of ALARA programs implies integration of radiation protection criterion at all stages of outage management. Within the framework of its ALARA policy, Electricide de France (EDF) has given an incentive to all of its nuclear power plants to develop open-quotes good practicesclose quotes in this domain, and to exchange their experience by the way of a national feed back file. Among the developments in the field of outage organization, some plants have focused on the planning stage of activities because of its influence on the radiological conditions of interventions and on the good succession of tasks within the radiological controlled areas. This paper presents the experience of Chinon nuclear power plant. At Chinon, we are pursuing this goal through careful outage planning. We want the ALARA program during outages to be part of the overall maintenance task planning. This planning includes the provision of the availability of every safety-related component, and of the variations of water levels in hthereactor and steam generators to take advantage of the shield created by the water. We have developed a computerized data base with the exact position of all the components in the reactor building in order to avoid unnecessary interactions between different tasks performed in the same room. A common language between Operation and Maintenance had been established over the past years, using open-quotes Milestones and Corridorsclose quotes. A real time dose rate counting system enables the Radiation Protection (RP) Department to do an accurate and efficient follow up during the outage for all the open-quotes ALARAclose quotes maintenance tasks

  20. Savannah River Site ALARA Program appraisals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    ALARA Program audits are recommended in PNL-6566, ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).`` The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11, ``Radiation Protection For Occupational Workers,`` requires contractors to conduct internal audits of all functional elements of the radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, as often as necessary, but at a minimum every three years. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), these required audits are performed as part of the Health Protection Internal Appraisal Program. This program was established to review the Site radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, on an ongoing basis and to provide recommendations for improvement directly to senior Health Protection management. This paper provides an overview of the SRS Health Protection Internal Appraisal program. In addition, examples of specific performance criteria and detailed appraisal guidelines used ALARA appraisals are provided.

  1. Preliminary ALARA design concept for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is a space saving integral type nuclear rector with the thermal power of 330 MW. This report provides general design guide and authority in NSSS designs for SMART needed to maintain the occupational doses and doses to members of public ALARA to meet the regulatory requirements. Paragraph 20.1 of 10 CFR 20, ''Standards for Protection Against Radiation'', states that licensee should make every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the limits specified in Part 20 as is reasonably achievable. The ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle is incorporated into Korean radiation protection law as paragraph one Article 97 of the Atomic Energy Act. (Jan. 1995). This ALARA Design Concept for SMART provides 1) description of the organization and responsibilities needed for upper level management support and authority in order for the implementation of ALARA, 2) guidance and procedures for design, review, and evaluation needed for SMART ALARA program implementation, 3) general design guidelines for SMART NSSS and BOP designers to implement ALARA principles in design stage, and 4) training and instruction requirement of SMART NSSS and BOP designers for the familiarization of ALARA principles to be implemented in NSSS designs. (Author). 4 refs., 1 tabs

  2. Alara - from theory towards practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alara principle states that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. It is a simple concept - the idea behind it is widely used in nearly all spheres of life, i.e. to do the best one can under the given circumstances. This book aims to help define what is meant by best in the context of radiation protection. It describes a procedure that is useful in structuring one's approach to any particular situation where a decision as to the best course of action is required. It also provides practical guidance on how the concept can be incorporated into radiation protection programmes. This book has been written as a reference manual on both the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject. But it is especially targeted at those involved in radiation protection at the practical level

  3. Can practical ALARA be taught?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Purpose: Outside of the nuclear industry, many users of sources of ionising radiation may be characterised as 'High Frequency/Low Dose' users. It is argued here that they have special training requirements in order to understand the ICRP concept ALARA, indeed all the fundamental concepts of radiological protection and their relevance to the workplace. It is not practicable to practise dose avoidance in many situations so dose reduction becomes even more important. For example, laboratory life sciences researchers often have to use very small quantities and activities of beta emitting radioisotopes which give small or minuscule external doses to well trained workers but can give extremely serious high doses if mishandled Similarly, dentists routinely use 60- 100 kV X-ray generators to diagnose abnormalities and disease which other techniques would fail to detect. By practising simple and effective dose reduction methods, they can reduce the dose to themselves and their patients to arguably trivial levels. Method: The paper will use examples from Radiation Protection Supervisors courses run over the past 6 years for UK pharmaceutical companies and research into courses for general dental practitioners run over the past 8 years in East Anglia, England. The latter courses must meet the requirements laid down in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 and the requirements of the professional dental association, the British Dental Council, and the continuing professional development requirements of the dental registration body, the General Dental Council. Major Findings and Conclusions: The research findings show an urgent need to train dental practitioners in the concepts and practical aspects of dose avoidance and dose minimisation, social and economic factors being considered. Pharmaceutical company research Radiation Protection Supervisors are generally well trained but also need to know the practical implications of the ALARA principle

  4. Maintaining occupational dose ALARA through work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadian philosophy in keeping occupational dose ALARA has been to train staff in radiation safety so that they can be fully responsible for participating in minimizing the risks associated with the hazardous work. Senior managers actively promote high standards of performance in dose reduction techniques as a means for integrating ALARA into the operation and maintenance of the station by all personnel. Minimizing radiation dose is accomplished by applying cost effective work management techniques such as Job Safety Analysis, pre-job briefings and establishing and achieving radiation dose goals. Radiation dose goals are used as a management tool for involving all work groups in reducing doses as well as providing a means of assessing the effectiveness of dose reduction actions. ALARA, along with conventional safety, is used as a lever to raise the standard of quality of work and to overall build a safety culture. (author). 4 figs

  5. Experience of implementing ALARA outside the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the structured approach of ALARA Audits can help judgements on whether the ALARA principle has been implemented. The development of ALARA Audits, their integration into a nationwide Radiation Protection Adviser service to the non nuclear power sector, and the experience of their use are described. (author)

  6. New influences on the ALARA concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA concept is an essential component of an occupational radiation protection program because the fatality risk associated with continued exposure at or near the 5-rems/year limit is unacceptably high. Using a risk coefficient of 4 x 10-4 fatalities/person-rem the risk for a large worker population exposed in this manner for a working lifetime would be 10%. The ICRP fatality risk criterion is an average of 1 per year per 10 thousand workers. The average annual dose that would achieve this objective depends on the risk coefficient used. Using 4 x 10-4 again, the annual dose average would have to be 0.25 rem, a factor of 20 below the limit. It is evident that the ALARA concept is the most important aspect of occupational radiation protection and that the justification for an effective ALARA program is the cancer fatality risk. Not quite so evident but nonetheless important is the consideration that once the ICRP criterion is achieved, it is probably int eh best interest of the workforce to use resources available for their health and safety to reduce other risks. In this paper the risk information under examination by the government agencies is reviewed from the viewpoint of dose reduction through enhanced implementation of the occupational ALARA concept

  7. Radiation exposure management - The Westinghouse ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse has incorporated radiation management into the design of its NSSS plants. This paper describes the Westinghouse program for incorporating As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure into the design process. A description is given of the method of collecting data from operating Westinghouse plants. The analysis of this data and its use in the total NSSS plant exposure estimate is presented. Application of a detailed exposure review to the development of an improved mechanical component is described. A particular exposure review for a refueling task is discussed. One high exposure task is detailed and specific design improvements are identified. The disadvantages of the existing design are expressed and design improvements are suggested. The matrix management of the team that develops the improved design is described and the resulting product is presented. The specific example is used to illustrate the operation of the Westinghouse ALARA program

  8. ALARA in the radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This part treats especially the question of the training in radiation protection. The electro nuclear sector has given an ALARA principle culture and succeeded to sensitize each level of hierarchy, but for small industry, the research and the medical world the same method appears more difficult to use. It seems better to reinforce the importance of the competent person and to include a training in radiation protection on the initial formation in numerous professional categories. (N.C.)

  9. ALARA application in Spanish NPP's. New approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One main objective of all nuclear installations is to underlie the principle of optimization. The focus in the application of this principle varies considerably, from cost-benefit techniques in the design phases to commitment, attitude and motivation in operation. The ALARA principle should permeate the entire organisation of the company during operation. Management should be the first link of a chain originating with explicit corporate commitment, leading to increasingly specific decisions, finally to reach those who are responsible for actual performance of each task. The safety culture is an element integrating the mentality that is to prevail throughout the organisation. The organisation shall contribute to incorporating the principle of optimization in all plant operations and all phases of activity. Management's commitment and motivation are transferred to all the workers and organisations involved. The ALARA commitment naturally extends to all outside organisations. The ultimate objective is to reduce collective doses through the promotion and enforcing of an ALARA culture and compliance with the operating collective dose objectives. (author)

  10. ALARA Review of the SHAARS Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHARS mobile hot cell was designed and manufactured by Necsa intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) from teletherapy units, gamma irradiators and brachytherapy units. This unit is to be used in countries with no remote infrastructure to handle SHARS. The hot cell was designed for a 3.7E+13Bq (1000Ci) activity although it was demonstrated that it can handle even more than 7.4E+13Bq (2000Ci). The unit has a biological shield which consists of river sand sandwiched between metal plates and a viewing window filled with 50% zinc bromide solution. The unit was designed to provide sufficient shielding to ensure that doses are kept ALARA (As low As Reasonably Achieved). This paper compares the modelled dose rates with the actual measured doses during operations conducted in Sudan, Tanzania and Uruguay. It also presents the key lessons learned in the application of the ALARA principle during the SHARS missions. The new working practices and additional methods are proposed in order to reduce doses in accordance with the ALARA principle. (author)

  11. The Alara principle in backfitting Borssele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive backfitting program, the Modifications Project, was carried out at the Borssele Nuclear Power Station. It involved sixteen modifications to technical systems. The scope of activities, and the dose rates encountered in places where work was to be performed, made it obvious from the outset that a high collective dose had to be anticipated. As a consequence, radiation protection within the project was organized in such a way that applicable radiation protection principles were applied in all phases of the project. From the point of view of radiation protection, the Modifications Project had to be subdivided into three phases, i.e., a conceptual design phase in which mainly the justification principle was applied; the engineering phase in which the Alara principle was employed; the execution phase in which management of the (internal) dose limits had to be observed in addition to the Alara principle. Throughout all project phases, radiation protection considerations and results were documented in so-called Alara reports and radiation protection checklists. As a result of the strictest possible observance of radiation protection principles in all phases of the project, a collective dose of 2505 mSv was achieved, which stands for a reduction by a factor of 4 compared to the very first estimate. In view of the scope and complex nature of the activities involved, and the radiation levels in the Borssele Nuclear Power Station, this is an excellent result. (orig.)

  12. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. [comps.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  13. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. (comps.)

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  14. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  15. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the second in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography may be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center. These abstracts, which have a bearing on dose reduction, consolidates information from publications pertinent to Radiological Engineers and Operational Health Physicists. Volume 2 contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195 as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface

  16. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, is the second in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a specific focus towards DOE facilities. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste; uranium enrichment; fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing; facility decommissioning; hot laboratories; tritium production; research, test and production reactors; weapons fabrication and testing; and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics has also been included. This volume (Volume 2 of the series) contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195, as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center

  17. ALARA at Tyco Health care-Mallinckrodt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to approach the ALARA requirement? That was one of the question in the beginning of the 1990's at the Mallinckrodt site for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This question was raised after the ICRP published their guidelines in the ICRP 60 publication, with the average effective dose limit that was changed from 50 to 20 mSv per year. In the early 1990's the individual effective dose at Mallinckrodt was up to 20 mSv7year and some of the people over this number. As a first result of the discussion Mallinckrodt adopted the 20 mSv/year as being the legal limit, although it finally took over a decade to incorporate this ICRP limit into legislation. A second action was to introduce a site internal limit: if a person would exceed 75% of the legal limit, the person would be restrained from radiation work. This restriction forced everybody to look for solutions to decrease dose and area dose rate. This was the beginning and resulted in nobody exceeding 15 mSv/year after a couple of years and a lower average dose than before, with no extra employees. The second stage in the process of ALARA was a systematic approach of the decrease in personal dose. This systematic approach consists of three phases. The first phase is dose assessment followed by routine measurements. The third phase is the ALARA step. First phase, dose assessment. Normally this could be done in a meeting or even behind the desk: assess the dose per department or per group or per activity. Make a decision on which party will get high priority, medium priority and low priority. Normally this means that the department with the highest dose will get the highest priority. (Author)

  18. Maintenance and radioprotection: the implementation of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing maintenance works on reactors has incited Electricite de France (EDF) to adopt a dosimetry optimization policy using the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Reactor maintenance represents 80% of the personnel exposures. This paper described the actions taken by EDF to improve the personnel (EDF and contractors) training and surveillance (medical examination, film dosemeters..) and the labor laws relative to the contractors and temporary employees. Other tools developed by EDF, such as robots, remote handling equipments, and a computerized individual and collective dosimetry database are described. (J.S.). 2 figs

  19. Strengthening ALARA approach in work management at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) occupational exposures at nuclear power plants should be included in work management as a concept. There are world-wide trends required by the utilities for improved design, operation and maintenance. Within the period of seventeen years of plant operation maintaining low radiation exposures requires additional efforts. The benefit of this effort should be reducing risks to nuclear workers, better work planning and performance. The Krsko Plant ALARA organisations has been revised recently and built on different levels of the hierarchy. The goal is to promote good industry practice and the management of work on primary systems. The established ALARA programme describes the objectives and defines the procedures and tools for its implementation. Brief presentation of the programme as well as organisational responsibilities of dedicated ALARA committee and working groups is the scope of this paper. The management tools and ALARA indicators are discussed to implement the programme and to evaluate the results.(author)

  20. Towards the development of an ALARA culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA principle, which states, for each exposure situation, that doses must be kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable, taking into account economic and social factors' represents the basis of the > developed to manage the radiological risk in a responsible manner. The practical implementation of the ALARA principle is complex. It requires defining transaction mechanisms which enable a responsible management of the radiological risk, taking into account, among other things, possible risk transfers in groups and the allocation of protection resources. The players who can take part in radiological risk management are numerous and have different functions: from the authorities to exposed workers, together with company managers. They all possess specific knowledge and have objectives which are not necessarily compatible. The transactions and negotiations initiated between these players during decision-taking relative to exposure management will therefore only be efficient and productive if there exists both a mutual comprehension of individual objectives and a readiness to collaborate on a common objective: keeping the residual risk at a level both acceptable to, and accepted by, the various parties involved. A fundamental element of this process therefore lies in the development among the various players concerned of a common culture with respect to radiological risks and the methods used for their management, in order to facilitate transactions by the sharing of a common language and system of values. A possible definition of > could be: >. Based on this statement, the paper presents, illustrated by the experience of the French Utility Electricite de France, the main components which should enter into consideration for the development of an ALARA culture for the management of occupational exposures. It concludes on the necessity to construct and transmit a common patrimony of a radiological risk management system comprising the scientific and technical knowledge

  1. Comments on two American justice decisions founded on ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the ALARA principle in the American justice is considered as a very important part of the law in evolution. The first decision called 'James decision' was the case of a worker who received a dose under the dose limit and was agreed in his demand. The second one,'Three Miles Island decision', was to refuse the ALARA principle as a norm because it would consider that the justice is more able to pilot a nuclear power plant than competent authorities. These two examples show that the ALARA principle must stay an operational guide and not a legal norm of precautions susceptible to impose sanctions by justice. (N.C.)

  2. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Nelsen, D P

    2002-01-01

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygien...

  3. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and

  4. World class ALARA performance at Darlington Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 2008, Darlington Nuclear was selected by Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) North American Technical Center to receive the 2007 World Class ALARA Performance Award for setting and achieving high standards in radiation protection. The purpose of this presentation is to share some of the station's successes and challenges in reducing dose to operation and maintenance personnel. In particular, the following dose reduction initiatives will be discussed: - Innovative shielding design including the use of water shielding walls for on-line airlock maintenance, tungsten shielding blocks for feeder replacement, and exposure reduction for horizontal flux detectors - Use of remote monitoring array to scan reactor face for hot spots to reduce dose and save critical path time - Tritium reduction through improvements in human performance, outage scheduling and introduction of new technology With increasing work scope associated with maintenance, refurbishment and retro-fit activities, there is an upward pressure on collective dose making it a critical resource for many inspection and maintenance work groups. There is a need to reduce radiation source terms as a lasting solution to address ever-increasing collective dose. Darlington's long term strategic goals to reduce tritium and gamma source terms and a bold vision for the future will be discussed. (author)

  5. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining

  6. The optimization (ALARA) problem: A direct formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative method to that set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for implementing the optimization (ALARA) principle of radiation protection is proposed. The method follows directly from the basic dose limitation system and naturally integrates the three components of the system. An essential feature of the method is that 'all exposures' is taken to mean 'each and every one' rather than the 'sum of individual doses', as in the usual method using the collective dose concept. The method draws on established techniques from optimization theory and those aspects of micro-economic theory which form the basis of cost-benefit analysis. The method takes separate account of both the direct costs to the community of the effects of radiation exposures and each individual's 'risk-benefit' attitudes to radiation exposures. The conundrum concerning the 'value of a life' turns out to be operationally and quantitatively irrelevant. Various constraints including the dose limits, economic and social constraints and natural physical constraints are included in the method which leads directly to a standard form problem in mathematical programming. A practical advantage of the method is that it is conceptually consistent with the operational methods used and judgements made regularly by health physicists and radiation safety officers. While the proposed method allows an optimization problem to be readily specified, it does require some familiarity with optimization solution techniques in larger applications. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs

  7. Incremental ALARA cost/benefit computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commonwealth Edison Company has developed and is testing an enhanced Fortran Computer Program to be used for cost/benefit analysis of Radiation Reduction Projects at its six nuclear power facilities and Corporate Technical Support Groups. This paper describes a Macro-Diven IBM Mainframe Program comprised of two different types of analyses-an Abbreviated Program with fixed costs and base values, and an extended Engineering Version for a detailed, more through and time-consuming approach. The extended engineering version breaks radiation exposure costs down into two components-Health-Related Costs and Replacement Labor Costs. According to user input, the program automatically adjust these two cost components and applies the derivation to company economic analyses such as replacement power costs, carrying charges, debt interest, and capital investment cost. The results from one of more program runs using different parameters may be compared in order to determine the most appropriate ALARA dose reduction technique. Benefits of this particular cost / benefit analysis technique includes flexibility to accommodate a wide range of user data and pre-job preparation, as well as the use of proven and standardized company economic equations

  8. Computer code for quantitative ALARA evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A FORTRAN computer code has been developed to simplify the determination of whether dose reduction actions meet the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) criterion. The calculations are based on the methodology developed for the Atomic Industrial Forum. The code is used for analyses of eight types of dose reduction actions, characterized as follows: reduce dose rate, reduce job frequency, reduce productive working time, reduce crew size, increase administrative dose limit for the task, and increase the workers' time utilization and dose utilization through (a) improved working conditions, (b) basic skill training, or (c) refresher training for special skills. For each type of action, two analysis modes are available. The first is a generic analysis in which the program computes potential benefits (in dollars) for a range of possible improvements, e.g., for a range of lower dose rates. Generic analyses are most useful in the planning stage and for evaluating the general feasibility of alternative approaches. The second is a specific analysis in which the potential annual benefits of a specific level of improvement and the annual implementation cost are compared. The potential benefits reflect savings in operational and societal costs that can be realized if occupational radiation doses are reduced. Because the potential benefits depend upon many variables which characterize the job, the workplace, and the workers, there is no unique relationship between the potential dollar savings and the dose savings. The computer code permits rapid quantitative analyses of alternatives and is a tool that supplements the health physicist's professional judgment. The program output provides a rational basis for decision-making and a record of the assumptions employed

  9. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3A, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Policy that radiation doses should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ''ALARA Principle of radiation protection,'' maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA Principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater positive impact on health and safety. The objective of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ALARA/Contamination Control Improvement Project (CCIP) Program is to manage and control exposures (both individual and collective) to the work force, the general public, and the environment to levels as low as is reasonable using the aforementioned ALARA Principle

  10. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance

  11. Experiences in ALARA application: 7th parade of maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The achieved experience with these activities, and all the carried out during the seventh stop but that they are not included here, carried to take a serie of decisions in the ALARA group, of which can be mentioned the following: 1. Definition of goals of collective dose and singular for works, to complete the ALARA commitment toward the occupational exposure personnel of the CLV. 2. To analyze the obtained information, as quick as possible, for using it in similar situations of work (to normalize the obtained results, when this is possible. 3. To coordinate the activities in those that participate different work groups with the end of not hindering the development of the same ones. 4. To establish ALARA responsibles of the works to fulfill functions of: pursuit of the work and information to the workers for their safety

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA Report for Calendar Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1993 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, and skin contaminations. The collective whole-body radiation dose to employees during 1993 was 0.58 person-sievert (58 person-rem). This dose was 11 percent lower than the projected dose of 0.65 person-sievert (65 person-rem). The Radiation Protection Section's Field Dosimetry Services group projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 0.02 sievert (2 rem) based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the limit by the end of CY 1993. There were 15 reported cases of skin contamination for PNL employees during 1993. This number of 60 percent of the projected total of 25 cases. There were an additional 21 cases of personal-effects contamination to PNL staff: Nine of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building, nine occurred at the 325 Building, one occurred in the 327 Building, one occurred in the 3720 Building, and one occurred in the 326 Building. Line management set numerous challenging and production ALARA goals for their facilities. Appendix A describes the final status of the 1993 ALARA goals. Appendix B describes the radiological ALARA goals for 1994. The Radiation Protection Section of the Laboratory Safety Dept. routinely perform audits of radiological ALARA requirements for specific facilities with significant potential for exposure. These ALARA audits are part of a comprehensive safety audit of the facility, designed to evaluate and improve total safety performance

  13. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygiene with the tools necessary to implement an integrated safety program. The establishment of tools and processes capable of sustaining a comprehensive safety program represents a key responsibility of industrial hygiene. Fluor Hanford has built integrated safety management around three programmatic attributes: (1) Integration of radiological, chemical and ergonomic issues under a single program. (2) Continuous improvement in routine communications among work planning/scheduling, job execution and management. (3) Rapid response to changing work conditions, formalized work planning and integrated worker involvement

  14. VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning and communication tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human operations are required in nuclear installation, during maintenance, outage, repair and decommissioning. This leads to the exposure of the worker to radiation. It is clear that these operations must be performed according to the ALARA principle (to reduce the dose As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The person responsible for planning the job needs to evaluate different scenarios based on the exposure of the worker. This involves the manipulation of a lot of information specific to the work place such as the geometry, materials, radiological and technical boundary conditions to assess the dose. A lot of communication between the ALARA stakeholders is needed during this pre-job study. A communication that can be cumbersome and tedious when based on written documents and paper plans. The use of 3D calculation and simulation tools provide a solution to this problem. They provide an excellent means to make the above mentioned process more efficient and effective by calculating and visualising the environment and the associated radiological risk. The VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool is developed and designed by SCK-CEN as a dose assessment tool enabling the user to calculate the dose in a 3D environment for work scenarios. This software is very successful in the ALARA field. At present 22 companies in Europe use the VISIPLAN software in the field of dose assessment in maintenance and decommissioning. Recent developments and applications are discussed

  15. ALARA review for the 202-S plutonium loadout hood stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposures, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting stabilization of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility plutonium loadout hood and associated piping, and the isolation of the ER-8 ventilation system

  16. Designing plants for ALARA-revelation or evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author traces the Duke Nuclear program from the late 1960s to today. He then looks at the future. The primary goal, he says, should be to continue to reduce individual exposure in order to reduce total station, industry exposure. In order to accomplish this goal in the design process, he recommends continued training of design personnel to reinforce the ALARA concepts and to provide new industry techniques and actual examples

  17. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection. In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective on September 28, 2011. The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  18. Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ''indicators''. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer's most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ''user friendly'', software and contains information from RIR's, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics

  19. ALARA approach on Qinshan unit I lower internals recovery project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qinshan unit-1 is a 300 Mwe prototype PWR. It has been successfully operating for 4 fuel cycles about 10 years. Some loose parts by the failure of the guide tube of the reactor core neutron flux measurement thimble were observed on the lower structure of Core Barrel during periodical inspection after unloading all fuel assemblies. Qinshan Nuclear Power Company selected Westinghouse Electric Company as contractor to perform the reactor core barrel recovery service after negotiated with 4 world big company. QNPC and Westinghouse worked together to approach the ALARA by increasing water shielding, adding additional steel shielding, fuel pool cleaning and using the long hand tools, remote camera system. The training, mock-up exercise, good personal behavior was greatly contributed to the ALARA approaching. The collective dose and personal exposure of this job were successful controlled by implementing the preset ALARA program. The job was done by the cost of 70 man.mSv collective dose and 3.5 mSv maximum personal exposure despite of the high dose-rate which hot spot in some place is up to several hundred Sv per hour. (author)

  20. ALARA and reactor shutdown organization in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To have an ALARA policy at EdF, the CEPN realized a study on unit shutdown organization and the place of radiation protection in four nuclear power plants: Ringhals (Sweden), Philippsburg (Germany), Koeberg (South Africa) and Clinton (Usa). These sites have common characteristics such strong integration of radiation protection in any phases of shutdown, a collaboration between services, a decision power given to radio protectionists and a real motivation to reduce exposure at any level of operators. Each site uses a radiological working license for intervention in controlled area. 5 refs

  1. Cost-effectiveness studies as part of an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of cost effectiveness of engineering modifications for dose reduction at nuclear power plants conducted at BNL will be considered in this report. Since each of these items has the potential for a 50% to 60% reduction in collective dose, it appears there is large potential for dose reduction from engineering type modifications. The question that must be answered for each plant is ''which modifications or improvements are required for optimization (ALARA). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that quantified optimization need not be costly and can often be highly beneficial

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles

  3. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  4. Experience and new developments in implementing ALARA in occupational, public and patient exposures. Summary and recommendations of the 10. european ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10. european ALARA network (E.A.N.) workshop took place in Prague (Czech Republic) in September 2006. This was the 10-year anniversary of the E.A.N., and unlike the previous workshops that addressed a particular ALARA topic, the aim of this workshop was to consider the implementation of the optimisation principle in all domains of activities (nuclear and conventional industry, medical sector, NORM industry). This principle is fundamental to radiation protection, and the workshop drew together key stakeholders to discuss its past, present and future status. The workshop was asked to consider the practical implementation of ALARA, and how this might be improved in the next 10 years. The objectives of the 10. E.A.N. workshop were to review the past evolution of the ALARA concept, internationally, within the Eu, and nationally, in terms of the practical impact on radiation protection; to examine the current status of the implementation of the ALARA principle; and to identify needs for future developments in the concept and implementation of optimisation. As with previous workshops, half the programme time was devoted to invited presentations, and half to working group discussions and report backs. After discussion, the output of these working groups was collated by the E.A.N. co-computers, to produce seven formal recommendations to international organizations (IAEA, International Labour Organisation, European Commission), to E.A.N. itself and to national authorities. These recommendations deal with justification of practices, holistic approach, ALARA culture, ALARA training, especially in the medical sector, ALARA focus through inspection and control, and stakeholder involvement. Individual presentations. (authors)

  5. ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices - Summary and recommendations of the 12. European ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12. European ALARA Network (EAN) workshop on 'ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices' took place in Vienna (Austria) in October 2009. The aim of that workshop was to consider how the implementation of ALARA3, in terms of planned and emergency situations, involving worker and public doses, is affected by the introduction of security-related measures. In the case of new equipment and procedures, there was also the question of whether exposures arising from security screening devices can be justified and optimised. This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. During their discussions, the working groups identified recommendations dealing with the following topics: the implementation of the Code of Conduct and HASS4 - ensuring ALARA; balancing security and safety - how to achieve an optimum solution; the management of an emergency exposure situation from an ALARA perspective; the justification and optimisation of the use of security devices. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and recommendations produced during the workshop. Individual presentations (papers and slides) as well as the reports from the working groups are available to download on the EAN web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). (authors)

  6. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry's attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry

  7. ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, S.H.

    1980-04-01

    In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated.

  8. ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated

  9. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose

  10. The ALARA project of the EDF nuclear park exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To bring the exploitation of the nuclear park of EDF at the level of the best exploiters in the world in matter of collective and individual dosimetry, the ALARA principle coordinates numerous actions: to associate the temporary societies, to define common language, methods and tools for the whole park to organize a level effect in this area, to optimize the maintenance that is expansive in radiation doses, to make the different levels of management responsible on dosimetric stakes, to reduce the singular sources of exposure, to assure the organisation and exploitation of the experience back in this field and adapt consequently the system of information. The results are cheerful and the objectives for 2000 are: less than 1.2 h.Sv by year and by reactor, no intervener whom annual radiation dose is upper than 20 mSv (out of exceptional case). (N.C.)

  11. Experience of occupational dose ALARA through work management in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational dose to radiation workers in nuclear power plants depends on not only plant-specific factors such as design features, materials, water chemistry and other factors related to dose rates but also work management particles. The long-term experience in the nuclear power industry has showed that the work management can be applied for the simultaneous achievement of two conflicting goals for cost saving and occupational dose reduction. KEPCO has been trying to fulfill these two goals through work management since early 1990s, and achieved great success in the occupational dose reduction. In this paper, the work management policy of KEPCO has been briefly described. Work management experiences for steam generator replacement job of Kori 1, RTD bypass line removal job of Kori 3 and 4, and some other important jobs presented in the ALARA workshop held in 1999 were summarized. Then the lessons learned from the experiences were discussed. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  12. Application of the ALARA process in the regulation of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the historical and conceptual basis of the ALARA process has been reviewed. The application solely of a prescriptive approach, particularly a rigorous quantitative approach to the decision-making process, has been questioned. While the Committees recognize the value of quantitative techniques they strongly emphasize that application of the ALARA concept is a much broader process for the determination of acceptable levels of protection. An ALARA process should take into account social and economic factors that are not quantifiable and involve representation of all those having a legitimate interest in the results of the process

  13. Digital Dosemeter 'ALARA OD 2 - ORT' Monitoring Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: New Croatian radiation protection law regulations are based, among other positive principles, on the principle of establishing the controlled area in which the workers undergo legal and obligatory external occupational dosimetry monitoring. Outside the area the 1 mSv/year level of exposure is not to be exceeded by the operating radiation source. 'ORT' is the common name for the above mentioned 'outside area' which is to be monitored. The new digital dosimeter device ALARA OD, produced by ALARA Instruments Ltd. has the probe sensitive to the background radiation and fast enough to record any change in normal environmental-background radiation field. If user or dosimeter device enter the higher radiation field area or radiation source produces higher radiation output, second mode will separately start to measure the dose which is at least two times higher than the background at the spot. This methodology of measurement was performed one year long with the set of 60 devices on more than 35 X-ray units used for the civil baggage control on the airports and else. The dosimeter device was a part of whole x-ray system, meaning that one device was always on the spot which was recommended from the manufacturer as a spot with highest external exposure possibilities if any at all. Devices integrated the radiation for the whole year (battery cap. 5 years) and the net result is that there is no need for obligatory dosimetry monitoring of the workers and other stuff working with or near such X-ray units because the integrated dose while X-ray units working on the full load did not exceed the 1 mSv/year level. (author)

  14. Determining the open-quotes Rclose quotes in ALARA: A parametric study to establish cleanup criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the use of a tool for establishing criteria for cleanup of low-level radioactive contamination that will result in cost-effective remedial action. Central to this tool is the application of the principles of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). ALARA goals are driven by a desire to remediate a site to meet the strictest criteria practicable; to meet economic requirements, waste volumes must be minimized. The result of using this tool is the development of a remedial action program that satisfies ALARA requirements while limiting health and environmental risks to acceptable levels. Topics discussed in depth include the ALARA process, its principles, and its application to remedial action programs. The paper concludes with a case study in which the tool is applied to establishing cleanup criteria for the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

  15. Fluor hanford ALARA center -showcases- tools, equipment, and work practices used during D and D work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, Fluor established the ALARA Center at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to 'showcase' tools and equipment used to support the principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Much of the work was being done by workers who used hand tools while dressed in multiple sets of protective clothing. The Center was opened so that workers could see and handle the latest tools and equipment and have experienced personnel to help them plan work evolutions. Experienced personnel who were familiar with the ALARA concept as well as new technology were assigned to the Center. In addition, vendors were asked to display their products so the Hanford workers could experience state-of-the-art tools and equipment for doing work in a radiological environment. Since opening, the ALARA Center has evolved into a tremendous resource - not only for Hanford, but also most of the entire DOE Complex, as well as contractors around the world. Classes in fundamental radiological work practices are presented when the facilities recognize a need. The ALARA Center has a variety of products that range from simple hand tools to robots, video scopes, and gamma cameras. The tools and equipment on display are used in these training classes to train the workers on the work practices to operate them, take them apart to determine how they work and decide how to maintain them. Many facilities invite the ALARA Center staff to attend planning meetings at the facilities and participate in job walk-downs. Generally, ALARA Center personnel provide several options on how the radiological work can be accomplished safely and recommend the option that is ALARA and safest for the workers. A few years ago, it became obvious that the work scope was changing and many facilities had a new job to clean out the facilities and demolish them. The ALARA Center began contacting vendors who had tools and equipment that could be used for D and D work. Today, the ALARA

  16. ALARA Review for the Sediment Relocation and Removal from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) review revision provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations during sediment relocation and removal in the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin. This document updates and supercedes the ALARA review of the sediment-related activities contained in 100-N Basin Stabilization Project As Low As Reasonably Achievable Plan (BHI 1995)

  17. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedures for maintenance site: application to replacement of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes generic organization and ALARA procedures for preparing a maintenance site at a NPP. After a short description of the ALARA principle, it describes the proposition for French sites. They are grouped according to the following: motivation, organisation, means. They are illustrated by the example of steam generator replacement. Three special points concerning preparation of the site are developed: education; training of operators; review of the project

  18. Fuel transfer system ALARA design review - Project A.15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is to move the SNF from the K Basins in the Hanford 100K Area to an interim dry storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the Hanford 200 East Area. The Fuel Transfer System (FTS) is a subproject that will move the SNF from the 105K East (KE) Facility to the 105K West (KW) Facility. The SNF will be treated for shipment to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility at the KW Basin. The SNF canisters will be loaded underwater into a Shielded Transfer Cask (STC) in the KE Basin. The fully loaded STC will be brought out of the water and placed into a Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO) by the STC Straddle Carrier. As the STC is removed from the water, it will be washed down with demineralized water by an manual rinse system. The CTO with the STC inside will be placed on a transport trailer and transferred to the KW Basin as an intra-facility transfer. The CTO will be unloaded from the shipping trailer at the KW Basin and the STC will be removed from the CTO. The STC will then be lowered into the KW Basin water and the fuel will be removed. The SNF will then be processed for shipment to the CVD. As soon as all of the fuel has been removed from the STC, the cask will be removed from the KW Basin water and placed into the CTO. The CTO will again be placed on the trailer for transport back to the KE Basin where the entire cycle will be repeated approximately 400 times. This document records the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) findings and design recommendations/requirements by the SNF Project noted during the Final Design Review of the STC, CTO, STC Transfer System, Annexes and Roadways for support of FTS. This document is structured so that all statements that include the word ''shall'' represent design features that have been or will be implemented within the project scope. Statements that include the words ''should'' or ''recommend'' represent ALARA design features to be evaluated for future implementation

  19. Ten years of ALARA experience in commercial nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to review ten years of extremity exposure in a growing nuclear pharmacy company and determine those practices that have been most effective in keeping exposures ALARA. The focus of this study was specifically on extremity exposure since whole body exposures have not been as significant. Methods: More than 400 dispensing employees are monitored weekly for extremity exposure. Currently, these employees handle and dispense more than 9,000 Curies (333,000 GBq) of activity ready for use in nuclear medicine procedures each week. The quarterly and annual extremity exposure histories were examined and compared with the introduction of different initiatives to limit these exposures. Changes in the total activity per unit dose were considered as well as the introduction of different compounding practices during this time. An attempt was made to also determine specifically which activities contribute most to the extremity exposure of a dispenser. Procedural changes were reviewed as well as engineering controls such as new shielding materials and designs. Results: A significant conversion of cardiac doses occurred during the time period evaluated. Tc-99m heart agents became the preferred radiopharmaceutical replacing a significant portion of Tl-201 that had been used previously. Tl-201 is still used often in conjunction with a Tc-99m agent. The significance of the switch is the high percentage of dispensed doses for cardiac studies and the higher activities of the Tc-99m agents. A combination of procedural changes and engineering controls (primarily tungsten shielding devices) have been effective in preventing the extremity exposure increase one might expect based on higher activities dispensed per unit dose and the higher energy of Tc-99m compared to Tl-201. One procedural change, the mandatory use of tongs for handling unshielded syringes of radiopharmaceuticals, resulted in a 17% reduction in the average exposure to the extremities

  20. Application of the ALARA principle to the bleed condenser relief valve replacement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Division's achievements in radiation dose performance can be attributed, in part, to adherence to the ALARA principle. The station's ALARA program, which is an integral part of the safety culture, derives its strength from a strong and unwavering commitment by the site Vice President. This commitment is supported by performance standards and an accountability system which holds managers and supervisors responsible for dose performance. A LAN-based hazard and dose information system with site-wide accessibility was established to facilitate work planning and exposure control. The principle of dose optimization is fully integrated into the work management process and includes work planning, progress monitoring and post-job review. An integrated performance assessment and reporting system also provides timely feedback to management on dose performance. An example of the ALARA program was the bleed condenser relieve valve replacement project. Pre-job ALARA review meetings for the project were held with supervisory staff and technicians to discuss job details and dose reduction measures. All work groups were required to prepare a detailed step be step task safety analysis (TSA). The trades and engineering staff were requested to critique the TSA and suggest ways of reducing dose. Over 30 practical ALARA suggestions were received and adopted for implementation. Daily meetings were held to review job progress and the effectiveness exposure control. A post-job ALARA review was held at the conclusion of each project to obtain feedback and lessons learned. All improvement suggestions were reviewed for implementation during subsequent installations. As a result of the ALARA initiatives, significant dose savings were achieved. The normalized dose expenditure has been reduced from 9.6 rem for the first installation to 6.9 rem for the fourth and last installation. (author)

  1. Man-rem audit - a tool for exposure ALARA at Madras Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA - acronym for As Low As Reasonably Achievable, which means making every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the dose limits as is practical. ICRP has recommended ALARA to be implemented as a formal practice into the System of Dose Limitation, which contains three parts, 1) Justification of practice 2) Optimization 3) Dose Limits. As with the human endeavor, there is always room for improvement. Keeping this in mind, ALARA program is being practiced in our Nuclear Power Plants over the years. There has been a gradual reduction of collective dose in our Nuclear Power Plants due to successful implementation of the ALARA programs. This was possible due to the rigorous application of O and M experience, feedback and active participation of workforce towards ALARA. Furthermore, ALARA is an ongoing continual improvement programme towards collective dose reduction and has enough scope for improvement at any point of time. In order to substantiate the gains of ALARA programme and to improve it further, first time Mam-rem Audit was conducted at MAPS during the month of Sep-Oct 2010. This paper gives the brief outline about the method man-rem audit, its findings, corrective action implementation and the benefits derived from it. Man-rem audit similar to financial audit, serves as a tool for finding out grey areas where improvements is required so that station collective dose can be further optimized. It is one of the identified missions to achieve excellence in area of reducing station collective dose, unplanned exposures and RPP deviation. The scope of this audit is to bring further improvements in the reduction in station collective dose, create more awareness among the employees about ALARA principles and seek valuable suggestions for improvements. Audit team consisting of senior HP persons had one to one interaction with the individuals of the respective section in the field and tried to gather the information from the individual and

  2. Department of Energy ALARA implementation guide. Response to the Health Physics Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the August 1993 Health Physics Society (HPS) newsletter, the HPS Scientific and Public Issues Committee published a Position Statement entitled open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.close quotes. In this article, this HPS committee made the statement that they were deeply concerned by the trend for agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept as a regulatory requirements, without providing specific guidance as to what it means and how to implement it consistently. The HPS position paper was in response to the DOE notice on proposed rulemaking for Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 834, open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environmentclose quotes (10 CFR 834). In the notice of proposed rulemaking for 10 CFR 834, the Department of Energy (DOE) defined ALARA as follows: open-quotes As used in this part, ALARA is not a dose limit, but rather a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below the applicable limit of this part as is reasonably achievableclose quotes (10 CFR 834.2, p. 16283 of the Federal Register). The HPS position paper continues, open-quotes The section goes on to elaborate on what is meant by a process without providing sufficient guidance to assure uniform applicability of the process.close quotes. Although this concern is directed towards the ALARA process as it relates to the environment, the Office of Health, which is responsible for occupational workers, shares the same definition for ALARA

  3. Digital Dosemeters - 'ALARA OD' - Personal and Environmental Monitoring Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The importance of prompt dose reporting rises when dose is received within short-time interval or when the radiation source suffers technical failures. New dosimetry concept, where radiation exposure is recognized as a private /or/ group hazard of each person involved in occupational ionizing sources handling, taking into account actual radiation quality of the source, based among other principles, on the principle of establishing the well defined controlled area is introduced. New digital dosemeter device, produced by ALARA Instruments Ltd., measures small occupational doses, including the background. Device is based on ionizing GM tube, a set of modern EEPROM memory chips and Li compound battery set. It operates in two modes and the measurements are continuously performed no matter which mode is on. First mode integrates the dose (including background). If user or dosemeter device enter the higher radiation field area second mode will separately start to measure the dose which is at least two times higher than the surrounding background. The level above which the higher field is considered has to be preprogrammed during the calibration of device. Level depends on the workplace type /or/ environmental conditions where the device will be used. Device is suitable as well for the low level measurements and for the high radiation outputs. When used in the stronger fields, several devices can form a field monitoring system. Device is suitable for the various non-occupational purposes. With some telecommunication electronics and technical improvement, this device is usable as a point (Ort) environmental measuring station. Probe is sensitive to the background radiation and it is fast enough to record any change in normal environmental radiation field, send the data to the central station and raise alarm if necessary. We have built a prototype for environmental monitoring connectable to any kind of telecommunication net. (author)

  4. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans

  5. Methodology for making environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall evaluation concept for use in making differential cost-benefit analyses in environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations is being implemented by Rockwell Hanford Operations. This evaluation includes consideration of seven categories: (1) capital costs; (2) operating costs; (3) state of the art; (4) safety; (5) accident or upset consequences; (6) reliability, operability, and maintainability; and (7) decommissionability. Appropriate weighting factors for each of these categories are under development so that ALARA determinations can be made by comparing scores of alternative proposals for facility design, operations, and upgrade. This method of evaluation circumvents the traditional basis of a stated monetary sum per person-rem of dose commitment. This alternative was generated by advice from legal counsel who advised against formally pursuing this avenue of approach to ALARA for environmental and occupational dose commitments

  6. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Luke R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the philosophy to keep exposures to radiation As Low As is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  7. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Luke R

    2014-08-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the ALARA philosophy. This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  8. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Dayley, L

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included...

  9. Development of a general framework for the practical implementation of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of optimization of protection of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) had its roots in the realization that radiation damage is not solely a threshold phenomenon, so a system of protection could not rely solely on limits. It was originally a qualitative idea that you did what was reasonable to reduce doses in the region below the limits. In Publication 26 of the ICRP the recommendation was in terms of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). It seems that there are still a number of problem areas and misconceptions about the practical implementation of ALARA, particularly the relationship between the ALARA requirement, decision-aiding techniques and decisions. The development of a general methodological framework for ALARA studies is primary objective of a joint project between the United Kingdom National Radiological Protection Board and the French Centre d'etude sur l'evaluation de la protection dans le domaine nucleaire, sponsored by the Biology and Health Protection programme of the Commission of the European Communities. Following a review of the underlying concepts, the paper outlines progress made on the general framework in a step-by-step guide to performing ALARA studies. The framework covers the initial structuring of the radiological protection problem; the identification of alternative protection options; the selection and quantification of relevant factors for each option; the use of decision-aiding techniques incorporating judgements on the relative weight assigned to these factors; and subsequent sensitivity analyses. This framework provides a method for carrying out ALARA studies to form a structured input to decisions involving non-radiological aspects. Each stage is described, highlighting problem areas where detailed technical guidance or value judgements are required. (author)

  10. ALARA radiation protection applications at NPP A1 decommissioning using VISPLAN planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCK.CEN developed during the BR3 reactor decommissioning a graphical interfaced 3D dose assessment tool aimed at the above mentioned dose optimization problems. The tool was improved further and commercialized under the name VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. The use of VISIPLAN tool at NPP A1 decommissioning was advised by EDF within the IAEA TCP SLR/4008 project missions as a component of a 3D technological chain ensuring acquisition and evaluation of digitized information leading to ALARA optimisation of the developed decommissioning working procedures (see Fig. 1). VISIPLAN license was purchased by IAEA and granted to VUJE and NPP A1 within the IAEA TCP project SLR/4008, covering also the necessary basic and advanced training (at NPP A1 real decommissioning environment), and is currently used by VUJE analysts at NPP A1 decommissioning as an ALARA tool for intervention planning and optimisation. The VISIPLAN allows a fast dose assessment for work planned in a radioactive environment. The calculations are based on a 3D model of the work place. This PC-based tool is user friendly and calculates a detailed dose account for different work scenarios defined by the ALARA analyst, taking into account worker position, work duration and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes. The VISIPLAN methodology is described. The VISIPLAN tool was applied to several ALARA studies carried out by the VUJE within development and analysis of various Work Programs for NPP Al decommissioning tasks. The applications ranged from simpler to complex ALARA planning tasks covering simple shielding applications to selection of the most suitable order of complex working procedures. Removal of inner liners from underground reservoirs 6/1 and 6/2 as well as Dismantling of pipes and components from a (hostile) 60 m corridor are described. (authors)

  11. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  12. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Roecklein, A.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. Dose assessment and dose optimisation in decommissioning using the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimisation of radiological protection of the workers in nuclear industry is an important part of the safety culture especially in the field of decommissioning where we are confronted with a radioactive environment that is in the process of constant change. The application of the ALARA concept (to keep exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is not always straightforward in such cases. A good ALARA pre-job study must be performed and should contain predicted doses in the work area and investigate the effects of geometry, material, source or work position changes. This information provides a quantitative basis to select between various alternative work scenario's for a specific operation. In order to handle this information SCK-CEN developed the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. This PC-based tool makes it possible to create and edit work scenarios taking into account worker positions and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes in a 3D environment. The presentation will show the current status of the tool and its application to the decommissioning of the BR3 reactor and other installations. New developments will also be presented regarding the geometric and radioactive characterisation of a decommissioning site. The use of human motion simulation tools in ALARA assessment will also be discussed. This will show how new developments of software and measurement tools can help dealing with the new challenges of decommissioning in the field of dose optimization. (authors)

  14. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE's nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers'' and PNL-6577 ''Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.'' The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility

  15. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  16. Radiation protection-culture. Culture improvement in radiation protection and ALARA behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to that the optimization principle become an actual professional liable dynamical critter in the radiological protection topics, the hierarchic impulse and the personnel sensitiveness are determining. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) in the firm cultivation modify the behaviour and act philosophy. 7 refs., 2 figs

  17. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Development of an ALARA programme based on radiological measurements at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) approach, recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the control of radiation exposures of personnel, requires assigning monetary value to the detriment implied in the radiation exposure based on social and economic consideration. It is, however, felt that the global application of such an approach could neither be practical nor be objective in view of the widely differing socio-economic conditions of various countries. In view of these difficulties, an analytical method has been developed to quantify avoidable collective external dose of the work force at a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) type of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in implementing ALARA methodology

  20. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  1. ALARA Review for the Decontamination, Deactivation and Housekeeping of the 233-S Viewing Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Safety and Health Procedures, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger level. The level of contamination inside the viewing room of the 233-S Facility meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instructions 1997-03-18-005-8.3.1, 'Instructions for Routine Entries and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and 8.3.2, 'Instructions for Deactivation, Decon, and Housekeeping in Viewing Room.' The radiological work permit (RWP) request broke the two task instructions into nine separate tasks. The nine tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  2. ALARA optimization at decommissioning of NPP A1, Slovak Republic, using advanced radiation protection tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning operations effect changes in the environment and lead to situations where occupational doses strongly depend on space distribution of dose rates (DR) and time duration of critical activities. In such cases one needs an adequate geometrical and source model that allows the user to calculate the DR dose exposures. In the end a comparison of doses for alternative sets of work trajectories can lead to the selection of the most adequate scenario with minimised dose burden to the workers. The use of laser scanning with respective as-built 3D modeling software, gamma imagery of the dominant sources and application of 3D ALARA planning tool, VISIPLAN, for the above mentioned purposes was the solution advised by EDF, the technical advisor within the IAEA TCP SLR/4008 project. The above-mentioned components were intended to create a 3D technological chain ensuring acquisition and evaluation of digitized information leading to ALARA optimisation of the decommissioning work procedures. In the case of very complex structures to be modelled for ALARA purposes, an auxiliary code, VISIMODELLER, allows the direct transfer of already existing 3D objects to VISIPLAN. This means the saving of a lot of man-power in drawing the geometry. For gamma imaging and positioning of main sources in the installation the old version gamma camera, ALADIN, owned by NPP A1 was used. Applications of radiation protection techniques at NPP A1 decommissioning project are presented in the paper. These range from simple shielding application by the 3D VISIPLAN planning tool, or creating a 3D as-built model, to ALARA applications for alternative work trajectories in complex geometrical and hostile environment with multiple sources. As examples, removal of plastic liner from large underground reservoirs and removal of contaminated pipes from a long corridor are described in more detail. (author)

  3. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  4. Application of the Alara principle to the occupationally exposed workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report sets down how the Alara (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is applied in radiation protection of the occupationally exposed personnel at light-water reactors in EC countries. In some instances the practices, experiences and results from EC countries are supplemented by the practice in other States (e.g. USA, Sweden). Commencing with a short summary of the legal situation in the Member States of the European Community with regard to Alara, the report describes the framework in which the optimization practice has been developed. The main chapters elaborate in detail how the Alara principle has been put into practice in design and operation in LWRs. The importance of qualification and training of power-plant personnel in relation to optimization of radiation protection is considered and some comparisons are drawn with the US practice. Recommendations are made where reason for modification or harmonization of practices is seen in the conclusions of the different chapters and the overall conclusions and summary of the report

  5. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory

  6. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  7. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S pipe trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. Isolation from REDOX and removal of the product transfer lines from the pipe trench is the second step in the decontamination and decommissioning of the entire 233-S Facility. The work scope is to isolate all piping from REDOX and then to remove all the piping/equipment from the pipe trench. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure No. 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the pipe trench and the process fluid piping is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the pipe trench and cutting of piping commences. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-009 Revision 1, 233-S Pipe Trench Decon and Pipe Removal

  8. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  9. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included in the original project design. That is, that the design and operation of existing Cementation Process equipment and processes allows for the minimization of personnel exposure in its operation, maintenance and decommissioning and that the generation of radioactive waste is kept to a minimum

  10. ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the first in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at DOE facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, and searches of the DOE Energy Data Base. The abstracts included in this report relate to operational health physics as well as other subjects which have a bearing on dose reduction. Facilities covered include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fabrication, unirradiated fissile materials storage, irradiated fissile material storage, reprocessing, decommissioning, recovery, hot laboratories, tritium production, reactors (research, test and production but not power reactors), and accelerators. We have also included material in improved design, materials selection, planning, and other topics which are related to dose-reduction efforts. The report contains 68 abstracts as well as subject and author indices

  11. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, contains the third in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This report also contains abstracts from the two previous volumes. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics are also included

  12. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  13. Measures to obtain ALARA radiation exposures in ABB Atom BWRs: the BKM project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review is made of the water chemistry, fuel crud and collective radiation exposure in the ABB Atom BWRs and of a computer simulation study of decontamination strategies. The presented data represent a small selection of results that have been produced by the BKM project in order to investigate how the ALARA concept can be met in a BWR plant. The data show that an annual collective exposure of 0.5 manSv is a realistic target in newer BWR plants. (author)

  14. Networking as a tool to promote stakeholder involvement: Example of the European ALARA Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European ALARA Network (EAN), set up in 1996 by the European Commission, has helped reveal stakeholders needs regarding feedback on good radiation protection practice and helped towards stakeholders' satisfaction through their direct involvement into the network's life. Good examples of that involvement are the EAN workshops. The stakeholders are involved during the preparation phase, the workshops themselves, the development of recommendations and finally within the follow up actions. More and more categories of stakeholders are interested in topics covered within the EAN, and other similar networks are being set up in other regions. (author)

  15. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  16. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project is to remove the liquid low-level waste from the five underground storage tanks located at OHF and transfer the resulting slurry to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks facility for treatment and disposal. Among the technical objectives for the OHF Project, there is a specific provision to maintain personnel exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during each activity of the project and to protect human health and the environment. The estimated doses and anticipated conditions for accomplishing this project are such that an ALARA Plan is necessary to facilitate formal radiological review of the campaign. This ALARA Plan describes the operational steps necessary for accomplishing the job together with the associated radiological impacts and planned controls. Individual and collective dose estimates are also provided for the various tasks. Any significant changes to this plan (i.e., planned exposures that are greater than 10% of original dose estimates) will require formal revision and concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page. Deviations from this plan (i.e., work outside the scope covered by this plan) also require the preparation of a task-specific ALARA Review that will be amended to this plan with concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page

  17. As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA): is it appropriate for low level exposures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through various researches and investigations it has been established that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health and there is a linear relationship between dose and the effect. There is substantial controversy regarding the biological and health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans and the biota, in vitro and in vivo despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). By low-level exposure, we mean the exposure to radiation levels comparable to those encountered in the natural environment (ambient radiation level). The proponents of the ALARA policy are the believers of LNT hypothesis adopted by major scientific, official and governmental organizations such as ICRP, NCRP, the NAS-NRC etc. for risk assessment, according to which exposure to any amount of radiation, no matter howsoever small is potentially harmful. The idea that the dose to radiation worker should be As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is only appropriate if small doses have a risk. Current radiation risk estimates, drawn by linear extrapolation, from high dose and dose rate of radiation to zero dose, clearly ignore the effects of the repair of DNA- the target of radiation damage. If the hormetic effect is added to the effect predicted by the LNT hypothesis, the resultant effect will be somewhat different from that predicted by the LNT hypothesis alone. Excellent human data show that a moderate increase in background radiation decreases the risk of cancer and significantly increases longevity. There are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). In the present paper, we propose to highlight the results of a comprehensive study of the available literature, data and reports of various radiation exposure and protection studies carried out in India and abroad. In conclusion, we find that the radiation hormesis contradicts the

  18. Practical application of the ALARA principle in management of the nuclear legacy: optimization under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiological protection has a long and distinguished history in taking a balanced approach to optimization. Both utilitarian and individual interests and perspectives are addressed through a process of constrained optimisation, with optimisation intended to lead to the most benefit to the most people, and constraints being operative to limit the degree of inequity among the individuals exposed. At least, expressed simplistically, that is what the recommendations on protection are intended to achieve. This paper examines the difficulties in achieving that objective, based on consideration of the active role of optimisation in regulatory supervision of the historic nuclear legacy. This example is chosen because the application of the ALARA principle has important implications for some very major projects whose objective is remediation of existing legacy facilities. But it is also relevant because timely, effective and cost efficient completion of those projects has implications for confidence in the future development of nuclear power and other uses of radioactive materials. It is also an interesting example because legacy management includes mitigation of some major short and long term hazards, but those mitigating measures themselves involve operations with their own risk, cost and benefit profiles. Like any other complex activity, a legacy management project has to be broken down into logistically feasible parts. However, from a regulatory perspective, simultaneous application of ALARA to worker protection, major accident risk mitigation and long-term environmental and human health protection presents its own challenges. Major uncertainties which exacerbate the problem arise from ill-characterised source terms, estimation of the likelihood of unlikely failures in operational processes, and prospective assessment of radiological impacts over many hundreds of years and longer. The projects themselves are set to run over decades, during which time the

  19. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts

  1. Managing the radiological risk: ALARA, a principle, an obligation, a state of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the 1993 data published by French nuclear operators and by the Ionizing Radiations Protection Office (OPRI), only two workers have exceeded the maximum annual permissible dose of 50 mSv. However, the respect of dose limits is not a sufficient warranty to accept the ionizing radiations exposure risk. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle is a masterpiece of the radiological protection system. Its goal is to maintain the exposures as low as reasonably achievable taking into account the socio-economical constraints. In France, the application of this principle is as compulsory as the respect of dose limits. The proper management and optimization of radiological risk requires the motivation of everybody. (J.S.). 2 refs., 3 figs

  2. Use of rank sum method in identifying high occupational dose jobs for ALARA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost-effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) dose at a nuclear power plant could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORE dose data of existing plants. It is necessary to identify what are high ORE jobs for ALARA implementation. In this study, the Rank Sum Method (RSM) is used in identifying high ORE jobs. As a case study, the database of ORE-related maintenance and repair jobs for Kori Units 3 and 4 is used for assessment, and top twenty high ORE jobs are identified. The results are also verified and validated using the Friedman test, and RSM is found to be a very efficient way of analyzing the data. (author)

  3. ALARA in design and operation of KAIGA-3 and 4, Indian 220 MW(e) PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological protection by ALARA in design and operation of nuclear power reactors had made down trend collective dose to occupational workers as well as members of the public. India is operating PHWRs type reactors RAPS onwards and gained a lot of experiences in the design and operation of 100 to 540 MW(e) rated capacity factor. The dose reduction measures have been incorporated into the design of the later reactors based on the operating experiences of earlier reactors. The various components/parts in the design stage have been modified and/or replaced in KAIGA-3 and 4, a long journey of lndian PHWRs operation. The improved operational practices have evolved which resulted in high level of the radiological safety. The radiological safety is ensured by approved guidelines, design improvements, effective shielding, source control, delay/decay of sources, radiation work control, protective equipments, contamination control, ventilation, radioactive waste management, effluent monitoring, work management, training, pep-talk/table-top, ALARA goals/achievements, close review of operational parameters, personal monitoring and other elements. This paper discusses the design and operation improvements of KAIGA-3 and 4 which reduced the Station collective dose and effluent releases. Low ambient gamma radiation field and very low tritium-in-air activity in reactor building has reduced the collective dose compared with similar reactor (KGS-1 and 2 and RAPS-3 and 4) and made record of lowest collective dose. The lowest tritium-in-air activity in accessible/shutdown areas and better fuel management has reduced tritium and FPNG gaseous effluent. The overall radiological safety of KAIGA-3 and 4 maintain low collective dose and insignificant contribution to public dose. The continual improvements in design and operation would bring down collective in the future new 700 MWe IPHWR series

  4. BNL ALARA Center's development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  5. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  6. ALARA in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients--a white paper executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Keith J; Kaste, Sue C

    2006-09-01

    Pediatric patients might be as much as 10 times more radiosensitive than adults. Thus, adherence to the principle of "As low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) represents a practice mandate that minimizes ionizing radiation exposure while optimizing imaging results. This symposium is the third multidisciplinary program that focused on the ALARA principle in pediatric imaging and addressed issues associated with pediatric fluoroscopy and interventional imaging techniques. PMID:17412149

  7. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  8. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6° inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (C nH n) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry.

  9. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step

  10. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, G.J.; Durham, J.S.; Hickey, E.E.; Stansbury, P.S.; Cicotte, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL`s reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included.

  11. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL's reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included

  12. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, J.; Job, P. K.; Rauchas, A.; Justus, A.; Veluri, V. R.

    2000-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step.

  13. INNOVATIVE ALARA TECHNIQUES and WORK PRACTICES USED AT HANFORD FOR D and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Site has several nuclear facilities in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) with many more to follow. These facilities contain hazardous and highly radioactive materials in plant systems, gloveboxes, hot cells, rooms, collection tanks, ventilation ducts, fuel pools and outside these facilities. Some of the radioactive isotopes are fissile material and have to be closely guarded and require special handling. To safely work in this environment, workers had to learn new skills and develop innovative techniques to decontaminate, remove all equipment and demolish these radioactive work facilities without spreading contamination to the environment. Changing the workscope and worker attitudes involves a culture change for workers, managers, Department of Energy (DOE) and support organizations. DandD involves making different types of risk-based decisions than were made when the plants were operated or sitting dormant. Management involvement, use of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), communications and sharing lessons learned are essential ingredients in developing a successful DandD strategy. New technologies have to be learned including the use of robotic devices and manipulative arms due to high dose rates and amount of radioactive contamination. Minimizing the amount of Transuranic and Mixed radioactive waste and learning how to ship the large quantities of waste are additional skills the Hanford workers have had to learn. DandD work at Hanford is in progress and Hanford Contractors have completed some very difficult and intense DandD work. This presentation will provide information on the best As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) protective measures, work practices, and the lessons learned to date

  14. ALARA review of the maintenance and repair jobs of repetitive high radiation dose at Kori Unit 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The policy of maintaining occupational radiation dose (ORD) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requires the effective reduction of ORD in the phases of design as well as operation of nuclear power plants. It has been identified that a predominant portion of ORD arises during maintenance and repair operations at nuclear power plants. The cost-effective reduction of ORD cannot be achieved without a comprehensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing nuclear power plants. To identify the jobs of repetitive high ORD, the ORD data of Kori Units 3 and 4 over 10-year period from 1986 to 1995 were compiled into the PC-based ORD database program. As the radiation job classification structure, 26 main jobs are considered, most of which are further subdivided into detailed jobs. According to the order of the collective dose values for 26 main jobs, 10 jobs of high collective dose are identified. As an ALARA review, then, top 10 jobs of high collective dose are statistically analyzed with regard to 1) dose rate, 2) crew number and 3) job frequency that are the factors determining the collective dose for the radiation job of interest. Through the ALARA review, main reasons causing to high collective dose values are identified as follows. The high collective dose of RCP maintenance job is mainly due to the large crew number and the high job frequency. The characteristics of refueling job are similar to those of RCP maintenance job. However, the high collective doses of SG-related jobs such as S/G nozzle dam job, S/G man-way job and S/G tube maintenance job are mainly due to high radiation dose rate. (author)

  15. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique

  16. ALARA principle and applications in the safety files of Laboratories and factories. Experience return from three years expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispositions of operational radiation protection used by the nuclear exploiting societies contribute to the safety of their installations. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.P.S.N.) is led to evaluate these dispositions, particularly the application of the ALARA principle. It appears that it was interesting to make an accounting on the period where the optimization and workers protection were taken into account. The accounting presented in this work is relative to the installations else than power reactors, that is to say: laboratories, fuel cycle facilities, research installations, irradiators. (N.C.)

  17. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  18. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  19. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  1. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  2. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  3. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  4. Replacement of neutron absorbers in the spent fuel pool storage facility of the Tihange 3: an ALARA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiated fuel assemblies placed in the storage racks (pools) subject the Boraflex to an intense gamma flux, which causes degradation of the Boraflex arising from the radiolysis reaction and rupture and rearrangement of the chemical bonds by the gamma rays. The decision was taken to remove the Boraflex from the existing racks and reuse them with a neutron absorber, boron steel or borated stainless steel. Throughout this replacement project, the ALARA principle has been applied in developing tools and choosing methods. Each phase was then re-evaluated in terms of dosimetry cost in order to make improvements that would mean a reduction in the dosimetry of the operation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  6. New recommendations of the ICRP and the ALARA program of the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the events happened in it finishes it decade, in the nuclear environment, it is necessary that any he/she practices that it involves exhibition to the radiation, real or potential, be detailed and systematically analyzed by the light of the current knowledge, capitalizing the generated experience. They think about three fundamental aspects in the campaign of radiological cultivation: 1. New methods of evaluation of equivalent dose. 2. Limit of individual dose, base of the change and control implications, and 3. Analysis philosophies and the application of the system of dose limitation. The program ALARA of the Laguna Verde Central from its installation in 1987 observes and it implements actions trending to optimize it practice of situation of potential and planned exhibition with the purpose of fulfilling the commitment settled down in the declaration of political of this program

  7. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report

  8. Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. (author)

  9. [Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozziconacci, J G; Ayivi, J; Loat, A; Ifergan, J; Mourbrun, M; Drevet, B

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. PMID:16114200

  10. IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

    2002-02-25

    In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P&A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented.

  11. Reference values of the workers' collective dose unit for the implementation of ''ALARA'' policy in EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementing the ALARA principle at the design, operation and maintenance stages of EDF's PWRs aims at ensuring a coherent management of individual and collective exposures. The objective of such a policy is, as recommended by ICRP 60, to keep exposures (number of individuals exposed and levels of exposure) as low as reasonably achievable, with an equitable distribution taking into consideration economical and social aspects. This leads EDF to adopt, among other tools, a system of reference monetary values for the unit of collective dose averted. After having recalled the ethical issue associated with such an approach as well as the international consensus on the dose-risk relationship for low doses, the model adopted, integrating risk aversion considerations, is presented. Its main characteristic is a rapid increase of the monetary values with the level of annual individual doses coming close to the regulatory limits. This model will be used as a decision-aiding tool for the evaluation and comparison of alternative protection actions within the optimization process of workers'exposure

  12. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well other topics, has been included. This volume (Volume 4 of the series) contains 209 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume

  13. Impact of main radiological pollutants on contamination risks (ALARA) optimisation of physico-chemical environment and retention techniques during operation and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this paper is to precise the behaviour of different radiochemical species in the primary coolant of PWR plants. Managing these pollutants must lead to limit Reactor Coolant System (RCS) walls 'over-contamination' to decrease the dose rates during the maintenance operations (ALARA). In French Plants, 60Co, silver and antimony represent the major radiochemical pollutants which require a good knowledge of the different phenomena to ensure the lowest contamination risks. The stakes deal with the control and the optimisation of collective and individual doses including waste treatment with low costs. These stakes represent primordial elements of nuclear acceptability. (authors)

  14. The necessary guidance on the application of JUSTIFICATION and ALARA by the nuclear authorities, using 'Accountability for Reasonableness' as a decision making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In all branches of law, but foremost in international nuclear law, the global economic system brings along a vast record of Soft Law covering General Principles and Standards. For a part we can find these Soft Law Principles and Standards back in the clothing of hard law, or in the licensing procedures, at the national level. The larger part however is never 'transposed' into national laws and especially the harmonization, the implementation and control of such Principles and Standards remain doubtful. In this paper the focus lies on JUSTIFICATION and ALARA, as the main nuclear safety principles, accepted world-wide. The regulatory guidance and demonstration of these Principles, indicating which (numerical) safety levels or safety objectives are mandatory and which are only guidance should be undertaken by the international regulators and authorities, but are often lacking. It is the aim of this paper to come up with a better procedural framework for a priority setting process by nuclear authorities. Establishing a fair process for priority setting is easier than agreeing on principles. We use the idea of 'Accountability for Reasonableness', developed in the field of Health Care Management. An ideal model of priority setting within the JUSTIFICATION/ALARA approach will need to specify what should be done (i.e. justified ethically) and how it can be done (i.e. based in empirical reality and on benchmarking), to reach optimal levels of nuclear safety. (author)

  15. When RCRA meets ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a method to identify an inconsistency between RCRA and AEA and for distinguishing a true inconsistency from a compliance difficulty. The paper also provides examples of each situation, accommodating specific RCRA requirements to maintain adherence to radiation protection requirements. The proposed method is derived from radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure that was issued by EPA, under authority derived from Executive Order 10831, the AEA, and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970. This EPA guidance was approved by President Reagan on January 20, 1987 and closely reflects the guidance of national and international radiation standard-setting groups

  16. ALARA notes, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the 'tyranny' of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment

  17. ALARA and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of open-quotes hostileclose quotes environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views

  18. Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items; Role de la personne competente dans la sensibilisation au principe ALARA a travers l'application de la directive europeenne 97-43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozziconacci, J.G.; Ayivi, J.; Loat, A.; Ifergan, J.; Mourbrun, M.; Drevet, B. [Hopital J. Coeur, Service d' Imagerie et de Medecine du Travail, 18 - Bourges (France)

    2005-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. (author)

  19. Impact of main radiological pollutants on contamination risks (ALARA). Optimisation of physico chemical environment and retention techniques during operation and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this paper is to follow up the behaviour of different radiochemical species in the primary coolant of PWR plants. Managing these pollutants must lead to limit Reactor Coolant System (RCS) walls 'over-contamination' and consequently to decrease the dose rates during the maintenance operations (ALARA). In French plants, Co 60, silver and antimony represent the major radiochemical pollutants which require a good knowledge of the different phenomena to ensure the lowest contamination risks. The stakes deal with the control and the optimization of collective and individual doses including waste treatment with low costs. These stakes represent primordial elements of nuclear acceptability. It is obvious that implementing specific chemistry and optimizing purification features (filters, resins and flowrate) ensures a limitation of the effects of this type of pollutions. That's why studies are yet in progress to propose operators a chemical policy and adapted procedures for each type of radioactive pollution able to reduce the impact on dosimetry. On the other hand, a new specific gamma spectrometer able to characterize on the field the nature of radioactive deposits, in order to improve the diagnostic, is being developed

  20. Optimization (Alara) and probabilistic exposures: the application of optimization criteria to the control of risks due to exposures of a probabilistic nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper described the application of the principles of optimization recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to the restrain of radiation risks due to exposures that may or may not be incurred and to which a probability of occurrence can be assigned. After describing the concept of probabilistic exposures, it proposes a basis for a converging policy of control for both certain and probabilistic exposures, namely the dose-risk relationship adopted for radiation protection purposes. On that basis some coherent approaches for dealing with probabilistic exposures, such as the limitation of individual risks, are discussed. The optimization of safety for reducing all risks from probabilistic exposures to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels is reviewed in full. The principles of optimization of protection are used as a basic framework and the relevant factors to be taken into account when moving to probabilistic exposures are presented. The paper also reviews the decision-aiding techniques suitable for performing optimization with particular emphasis to the multi-attribute utility-analysis technique. Finally, there is a discussion on some practical application of decision-aiding multi-attribute utility analysis to probabilistic exposures including the use of probabilistic utilities. In its final outlook, the paper emphasizes the need for standardization and solutions to generic problems, if optimization of safety is to be successful

  1. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  2. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S., E-mail: sodhiks@gmail.com [Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India); Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K.; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan [Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India); Lee, Edward Y. [Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Pulmonary Division, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave. Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  3. Reduction in airborne contamination levels at the 9201-5 Arc Melt sawing operation. A Y-12 Plant 1982 ALARA goal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.E.; West, C.M.

    1983-02-01

    Lowering the uranium airborne contamination level at the two saws in the 9201-5 Arc Melt Area was chosen as a Y-12 Plant As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) goal for 1982. This priority was convincingly communicated to those involving by giving specific instructions to suspend saw operations any time there was evidence of a problem until that problem could be corrected. Using control charts on air flow rates into the saw enclosures and pressure drops across filters in the saw ventilation (Delta Phase I) exhaust system, it was possible to decide when filter changes or other adjustments were necessary to maintain the exhaust flow rates needed for improved airborne contamination control. The keeping of these charts, along with the actions taken on the basis of the data gathered, made it possible to meet the goal of reducing airborne contamination levels in 1982, as compared with 1981, although production in the Arc Melt Area increased significantly. These data also showed that use of one brand of filter in the prefilter system resulted in the need to change filters more frequently than when another brand was used. This fact triggered an investigation which revealed the cause for the shorter useful life of that filter and a request that only specifically approved filters be purchased for use in this system. Use of these control data also made it possible to establish that the exhaust system operated more effectively without the Roto-clone hydrostatic pecipitators because exhaust air flow was increased without reduction in filter life.

  4. Reduction in airborne contamination levels at the 9201-5 Arc Melt sawing operation. A Y-12 Plant 1982 ALARA goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowering the uranium airborne contamination level at the two saws in the 9201-5 Arc Melt Area was chosen as a Y-12 Plant As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) goal for 1982. This priority was convincingly communicated to those involving by giving specific instructions to suspend saw operations any time there was evidence of a problem until that problem could be corrected. Using control charts on air flow rates into the saw enclosures and pressure drops across filters in the saw ventilation (Delta Phase I) exhaust system, it was possible to decide when filter changes or other adjustments were necessary to maintain the exhaust flow rates needed for improved airborne contamination control. The keeping of these charts, along with the actions taken on the basis of the data gathered, made it possible to meet the goal of reducing airborne contamination levels in 1982, as compared with 1981, although production in the Arc Melt Area increased significantly. These data also showed that use of one brand of filter in the prefilter system resulted in the need to change filters more frequently than when another brand was used. This fact triggered an investigation which revealed the cause for the shorter useful life of that filter and a request that only specifically approved filters be purchased for use in this system. Use of these control data also made it possible to establish that the exhaust system operated more effectively without the Roto-clone hydrostatic pecipitators because exhaust air flow was increased without reduction in filter life

  5. Evolución del paisaje vegetal durante los últimos 1.680 años BP en el Macizo de Peñalara (Sierra de Guadarrama, Madrid)

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, C.; Ruíz Zapata, María Blanca; M.J. Gil; López Sáez, José Antonio; Santiesteban, J.; Mediavilla, R.; Domínguez, F.; Vera, S

    2009-01-01

    El estudio polínico de un depósito higroturboso de origen periglacial localizado en el macizo de Peñalara (Sierra de Guadarrama. Madrid) apoyado en 7 dataciones AMS de 14C, proporciona la primera reconstrucción de alta resolución de la evolución de la vegetación en el área durante los últimos 1689 años. Los resultados obtenidos reflejan la existencia de un paisaje vegetal dominado por el estrato herbáceo, constituido fundamentalmente por Poaceae y Plantago lanceolata tipo. La masa fo...

  6. Dose response relationship and Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, it will be shown how dose-response relationships allow to give quantitative figures for the detriment of irradiation. At this stage, the detriment is expressed directly as a certain number of health effects, whose valuation is not dealt with here. The present tools for quantifying, their weaknesses and their strenghts, and their scientific basis will be developed

  7. Applied ALARA Workshops Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System

  8. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Keith J. [Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2006-09-15

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care.

  9. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care

  10. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program's capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure

  11. N Area Post-Deactivation ALARA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides information about a wide range of radiological work activities at the N Area Deactivation Project. The report is divided into sections that are based on specific N Area scopes of work. Each section contains specific information that was of significant radiological importance in completing N Area Deactivation work. The information presented in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and in commercial industry

  12. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate

  13. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Richard S.; Diamond, David A; Chow, Jeanne S.

    2006-01-01

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH),...

  14. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Richard S.; Diamond, David A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux. (orig.)

  15. Applying the ALARA concept to the evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is a widely used study to define lower urinary tract anatomy and to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children. We examine the technical advances in the VCUG and other examinations for reflux that have reduced radiation exposure of children, and we give recommendations for the use of imaging studies in four groups of children: (1) children with urinary tract infection, (2) siblings of patients with VUR, (3) infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), and (4) children with a solitary functioning kidney. By performing examinations with little to no radiation, carefully selecting only the children who need imaging studies and judiciously timing follow-up examinations, we can reduce the radiation exposure of children being studied for reflux. (orig.)

  16. An ALARA-conscious hot particle control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989 approximately twenty-five percent of the radiation dose received by the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP) Health Physics group was due to its hot particle control program. The Health Physics group initiated a review of the program with the objective of decreasing the dose expenditure for hot particle control while maintaining a high standard for hot particle detection and control. In this paper the methods and results of this evaluation are described. The components of the hot particle control program, rules of thumb, and radionuclide composition at PBNP are presented

  17. Analyses of high occupational dose jobs for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Database of occupational dose data was developed, and radiation jobs were categorized into 26 main jobs. Dose rate, job manpower and job frequency are important factors having influence on occupational collective dose value. For each 26 main jobs, these factors were statistically analyzed. For each 26 main jobs, collective dose was evaluated, and 10 high occupational dose jobs were identified. For these 10 high dose jobs, dose rate, job manpower and job frequency were analyzed, and main reasons and factors for high dose were identified. This could be helpful to develop reasonable dose reduction plans for the high dose jobs

  18. Radiation therapy for children: evolving technologies in the era of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of ever more sophisticated oncologic imaging and technologies providing far more precise radiation therapy have combined to increase the utilization of sophisticated radiation therapy in childhood cancer. For a majority of children with common central nervous system, soft tissue, bone, and dysontogenic neoplasms, local irradiation is fundamental to successful multi-disciplinary management. Along with more precise target volume definition and radiation delivery, new technologies provide added certainty of patient positioning (electronic portal imaging, cone beam CT) and conformality of dose delivery (3-D conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiation therapy, proton beam therapy). Each of the major areas of technology development are able to better confine the high-dose region to the intended target, but they are also associated with the potential for larger volumes of uninvolved tissues being exposed to low radiation doses. The latter issue plays a role in documented levels of secondary carcinogenesis, sometimes with greater anticipated incidence than that seen in conventional radiation therapy. Parameters related to carcinogenesis, such as dose-volume relationships and neutron contamination that accompanies high-energy photon irradiation and proton therapy, can be identified, sometimes modulated, and accepted as part of the clinical decision process in fine tuning radiation therapy in this more vulnerable age group. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of DUF6-G-Q-STU-001 (ALARA analysis supporting approval of authorized limits)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (UDS) to proceed with disposition of the inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for which DOE has management responsibility. To accomplish this task, UDS will construct and operate facilities at two DOE-owned sites, one near Paducah, Kentucky, and another near Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert DUF6 to uranium oxide (principally U3O8). The off-gas treatment system for the conversion process will produce aqueous hydrogen fluoride (AqHF), also known as hydrofluoric acid, and a relatively small amount of calcium fluoride (CaF2), each containing some residual radioactive material. As part of its contractual charge, UDS must identify and implement a disposition for all three products generated by the DUF6 conversion facilities: uranium oxide, AqHF, and CaF2. The UDS DUF6 Conversion Product Management Plan (DUF6-UDS-PLN-004, September 2003) concludes that a viable commercial market exists for AqHF, which, if not sold, would have to be neutralized, producing a relatively large quantity of additional CaF2. Although CaF2 has very limited market potential, there is some possibility that it also could be sold. If these potential markets could be developed, DOE would save the costs of neutralizing AqHF and/or disposing of the CaF2 neutralization product. Accordingly, UDS has decided to seek approval from DOE for unrestricted release of both AqHF and CaF2 that would be generated if AqHF could not be sold or if sales were interrupted. If AqHF were sold, the relatively small quantity of CaF2 still being generated by the DUF6 conversion process off-gas treatment system would most likely be disposed of as waste. The main product of conversion, depleted uranium oxide, will be reused to the extent possible or disposed of as waste, if no practical reuse option is found

  20. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  1. Establishing a process for handling radiation protection and ALARA reviews of projects at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the exciting world of emerging opportunities, establishing new projects are often synonymous with a rollercoaster ride. Even in the best circumstances there is always something lost along the way. Very often this will be the small crack that might lead to the large break a few generations down the line. With the big focus on new developments at ANSTO, it has become necessary to have Radiation Protection Advisors who will be available to provide the inputs and expertise needed to influence the designs in the earliest phases of development. Specifically looking at designs where there might be no operational experience available, judgement has to be made on best engineering practise and taking into account best estimate values for the radiological exposures related to the design. A special process is being developed to highlight the inputs needed from the designers and engineers in every phase of the design process. This process establishes the steps to be followed by the Radiation Protection Advisors in performing radiation protection reviews and identifies the outputs for every phase. They are crucial in declaring design baselines and proceeding to the next phase of the project design. These reviews of the design, operation and maintenance of the systems and components is done taking into consideration international guidelines for good radiation protection and nuclear engineering practise with regards to material composition, system design, layout, operation, maintenance and waste minimisation. The aim is to integrate this process into the overall ANSTO project management process. It will be done by applying it to the various ANSTO capital expenditure and other projects which may be in various stages of development. This will help to identify process shortcomings and to measure its efficiency. Ultimately it will be tested in its entirety from the Concept to the Detail design phase and help to provide baseline information and reasoning throughout the facility's lifecycle until its decommissioning.

  2. Radiation therapy for children: evolving technologies in the era of ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kun, Larry E.; Beltran, Chris [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The evolution of ever more sophisticated oncologic imaging and technologies providing far more precise radiation therapy have combined to increase the utilization of sophisticated radiation therapy in childhood cancer. For a majority of children with common central nervous system, soft tissue, bone, and dysontogenic neoplasms, local irradiation is fundamental to successful multi-disciplinary management. Along with more precise target volume definition and radiation delivery, new technologies provide added certainty of patient positioning (electronic portal imaging, cone beam CT) and conformality of dose delivery (3-D conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiation therapy, proton beam therapy). Each of the major areas of technology development are able to better confine the high-dose region to the intended target, but they are also associated with the potential for larger volumes of uninvolved tissues being exposed to low radiation doses. The latter issue plays a role in documented levels of secondary carcinogenesis, sometimes with greater anticipated incidence than that seen in conventional radiation therapy. Parameters related to carcinogenesis, such as dose-volume relationships and neutron contamination that accompanies high-energy photon irradiation and proton therapy, can be identified, sometimes modulated, and accepted as part of the clinical decision process in fine tuning radiation therapy in this more vulnerable age group. (orig.)

  3. A user friendly database for use in ALARA job dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressurized water reactor (PWR) design chosen for adoption by Nuclear Electric plc was based on the Westinghouse Standard Nuclear Unit Power Plant (SNUPPS). This design was developed to meet the United Kingdom requirements and these improvements are embodied in the Sizewell B plant which will start commercial operation in 1994. A user-friendly database was developed to assist the station in the dose and ALARP assessments of the work expected to be carried out during station operation and outage. The database stores the information in an easily accessible form and enables updating, editing, retrieval, and searches of the information. The database contains job-related information such as job locations, number of workers required, job times, and the expected plant doserates. It also contains the means to flag job requirements such as requirements for temporary shielding, flushing, scaffolding, etc. Typical uses of the database are envisaged to be in the prediction of occupational doses, the identification of high collective and individual dose jobs, use in ALARP assessments, setting of dose targets, monitoring of dose control performance, and others

  4. The application of non-parametric statistical method for an ALARA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost-effective reduction of Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) at a nuclear power plant could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing plants. Through the data analysis, it is required to identify what are the jobs of repetitive high ORD at the nuclear power plant. In this study, Percentile Rank Sum Method (PRSM) is proposed to identify repetitive high ORD jobs, which is based on non-parametric statistical theory. As a case study, the method is applied to ORD data of maintenance and repair jobs at Kori units 3 and 4 that are pressurized water reactors with 950 MWe capacity and have been operated since 1986 and 1987, respectively in Korea. The results was verified and validated, and PRSM has been demonstrated to be an efficient method of analyzing the data

  5. Optimization of the ALARA principle for the management and elimination of very low level radioactive waste; Optimisation de principe ALARA en matiere de gestion et d'elimination de dechets radioactifs de tres faible activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regibeau, A.; Caussin, J.; De Spiegeleer, M.; Poelaert, M. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Service de Radioprotection, Louvain-la-Neuve (France)

    1992-07-01

    The management of low level solid radioactive waste, as proposed by the National Institutions, cannot be applied to waste produced in a University environment. The report from the Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL) states the reasons and the procedure which has been set up by the radioprotection department. It describes the storage facilities and details the quality control tests carried out during the elimination process. The report outlines the difficulties encountered by the radioprotection departments due to the absence of normes for the disposal of solid radioactive waste. (author)

  6. Engineered design features in the HI-STAR/HI-STORM systems to maximize ALARA, safety, and community acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blessing, Christian [Holtec International, New Jersey (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Heltec International is a U.S. corporation headquartered in New Jersey, dedicated to providing capital goods and technical services to the power industry. Over 75 percent of the company's product output is destined for nuclear power plants. Holter counts among its active clients a majority of the nuclear plants in the United States, as well as Korea, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil. The company also has a growing market presence in Japan and the European Union. Leading U.S. nuclear plant owners, such as Entergy, Exelon, FPL, Southern Nuclear, PG and E and TVA have a long-term and continuous business relationship with Holtec International. This article deals with Holtec dry storage system description, the multi-purpose canister, hi-star 100 overpack, hi-storm 100 overpack and unique advantages of holtec's dry storage technology.

  7. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, M E

    2000-01-01

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  8. General approach to assure compliance with ALARA guidelines on direct radiation from a nuclear power plant, January 1979-January 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, W; Silver, C

    1983-06-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission guide lines specify 10 mrad per reactor as the total yearly direct (gamma) radiation dose at any point external to a nuclear power facility site boundary. Typically a nuclear utility submits only thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) data unaccompanied by corresponding core sample, ion chamber or other data or analyses to demonstrate compliance. This study considers a standard approach for analyzing the TLD data in terms of semiempirical physical constructs which allow the use of correlations among certain preoperational TLD data to predict or model operational period TLD measures (expected values) in the absence of the source (nuclear facility). These apriori models depend only upon their fit to the observed nonimpacted data for their verification. They are not veridical. The models are used to analyze a CaSO/sub 4/ (TM) thermoluminescence dosimetry system set up in a matrix about the nuclear plant and which records the terrestrial and cosmic radiation background as well as the nuclear plant contribution.

  9. Technological innovations and design improvements to achieve ALARA exposures in Tarapur Atomic Power Station 3 and 4 (540 MWe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure control at the operating Nuclear Power Station is a major concern. Tarapur Atomic Power Station(TAPS) Unit- 3 and 4 is the first Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor of 540 MWe electrical capacity in-depth review of radiation safety was done to identify the impact of design modification on dose rates. Based on the experience gained in the operation of 220 MWe design modifications incorporated in TAPS unit-3 and 4. The challenging task of meeting the International standards in the field of radiation protection had been achieved at Tarapur Atomic Power Station 3 and 4 right from the initial stages of commissioning and operation. To avoid any unplanned exposures and also to keep the exposures at low level, several innovative features were introduced. These efforts were useful in achieving the lowest collective dose in the first year of operation among the Indian Nuclear Power Plants. This paper presents the brief descriptions of the systems and communication strategies adopted and design modifications implemented to reduce the dose rates and controlling exposure at TAPS 3 and 4. (author)

  10. ALARA-based strengthening of radiation protection in a high dose rate nuclear power plant: A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first years of operation the dose rates at Goesgen nuclear power plant increased more strongly than expected. Co-60 has been the main radiation contributor from the beginning. As an immediate step, investigations were initiated to find and remove unknown cobalt sources. System modifications and optimization in water chemistry were carried out to reduce material and activity transport within the primary system. As a result the dose rates were stabilized after a couple of years -unfortunately on a high level. To reduce the dose rate levels and the occupational radiation exposure, further long term measures were implemented. System decontamination and source replacement were considered as well as the implementation of enhanced shielding procedures and a more source oriented chemistry. As a result the dose rates have reduced significantly and the occupational radiation exposure has been decreased by more than a factor of 2 over the last two decades. The reduction of the mean individual dose turned out even better and was cut by a factor of 5. On terms of plant and personal safety, Goesgen nuclear power plant decided to improve radiation protection using a smooth step by step action plan and has been very successful with it. Currently the technical possibilities have been developed to a high standard. Further improvements will be selective only. In future the focus will be set to personal behavior and human performance, using enhanced target settings, briefings, debriefings, experience feedback and (international) experience exchange. Nevertheless it will be essential to avoid unnecessary administrative and counterproductive short term hurdles. Strengthening of radiation protection is and will be a long term and continuous process. Goesgen nuclear power plant will continue to introduce further actions one by one. (author)

  11. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit

  12. ALARA-based strengthening of radiation protection in a high dose rate nuclear power plant. A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first years of operation the dose rates at Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant increased more strongly than expected. Co-60 has been the main radiation contributor from the beginning. As an immediate step, investigations were initiated to find and remove unknown cobalt sources. System modifications and optimization in water chemistry were carried out to reduce material and activity transport within the primary system. As a result the dose rates were stabilized after a couple of years - unfortunately on a high level. To reduce the dose rate levels and the occupational radiation exposure, further long term measures were implemented. System decontamination and source replacement were considered as well as the implementation of enhanced shielding procedures and a more source oriented chemistry. As a result the dose rates have reduced significantly and the occupational radiation exposure has been decreased by more than a factor of 2 over the last two decades. The reduction of the mean individual dose turned out even better and was cut by a factor of 5. On terms of plant and personal safety, Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant decided to improve Radiation Protection using a smooth step by step action plan and has been very successful with it. Currently the technical possibilities have been developed to a high standard. Further improvements will be selective only. In future the focus will be set to personal behavior and human performance, using enhanced target settings, briefings, debriefings, experience feedback and (international) experience exchange. Nevertheless it will be essential to avoid unnecessary administrative and counterproductive short term hurdles. Strengthening of Radiation Protection is and will be a long term and continuous process. Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant will continue to introduce further actions one by one. (author)

  13. Engineered design features in the HI-STAR/HI-STORM systems to maximize ALARA, safety, and community acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heltec International is a U.S. corporation headquartered in New Jersey, dedicated to providing capital goods and technical services to the power industry. Over 75 percent of the company's product output is destined for nuclear power plants. Holter counts among its active clients a majority of the nuclear plants in the United States, as well as Korea, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil. The company also has a growing market presence in Japan and the European Union. Leading U.S. nuclear plant owners, such as Entergy, Exelon, FPL, Southern Nuclear, PG and E and TVA have a long-term and continuous business relationship with Holtec International. This article deals with Holtec dry storage system description, the multi-purpose canister, hi-star 100 overpack, hi-storm 100 overpack and unique advantages of holtec's dry storage technology

  14. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  15. Global, regional and national nuclear risk management. Use of ALARA in decision-making on costly international cleanup effort of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the national risk management, it's found out that 'external' source of hazard situated at the territory of neighbor country contributes heavily to total public and environment risk of the country. In order to remove such an opportunity, it's necessary to establish for these purposes special international funds ('safety funds') intended for environment pollution international standards. They are used for helping to establish quantitative standards for contribution in such fund from different countries. The authors considered problem of the optimal international investment in risk reducing from radioactive waste dumping in water of oceans. Coordinated mechanism for management and control, international legislative and legal norms are discussed

  16. Delimitación espacial de las zonas probables de salida de aludes en el macizo de Peñalara mediante el uso de SIG

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Cañadas López-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Palomo Segovia, María; Pantoja Trigueros, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Las zonas de montaña presentan una exposición natural a ciertos riesgos naturales entre los que se encuentra el desencadenamiento de aludes. A pesar de que nuestro país no presenta, en general, un riesgo elevado de desencadenamiento de aludes, el n�

  17. Utilizing 3D-visualization to apply compulsory ALARA principles in nuclear power plant design and day-to-day operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of an advanced visualization and simulation tool to support both design as well as day-to-day operation is presented. This tool exploits cutting edge computer graphics, physics-based effects modeling, virtual reality, and gaming technologies to establish a system that can eventually be used for the administrative planning and training of plant operators and design engineers. (authors)

  18. ALARA calculations for removal PESL liner from inner concrete wall of the underground storage reservoirs in the NPP Al by VISIPLAN 3D planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of working plan 16/82022/2004 'Removal of PESL from the storage tanks 1, 2, 3/1, 3/2, 4/1, 4/2, 6/1 and 6/2 at the obj. 41' and requirements of UVZ SR it was necessary to establish an optimal sequence of removal of the PESL plastic liner from inner concrete surfaces of the walls of the tanks 6/1 and 6/2. The optimisation concerned the underground tanks 6/1 a 6/2, which have been used for storage and handling the waste water at NPP A-l where the contamination after wet cleaning is still elevated. After the accident at NPP A-l the waters with high activity were also stored in the tanks, leading to significant contamination of their inner walls. The main aim of removal the PESL from the tanks was to examine the state of the tanks construction to determine the potential ways of leakage of liquid waste from the tanks. To make a decision on the tanks future handling it was also necessary to know the level of contamination of the construction and the vicinity of the tanks as well as to collect qualified basic data to perform a boring exploration. The tanks contamination after a draining and surface cleaning were confirmed by dose rate mapping measurements close to the surfaces of the tanks. The evaluation of work program done after finalising the PESL removal from underground reservoirs showed an overestimation of the calculated collective as well as individual doses. The main source of this was fold, however, not in dose rate calculations but in large (≅2-fold) overestimation of the working time duration (it concern to removal (4 h) a swell as to fragmentation duration applied and approved in the work program. (authors)

  19. The International System on Occupational Exposure. An ALARA Success Story Relying on Strong Individual Commitments, Effective International Feedback and Exchanges, and a Robust Database - 20 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why, more than 20 years ago, did there emerge the need for an International System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)? How was it created? What were the problems and their possible solutions? Who were the main stakeholders? These are a few of the questions that the ISOE NEA Secretariat and Bureau asked Christian Lefaure, ex CEPN Deputy Director, to address in preparing a report on the history of ISOE and its progress. He had been directly involved in the brainstorming that preceded ISOE establishment, and he became the first head of the ISOE European Technical Centre, in charge of the world database development and management from 1991 to 2007. For writing this report, he made use of his own souvenirs and documentation as well as of those of tens of ISOE participants, both from major international and regional organisations (OECD/NEA, IAEA, EC and BNL), nuclear power plant utilities and national regulatory authorities. He voluntarily focused not only on the technical aspects but also on the human components of that story. This was done through personal interviews with many individuals who have played an important role at one moment of ISOE life, the analysis of answers to a questionnaire, and reviews of the minutes of many ISOE meetings that were held before and after the official establishment of the ISOE, along its lifespan to date. The most important inputs were the accounts from many individuals having very actively participated in the ISOE life at one step or another. The contacts were not always easy to make 15 or 20 years later. But in general, the questions were welcomed and the answers to the interviews and to a short questionnaire have fed this report. More than 50 individuals have answered these requests one way or another. Some have followed ISOE birth and premises; some have not seen the first steps of ISOE but have participated later on or are still participating. Some have been able to provide pictures, drawings or relevant publications. All their accounts are part of the collective memory of that important adventure shared during the last two decades by many individuals all over the world. They have allowed a more lively description than the one that would have come solely from documents, which have also been checked. This report provides excerpts of their interviews verbatim and written answers. This report is divided into three parts: Chapter 2: Why ISOE? Chapter 3: What has been the evolution of ISOE? Chapter 4: How has ISOE been perceived and is now perceived?

  20. The exercise of the ALARA principle at the installation of the primary neutron sources into the fuel assemblies at the Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Temelfn NPP consists of two units VVER 1000 type V320, each with a rated thermal power of 3 000 MW. The original Soviet design has been modernized in the early nineties and the original instrumentation and control system, the diagnostics as well as the complete radiation control system have been replaced. The modifications touched also the supply of the nuclear fuel. Currently, both Units are in the stage of commissioning, Unit I in the power ascension testing stage at a power of 100 % Nrated, Unit 2 is in the stage of zero and low power testing. (authors)

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  2. Biología, ecología, genética y conservación del topillo nival ("Chionomys nivalis") en Peñalara y Sierra Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Aranda Serrano, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Esta tesis comprende un estudio multidisciplinar e integrado sobre el topillo nival, en el que se cubren tanto aspectos sobre su autoecología y biología básica (ecología espacial, biología reproductiva y dinámica poblacional) así como aspectos de índole genético (caracterización genética de las poblaciones ibéricas utilizando marcadores microsatélites) y molecular (perfil bioquímico sanguíneo), con el fin de poder reconstruir la historia natural del topillo nival y entender el funcionamiento ...

  3. Economics v pragmatics: the control of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic principles lying behind the phrase ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) are examined with respect to the indictment of British Nuclear Fuels following certain incidents in its Sellafield Reprocessing Plant in November 1983. Based on the evidence submitted to the trial it is argued that the ALARA approach is of questionable utility to the more sensitive areas of contemporary environmental management. (author)

  4. Transforming Welfare Institutions through Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika......Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika...

  5. Design features of the cold vacuum drying facility to keep worker doses as low as reasonably achievable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NELSON, J.V.

    1999-06-24

    This report describes the design features and steps taken to ensure that the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility satisfies regulatory requirements that personnel doses be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report also documents an analysis of worker doses and demonstrates that the ALARA goal of limiting individual doses to 500 mrem per year can be met.

  6. PAR as a way of organising a social workers labour union in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Arnfjord, Steven

    Abstract, ALARA2015012:PAR as a way of organising a social workers labour union in Greenland for consideration and inclusion in the programme for the ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress to be held at St. George Hotel and Conference Centre...

  7. Sharing good practices of radiation exposure reduction in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yearly average exposure dose per reactor in Japan is relatively higher than other major countries. JNES held ALARA symposiums in Asia calling persons from abroad participated to collect the information on good practices of radiation exposure reduction measures and to share such information for promoting ALARA activities of utilities. (author)

  8. Savannah River Site dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits

  9. Licensee programs for maintaining occupational exposure to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report defines the concept of maintaining occupational exposures to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) and describes the elements necessary for specific licensees to implement, operate, and evaluate an effective ALARA program. Examples of cost-effectiveness analysis and optimization are provided. The rationale for providing more detailed guidance to specific licensees stems from the current recommendations provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as well as from the increased regulatory emphasis on maintaining occupational exposures ALARA. The objective of this work is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with a basis for updating Regulatory Guide 8.10

  10. Methodic of dose planning for WWER-1000 power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of minimization of dose loads for Zaporozhe NPP personnel were studied. They are aimed decrease the dose limits for reactor personnel to 20 mSv/year on the base of organization and technical improvements and ALARA principle

  11. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  12. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  13. Twenty years of experience in the control of low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steps taken in the health care institutions of the Province of Santa Fe, Argentina, are described which aim to optimize radiation protection in accordance with the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) concept

  14. Campaigning on radiation standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author outlines the controversy surrounding ICRP recommendations of dose limits for workers and members of the public and the ALARA concept and sketches suggestions for campaigning for radiation standards. (U.K.)

  15. Health physics practices and experience at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and development of the health physics and as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) program at Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station is described as are the fundamental elements of the program and how the program works. The benefits of this health physics/ALARA program have been determined to be (a) improved quality of manpower planning and scheduling, (b) increased efficiency of shutdown activities, (c) reduced cost of shutdown, (d) immediate awareness of adverse job exposure trends, (e) better management information on exposure-related problems, (f) improved accuracy of personnel and job dose records, and (g) in general, improved outage performance and subsequent plant operation. Experience with the health physics/ALARA program is discussed in terms of (a) savings of critical path time, (b) maintaining ALARA personnel doses, and (c) record capacity factors

  16. Radiation protection optimization: reminders, recent advances and problem to solve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA principle, the question of the existence of a threshold dose and what it is possible to do until the scientific proof of the existence or the no existence of a such threshold emerges. (N.C.)

  17. Nuclear dismantling and asbestos elimination: the same challenge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA principle constitutes a powerful tool for workers dosimetry management in the nuclear field. A consequence of the application of this principle could be an accentuation of the nuclear risk face to the industrial risk. Using works of asbestos elimination in nuclear medium, the present article examines how a generalization of the utilization of the ALARA principle is conceivable and how the existing obstacles could be removed. (N.C.)

  18. Optimization of the very low-level radioactive wastes volume in Cogema La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the reprocessing plant of la Hague, the ALARA policy was principally focused until now, on the personnel dosimetry. For several years, the approach is more global and concerns the environmental impact and radioactive wastes. In this frame, an action has been started upon the wastes relative to a surface storage and with the regulatory context, it was translated by the putting in operation of a global management of very low level radioactive wastes in an ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  19. Status of achievements reached in applying optimization of protection in design and normal operation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased emphasis in recent years on the ALARA principle and its practical implementation has opened new perspectives in the organisation of radiological protection. This change could be characterised as a shift from an 'a posteriori' control, (i.e. demonstrating that dose limits had not been exceeded), towards an 'a priori' management or dose predictive approach. Undoubtedly in both operation and design conscious efforts are made to achieve ALARA. However, there are certainly differences in various organisations' perceptions of what this practically entails and there is scope for us all to learn. If the 'ALARA Procedure' remains only a tool used at the early stage of design or as an elegant means of justifying past choices, it will have missed its main objective which is to give more rational and coherent management of practical protection at both the design and operational stages. We feel that the integration of the structured approaches of the ALARA Procedure and the ALARA Audit, into radiation protection programmes provides the best way forwad. This would require ALARA studies moving from the province of the 'experts' to the 'practitioners'. This in turn will require us to provide them with the tools to do the job. The methodology is secure but the areas of dose data collection and the costing of detriment need to be addressed further. Similarly, there is perhaps a need for the 'experts' to develop further experience of using the multiattribute and multicriteria techniques for the higher level decisions

  20. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1996-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author)

  2. Optimization of radioprotection in the nuclear power, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These 3. SFRP days are devoted to the optimization of radioprotection in the context of the evolution of the regulation in this domain with the introduction of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the public health regulations. First of all, the optimization of radioprotection is a principle of action aiming at elaborating a practical organization of risk taking based on the responsibility of the different actors and leading to an individual and collective management of the radiological risk. These days are oriented towards practical applications of this optimization and in a lesser extend towards the general radioprotection policies and the technical aspects, in particular the operational dosimetry: 1 - Alara bases and regulation: bases of radioprotection optimization; optimization and Belgium regulation: the contribution of the Royal by-law from July 20, 2001; status of the French regulation; 2 - Alara policies in the nuclear power domain: maintenance of PWR reactor vessels: exploratory approach of a joint safety and radioprotection control by the nuclear safety authority; implementation of the Alara approach at the CEA: status and perspectives; optimization of activities and Alara project at EdF; the file for the intervention in radioactive environment: an Alara tool; 3 - practical applications and experience feedback: optimization in interventional vascular radiology unit; forecast evaluation and personnel exposures optimization in the experiment hall of the laser integration line at CESTA; a French system of radioprotection experience feedback for radiological incidents; the European Alara network: a growing up dialogue and improvement structure; 4 - Alara policies in the medical and first aid services: dosimetry of radiodiagnosis personnel; integration of the radioactive waste management organization to the elimination files of hospital wastes; optimization of patient's radioprotection: a calculation approach of the specific risk by sex

  3. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in the development and coordination of the nuclear station ALARA programs

  4. The role of work management in occupational dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA is an important and growing part of radiological protection practice and it is clear that the management approach adopted towards radiation work can have a major influence over the degree of radiation exposure in the workplace. This paper reviews the various contributors to work management relating to the achievement of ALARA. It first addresses the institutional arrangements such as the regulatory framework, company organization and people motivation factors. The paper then considers the management of the tasks themselves and looks at how the lesson learned can be assessed and made available to a wider audience, and indeed whether it is possible to quantify the key parameters in order to aid the prediction of future exposures. Finally it outlines the key questions in the field of ALARA work management with the objective of focusing future discussions

  5. Process optimization of solid rad waste management at the Shelter object transformation to the ecologically safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodological approach of optimization of schemes of solid radwaste management of the Object Shelter (Shelter) and ChNPP industrial site during transformation to the ecologically safe system was developed. On the basis of the conducted models researches the ALARA-analysis was carried out for the choice of optimum variant of schemes and technologies of solid radwaste management. The criteria of choice of optimum schemes, which are directed on optimization of doses and financial expenses, minimization of amount of the formed radwaste etc, were developed for realization of this ALARA-analysis. (authors)

  6. Circles of quality in radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of Circles of quality arose in Japan like an option to capitalize the enormous potential that the workers had developed as a result of its training in the statistical tools of quality. There are presented a series of steps that could be given with the purpose of implementing a program of ALARA circles. The radiological safety is in it finishes instance responsibility of each hard-working one and there won't be a protection program that can work among apathetic people, it is in this sense where the ALARA circles can provide its maximum contribution creating a conscience of responsibility and participation

  7. Cost benefit analysis cost effectiveness analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of various protection options in order to determine which is the best compromise between cost of protection and residual risk is the purpose of the ALARA procedure. The use of decision-aiding techniques is valuable as an aid to selection procedures. The purpose of this study is to introduce two rather simple and well known decision aiding techniques: the cost-effectiveness analysis and the cost-benefit analysis. These two techniques are relevant for the great part of ALARA decisions which need the use of a quantitative technique. The study is based on an hypothetical case of 10 protection options. Four methods are applied to the data

  8. General Employee Radiological Training: Study guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon completion of this class, the participant will be able to discuss his/her responsibilities for maintaining exposures to radiation and radioactive material As Low As Reasonably Achievable. The participant will be able to select the correct response from a group of responses which verifies his/her ability to: Identify natural background and man-made sources of radiation; state the whole body radiation exposure limit for non-radiological workers; state the potential biological effects from chronic radiation exposure; identify the ALARA concept and practices; state methods used to control radiological material; and state employee responsibilities for the ALARA Program

  9. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated

  10. Optimizing of radiation protection. Quantitative approaches and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is made of some of the fundamental ideas and notions, concerned with the quantitative methods of optimizing of radiation protection: modern interpretation of the principle ALARA, definition of the terms 'benefit' and 'harm', the general quantitative measures for evaluation, the socio-economic value of the unit 'collective effective equivalent dose', etc

  11. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, Volume 6 Book 2, contains design studies for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. Topics discussed include: materials handling; processing; support systems; support utilities; spent fuel; high-level radioactive wastes and storage; field drywell storage; ALARA consideration; safety considerations; and design approach

  12. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  13. Views of the employers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The employer shall establish and maintain a safety management system, which is a part of the overall management system that facilitates the management of the occupational health and safety risks associated with the business of the organization. In addition to meeting its legal responsibilities, the employer should aim to improve its occupational health and safety performance, and its safety management system, effectively and efficiently, to meet changing business and regulatory needs. Occupational radiation protection is also a part of its activities. The concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) presumes that any increment of radiation dose may produce a proportionate incremental risk, and that all radiation doses shall be kept ALARA, taking into account social and economic factors. Up to now, by implementing various activities in accordance with the principle of ALARA, employers have been minimizing the exposure dose of plant workers. Owing to improvements in hardware and administrative control, the exposure dose of workers has followed a remarkable downward trend, and now the number of workers exceeding 20 mSv/a is nearly zero. By implementing more thorough radiation protection and safety programmes, as well as by promoting safety consciousness among individual workers, the employers are continuing their efforts, respecting ALARA, to prevent workers from being exposed to radiation unnecessarily. As a consequence, the average individual dose of workers has dropped to 1 mSv/a or so. There may no longer be a discernible decrease in doses received at most of nuclear facilities

  14. Radiological services pact relies on teamwork and experience [dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virginia Power has entered into a radiological service agreement with Westinghouse. The contract commits Westinghouse to work in partnership with Virginia Power to improve performance in the areas of radiological protection, decontamination, ALARA, and radioactive waste management. It is expected that the agreement will solve the problems caused by the shortage of qualified contractor personnel during scheduled outages. (U.K.)

  15. Radioprotection optimization in the electro-nuclear, industrial and medical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes abstracts of interventions which have been proposed during a two-day meeting in Saint-Malo in September 2010. Thus, it evokes recent legal and regulatory evolutions (new recommendations by the International Commission for Radiological Protection or ICRP, the new Basic Safety Standards of BSS of the European Commission), the optimization in the electro-nuclear field (overview of the situation for the main nuclear operators, practical examples of radioprotection optimization through the ALARA approach), in the industrial field (ALARA approach for the design of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility of IFMIF, alternative techniques of use of industrial gamma-graphy, radon management in private dwelling in Switzerland, optimization implementation in NORMS companies, management of solids and sites polluted by radioactive substances), in the medical field (teaching in radioprotection, use of ALARA in design in a proto-therapy centre, development of alternative techniques for the use of ionizing radiations in the medical field, use of diagnosis reference levels for optimization in radio-diagnosis, ALARA in veterinary radio-diagnosis, optimization of doses in nuclear medicine, optimization in interventional radiology). A last set of interventions dealt with the activity international networks for the development of radioprotection

  16. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing

  17. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule; Facteurs techniques et humains dans la reduction et l'optimisation des doses a Cogema/Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgogne, J.L. [Cogema, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    1998-07-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  18. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. This paper describes our experience and means of arriving at recommendations for ALARA

  19. RCT: 2.05 Contamination Control, Course #8770

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report focuses on the detection and control of radioactive contamination, which are an integral part of an aggressive ALARA program and provide an indication of the effectiveness of engineering controls and proper work practices in preventing the release of radioactive material. Radioactive contamination, if undetected or not properly controlled, can be spread and contaminate areas, equipment, personnel, and the environment.

  20. Guidelines on how to meet the requirement to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable. Regulatory guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of Regulatory Guide G-129 (E) is to provide Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) licensees with guidelines on how to meet the forthcoming AECB regulatory requirement to keep doses received by workers and members of the public As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), social and economic factors taken into account. it is realized that the scope for realistic dose reductions will vary depending on the nature of the licensed activity. Therefore, criteria are given in section D for determining if doses can be deemed to be as low as reasonably achievable without further evaluation. The elements that the AECB considers to be essential in the approach to ALARA are described in section E and are summarized as follows: a demonstrated management commitment to the ALARA principle; the implementation of ALARA through a licensee's organization and management, provision of resources, training, establishment of action levels, documentation and other measures; and regular operational reviews. The above elements will be the focus of any AECB assessment to verify compliance with the requirement to keep radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  1. Vegetation management 1994 fiscal year end report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year-end report evaluates vegetation management operations on the Hanford reservation conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1994 and proposed control methods to be used in FY 1995 and following years. The 1995 control methods proposed are based on an evaluation of past and current ALARA principles, employee safety, environmental impacts, applicable regulations, site esthetics, and other site-specific factors

  2. Analysis of the evolution of the collective dose in nuclear power plants in Spain; Analisis de la evolucion de la dosis colectiva en las centrales nucleares de Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponjuan Reyes, G.; Ruibia Rodiz, M. A. de la; Rosales Calvo, M.; Labarta Mancho, T.; Calavia Gimenez, I.

    2011-07-01

    This article presents an analysis of the evolution of occupational collective dose of the Spanish nuclear power plants during the period 2000 - 2008 within the international context, by the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) in order to have information contrasted to assessing the extent of application of the ALARA criteria in the Spanish plants and identify areas of priority attention.

  3. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields; Optimisation de la radioprotection des travailleurs dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  4. Reverse osmosis pilot plant experience in reprocessing plant for treatment of delay tank solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reverse osmosis (RO) technology will help in achieving ALARA concept, which will be beneficial for the environment. In present study, the removal of alpha activity, beta activity, nitrate and total dissolve salt (TDS) are investigated from delay tank solution utilizing RO pilot plant

  5. Reactor. Mind picture of the future Jules-Horowitz Reactor (RHJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives information about the future research reactor, named Reactor Jules-Horowitz (RJH). This irradiation reactor will be placed at industrialists disposal, for research concerning the competitiveness and the safety french electro-nuclear park. Principles and innovations are detailed. This reactor will respect the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable). (A.L.B.)

  6. Addendum to the performance assessment analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 west area active burial grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    An addendum was completed to the performance assessment (PA) analysis for the active 200 West Area low-level solid waste burial grounds. The addendum includes supplemental information developed during the review of the PA analysis, an ALARA analysis, a comparison of PA results with the Hanford Groundwater Protection Strategy, and a justification for the assumption of 500 year deterrence to the inadvertent intruder.

  7. Optimization of the workers radiation protection in the electro nuclear, industrial and medical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference is devoted to the radiation protection and the best way to optimize it. It reviews each area of the nuclear industry, and explores also the medical sector. Dosimetry, ALARA principle and new regulation are important points of this meeting. (N.C.)

  8. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  9. US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks

  10. Valuing radiation detriment for optimisation purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief article discusses new information which may affect NRPB's present advice on the use of cost benefit analysis for determining whether radiation exposures are ALARA. Topics discussed include the effect of the revised radiation risk estimates on the value of unit collective dose, human capital and willingness-to-pay, and comparing values of statistical life and risk. (UK)

  11. Recommended radiation protection practices for low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupationally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61. 66 references, 26 figures, 7 tables

  12. SPR 2015. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-04-01

    The volume contains the abstracts of the SPR (society for pediatric radiology) 2015 meeting covering the following issues: fetal imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, cardiac imaging, chest imaging, oncologic imaging, tools for process improvement, child abuse, contrast enhanced ultrasound, image gently - update of radiation dose recording/reporting/monitoring - meaningful or useless meaning?, pediatric thoracic imaging, ALARA.

  13. Cean air and clear responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the text of the address given by Commissioner Kenneth C. rogers, USNRC, at the 23rd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. Mr. Rogers reviews the regulatory approach to the subject, discussing the requirements of 10CFR20 and ALARA principles. A discussion of the talk follows the text

  14. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  15. Multiple cost criteria for occupational dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a simple, feasible procedure for deciding if a proposed dose reduction measure is justified under ALARA, based on engineering economic principles of project feasibility analysis. Particular attention is given to the fixing of cost criteria: the importance of melding disparate objectives into a single parameter, and the distinction between a cost criterion and a cost consideration. (author)

  16. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie Institute

  17. Radiation source term reduction in BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of slides presents: the collective radiation exposures at US and European BWRs; the European experience with source term reduction measures (normal water chemistry - NWC): zinc addition, stellite replacement, full system decontamination; the effects of evolving water chemistries/US experience. The conclusions are summarized as follows: worldwide reduction of collective radiation exposures at BWRs by following the ALARA principle; zinc addition proven option for source term reduction for NWC and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) plants; reducing feedwater iron has been proven to reduce dose rates - as operational observations in the US indicate; optimized feedwater iron is very important for fuel performance under all modes of water chemistry (HWC, Zn, and noble metal chemical addition (NMCA)); minimize 59Co sources/stellite, follow the ALARA principle; full system decontamination (FSD) plus zinc injection is an attractive option for reducing reactor coolant system (RCS) dose rates of mature BWR plants

  18. Narveos: a virtual reality simulation environment for nuclear radiating working sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear industry, any company involved in the management and/or the design and performance of interventions on equipment must find the most appropriate scenario considering several constraints: technical requirements: feasibility, kind of means to use, operating modes, tasks scheduling; economical requirements: global mission cost minimization and long-term funding; environmental requirements: waste management, contamination containment, different impacts; legal and regulatory requirements: the ALARA principle, some specific facility rules, the target state with respect to governmental decrees. Today, complex questions about interventions design with increasing reactivity, lower costs and shorter delays must be addressed. In addition, one must deal with unexpected situations during the effective realization of the interventions, and finally the experience feedback of the missions must be consolidated. One important question related to the above mentioned aspects is the choice of a human versus a remote handling or robotic intervention including ALARA consideration for decommissioning workers. (authors)

  19. Use of cost benefit analysis in the field of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade NRPB has had a program of work on the development of cost benefit analysis (CBA) techniques in the optimisation of radiological protection. A provisional framework for including suggestions for assigning a value to unit collective dose was published for consultation in 1981/82 and after various interim statements this process culminated in formal advice in 1986. As part of this work, and as part of a project for the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) the NRPB has carried out a number of case studies to demonstrate the practical implementation of ALARA or optimisation of protection using CBA. These techniques, used in conjunction with ALARA audits, are now in general use in the NRPB's Radiation Protection Advisor Service. They have been used for a variety of medical and industrial situations, but mainly in industrial radiography as this is the part of the non-nuclear sector where occupational exposure problems predominate. Three cases are presented as representative examples

  20. Efforts to control occupational radiation exposure at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Station collective dose at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station -1 and 2 was high compared to other new generation Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Due to aging of the plant, system radiation levels and radioactivity of the system heavy water have been increasing. In addition maintenance has also increased. Various efforts were initiated to keep the occupational exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). A number of ways were identified to reduce the radiation levels and collective doses. Important among them were administrative control, indigenous way of shielding, system decontamination, system modification, training, mock-up and pre job briefing. Previous operating experiences, ALARA review, increased radiation protection surveillance, emphasis on use of personnel protective equipment's, good housekeeping and ventilation improvement have also helped in reduction of station collective dose. (author)

  1. The Texas Solution to the Nation's Disposal Needs for Irradiated Hardware - 13337

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The closure of the disposal facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, to out-of-compact states in 2008 left commercial nuclear power plants without a disposal option for Class B and C irradiated hardware. In 2012, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) opened a highly engineered facility specifically designed and built for the disposal of Class B and C waste. The WCS facility is the first Interstate Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed and operated under the Low-level Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. Due to design requirements of a modern Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) facility, traditional methods for disposal were not achievable at the WCS site. Earlier methods primarily utilized the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept of distance to accomplish worker safety. The WCS method required the use of all three ALARA concepts of time, distance, and shielding to ensure the safe disposal of this highly hazardous waste stream. (authors)

  2. Strategy proposed by Electricite de France in the development of automatic tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy proposed by EDF in the development of a means to limit personal and collective dosimetry is recent. It follows in the steps of a policy that consisted of developing remote operation means for those activities of inspection and maintenance on the reactor, pools bottom, steam generators (SGs), also reactor building valves; target activities because of their high dosimetric cost. One of the main duties of the UTO (Technical Support Department), within the EDF, is the maintenance of Pressurized Water Reactors in French Nuclear Power Plant Operations (consisting of 54 units) and the development and monitoring of specialized tools. To achieve this, the UTO has started a national think-tank on the implementation of the ALARA process in its field of activity and created an ALARA Committee responsible for running and monitoring it, as well as a policy for developing tools. This point will be illustrated in the second on reactor vessel heads

  3. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  4. Chemistry control at Bruce NGS 'B' from constructed to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce NGS 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro Nuclear Unit. The significance of the improved Construction installation and Quality Assurance procedures, combined with those of Operations is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met

  5. Repeat film analysis and its implications for quality assurance in dental radiology: An institutional case study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Context: The goal of any radiologist is to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs, while keeping patient exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the reasons for radiograph rejections through a repeat film analysis in an Indian dental school. Settings and Design: An observational study conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month ...

  6. Atmospheric modelling of tritium forms transport: review of capabilities and R&D needs for the assessment of fusion facilities environmental impact

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Paloma; Velarde Mayol, Marta; Ardao, Jose; Perlado Martin, Jose Manuel; Sedano, Luis

    2012-01-01

    One of the key scrutiny issues of new coming energy era would be the environmental impact of fusion facilities managing one kg of tritium. The potential change of committed dose regulatory limits together with the implementation of nuclear design principles (As Low as Reasonably achievable - ALARA -, Defense in Depth -D-i-D-) for fusion facilities could strongly impact on the cost of deployment of coming fusion technology. Accurate modeling of environmental tritium transport forms (HT, HTO) f...

  7. Analysis of the evolution of the collective dose in nuclear power plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents an analysis of the evolution of occupational collective dose of the Spanish nuclear power planLs during the period 2000 - 2008 within the international context, by the Nuclear SafeLy Council (CSN) in order to have information contrasted to assessing the extent of applicaLion of the ALARA criLeria in the Spanish plants and identify areas of priority attention.

  8. Occupational exposure in the National Institute of Nuclear Research between 1990-1994. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an analysis of the occupational doses of the workers is performed, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs and activities of the radiological occupational control that the Radiological Protection Department has been carrying out in order to execute the ALARA Recommendation. It is also discussed the possibility of adopting the recommendations about dose limits of ICRP 60. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs

  9. Recommendations for the basic concepts and dose limits in domestic safeguard regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main concepts and standards presented in ICRP recommendations on radiation protection have been analyzed, and they are compared with domestic radiation protection guides (RPG-76). Special attention is paid to the ALARA principle, stochastic and non-stochastic effect, hazard factor, maximum dose equivalent dose limits, effective dose equivalent. It is shown, that in the national legislation the former approach should be preserved, but partially modernized, taking into account new scientific data and ICRP recommendations

  10. Dose reduction due to the use of pulsed miction-cystourethrography in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The miction-cystourethrography (MCU) is the most frequently used radiographic method (30-50%) in pediatrics. The absorbed doses were significantly reduced during the last years aimed to realize the ALARA principle. The scope of the work is to study the possibility of a further dose reduction using pulsed radiation systems based on a computer-aided analysis of the dose-time curve during MCU examination.

  11. Backfit of a redesigned radwaste processing and solidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The original design of the radwaste system for the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 2, had been overtaken by recent developments in processing and volume reduction/solidification technology as well as heightened awareness of ALARA concepts and experience with similar systems in operating plants. This paper describes the design and backfit of current technology liquid and solid radwaste processing systems, including an asphalt-based volume reduction and solidification system

  12. Waste hoist technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates unique applications of current hoisting design practice that satisfy the waste package transfer functional requirements for a Nuclear Waste Repository in Salt. Hoisting system configurations that could provide the desired service for this important function are identified. Implications on hoist design for both shielded and unshielded waste package casks are evaluated. The report also presents specially engineered features which limit exposure levels to as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) criteria. 32 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  13. International benchmarking analysis on the evolution of occupational exposures in the Spanish nuclear park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the essential tools for assessing the ALARA principle in the occupational exposure of workers in nuclear facilities is the availability of data on collective doses in order to be able to see the evolution of the implementation of the ALARA principle compared with the plant itself and also with other similar plants (benchmarking analysis). This paper shows a benchmarking analysis on the implementation of the ALARA principle in the Spanish nuclear park based on the evolution of occupational exposure from 1980 to 2006 within an international frame including a detailed individual analysis describing the relevant operations and factors influencing the annual collective dose in the Spanish reactors. For this purpose, data from the ISOE database, world's largest database on occupational exposure data in nuclear power plants, have been used. The analyses shows a common decreasing trend in the evolution of the annual collective dose for both types of reactors in Spain, pressurized and boiling water reactor. Nevertheless, this general decreasing trend shows some temporary increases when analysing individual plants. A decade ago, the relationship between collective doses in Spain and the total of reactors participating in ISOE was inverted being since 1997 lower than the average doses in the ISOE world. This reduction is the result of a jointly effort between the regulator and the utilities being a major achievement regarding the ALARA implementation in Spain. However, we cannot afford to become complaisant as there are still some challenges to face at the level of individual reactor. Details of this challenges are also presented in this paper. (author)

  14. News equipment to the remote inspection by ultrasonic of the areas of the flange screw the reactor vessel; Nuevos equipos para la inspeccion remota por ultrasonidos de las zonas roscadas de la brida de la vasija del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J. R.; Willke, A.; Sanchez, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper is a presentation of the development of both ultrasonic remote inspection equipment threaded areas for accommodation with and without pin-guide describing its main characteristics and general requirements and conditions for use. Benefits will also be presented that introduces the use of this new equipment, among which are those relating to the minimization of dose ALARA compliance and other technical criteria as the permanent record of the ultrasound data that no manual inspection are available, in addition to the economic.

  15. Radiation protection optimization and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence quantification of bound factors to work management, and the obtained results when you apply the dosimetric economical evaluation model of the radiation protection experiments, prove that ALARA principle application musn't bound to actions on the radiation sources, but that you can find a wide act field in the irradiation work volume management topics. 53 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs., 4 appendixes

  16. Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project assessment plan for potential worker exposure: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the ''Assessment Plan for Potential Worker Exposure'' is to determine the potential radiological exposures to the workers as they dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) on the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project (TDDP). An evaluation of the work procedures and precautions will be made so as to maintain the exposure levels As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). 10 refs., 10 figs

  17. Basis for limiting exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the uncertainty about the size of the risk from radiation, it is assumed that all doses are potentially harmful with the probability of harm proportional to the dose, without threshold. Canada participates in the work of UNSCEAR, and the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board follows the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in setting its dose limits, encouraging the application of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept through its licensing and compliance activities

  18. Assessment and control of shielding in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The establishment of adequate shielding is a guarantor of the application of the ALARA principle. This work provides a method for the assessment of the thickness of shields and armouring of a medical radiology control room. An application of this method was performed for the verification of the thicknesses of protective barriers at AMIT (Association Médicale Inter-entreprises de Tananarive) center Behoririka, Antananarivo, Madagascar.

  19. Radiation protection at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Roesler, Stefan; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  20. Optimization of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Symposium presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: the role of optimization of radiation protection (10 papers), application of the principle of optimization of radiation protection (26 papers), methods and techniques in the optimization of radiation protection (7 papers). An additional session was devoted to the presentation of a summary statement and to an extended discussion by a panel of senior experts on the question of whether optimization (ALARA) is meeting its objective

  1. Radiation exposure and radiological protection in interventional radiological procedures with special attention to neurointerventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Kouichirou; Sakai, Kunio [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yoshimura, Shutaro; Oka, Tetsuya; Ito, Jusuke

    2000-11-01

    It is necessary to interventional radiologists to understand the system of radiological protection recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection: justification, optimization, and individual dose and risk limits. Estimation and measurements of the radiation exposure to patients and personnel are important for radiological protection to avoid radiation injuries, such as temporal epilation and cataract. The practical principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) should be kept in any interventional radiological procedure. (author)

  2. Controllable doses. New ICRP definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less than 10 years after the introduction of a new radiation protection philosophy, the International Commission Radiation Protection (ICRP) once again proposes a change in how radiation doses must be considered: as a collective dose based on the ALARA approach or a individual-oriented view of protection based on 'controllable doses'. The ICRP invites everybody to answer the question whether this change is desirable or not, and why. 2 refs

  3. Use of technology in implementing radiation protection good practices at RAPS-5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL), is committed to perform all its activities while providing high level of radiological protection and continue to meet international standards on radiological safety. In continuation to reducing in expenditure of station collective dose/individual dose both in terms of external and internal dose is attained by adopting many new and innovative good radiological practices as per ALARA principle. Some of these improved radiological practices of RAPS-5 and 6 are discussed in this paper

  4. Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report. Fourth quarter calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansing, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed information pertaining to As Low As Reasonably Achievable/Contamination Control Improvement Project (ALARA/CCIP) activities are outlined. Improved commitment to the WHC ALARA/CCIP Program was experienced throughout FY 1994. During CY 1994, 17 of 19 sitewide ALARA performance goals were completed on or ahead of schedule. Estimated total exposure by facility for CY 1994 is listed in tables by organization code for each dosimeter frequency. Facilities/areas continue to utilize the capabilities of the RPR tracking system in conjunction with the present site management action-tracking system to manage deficiencies, trend performance, and develop improved preventive efforts. Detailed information pertaining to occupational injuries/illnesses are provided. The Industrial Safety and Hygiene programs are described which have generated several key initiatives that are believed responsible for improved safety performance. A breakdown of CY 1994 occupational injuries/illnesses by type, affected body group, cause, job type, age/gender, and facility is provided. The contributing experience of each WHC division/department in attaining this significant improvement is described along with tables charting specific trends. The Radiological Control Program is on schedule to meet all RL Site Management System milestones and program commitments.

  5. Selecting a land disposal alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter presents procedures needed to plan for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The basic planning objective is to develop facilities for disposal of LLW that will provide adequate protection of public health and safety by: (1) ensuring compliance with basic radiation protection criteria, and (2) reducing detrimental effects from waste disposal to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Compliance with applicable basic radiation dose limits for individual members of the general public and for radiation workers is the primary performance objective, which must be achieved without regard to cost. The ALARA requirement represents a secondary performance objective intended to accomplish further reduction of detrimental effects. Cost becomes a consideration that is taken into account in judging what further reduction of detrimental effects is reasonably achievable. Selection of a disposal site and selection of a disposal technology are the major planning decisions for realizing the basic performance objectives. The focus of this report is, therefore, on presenting a quantitative methodology for selecting a site, technology, and facility design that can accept the candidate waste streams and reduce detrimental effects to levels that are ALARA

  6. The information system on occupational exposure and related IAEA activities in the Europe region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Agency's Occupational Radiation Protection Programme, within the Division of Radiation and Waste Safety, are to encourage the global harmonization and optimization of occupational radiation protection in situations of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation; and to have in place and ensure compliance with operational health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency on its premises and in occupational activities under its supervision or control. The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) forms an integral part of this programme and the purpose of this paper is to present the current status of ISOE and the IAEA activities in the Europe region in support of the ISOE. The ISOE prograrnme will continue to be a very important part of the IAEA Occupational Radiation Protection Prograrnme as will the related activities under the Technical Co-operation prograrnme. Realizing the need for information exchange and promotion of the application of the ALARA principle in industries other than nuclear power plants, the Agency has recently initiated the creation of regional ALARA Networks. These are seen as an effective way to foster good working practices and the development of an ALARA culture. Further information on the IAEA radiation protection prograrnme can be found in the Web page: www.iaea.orgtns/rasanet. (authors)

  7. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  8. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, Ch. [Centre d' etudes sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Janssens, A. [European Commission DGTREN, Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Mrabit, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ahier, B. [Nuclear Energy Agency, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  9. Radiation-related impacts for nuclear plant physical modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation fields in nuclear power plants present significant obstacles to accomplishing repairs and modifications to many systems and components in these plants. The NRC's generic cost estimating methodology attempts to account for radiation-related impacts by assigning values to the radiation labor productivity factor. This radiation labor productivity factor is then used as a multiplier on the greenfield or new nuclear plant construction labor to adjust for the actual operating plant conditions. The value assigned to the productivity factor is based on the work-site radiation levels. The relationship among ALARA practices, work-place radiation levels, and radiation-related cost impacts previously had not been adequately characterized or verified. The assumptions made concerning the use and application of radiation-reduction measures such as system decontamination and/or the use of temporary shielding can significantly impact estimates of both labor requirements and radiation exposure associated with a particular activity. Overall guidance was needed for analysts as to typical ALARA practices at nuclear power plants and the effects of these practices in reducing work-site dose rates and overall labor requirements. This effort was undertaken to better characterize the physical modification cost and radiological exposure impacts related to the radiation environment of the work place. More specifically, this work sought to define and clarify the quantitative relationships between or among: radiation levels and ALARA practices, such as the use of temporary shielding, decontamination efforts, or the use of robots and remote tools; radiation levels and labor productivity factors; radiation levels, in-field labor hours, and worker radiation exposure; radiation levels and health physics services costs; and radiation levels, labor hours, and anti-contamination clothing and equipment. 48 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Operational Aspects of Space Radiation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyland, M. D.; Johnson, A. S.; Semones, E. J.; Shelfer, T.; Dardano, C.; Lin, T.; Zapp, N. E.; Rutledge, R.; George, T.

    2005-01-01

    Minimizing astronaut's short and long-term medical risks arising from exposure to ionizing radiation during space missions is a major concern for NASA's manned spaceflight program, particularly exploration missions. For ethical and legal reasons, NASA follows the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) principal in managing astronaut's radiation exposures. One implementation of ALARA is the response to space weather events. Of particular concern are energetic solar particle events, and in low Earth orbit (LEO), electron belt enhancements. To properly respond to these events, NASA's Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), in partnership with the NOAA Space Environment Center (SEC), provides continuous flight support during U.S. manned missions. In this partnership, SEC compiles space weather data from numerous ground and space based assets and makes it available in near real-time to SRAG (along with alerts and forecasts), who in turn uses these data as input to models to calculate estimates of the resulting exposure to astronauts. These calculations and vehicle instrument data form the basis for real-time recommendations to flight management. It is also important to implement ALARA during the design phase. In order to appropriately weigh the risks associated with various shielding and vehicle configuration concepts, the expected environment must be adequately characterized for nominal and worst case scenarios for that portion of the solar cycle and point in space. Even with the best shielding concepts and materials in place (unlikely), there will be numerous occasions where the crew is at greater risk due to being in a lower shielded environment (short term transit or lower shielded vehicles, EVAs), so that accurate space weather forecasts and nowcasts, of particles at the relevant energies, will be crucial to protecting crew health and safety.

  11. Assessment of occupational radiation exposure for two fusion power plant designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the occupational radiation exposure issues of the fusion power stations has been performed focusing on the primary heat transport system (PHTS) of safety and environmental assessment of fusion power (SEAFP) reactor models. Fuel cycle systems have been considered for completeness, but not assessed. Fission reactor experience and fusion power reactor studies formed the basis of this assessment. Four assessments were performed. Two were based on SEAFP models 1 and 2, and the other two were based on improvements of these models suggested by an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review. The following main conclusions are drawn from the assessments. The PHTS dose estimated for SEAFP model 1 (about 300 p-mSv/a) is below the current fission industry norm (about 500 p-mSv/a), but it is not ALARA. An ALARA value of 130 p-mSv/a is achievable and would be a reasonable target for the PHTS. The PHTS dose estimated for SEAFP model 2 (about 3000 p-mSv/a) is well above the current fission industry norm. Some design measures have been identified, that can reduce this dose to about 1200 p-mSv/a. While this is a substantial reduction, it is still well above the fission industry norm, therefore, additional effort is needed to obtain further reductions. The large difference in heat transport system doses between model 1 and model 2 is due to two main factors, the coolant and the coolant tubing material. The helium coolant eliminates the presence of corrosion products, and the vanadium alloy reduces the sputtering rate

  12. Improving occupational radiation protection in the Asian NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the IAEA Technical Cooperation projects on improving Occupational Radiation Protection in the Asian area and the added value of the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) for achieving a world class Radiation Protection Program in respective model Nuclear Power Plants located in the Region. The paper reflects the activities and main results that have been achieved under the IAEA Technical Cooperation (TC) projects RAS/9/022 and RAS/9/030 during the year 1999 to 2006. In 1999 the IAEA invited three Countries, People Republic of China, Republic of Korea and Pakistan (project RAS/9/022) and, in a second phase the Islamic Republic of Iran joined them (project RAS9/0/30). For each country a model Nuclear Power Plant was decided. At the beginning, the main objective was to improve the implementation of the optimisation principle in NPPs but it was later on considered that further support was needed on the following issues ALARA awareness of Regulatory bodies and management Self-assessment and corrective actions Further exchange of good practices and promotion of openness and transparency Cost effectiveness in the application of the ALARA principle Extension to at least one more NPP in each country The second phase focused on; Self-assessment and corrective actions programmes Increased ALARA awareness in workers, management and regulatory staff Further exchange of good practices and promotion of openness and transparency The Paper also describes the importance of the input provided by the ISOE network during these projects and its further added value such as, for example, providing opportunities for international benchmarking. The final outcome of the project is to be compiled in a working document and as a CDROM. (author)

  13. The occupational exposure during characterisation, conditioning and securing of radioactive sealed sources in Croatia - case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to compare passive personal dosimeters to an active electronic one, a study of occupational exposure during decommissioning of an old temporary storage of radioactive sealed sources was conducted (the Storage project). All the workers involved in decommission (supervisors and those who actually worked with sources) were under specific (additional to regular surveillance) dosimetric surveillance using film dosimeters, TLD and active electronic personal dosimeters ALARA OD simultaneously. Gammaspectrometric measurements were carried out prior and upon the decommission, covering the area in front of the storage, where overall waste from the storage was inspected for any misplaced sources. Radon concentration measurements were conducted inside the storage after decommission. The whole work was finished in 10 working days. Total occupational doses received by individual workers during characterization, conditioning and securing of radioactive sealed sources were in range from 0 to 20 mSv in ten days. Results for accumulated dose and dose rates obtained by ALARA OD provided a new insight into an occupational exposure of workers due to the fact that ALARA OD AEPD (Active Electronic Personal Dosimeter) records the time when the fractioned external exposure occurred and the duration in seconds of the given exposure. That is important when dose was received within short-time interval during the characterization of the source, when the radiation source suffered technical failures or when the handling difficulties occurred while moving the source from its original sealed container to a new waste container. Occupational dose upgraded with the dose rate data obtained with active electronic dosimeters allows the specification of real occupational burden to workers and reconstruction of their occupational exposure (mode of operation - work regime) in time. (author)

  14. Traitement d'images de radiographie à faible dose : Débruitage et rehaussement de contraste conjoints et détection automatique de points de repère anatomiques pour l'estimation de la qualité des images

    OpenAIRE

    Irrera, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We aim at reducing the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) dose limits for images acquired with EOS full-body system by means of image processing techniques. Two complementary approaches are studied. First, we define a post-processing method that optimizes the trade-off between acquired image quality and X-ray dose. The Non-Local means filter is extended to restore EOS images. We then study how to combine it with a multi-scale contrast enhancement technique. The image quality for the diag...

  15. Traitement d’images de radiographie à faible dose : Débruitage et rehaussement de contraste conjoints, et détection automatique de points de repère anatomiques pour l’estimation de la qualité des images

    OpenAIRE

    Irrera, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We aim at reducing the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) dose limits for images acquired with EOS full-body system by means of image processing techniques. Two complementary approaches are studied.First, we define a post-processing method that optimizes the trade-off between acquired image quality and X-ray dose. The Non-Local means filter is extended to restore EOS images. We then study how to combine it with a multi-scale contrast enhancement technique. The image quality for the diagn...

  16. Chemistry control at Bruce N.G.S. 'B' from construction to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce N.G.S. 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro nuclear unit. The significance of the improved construction installation and quality assurance is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met. (author). 11 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet (ft)) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area

  18. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire

  19. Study on behavior and treatment of radioiodine and carbon-14 at reprocessing of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of dissolver Off-gas (DOG) is one of important operation in the head-end process of spent fuel reprocessing. Radioiodine, carbon-14 are contained in the DOG. Confinement of radioiodine is required and the reduction of carbon-14 will be required following ALARA principle. In the present study spent fuel dissolution and off-gas treatment tests were carried out using spent fuel with burnups of 8,000 , 29,000 and 44,000 MWd·t-1. Behavior of radioiodine and carbon-14 was investigated. In addition, several adsorbents for carbon dioxide to capture carbon-14 from the DOG were tested in a cold equipment. (author)

  20. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the major considerations in establishing management policies, staff, facilities and equipment, and operational procedures to promote radiation safety in medical or hospital care programs using radioactive materials licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are presented. It is a compendium of good practices for establishing adequate radiation safety programs in medical institutions. The information presented is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations of interest to the specific type of activity

  1. McArthur River : a high-grade uranium mine poses radiation protection challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArthur river is the largest, highest-grade uranium deposit yet discovered. In developing the mine design, radiation protection has been paramount. Wherever possible standard sizes of equipment have been used in the mine design to avoid the extra costs of items that are not routinely manufactured. The dose predictions that have been done for all jobs int the operation, including upset conditions, maintenance, and spill clean-up, indicate that all employees will be well below the recommended dose limits. The ALARA analysis has demonstrated that additional measures to further reduce dose are not justified on a cost-benefit analysis

  2. A remote technologies application program at Nine Mile Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally, the use of robotics and remote technologies within the nuclear industry has been limited to hot cell facilities for fuel processing and highly radioactive sample handling. However, now faced with increasing pressures to reduce occupational radiation exposures as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA), the nuclear utility industry is looking beyond the traditional exposure reduction methods and is slowly and carefully entering into robotic automation. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the efforts, achievements, and experiences of the personnel at the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) Nine Miles Point Nuclear Stations to become involved in this emerging technology

  3. Portable laboratories for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The portable radiometric laboratories LARA-10, LARA-GS, LARA-86 and ALARA-10 designed, developed and produced at the Boris Kidric Institute are described. Earlier models (LARA-1, LARA-1D, LARA-2 and LARA-5) are presented in brief. The basic characteristics of the devices and methods of measurements are given. All the instruments are battery operated and almost all can also use 220V/50Hz supply. They are a very suitable facility for radiological monitoring of soil, water, food, clothes etc., when working in field conditions (author)

  4. Processeringsoptimering med Canons software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle

    2009-01-01

    . Muligheder i software optimering blev studeret i relation til optimal billedkvalitet og kontrol optagelser, for at undersøge om det var muligt at acceptere diagnostisk billedkvalitet og derved tage afsæt i ALARA. Metode og materialer Et kvantitativt eksperimentelt studie baseret på forsøg med teknisk og...... humant fantom. CD Rad fantom anvendes som teknisk fantom, hvor billederne blev analyseret med CD Rad software, og resultatet var en objektiv IQF værdi. Det humane fantom var et lamme pelvis med femur, der via NRPB’ er sammenlignelig med absorptionen ved et femårigt barn. De humane forsøgsbilleder blev...

  5. Disposal facilities on land for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; general issues (including - overall strategy; storage versus disposal; existing disposal routes; the need for further facilities; responsibilities; provision of advice and freedom of information); authorisations under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960; radiological protection (including - the basis for radiological requirements; dose limits; risk assessment; ALARA); permissions under the Planning Acts; licensing under the Nuclear Installations Act 1965; site selection - criteria and information requirements; phases in the life of a disposal facility; international requirements of the Euratom Treaty. (U.K.)

  6. 30 Years of NRWG activities towards harmonization of nuclear safety criteria and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work performed and the results achieved by the NRWG since its creation in 1972 to advise the Commission on nuclear safety matters (safety methodologies, criteria, standards, postulated accidents inside the nuclear installations, natural hazards, man-made hazards, training of personnel and use of simulator, ALARA policy to reduce the doses to the personnel and the public, emergency planning, defence in depth and integrity of the successive barriers between the radioactive products and the environment, radiological consequences of postulated accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, severe accidents analysis and management. The report also lists a number of technical subjects where NRWG has played a leading role. (author)

  7. Construction of pilot system for the Korea information system of occupational exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Seong Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Il; Im, Bok Soo; Lee, Seon Mi; Kim, Hyung Uk; Chae, Eun Yeong [ADDLAB Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    In this study, the construction of Korea Information System of Occupational Exposure (KISOE) system is designed with occupational exposure control system based on information evaluation technology and it makes the reliability of the personal exposure by use of personal dose verification. While the operation of national based radiation worker protection system, this system are settled the control system for radiation worker and ALARA. The purpose of construction and operation of pilot system of KISOE systematically is to derive the master plan of KISOE, stable development of this system, and serve the high quality radiation use internationally.

  8. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database

  9. Advances in Canadian regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new General Amendments to the Regulations, new recommendations on dose limits, developments in techniques and safety thinking, and aging of plant are all contributing to the need for a significant number of new regulatory document on a wide range of topics. this paper highlights a number of initiatives taken in response to these pressures, giving a brief background to the initiative and, where possible, outlining some of the ideas in the document licensing guides on new dose limits, dosimetry, safety analysis, reliability, fault tree analysis, reporting requirements, human factors, software, the ALARA principle, backfitting and the licensing process. (Author) 29 refs., fig., 4 tabs

  10. Active personal dosemeters for individual monitoring and other new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we will present a first (but not complete) status description of active personal dosemeters (APDs) and their implementation in European countries. In modern radiation protection practices, APDs are becoming absolutely necessary operational tools for satisfying the ALARA principle. Despite their success, they are relatively new for individual monitoring of workers. Regulation, legal requirements and calibration procedures are different in European member states. A catalogue of commercially available and prototype devices is presented. Improvement on devices and in implementation of calibration method are expected in the forthcoming years. End-user feedback experience and requirements are reported. (authors)

  11. A method of safety assurance for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes safety assurance method for fusion experimental reactor. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle for a normal condition and the defence in depth principle for states deviated from the normal condition can be used as basic principles of safety assurance of the reactor. The method includes safety design for systems, importance categorization method to impose suitable demands to their systems, safety evaluation method to validate the design and application of the method. It is considered that this method can be a strong candidate for safety assurance method. (author)

  12. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  13. Options for disposal of radioactive wastes arising from steam generator dismantling. Assessment from the external exposure aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses on steam generator dismantling at the Jaslovske Bohunice V1 nuclear power plant with VVER-440/230 reactors. The VISIPLAN 3D ALARA computer code was used to calculate external exposure arising from radiation existing on the waste package surface. The dependence of the external exposure on the internal configuration of the waste was investigated. The effect of the waste storage time (before packaging and disposal) and on personnel exposure was also examined and the suitability of the various decontamination techniques was assessed. (orig.)

  14. Health physics activities in support of the thermal shield removal/disposal and core support barrel repair at the St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health physics activities related to the removal and disposal of a thermal shield at a nuclear power plant and subsequent repairs to the core support barrel required increased planning relative to a normal refueling/maintenance outage. The repair of the core support barrel was a first in the nuclear power industry. Pre-job planning was of great concern because of extremely high radiation levels associated with the irradiated stainless steel thermal shield and core support barrel. ALARA techniques used in the preparation of the thermal shield for removal and shipment to the disposal site are discussed

  15. Phalangeal bone mineral density predicts incident fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Holmberg, Teresa; Brixen, Kim; Rubin, Katrine Hass;

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study investigates the use of phalangeal bone mineral density (BMD) in predicting fractures in a cohort (15,542) who underwent a BMD scan. In both women and men, a decrease in BMD was associated with an increased risk of fracture when adjusted for age and prevalent fractures...... Examination Survey 2007-2008. BMD at the middle phalanges of the second, third and fourth digits of the non-dominant hand was measured using RA (Alara MetriScan®). These data were merged with information on incident fractures retrieved from the Danish National Patient Registry comprising the International...

  16. Some Reproductive Features of Brown Trout (Salmo trutta macrostigma Dumeril, 1858) and its Larval Development under Culture Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    O. Demir, İ. Gülle1, E. Gümüş2*, F. Küçük, A. Günlü and K. Kepenek3

    2010-01-01

    In this study, some reproductive features of wild brown trout (Salmo trutta macrostigma Dumeril, 1858) populations in Aksu, Eşen, Alara and Alakır streams in Turkey were examined and larval development was also investigated in two different culture conditions established on Eşen Stream (Trial 1) and at the Research Unit of Eğirdir Faculty of Fisheries at Süleyman Demirel University (Trial 2). The spawning time of brown trout in Aksu Stream in the second half of December was different from oth...

  17. Radioactive waste management. UK policy examined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on radioactive waste management in the United Kingdom. Topics considered at the conference included the UK Radioactive Waste Inventory, radioactive waste management and disposal strategies in the European Community, radioactive waste disposal in the Federal Republic of Germany, environmental options for waste disposal and storage, marine disposal, public opinion, the reduction of BNFL discharges, planning aspects, the ALARA principle, air pollution from fossil-fuel power plants, United Kingdom government policy with regard to radioactive wastes, and the role of the media in the public over the UK nuclear industry

  18. Contaminated sediment removal from a spent fuel storage canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A leaking underground spent fuel transfer canal between a decommissioned reactor and a radiochemical separations building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was found to contain RCRA-hazardous and radioactive sediment. Closure of the Part B RCRA permitted facility required the use of an underwater robotic vacuum and a filtration-containment system to separate and stabilize the contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the radiological controls established to maintain contamination and exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) during the sediment removal

  19. 4. S.F.R.P. days on the optimization of radiation protection in the electronuclear, industrial and medical areas; 4. journees SFRP sur l'optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    These days are dedicated to the implementation of the radiation protection optimization in the activities of the electronuclear sector, of the industrial sector, the medical sector, the laboratories and the centers of research and the university sector. All the aspects of the practical application of the radiation protection optimization of the workers, the public and the patients will be approached. The oral communications and posters concern the following subjects: foundations of the optimization principle, new statutory context, transmission of ALARA principle, operational dosimetry, conception, operating and maintenance of the installations, the construction sites of dismantling, industrial radiology, radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  20. The Israeli Health Physics Society Annual Meeting 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains 20 abstracts of lectures covering topics such as radioactivity in food, the indoor radon problem, optimization of medical exposure, public health, alara and the various relevant radiation protection measures such as emergency planning and preparedness. Also, this is the first time for our society to include the issue of protection from harmful effects of non-ionizing radiations (NIR) emerging from their growing use in science, medicine, industry and agriculture. At last, the state of radiation protection in Israel is also reviewed

  1. Advances in inspection and maintenance of nuclear power plants of Electricite de France (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a survey of activities and results in the field of maintenance over the past 15 years. The measures initiated since the year 1990 have achieved until present an overall availablity of approx. 82%, and there is good reason to expect that availability will have been stabilised at 85% towards the end of the century. Application of the ALARA principle has brought down the collective dose from 2.3 to 1.7 manSv per power plant unit and year, and is expected to be cut down to 1.2 manSv over the next few years. (orig./HP)

  2. Analysis of the oxygenation operation effects in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of reducing radiation level with primary circuit oxygenation operation during cold shutdown were described in this paper. Based on the results of radiological analysis of primary coolant, radiation measurement on workplace during the 1st outage (without oxygenation operation) and the 2nd, 3rd and 4th (with oxygenation operation) in Qinshan NPP, the effects of oxygenation operation on reduction of radiation level in working area were analyzed. It shows that oxygenation operation during cold shutdown process can reduce radioactive source term, radiation level in working area and collective dose effectively. It is one of the ways to carry out the ALARA

  3. R and D for decommissioning in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1979, the European Community (EC) has been conducting three successive R and D programmes in the field of decommissioning of nuclear installations with the main objective of reinforcing the scientific and technical basis of decommissioning with a view to strengthening the safety and protection aspects. The current programme covers: six R and D projects concerning building integrity, decontamination, dismantling, treatment of waste materials, remote-controlled manipulator systems, estimation of radioactive wastes; identification of guidelines related to application of ALARA principle on decommissioning, and the technical elements of a Community policy; testing of new techniques in practice, particularly in the four pilot dismantling projects. (R.P.) 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  4. Radiation surveillance procedure during veterinary application of radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have found wide applications in the field of biomedical veterinary nuclear medicine and research. Radiation safety issues during internal administration of radioisotopes to laboratory animals, unlike human use, are far more challenging and requires stringent, well planned and an organized system of radiation protection in the animal house facility. In this paper, we discuss our experience during veterinary research experiments involving use, handling and administration of liquid sources of 131I. With extensive radiation protection surveillance and application of practical and essential radiation safety and hygiene practices, the radiation exposure and contamination levels during the veterinary application of isotopes can be kept ALARA

  5. Design considerations for an intelligent mobile robot for mixed-waste inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of low-level radioactive waste are stored in steel drums at various Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the United States. Much of the stored waste qualifies as mixed waste and falls under Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that require periodic inspection. A semi-autonomous mobile robot is being developed during Phase 1 of a DOE contract to perform the inspection task and consequently reduce the radiation exposure of inspection personnel to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). The nature of the inspection process, the resulting robot design requirements, and the current status of the project are the subjects of this paper

  6. Optimisation of protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is a branch of clinical medicine, which is concerned mainly with the use of unsealed sources of radionuclides for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint with the essential principles and procedures of radiation protection, so that nuclear medicine procedures are performed in a manner by which the radiation exposure to the patient, staff and public are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The philosophy of radiation protection in nuclear medicine involves protection of the patient, of the staff and the public

  7. Development and determination of a single-shell tank interim stabilization pumping strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This activity plan addresses the technique and steps involved in simulating a riser installation in the dome of a single-shell waste storage tank by the used of a rotary drill rig. This simulation will provide information to avoid potential inadequacies in planning and field efforts in a nonradiological environment. Personnel can be trained in a nonradiological environmental while perfecting techniques for drilling and installing risers. It is essential that field equipment and installation procedures be perfected before the installation of risers in SSTs occurs. Time spent installing the actual risers in the SSTs will be minimized, aiding in safety of personnel and conformance to ALARA principles

  8. High Level Waste plant operation and maintenance concepts. Final report, March 27, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reviews and evaluates worldwide High Level Waste (HLW) vitrification operating and maintenance (O ampersand M) philosophies, plant design concepts, and lessons learned with an aim towards developing O ampersand M recommendations for either, similar implementation or further consideration in a HLW vitrification facility at Hanford. The study includes a qualitative assessment of alternative concepts for a variety of plant and process systems and subsystems germane to HLW vitrification, such as, feed materials handling, melter configuration, glass form, canister handling, failed equipment handling, waste handling, and process control. Concept evaluations and recommendations consider impacts to Capital Cost, O ampersand M Cost, ALARA, Availability, and Reliability

  9. How it can assist in compliance with the DOE'S new 10 CFR 835 and the NRC'S 10 CFR 20 regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With new government regulations on the horizon, advanced technology will become a necessity for the accurate assessment of air sampling data and maintaining internal dose ALARA. Bar coding is one advanced technology which has provided significant improvements in radiological air sampling. When combined with specific hardware and software, bar code technology can be used to automate procedures and enhance the data accuracy associated with air sampling in the workplace. This paper discusses some of the regulatory issues regarding radiological air sampling and describes how improved bar coded accountability techniques can assist in regulatory compliance

  10. Regulatory control and NORM - the U.K. position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical background to the development of regulatory control of NORM in the workplace is described. The current U.K. approach is illustrated in terms of the basis of the legislation and the arrangements required for the employer to satisfy the legislation. The importance of ALARA is emphasised. Future changes to U.K. legislation, under a new European Directive, are outlined. The awareness of employers about the potential risk of chronic exposure of employees to NORM is judged to be generally low. (Author)

  11. Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE

  12. Implementation of current NCRP and ICRP guidance and revised 10 CFR Part 20: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 24th Annual Midyear Topical Meeting of the Health Physics Society, ''Implementation of Current NCRP and ICRP Guidance and Revised 10 CFR Part 20'' was held in North Carolina on January 22--January 24, 1991. The meeting featured symposia on the Basis for Change and Regulatory Implementation, Benefits and Problems in Implementation at Various Types of Facilities, Health Physics Monitoring Requirements and Record Keeping, Exposure Management, ALARA, and Dose Limit for Embryo/Fetus -- Impact on Employer and Employee. Individual papers are referenced separately

  13. Doses Assessment to the Population in the Environment of a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the nuclear power plant safety is to ensure that its operation does not cause radiation hazards which could endanger safety of workers or population in the vicinity or could other wise harm the environment. The radiation exposure arising from the operation of a nuclear power plant shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA principle). The aim of this paper is to summarize the principles to be followed for radiation doses assessment of the surrounding population of a nuclear power plant

  14. Radiation protection considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Adorisio, C; Urscheler, C; Vincke, H

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the legal Radiation Protection (RP) framework to be considered in the design of HiLumi LHC. It details design limits and constraints, dose objectives and explains how the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) approach is formalized at CERN. Furthermore, features of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are summarized that are of relevance for RP studies. Results of FLUKA simulations for residual dose rates during Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) are compared to measurements demonstrating good agreement and providing proof for the accuracy of FLUKA predictions for future shutdowns. Finally, an outlook for the residual dose rate evolution until LS3 is given.

  15. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  16. 4. S.F.R.P. days on the optimization of radiation protection in the electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These days are dedicated to the implementation of the radiation protection optimization in the activities of the electronuclear sector, of the industrial sector, the medical sector, the laboratories and the centers of research and the university sector. All the aspects of the practical application of the radiation protection optimization of the workers, the public and the patients will be approached. The oral communications and posters concern the following subjects: foundations of the optimization principle, new statutory context, transmission of ALARA principle, operational dosimetry, conception, operating and maintenance of the installations, the construction sites of dismantling, industrial radiology, radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  17. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  18. Optimisation and common sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note builds on recent articles about the development of new ICRP recommendations by supporting the use of common sense in optimisation; use of an additional criterion relating to technology-based principles is suggested to support utility- and equity-based criteria. This is taken forward by use of authoritative good practice safety precautions and a need to consider safety in an integrated manner. It is noted that use of common sense in ALARP or ALARA decisions is liable to rely on access to information and training. (author)

  19. Integration of Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, SCK-CEN initiated a programme to integrate social sciences into its scientific and technological projects. Activities were started on the following issues: (1) sustainable development; (2) ethics and decision making in nuclear waste management (transgenerational ethics/retrievability; socio-psychological aspect and local involvement); (3) law and liability (medical applications and the basic safety standards implementation); (4) decision making (emergency management); safety culture; ALARA and ethical choices in protection). Two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of the expert. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2001 are summarised

  20. A practical method of performing cost-benefit analysis of occupational and environmental protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A practical method of performing cost-benefit analysis for radiation protective measures relative to specific jobs or projects has been developed. The method is applicable to protective measures for both occupational and public radiation exposures. The method provides a straightforward, consistent procedure for weighing the cost and impact of protective measures against the benefits derived. The procedure employs various decision gates based on person-rem dollar figures and an ALARA factor analysis that weighs nonquantitative parameters. The procedure is designed to be used by job planners, design engineers, or other personnel, with appropriate consultation by qualified health physicists. 2 figs

  1. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A open-quotes good practiceclose quotes is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations

  2. Validation Analyses of IEAF-2001 Activation Cross-Section Data for SS-316 and F82H Steels Irradiated in a White d-Li Neutron Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.; v. Möllendorff, U.; Schmuck, I.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2005-05-01

    The evaluated intermediate-energy activation cross-section library IEAF-2001 has been tested against integral experiments with SS-316 and F82H steels exposed to a white neutron flux spectrum extending up to 55 MeV. By making use of the ALARA inventory code the expected γ-active product nuclide inventories were calculated and compared with the measured one. It was found that IEAF-2001 reasonably agrees with experimental data for most of the detected radioisotopes. The reasons for some larger disagreements were found to be the uncertainty of the sample elemental composition, non-validated neutron activation reaction cross sections, and sequential charge particle reactions.

  3. IPR 2016. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-05-15

    The volume on the meeting of pediatric radiology includes abstract on the following issues: chest, cardiovascular system, neuroradiology, CT radiation DRs (diagnostic reference levels) and dose reporting guidelines, genitourinary imaging, gastrointestinal radiology, oncology an nuclear medicine, whole body imaging, fetal/neonates imaging, child abuse, oncology and hybrid imaging, value added imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, dose and radiation safety, imaging children - immobilization and distraction techniques, information - education - QI and healthcare policy, ALARA, the knowledge skills and competences for a technologist/radiographer in pediatric radiology, full exploitation of new technological features in pediatric CT, image quality issues in pediatrics, abdominal imaging, interventional radiology, MR contrast agents, tumor - mass imaging, cardiothoracic imaging, ultrasonography.

  4. IPR 2016. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume on the meeting of pediatric radiology includes abstract on the following issues: chest, cardiovascular system, neuroradiology, CT radiation DRs (diagnostic reference levels) and dose reporting guidelines, genitourinary imaging, gastrointestinal radiology, oncology an nuclear medicine, whole body imaging, fetal/neonates imaging, child abuse, oncology and hybrid imaging, value added imaging, muscoskeletal imaging, dose and radiation safety, imaging children - immobilization and distraction techniques, information - education - QI and healthcare policy, ALARA, the knowledge skills and competences for a technologist/radiographer in pediatric radiology, full exploitation of new technological features in pediatric CT, image quality issues in pediatrics, abdominal imaging, interventional radiology, MR contrast agents, tumor - mass imaging, cardiothoracic imaging, ultrasonography.

  5. Radioprotection plan at the Abadia interim repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wastes from Goiania radiological accident are temporarily stored at a site near the village of Abadia de Goias, 23 km for far from downtown Goiania. Foreseeing operations inside the storage yard, a Radioprotection Plan was organize primarily with the aim of establishing procedures to reduce radiation exposure of workers to as-low-as reasonably achievable (ALARA principles and to be at the adopted regulatory exposure radiation limits. The adequacy of the storage containers and their reconditioning are the operations involved. (B.C.A.). 09 refs, 02 tabs

  6. The workers and public radiation protection; La radioprotection des travailleurs et du public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), Lab. d' Analyses Medicales et de Radiotoxicologie, SCAST, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Roupioz, A. [Electricite de France (EDF Industrie), DPN, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Rabu, B. [CEA Cadarache, Lab. de Transfert de Contamination, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  7. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Project summary report, Elk River Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Elk River Reactor. Decommissioning data from available documents were input into a computerized data-handling system in a manner that permits specific information to be readily retrieved. The information is in a form that assists the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in its assessment of decommissioning alternatives and ALARA methods for future decommissionings projects. Samples of computer reports are included in the report. Decommissioning of other reactors, including NRC reference decommissioning studies, will be described in similar reports

  8. Proposed retrofit of HEPA filter plenums with injection and sampling manifolds for in-place filter testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of testing HEPA filter exhaust plenums with consideration for As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) will require that new technology be applied to existing plenum designs. HEPA filter testing at Rocky Flats has evolved slowly due to a number of reasons. The first plenums were built in the 1950's, preceding many standards. The plenums were large, which caused air dispersal problems. The systems were variable air flow. Access to the filters was difficult. The test methods became extremely conservative. Changes in methods were difficult to make. The acceptance of new test methods has been made in recent years with the change in plant mission and the emphasis on worker safety

  9. Electrical Discharge Machining A responsive process for component repair and replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Industry is continually challenged to decrease accumulated dose during planned outages whereas the associated maintenance work required in these harsh environments is becoming more complex. In order to bridge these divergent trends, the ALARA principals must be applied during the development phase of any new tooling. Steps must also be included to qualify the specific maintenance equipment and train the site personnel, both on representative mock-ups. The goal is to ensure that the site maintenance work conforms to the customers requirements with regards to dose, quality and the outage schedule. (Author)

  10. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberger, Jan [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Fuel Service; Schienbein, Marcel; Geier, Roland [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Radiochemical Lab.

    2010-05-15

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  11. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental statement assesses the impacts of the implementation of plutonium recycle in the LWR industry. It is based on assumptions that are intended to reflect conservatively an acceptable level of the application of current technology. It is not intended to be a representation of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. This generic environmental statement discusses the anticipated effects of recycling plutonium in light water nuclear power reactors. It is based on about 30 years of experience with the element in the context of a projected light water nuclear power industry that is already substantial. A background perspective on plutonium, its safety, and its recycling as a reactor fuel is presented

  12. Savannah River Site Radiological Technology Center's Efforts Supporting Waste Minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberger, K. H.; Smith, L. S.; Bates, R. L.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the efforts of the newly formed Radiological Technology Center (RTC) at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to support waste minimization. The formation of the RTC was based upon the highly successful ALARA Center at the DOE Hanford Site. The RTC is tasked with evaluation and dissemination of new technologies and techniques for radiological hazard reduction and waste minimization. Initial waste minimization efforts have focused on the promotion of SRS containment fabrication capabilities, new personal protective equipment and use of recyclable versus disposable materials.

  13. The workers and public radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  14. Proceedings of the 6. conference days on radioprotection optimization in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 6. ALARA conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) and several professional associations (ABR, AFPPE, ARRAD, ATSR, RAMIP, SFPM, SFR). The conference was the occasion to review all aspects relative to the issues of radioprotection optimization and to its implementation to workers, patients and the public in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains. A particular attention must be given to the application of the ALARA principle in all sectors relevant to radioprotection, especially in a context characterized by: big dismantling works under preparation in the French nuclear park, an increased use of X-radiation in the medical domain - involving both patients and medical personnel, new knowledge concerning the health effects of ionizing radiations, and an evolution of European and international radioprotection safety standards. All these aspects were discussed during these conference days. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Review of the evolution of workers/patients exposure in France and comparison with international data (E. Vial); 2 - Status of low dose epidemiology (M.O. Bernier); 3 - Radioprotection optimization method at the MELOX plant (A. De Vita); 4 - Elaboration method for the annual dosimetric objective of the French nuclear park (C. Pignot); 5 - Optimisation principle in the new EURATOM Directive (N. Saad); 6 - Integrated management of radiological and non-radiological risks: the inevitable challenge (P. Deboodt); 7 - Radiological and conventional risks: the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) integrated approach (S. Faure); 8 - EVEREST (Evolving towards an entry into controlled areas in street clothes, M. Alvarez); 9 - Example of multi-risk management in the medical domain (C. Tourneux); 10 - Radioprotection optimisation in the research domain (P. Barbey); 11 - Child scanning dosimetry

  15. Best Available Technique (BAT) assessment applied to ACR-1000 waste and heavy water management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACR-1000 design is the next evolution of the proven CANDU reactor design. One of the key objectives for this project was to systematically apply the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle to the reactor design. The ACR design team selected the Best Available Technique (BAT) assessment for this purpose to document decisions made during the design of each ACR-1000 waste and heavy water management systems. This paper describes the steps in the BAT assessment that has been applied to the ACR-1000 design. (author)

  16. Health physics experience during 46Sc radiotracer injection at Kolkata Port, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the suitability of dumping site for dredged sediment, 46Sc in scandium glass matrix is mainly used for the investigation at ports and harbours. In this paper authors share Health Physics experience on control of personnel exposure in order to achieve ALARA. About 260 GBq of 46Sc was used for sediment transport study near SAGAR Island at Kolkata Port, Kolkata. During the study, the maximum dose was found to be less than 0.37 mSv, which is 1.23 % of the authorized annual effective dose limits for occupational radiation worker. The average dose for the experiment was computed as 0.21 mSv. (author)

  17. 'Sleeping with the enemy?' Expectations and reality in imaging children in the emergency setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an introduction to the ALARA conference titled ''Building Bridges between Radiology and Emergency Medicine: Consensus Conference on Imaging Safety and Quality for Children in the Emergency Setting,'' it is important for us to understand the landscapes of both the pediatric radiology and emergency medicine subspecialties. Recognizing potentially different practice patterns, including perspectives on pediatric care, as well as shared and sometimes unique professional pressures, can help us identify common concerns and problems and facilitate the development of strategies aimed at correcting these issues. (orig.)

  18. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  19. Decommissioning plan depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerojet Ordnance Tennessee, Inc. (Aerojet) is decommissioning its California depleted uranium (DU) manufacturing facility. Aerojet has conducted manufacturing and research and development activities at the facility since 1977 under a State of California Source Materials License. The decontamination is being performed by a contractor selector for technical competence through competitive bid. Since the facility will be released for uncontrolled use it will be decontaminated to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In order to fully apply the principles of ALARA, and ensure the decontamination is in full compliance with appropriate guides, Aerojet has retained Rogers and Associaties Engineering Corporation (RAE) to assist in the decommissioning. RAE has assisted in characterizing the facility and preparing contract bid documents and technical specifications to obtain a qualified decontamination contractor. RAE will monitor the decontamination work effort to assure the contractor's performance complies with the contract specifications and the decontamination plan. The specifications require a thorough cleaning and decontamination of the facility, not just sufficient cleaning to meet the numeric cleanup criteria

  20. Repeat film analysis and its implications for quality assurance in dental radiology: An institutional case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The goal of any radiologist is to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs, while keeping patient exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA. Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the reasons for radiograph rejections through a repeat film analysis in an Indian dental school. Settings and Design: An observational study conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month study period, a total of 9,495 intra-oral radiographs and 2339 extraoral radiographs taken in the Radiology Department were subjected to repeat film analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS Version 16. Descriptive analysis used. Results: The results showed that the repeat rates were 7.1% and 5.86% for intraoral and extraoral radiographs, respectively. Among the causes for errors reported, positioning error (38.7% was the most common, followed by improper angulations (26.1%, and improper film placement (11.2% for intra-oral radiographs. The study found that the maximum frequency of repeats among extraoral radiographs was for panoramic radiographs (49% followed by lateral cephalogram (33%, and paranasal sinus view (14%. It was also observed that repeat rate of intraoral radiographs was highest for internees (44.7%, and undergraduate students (28.2%. Conclusions: The study pointed to a need for more targeted interventions to achieve the goal of keeping patient exposure ALARA in a dental school setting.

  1. Radiological and non-radiological risks: The search for a global approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looking at some regulations from around the world, we can easily observe that the global approach to safety in the workplace has already been recommended for many years. Nevertheless, very recently, some regulators felt the need for not putting emphasis on this. Laws have been published, dealing more and more with the concept of 'welfare' in the workplace. In other words, people in charge of the protection of the workers were pushed into adopting a more multidisciplinary approach to the work and its consequences, not only in terms of safety but also as far as the 'quality' of the lives of the workers in the workplaces is concerned. The nuclear sector has also been involved in such evolution. As a matter of fact, since the 'birth' of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle, more attention has been paid to other factors than to either the individual dose or the collective dose. Economic and social factors need to be taken into account. This is not the place for discussing the results of the optimization principle, but there is now enough evidence to show that the application of the ALARA approach has significantly increased the level of protection against the radiological risks

  2. Operational Health Physics-Science or Philosophy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    Operational health physics is concerned with protecting workers and the public from harm due to ionizing radiation. This requires the application of philosophy (ethics) as well as science. Operational health physics philosophy has been dominated by the ICRP. A particular aspect of ICRP's philosophy that is often misunderstood is (As low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account). (ALARA) Although the ALARA philosophy has been interpreted as a cost-benefit approach it is in fact a risk-benefit approach including social considerations as the ICRP has emphasised from time to time. A recent report has accused the ICRP of using a discarded philosophical approach, namely Utilitarianism, as a result of which its recommendations are unethical. The report suggests that a (rights) based philosophy such as Rawls' Theory of Justice would be a more appropriate basis. This paper discusses this accusation, considers some relevant philosophies and concludes that the accusation is not valid and that ICRP's recommendations are ethical but are frequently misinterpreted. (Author)

  3. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  4. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  5. Radiation Protection of the Child from Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years due to the technological advances in imaging techniques, which have undoubtedly improved diagnostic accuracy and resulted in improved patient care, the utilization of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging has significantly increased. Computed tomography is the major contributor to the radiation burden, but fluoroscopy continues to be a mainstay in paediatric radiology. The rise in the use of ionizing radiation is of particular concern with regard to the paediatric population, as they are up to 10 times more sensitive to the effects of radiation than adults, due to their increased tissue radiosensitivity, increased cumulative lifetime radiation dose and longer lifetime in which to manifest the effects. This article will review the estimated radiation risk to the child from diagnostic imaging and summarise the various methods through which both the paediatrician and radiologist can practice the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle, which underpins the safe practice of radiology. Emphasis is on the justification for an examination, i.e. weighing of benefits versus radiation risk, on the appropriate utilization of other, non-ionizing imaging modalities such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and on optimisation of a clinically indicated examination. It is essential that the paediatrician and radiologist work together in this decision making process for the mutual benefit of the patient. The appropriate practical application of ALARA in the workplace is crucial to the radiation safety of our paediatric patients. PMID:26219738

  6. Occupational radiation protection in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the global situation in terms of occupational exposures in worldwide nuclear facilities from 1974 to 1990 and highlights some specific issues for radiation protection over the next decades. The stages and facilities considered in this presentation of the evolution of occupational exposures are the following: uranium enrichment and conversion facilities, nuclear fuel fabrication plants, reactor operation and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The data presented are based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation 2000 Report and the International System on Occupational Exposure database, and illustrated in some cases with respect to the French situation for nuclear power plants. Reflections on the status of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle are proposed, showing that ALARA has been the driving force of radiation protection. Two issues for the future of occupational radiation protection are discussed: the case of itinerant workers and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The conclusion addresses the need to continue spreading the radiation protection culture among the various actors and the development of networks of actors, in order to favour the sharing of experiences in radiation protection practices and to create a dynamic of progress for the protection of workers. (author)

  7. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  8. Use of γ-H2AX Foci Assay on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Sensitive Biomarker of Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modern medicine, it is impossible to imagine diagnostics and treatments without equipment that emit radiation (X-ray, CT, PET, etc.). At the same time there is a need to minimize the amount of radiation that the patient will gain during such medical examination. In that manner ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle and dosimetry are the bases of assuring patients safety. The induction of gamma phosphorylated H2AX histone is newly developed tool in biodosimetry, which is more sensitive for the detection of radiation caused DNA damage than currently used micronucleus and comet assay. Gamma phosphorylation of H2AX histone is a consequence of DNA double strand breaks and its role is to trigger the DNA repair mechanisms. In this study, we tested the effect of 2 and 4 Gy X-rays on human peripheral blood lymphocytes from two healthy volunteers using γ-H2AX foci assay. The FITC signal from labelled antibodies was monitored using flow cytometry and clearly demonstrated the difference in control samples and irradiated samples. There was also the difference between the exposed blood samples from the two volunteers. The results of present study reveal new sensitive method that is capable of detecting changes in DNA when exposed to different doses of radiation, and thus potentially optimizing the ALARA principle.(author)

  9. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  10. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations

  11. Grout Treatment Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, a permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations. This volume contains 14 Appendices. Topics include Engineering Drawings, Maps, Roads, Toxicity Testing, and Pilot-Scale Testing

  12. Analysis of occupational doses from the CDTN reactor TRIGA IPR-R1 for radiation protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worker and area monitoring have routinely been done around the CDTN TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor aiming to optimize and assure radiation protection safety. As part of the implementation of the ALARA program, individual doses from planned practices were analyzed. Personnel dose equivalents, Hp(10), from up to 39 occupationally exposed workers were daily reported during their stay in the restricted area. Measurements were done with a RAD-60 Rados electronic personal dosimeter with a 1 μSv low detection limit. Results of about 5000 measurements in a year obtained during 2009 and 2010 showed that monthly doses did not exceed 60 μSv, except in very specific cases of non-routine practices. Results also suggested that values of 40, 100 and 800 μSv could be adopted as weekly, monthly and annual dose constraints. Considering that measured doses were very small when compared to the 20 mSv/year dose limit, it was concluded that the adoption of the dose constraints was enough to assume the compliance with the ALARA principle and that changes in the routine procedure or in the reactor facility design are not needed. (author)

  13. New technologies, virtual reality and multimedia, in Radiation Protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iberdrola Ingenieria y Consultoria (Iberinco) has developed some computer applications based in New Technologies, Virtual Reality and Multimedia, with the aim to optimise the formation and training of professionally exposed workers as well as to inform the public. The use of the new technologies could be an important help for the workers training. Virtual Reality Projects developed by Iberinco are: a) CIPRES: Interactive Calculations of Radiological Protection in a Simulation Environmental and, b) ACEWO: Workers Control Access to Nuclear Power Plants, virtual Reality could be directly applicable to several aspects related with Radiological Protection Training, for example. An application that workers could used to learn the main aspects of Radiological Protection related with: a) Physical concepts, b) Regulations, c) Use of protective clothing, d) Access into and exit out controlled areas, e) ALARA criterion. An examples is the project ACEWO. A training program based on Virtual Reality systems with simulations of procedures in which the operators could receive high doses. In this way, the operation time and dose could be minimised according to the ALARA criterion owing to the ability of repeating the exercise, or the work, as many times as be necessary, like project CIPRES. Iberinco has been developed an educational CD multimedia on nuclear energy and the protection measures foreseen in the emergency plans for the Spanish Civil Protection Agency, with the aim of being distributed to all the schools placed near a nuclear power plant. (Author) 4 refs

  14. Semiempirical method for calculating equivalent dose rates of non-standard operations during transportation of SNF in dry shielded canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For effective implementation of ALARA approach, one should correctly know the values of expected equivalent dose rates. Doses of the personnel who will carry out preparation of workplaces will depend on accuracy of such estimation as well as the doses received by the personnel, which will perform work. In cases complicated for calculation, the most close to reality results can be received through application of so-called 'semiempirical' methods of calculation. The algorithm of calculation is given in this paper in a schematic way. Calculation algorithm used the data of EDR measurements from the container loaded with a nominal SNF, the container design specific features, the container configuration for such usage, work performance procedure technique, and also tabulated and analytical formulas of calculating radiation protection. The subsequent comparison of the measured values of equivalent dose rate with pre-computed dose rate has shown correctness of the calculation algorithm: the divergence did not exceed 3 per cent. For procedure of (from spent nuclear fuel storage pool of Unit 2 to Unit 1) the spent nuclear fuel transportation in Framatome Company manufactured container, in case of loading the container with a non-standard (other, than the design) SNF, we carried out semiempirical calculation of expected equivalent dose rates. In conclusion, correct pre-computation of dose-rate and using of principle ALARA allowed us exclude inexpedient operations (plums of water) and considerably to reduce a collective dose (almost in 8 times)

  15. 3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian–Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators. (paper)

  16. Personnel contamination protection techniques applied during the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The severe damage to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core and the subsequent discharge of reactor coolant to the reactor and auxiliary buildings resulted in extremely hostile radiological environments in the TMI-2 plant. High fission product surface contamination and radiation levels necessitated the implementation of innovative techniques and methods in performing cleanup operations while assuring effective as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) practices. The approach utilized by GPU Nuclear throughout the cleanup in applying protective clothing requirements was to consider the overall health risk to the worker including factors such as cardiopulmonary stress, visual and hearing acuity, and heat stress. In applying protective clothing requirements, trade-off considerations had to be made between preventing skin contaminations and possibly overprotecting the worker, thus impacting his ability to perform his intended task at maximum efficiency and in accordance with ALARA principles. The paper discusses the following topics: protective clothing-general use, beta protection, skin contamination, training, personnel access facility, and heat stress

  17. ISOE: an international occupational exposure database and communications network for dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on 1 January 1992 to facilitate the communication of dosimetry and ALARA implementation data among nuclear facilities around the world. Members of ISOE include 51 utilities from 17 countries and regulators from 11 countries, with four regional technical centres administering the system and a Steering Group which manages the work. ISOE includes three databases and a communications network at several levels. The three databases NEA1, NEA2 and NEA3 include varying levels of details, with NEA3 being the most detailed giving task and site specific ALARA practices and experiences. Utility membership of ISOE gives full access to the databases whereas regulators have more limited access. This paper reviews the current status of participation, describes the three databases and the communications network. Some dose data showing trends in particular countries are presented as well as dose data relating to operation cycle length and outage length. The advantages of membership are described, and it is concluded that ISOE holds the potential for both dose and cost savings. (author)

  18. 3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, K; Sneve, M K; Szőke, I; Mazur, I; Mark, N K; Kudrin, I; Shandala, N; Simakov, A; Smith, G M; Krasnoschekov, A; Kosnikov, A; Kemsky, I; Kryuchkov, V

    2014-12-01

    Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators. PMID:25254659

  19. Role of the chemistry in the occupational dose control in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety and radioprotection problem in nuclear power plants does not only concern the plants in operation, but it also includes the design, building and decommissioning stages. The factors that determine the radiation field development and the possibility of diminishing them when they reach critical values are presented. Here are considered pressure vessel-heavy water reactors and particularly the radionucleides coming from the products of structural material corrosion. These products are removed by decontaminating compounds and primary circuit systems in general. In accordance with ALARA criterium, the factors that make the decontamination process advisable are analyzed. Firstly, the number of collective doses is discused. In case of heavily contaminated components there is another limitation to the ALARA criterion: the limits of individual dose in a fixed period of time (year, trimester, etc). Among the various decontamination processes-physical or chemical - the stages to follow just in chemical procedures are stated. As Atucha I and II Power Plants are uniques it is necessary to be ready to solve problems. The research and development programs of National Atomic Energy Commission have produced very valuable results such as the 'in situ' activation model and the HERO (high efficient electrochemical removal of oxides) decontamination procedure. (M.E.L.)

  20. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis

  1. The interpretation of monitoring results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have attempted to show that the UK policy of dilute and disperse, Limiting Environmental Capacity (or Assimilative Capacity) and the ALARA principle have not prevented widespread pollution. Indeed, that pollution has necessitated expensive retrofitting to a plant that even when all modifications are complete (by 1990) will still operate at least ten times less efficiently than a state-of-the-art reprocessing plant. There have been unaccounted economic losses, prospective health damage and a widespread perception of a loss of environmental quality, alarm and unease, with additional loss of confidence in regulatory bodies and scientific research. All this could have been avoided by a precautionary approach as applied by the US, USSR and France at the inception of reprocessing. There is a strong case for indicting the UK for failing to effectively apply its own criteria of ALARA, and thus for not abiding by international agreements. Furthermore, UK monitoring and models failed to predict the return of plutonium to land, and there are still significant uncertainties with regard to the sea-food pathway and the critical group, as evinced by the Black Inquiry. (author)

  2. Reduction of radioactivity in oils prior to PCB analysis: A new use for solid phase extraction cartridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactively contaminated oils represent a significant waste problem throughout the Department of Energy complex (DOE). From contaminated oils in glove box facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) through the 1200 kg of oil waste at Paducah to an estimated 46,000 kg of contaminated oily water at Lawrence Livermore, contaminated oil exists at all of the DOE facilities. Dilution is the primary mechanism for reducing the radionuclides to safe handling levels prior to analysis. However, this approach requires contamination of instrumentation as well as increased limits of quantitation. Often, the dilutions required to maintain As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) guidelines result in limits of quantitation which are above the regulatory limits for waste acceptance. In order to maintain ALARA guidelines while obtaining the lowest possible detection limits, the Organic Analysis Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has established a cleanup technique for oils suspected of being contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. The technique uses a 0.02 μm disposable filter in conjunction with Florisil SPE cartridges. Using this technique we have demonstrated radionuclide reductions ranging from 60 to 95+% for gross alpha, beta, and gamma while maintaining analyte and surrogate recoveries well within established guidelines. Further advantages of this technique include its simplicity, the generation of a minimum of secondary waste materials, and the potential for field use. Implications of this analytical technique as well as applications to other analytes of interest are currently being explored

  3. New technologies, virtual reality and multimedia, in Radiation Protection training; Nuevas tecnologias, realidad virtual y multimedia, aplicadaas a la formacion en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.; Lamela, B.; Merino, A.; Sarti, F.

    2003-07-01

    Iberdrola Ingenieria y Consultoria (Iberinco) has developed some computer applications based in New Technologies, Virtual Reality and Multimedia, with the aim to optimise the formation and training of professionally exposed workers as well as to inform the public. The use of the new technologies could be an important help for the workers training. Virtual Reality Projects developed by Iberinco are: a) CIPRES: Interactive Calculations of Radiological Protection in a Simulation Environmental and, b) ACEWO: Workers Control Access to Nuclear Power Plants, virtual Reality could be directly applicable to several aspects related with Radiological Protection Training, for example. An application that workers could used to learn the main aspects of Radiological Protection related with: a) Physical concepts, b) Regulations, c) Use of protective clothing, d) Access into and exit out controlled areas, e) ALARA criterion. An examples is the project ACEWO. A training program based on Virtual Reality systems with simulations of procedures in which the operators could receive high doses. In this way, the operation time and dose could be minimised according to the ALARA criterion owing to the ability of repeating the exercise, or the work, as many times as be necessary, like project CIPRES. Iberinco has been developed an educational CD multimedia on nuclear energy and the protection measures foreseen in the emergency plans for the Spanish Civil Protection Agency, with the aim of being distributed to all the schools placed near a nuclear power plant. (Author) 4 refs.

  4. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations

  5. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'' (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources

  6. Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites

  7. Operational Health Physics-Science or Philosophy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational health physics is concerned with protecting workers and the public from harm due to ionizing radiation. This requires the application of philosophy (ethics) as well as science. Operational health physics philosophy has been dominated by the ICRP. A particular aspect of ICRP's philosophy that is often misunderstood is (As low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account). (ALARA) Although the ALARA philosophy has been interpreted as a cost-benefit approach it is in fact a risk-benefit approach including social considerations as the ICRP has emphasised from time to time. A recent report has accused the ICRP of using a discarded philosophical approach, namely Utilitarianism, as a result of which its recommendations are unethical. The report suggests that a (rights) based philosophy such as Rawls' Theory of Justice would be a more appropriate basis. This paper discusses this accusation, considers some relevant philosophies and concludes that the accusation is not valid and that ICRP's recommendations are ethical but are frequently misinterpreted. (Author)

  8. French government regulation - new enactment on optimised radiation protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation - implementation at a French nuclear power plant belonging to the EDF Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation protection system defined by ICRP 60 and included in European Directive no. 96/29 is based on the three general principles of radiation protection: the justification of practices, the optimisation of radiation protection and the limitation of individual exposures. Since 1988, French law requires for nuclear power plant an optimisation approach (ALARA) in the case of maintenance activities (equipment, methods and work organisation) relying on a specific structure: the department with special responsibility for radiation protection. Recently, in December 1998, this general principle of optimisation was enhanced by the obligation to take a predictive approach in order to implement it. For all operations carried out in Radiation Controlled Areas (RCA), the law requires a prior estimation of individual and collective doses to which workers might be exposed, followed by the measurement and analysis of radiation doses actually absorbed during the activity. With a view to consistent implementation on all its plants, EDF has drawn up a set of specific reference guidelines. These guidelines define the activity and describe a procedure for carrying out individual and collective dose forecasts for each activity. They also include a set of activity grading criteria based on the activity's radiological risk factor, a procedure for dealing with each level of risk, and a procedure for monitoring operational radiation exposure. They deploy the three phases of the ALARA approach: planning, implementation and experience feedback. (author)

  9. Paediatrician awareness of radiation dose and inherent risks in chest imaging studies-A questionnaire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess paediatricians' knowledge regarding radiation exposure of chest imaging. Materials and methods: German paediatricians were surveyed using a questionnaire. Participants were asked to estimate effective dose (ED) of radiographs (CR) and computed tomography (CT). Further questions included dose-saving of paediatric CT-protocols, ALARA principle, and awareness of the link between radiation and cancer development. Length and type of occupation and amount of ordered procedures were evaluated. Results: 137 paediatricians participated with 59% and 39% correctly estimating ED of an adult (0.01-0.1 mSv) and newborn CR (0.01-0.1 mSv), respectively. ED of an adult chest CT (1-10 mSv) was underestimated by 28%, whereas ED of cardiac CT (10-100 mSv) was underestimated by 54%. 35% of participants correctly estimated ED of a chest CT in an infant (10-100 mSv) which was underestimated by 56%. Neither length nor type of occupation showed significant impact on dose estimations. 14% of paediatricians stated that MRI causes radiation, whereas 4% correctly estimated the potential of paediatric CT-protocols. 15% were familiar with the ALARA principle and 26% were aware of a publication concerning radiation and malignancy. Conclusion: Paediatricians demonstrated an increased level of awareness compared to previous surveys. However, estimation of ED of CT remained difficult. Increased information transfer and education seem pressing in the light of increasing radiological examinations.

  10. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company Health and Safety Performance Report. First quarter calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansing, K.A.

    1995-05-01

    During the first quarter of CY 1995, four of the WHC sitewide ALARA performance goals were completed on or ahead of schedule. One of the completed goals related to reduction of radiological areas at WHC-managed facilities. Due to anticipated resource reductions and increased scope of work, several facilities escalated their reduction schedule. This allowed the ALARA goal to be completed and exceeded ahead of schedule. Industrial Safety and Health initiatives are being pursued in areas such as workplace ergonomics, safety training, and standards development. Positive efforts are ongoing in the areas of management commitment and employee involvement through the WHC Voluntary Protection Program. Successful implementation continues through the President`s Accident Prevention Council (PAPC) and division employee Accident Prevention Councils. The Company now has established CY 1995 PAPC goals. Major programmatic accomplishments completed during this reporting period include the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) formally endorsing the Radiological Control organization`s approach toward development of the Radiation Protection Program (RPP) document. The DOE-HQ has recognized the significant contributions and leadership that Radiological Control has provided in planning and implementation of this ``model example of an RPP`` across the DOE complex and is encouraging other sites to contact WHC for assistance in developing their RPPs.

  12. Health physics aspects in disposal of self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) are being used in reactor core for neutron flux measurement at Nuclear Power Plants. After their useful life, SPNDs are replaced and are disposed off in Tile holes. The Cobalt SPNDs having activity in the range of 35 to 160 TBq were encompassed in carbon steel canister. The canister having dose 25 to 50 Sv/h at 1 meter were transported in shielded flask for disposal in specially designed Tile hole at Solid Waste Management Facility (SWMF) at Tarapur. To keep personal exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) the disposal operation was carried out remotely from a shielded cabin placed at a distance of 50 meter from the disposal site. During the disposal radiation measurements were carried out remotely by installing radiations monitors at a distance of 10 m, 25 m, and 50 m from the Tile hole. Estimations of radiation levels were carried out before jobs were taken up. Disposal of 70 numbers of Cobalt SPNDs was carried out by implementing ALARA. The decrease in collective dose is achieved due to improved operational practices, mock-up trials, effective monitoring program and safety compliance at various stages of operation

  13. Review of occupational radiation exposures in all biennial shutdown maintenance of Kaiga generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Kaiga generating station 1 and 2 consists of twin units of 220 M We pressurized heavy water reactors located in Karnataka, India. Major maintenance activities of one of the twin units are taken up once in two years (biennial shutdown) to execute system maintenance, system up gradation, surveillance and in-service inspection (ISI) jobs. BSDs are mandatory activities to comply with regulatory requirement to ensure the safety and reliability of plant system equipment. More than 65% of the station collective dose is contributed by biennial shutdown (BSD) jobs. It is observed that the man rem consumed during normal operation of the plant is less than 35% of the total man rem consumed. Since BSD jobs contributes significantly to station collective dose, an effective implementation of radiation protection programme specific to BSD is the key to control the occupational exposure. Various improvements in the field of radiation protection practices and process systems are adopted to achieve lowest collective dose at par with international standards. The key areas identified for application of various strategies to achieve ALARA were Man rem budgeting, Radiological condition monitoring, Radiation protection practices, Identification of critical jobs and Work groups, Work planning and execution, and Radioactive waste management. Review of collective doses of all the BSD jobs performed in the station since year 2004 and various measures incorporated to achieve ALARA exposures to plant personnel are briefly discussed in this paper. (author)

  14. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for license termination of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Final report, main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action being considered in this Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the final GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, conclusions on radiological criteria for decommissioning were provided. Contained in the GEIS are results and conclusions related to achieving, as an objective of decommissioning ALARA, reduction to preexisting background, the radiological criterion for unrestricted use, decommissioning ALARA analysis for soils and structures containing contamination, restricted use and alternative analysis for special site specific situations, and groundwater cleanup. In its analyses, the final GEIS includes consideration of comments made on the draft GEIS during the public comment period

  15. Paediatrician awareness of radiation dose and inherent risks in chest imaging studies-A questionnaire study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M., E-mail: christoph.heyer@rub.de [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berufgenossenschaftliches Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil GmbH, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Buerkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1, D-44789 Bochum (Germany); Hansmann, Jan; Peters, Soeren A.; Lemburg, Stefan P. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berufgenossenschaftliches Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil GmbH, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Buerkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1, D-44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: To assess paediatricians' knowledge regarding radiation exposure of chest imaging. Materials and methods: German paediatricians were surveyed using a questionnaire. Participants were asked to estimate effective dose (ED) of radiographs (CR) and computed tomography (CT). Further questions included dose-saving of paediatric CT-protocols, ALARA principle, and awareness of the link between radiation and cancer development. Length and type of occupation and amount of ordered procedures were evaluated. Results: 137 paediatricians participated with 59% and 39% correctly estimating ED of an adult (0.01-0.1 mSv) and newborn CR (0.01-0.1 mSv), respectively. ED of an adult chest CT (1-10 mSv) was underestimated by 28%, whereas ED of cardiac CT (10-100 mSv) was underestimated by 54%. 35% of participants correctly estimated ED of a chest CT in an infant (10-100 mSv) which was underestimated by 56%. Neither length nor type of occupation showed significant impact on dose estimations. 14% of paediatricians stated that MRI causes radiation, whereas 4% correctly estimated the potential of paediatric CT-protocols. 15% were familiar with the ALARA principle and 26% were aware of a publication concerning radiation and malignancy. Conclusion: Paediatricians demonstrated an increased level of awareness compared to previous surveys. However, estimation of ED of CT remained difficult. Increased information transfer and education seem pressing in the light of increasing radiological examinations.

  16. Radiation physics and shielding codes and analyses applied to design-assist and safety analyses of CANDUR and ACRTM reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the radiation physics and shielding codes and analyses applied in the design of CANDU and ACR reactors. The focus is on the types of analyses undertaken rather than the inputs supplied to the engineering disciplines. Nevertheless, the discussion does show how these analyses contribute to the engineering design. Analyses in radiation physics and shielding can be categorized as either design-assist or safety and licensing (accident) analyses. Many of the analyses undertaken are designated 'design-assist' where the analyses are used to generate recommendations that directly influence plant design. These recommendations are directed at mitigating or reducing the radiation hazard of the nuclear power plant with engineered systems and components. Thus the analyses serve a primary safety function by ensuring the plant can be operated with acceptable radiation hazards to the workers and public. In addition to this role of design assist, radiation physics and shielding codes are also deployed in safety and licensing assessments of the consequences of radioactive releases of gaseous and liquid effluents during normal operation and gaseous effluents following accidents. In the latter category, the final consequences of accident sequences, expressed in terms of radiation dose to members of the public, and inputs to accident analysis, e.g., decay heat in fuel following a loss-of-coolant accident, are also calculated. Another role of the analyses is to demonstrate that the design of the plant satisfies the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) radiation doses. This principle is applied throughout the design process to minimize worker and public doses. The principle of ALARA is an inherent part of all design-assist recommendations and safety and licensing assessments. The main focus of an ALARA exercise at the design stage is to minimize the radiation hazards at the source. This exploits material selection and impurity specifications and relies

  17. Improved station performance through the use of sub-micron filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operators in CANDU nuclear power plants, like those in other nuclear plants, are exposed to radiation from various sources. The doses of radiation received must be kept within regulatory limits, and should in fact be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The heat transport system (HTS) purification system provides CANDU plant operators with a means to control plant radiation fields. Positive results with the use of sub-micron filters have led European and North American nuclear plant operators to implement sub-micron filtration as part of their overall ALARA strategies. For example, North Anna's Virginia utility reported a reduction in the daily average dose per day (non-outage) from 0.26 to 0.03 mrem/day after introduction of sub-micron filters. In the CANDU heat transport system, purification filters can reduce out-core radiation fields by removing particles containing activity before they can deposit on system surfaces, or by removing particles containing the parent isotopes of hazardous radionuclides from the HTS before they can deposit in the core and be activated. Sub-micron filters can reduce out-core radiation fields if they are able to perform one or both of these tasks more effectively than larger pore size filters. Based on the positive industry experiences to date, and the absence of any apparent negative consequences, Darlington NGS moved forward with the implementation of a sub-micron filter program in 2002, replacing the 1-μm filters in FR1 with 0.45-μm filters in all 4 Units. One-micron filters were retained in FR2 as a backup. The results of the switch to sub-micron filters at DNGS have been very positive to date. Not one of the concerns expressed by the station staff at the start of the program materialized. The use of 0.45-μm filters has contributed to a 6-rem dose savings during the Unit 1 outage in November 2002. The observed benefits of installing sub-micron filters, with no capital cost incurred, make it a simple and cost

  18. United Kingdom [Experiences from international projects on the decommissioning of both large and small facilities]. Annex IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident damaged nature of the pile 1 reactor core led to a range of issues that would not normally be encountered at a reactor system that had shut down following normal operations. Hence, from the decommissioning perspective, this project has been unconventional since the early stages, and has focused on the physical characterization of the damaged core to try to ascertain the issues that must be fully understood before decommissioning proceeds. The criticality assessment has examined the effect of accidental (seismic) relocation of material in the FAZ. From this work, it can be deduced that, provided sufficient neutron absorbing isotope cartridges are retained in the FAZ, the movement of the fuel, graphite moderator, control rods or shutdown rods during dismantling will not cause a criticality. No additional neutron absorber or criticality shutdown systems will therefore be required during core dismantling. Procedures for the orderly removal of material from the FAZ must be assessed and provide the control to ensure that criticality risks remain ALARA. The formation of uranium hydride and its subsequent survival over 50 years in aerobic conditions is highly improbable. Analysis, based on an impossibly high uranium hydride inventory, shows that at ambient conditions, the oxidation thermal transient caused by disturbance and exposure to air will not propagate to adjacent material. Dismantling in an air environment will therefore be possible. ALARA considerations will require that techniques for core dismantling, and fuel and isotope removal, should minimize energy input and limit temperature rise as a precautionary measure. Although the risk of a graphite dust explosion can be dismissed, techniques that minimize the generation of any type of dust are recommended. This will ease the problem of dust handling, minimize the potential for airborne activity release and reduce the challenge to the core ventilation treatment system. There is a need to satisfy ALARA

  19. Practical measurements of radiation dose in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smans, K.; Vanhavere, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2006-07-01

    The EURATOM directive 97/43 and the Belgian Royal Decree of July 20, 2001 impose today the application of the ALARA principle in medical practices. Priority should be given to paediatric examinations, especially for X-ray examinations undertaken in neonatal intensive care units. Within this framework, a dose study was started to assess the patient doses in one neonatal intensive care unit for the most common examinations. Direct measurement of radiation dose was done using highly sensitive thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The ESD was on average 66 {mu}Gy. Also DAP-measurements were performed. For RX-thorax an average DAP-value of 1,27 cGy.cm{sub w}as calculated. (Author)

  20. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  1. Technological Evolution on Computed Tomography and Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been available since the 70s and has experienced a dramatic technical evolution. Multi-detector technology is our current standard, offering capabilities unthinkable only a decade ago. Yet, we must nor forget the ionizing nature of CT's scanning energy (X-rays). It represents the most important cause of medical-associated radiation exposure to the general public, with a trend to increase. It is compulsory to intervene with the objective of dose reduction, following ALARA policies. Currently there are some technical advances that allow dose reduction, without sacrificing diagnostic image capabilities. However, human intervention is also essential. We must keep investment on education so that CT exams are don when they are really useful in clinical decision. Alternative techniques should also be considered. Image quality must not be searched disregarding the biological effects of radiation. Generally, it is possible to obtain clinically acceptable images with lower dose protocols. (author)

  2. Radiation protection at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy: Organization and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of radiation protection at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is based on national laws and international recommendations for radiation safety. Work with different radiation sources is controlled by a number of regulations and documents issued by the Institute. General as well as specific documents are issued to different groups. Personal irradiation is controlled by means of Agfa-Gevaert dosimetric film inserted into a photodosimetric cassette designed and produced at the Institute. Personnel irradiation data show good application of the ALARA principle in the general organization of radiation protection. Most of the staff received a dose of less than 1 mSv, and none above the annual permitted dose of 50 mSv. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  3. Department of Energy LLW disposal; adapting to a changing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's philosophy is evolving to meet the challenge of providing safe and cost-effective LLW management. The DOE expects to use a system approach by obtaining consensus on performance requirements with all of the involved regulatory agencies and by applying these performance requirements to the best available site. Engineered features will be added either through the stabilization of the waste or site improvements as required to meet the performance requirements. Necessary waste stabilization will be incorporated into the waste acceptance criteria relieving the operator from making waste treatment decisions on a strict cost-effectiveness basis. The initial analysis to determine a configuration which meets minimum performance requirements will also serve as the baseline for additional analyses to meet the ALARA requirements

  4. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory; Vigilancia y proteccion radiologica en el Laboratorio de Celdas Calientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, J.M.; Torre, J. De la; Garcia C, M.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  5. TA-2 water boiler reactor decommissioning (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of external structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from the TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor was performed as Phase I of reactor decommissioning. Six concrete structures were dismantled and 435 ft of contaminated underground piping was removed. Extensive soil contamination by 137Cs was encountered around structure TA-2-48 and in a suspected leach field near the stream flowing through Los Alamos Canyon. Efforts to remove all contaminated soil were hampered by infiltrating ground water and heavy rains. Methods, cleanup guidelines, and ALARA decisions used to successfully restore the area are described. The cost of the project was approximately $320K; 970 m3 of low-level solid radioactive waste resulted from the cleanup operations

  6. Radiation protection awareness in dentistry students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Dentistry students were assessed in one of the school of dentistry in Iran. 11% of responders had attended a radiation protection course. This study showed that those who have attended this course had improved knowledge of ALARA principle, assessment of the impact of digital imaging in patient dose reduction and usage of personal dosimeter systems. Course attendance made no considerable difference to knowledge of the patient dose, dose reduction techniques and annual permissible dose limits of general public and radiation workers. The results of this study revealed that the majority of students have not received adequate radiation protection teaching and even if a course has been attended, overall knowledge is still poor and formal teaching at undergraduate level should be corrected in the future.

  7. Development of radiological criteria for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of criteria for the safe disposal of nuclear wastes in geologic media requires the establishment of definitive objectives against which the adequacy of various waste management methods may be judged. This report suggests certain guidelines that might serve as first approximations pending promulgation of official criteria. These include the following proposals: (a) The allowable radiation dose to individuals should be related to the predicted probability of receiving the dose such that as the dose increases, the event(s) leading to that dose should become less probable. A quantitative relationship is developed and discussed. (b) Selection of a waste management method should be made in accordance with the principles of ALARA. (c) Doses to future generations should be considered to be equally serious as doses to present populations. (d) When the hazard potential of an underground nuclear waste repository becomes less than that of typical hazardous ore formations (i.e. 0.2% uranium ore), further concern is unwarranted. (author)

  8. Radiation load of the electro-thermal production of phosphorus. Part 2. The inhalation dose in road construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphate ore which is processed by Thermphos International in Vlissingen, Netherlands, to produce element phosphorus contains circa 1 Bq per gram uranium 238. As a result of this production process radionuclides are emitted and slags that contain natural radioisotopes are formed. The slags can be used as a building material for roads and water works. During the production of phosphorus the waste material calcinate is formed as well. Operators, working in the production process of phosphorus and laborers, working in road construction and hydraulic engineering inhale radioisotopes. In two articles attention will be paid to the inhalation doses, how the doses are measured, measures that were taken to reduce and control the doses, and the ALARA-principles. This article is focused on the inhalation doses for road construction workers

  9. Radiological assessment and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised.

  10. Thermoluminescence external personnel monitoring of workers in diagnostic radiology in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of thermoluminescence personnel external monitoring are reported from 1990 to 2000 for workers in diagnostic radiology which represents more than 75% of the professional exposition in Madagascar and for which enough data for good statistical considerations are available. Average and individual doses distribution are presented. In most cases, compliance with dose limits is verified though some high exposures have been identified. In average, these doses can be compared with the average effective dose from natural radiation sources. Methods for the evaluation of quality and performance are presented since the doses measured are all in the low range. In radiation protection, an important principle is to meet the requirements of the implementation of ALARA, in order to limit or reduce exposures. This work can be used as a tool for reference to make decision for corrective measures or further investigation when substantial variation in average doses is observed.

  11. Optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimisation of radiation protection is one of the key elements in the current radiation protection philosophy. The present system of dose limitation was issued in 1977 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and includes, in addition to the requirements of justification of practices and limitation of individual doses, the requirement that all exposures be kept as low as is reasonably achievable, taking social and economic factors into account. This last principle is usually referred to as optimisation of radiation protection, or the ALARA principle. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) organised an ad hoc meeting, in liaison with the NEA committees on the safety of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  12. Low dose effects - is the fear more dangerous than the radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of hypothesis which assumes a dose / harmful effect relationship without a limit allows the calculation of risks attributable to doses too small to produce detectable, harmful biological effects. The daughter product of this hypothesis is ALARA concept which requires that the dose received is kept as low as reasonably achievable. This concept of prudent avoidance is generally accepted by international radiation protection organisations and universally applied by radiation health professionals. The acceptance of a hypothesis which assumes that a single nuclear event can cause carcinogenesis, has generated levels of anxiety which may have resulted in significant detriment to those possibly exposed to ionising radiation. The anxiety generated may have caused more detriment and a higher death rate than the worst case ' theoretical' value calculated using the Linear or Quadratic Linear Hypothesis. Information selected from reports and comments in relevant publications indicating that this possibility has become a realty is presented. 24 refs

  13. Assessment of exposure pathways connected with construction and operation of concrete bridge reinforced with very low level radioactive steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large amount of low level radioactive material arises during decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Material mostly comprises metal scrap and concrete ruble. Paper deals with recycling and reuse of metal scrap and its utilization as part of reinforcement of concrete bridges under the conditional release concept. Radiation exposure originating in very low level reinforcement steel consists of several exposure pathways. Short-term radiation impact is represented mostly by external exposure pathway and it is relevant to the construction workers and users of the bridge. Long-term radiation impacts on inhabitants living near finished bridge and it is divided into inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides-internal exposure pathways. Radiation impact caused by utilization of very low level radioactive waste was calculated using simulation software VISIPLAN 3D ALARA and GOLDSIM. Results of calculations provide fair summary of possibilities of utilization of conditionally released steel as reinforcement of concrete bridges. (Authors)

  14. Integration of Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovy, M.; Eggermont, G

    2002-04-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN initiated a programme to integrate social sciences into its scientific and technological projects. Activities were started on the following issues: (1) sustainable development; (2) ethics and decision making in nuclear waste management (transgenerational ethics/retrievability; socio-psychological aspect and local involvement); (3) law and liability (medical applications and the basic safety standards implementation); (4) decision making (emergency management); safety culture; ALARA and ethical choices in protection). Two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of the expert. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2001 are summarised.

  15. Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance

  16. Improvements in D2O leakage detection in restricted areas of Reactor Building during operation and tritium in air monitoring during outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the air sampling lines required for the improvement of simultaneous sampling for tritium in air monitoring in restricted areas of Reactor Building during operation. These sampling lines require penetrations equipped with containment sealing solenoid valves. It also describes the equipment used and the experience gained from some D2O leakages since Plant commissioning. By taking into account the current tendencies, improvements in gathering all data related to tritium concentrations in Reactor Building in Health Physicist's office, room S - 307 were made. Air samples were analyzed either by a liquid scintillation detector and/or by a proportional counter simultaneously, instead of the former single samples. These improvements also gave the possibility of a quicker detection of D2O leakage, thus contributing to keep low personnel dose, according to ALARA principles, as 'in situ' monitoring have proved to be not justifiable. (authors)

  17. Radiation Dose Management In Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the US experience, the factors contributing to savings in radiation exposures for the period of 1985 to 1994 are (in the order of rank) (1) radiation protection guidelines, (2) reductions in unscheduled special maintenance, (3) reductions in source of exposure through material replacement, (4) primary chemistry control, cobalt substitution, decontamination, and preconditioning, (5) shutdown chemistry control guidelines, and (6) automated in-service inspection methods, and heat stress management guide. This illustrates that for successful radiation management, various factors must be included and integrated in the spirit of optimization. These factors are good planning and programming, use of technology, the culture to support ALARA among the management and workers, and the process of carrying out the actual tasks in details. Not only the control of radiation field through the implementation of technology is important but also the proper control of human involvement in radiation zone based on good planned programs and supportive culture is very important

  18. Safety design guide for radiation protection for CANDU 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety design guide describes the radiation protection philosophy, objectives and requirements to be used through out the design of CANDU 9. After describing the hazards associated with different systems, equipments and components, the guide then, identifies the regulatory limits which must be satisfied during operation of the plant and outlines the principal features of a viable radiation protection design. Finally, the guide identifies the specific design requirement which is systems and structures must satisfy. As a part of the ALARA approach, the guide also describes a Radiation Exposure Control Program. This program is a systemic review of the radiation exposures accumulated in the operation, inspection, maintenance or repair of each system or component. The program will be demonstrate that we have, from a radiological view point, an optimized design. The change status of the regulatory requirements, code and standards should be traced and this safety design guide shall be updated accordingly. 13 tabs. (Author) .new

  19. National Ignition Facility Project Input for Assessment of Environmental Impacts of NIF for the Sitewide Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S

    2003-10-01

    This report provides the baseline data from which the environmental impacts of bounding NIF operations can be assessed. Included are operations in the NE Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB) and the Optics Assembly Building (OAB), (Buildings 581 and 681), and the Building 582 equipment building. The NIF is an experimental laser fusion facility undergoing construction and commissioning at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The LTAB, the main experimental building of the NIF, is where laser-driven experiments will be conducted. The LTAB consists of two laser bays, two optical switchyards, a target bay, target diagnostics areas, capacitor bays, mechanical equipment areas, control rooms, and operational support areas. The LTAB provides an optically stable and clean environment and provides sufficient shielding against prompt radiation and residual radioactivity to meet the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle.

  20. Regulation of NORM by the US Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvall, K.C.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The authors discuss the radiation protection standards of the DOE for protection of the general public, which at present are primarily outlined in Order DOE 5400.5 and 10 CFR Part 834. The requirements include: basic dose limits for protection of the general public; radionuclide concentration guidelines for air and water; and surface contamination criteria for controlling the release of soil and equipment for restricted or unrestricted use. A major component of these orders is the concept of keeping radiation exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA), and the authors explain how this is applied to the implementation of the orders. Sections of the orders address radiation protection issues regarding natural radioactivity exposures.

  1. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  2. Shielding evaluation of the Thorium Lean Raffinate (TLR) waste treatment system at Waste Immobilisation Plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoria rods irradiated in research reactors were reprocessed for 233U recovery and resulted in 9 m3 of acidic Th-bearing raffinate waste. A two step treatment system was planned to treat the raffinate waste. The first step was the generation of thorium lean raffinate waste (TLR) after separation of thorium and the second step was the separation of residual radioactivity and conditioning planned at WIP. The beta activity in the TLR waste is around 50 mCi/i having 137Cs, 90Sr and 125Sb as its main constituents. Shielding calculations were carried out for the various stages of the treatment system at Area-61 of WIP, Trombay. Dose rate evaluations at each step of the treatment system were evaluated to keep the personnel exposure during campaign, ALARA. The work set the base for the shielding design of the treatment system and for the estimation of the man-rem budgeting during commissioning of the system

  3. Current Challenges in Radiation Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection professionals in medical facilities and practices are being challenged by new imaging technologies that use x-rays or radioactive materials. These include faster computerized tomography (CT) scanners, new interventional techniques that use extended fluoroscopy time, increased use of positron emission tomography (PET), and digital imaging techniques. More frequently these technologies are being fused into a single procedure, such as combined CT and PET scanning. Radiation Protection professionals are challenged to (1) be aware of developing technologies and clinical techniques, (2) analyze the potential radiation risks to patients and staff, (3) initiate necessary radiation safety training for medical staff, and (4) be involved in planning, dose measurement and optimization of the procedure to achieve appropriate dose control and ALARA

  4. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within C Tracts (C-2, C-3, and C-4) for Land Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis, Jessica M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-26

    Three separate Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAPs) were prepared for tracts C-2, C-3, and C-4. The objective of sampling was to confirm, within the stated statistical confidence limits, that the mean levels of potential radioactive residual contamination in soils in the C Tracts are documented, in appropriate units, and are below the 15 mrem/y (150 μSv/y) Screening Action Levels (SALs). Results show that radionuclide concentration upper-bound 95% confidence levels were close to background levels, with the exception of Pu-239 and Cs-137 being slightly elevated above background, and all measurements were below the ALs and meet the real property release criteria for future construction or recreational use. A follow-up ALARA analysis showed that the costs of cleanup of the soil in areas of elevated concentration and confirmatory sampling would far exceed any benefit from dose reduction.

  5. Patient doses in CT Examinations in 18 countries: Initial results from international atomic energy agency projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this prospective study at 73 facilities in 18 countries in Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe was to investigate if the CT doses to adult patients in developing countries are higher than international standards. The dose assessment was performed in terms of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and dose length product (DLP) for chest, chest (high resolution), lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis CT examinations using standard methods. Except in one case, the mean CTDIw values were below diagnostic reference level (DRL) while for DLP, 17% of situations were above DRLs. The resulting CT images were of adequate quality for diagnosis. The CTDIw and DLP data presented herein are largely similar to those from two recent national surveys. The study has shown a stronger need to create awareness and training of radiology personnel as well as monitoring of radiation doses in many developing countries so as to conform to the ALARA principle. (authors)

  6. Radiation protection aspects of the operation in a cyclotron facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. P. N.; Carneiro, J. C. G. G.

    2014-02-01

    The activated accelerator cyclotron components and the radioisotope production may impact on the personnel radiation exposure of the workers during the routine maintenance and emergency repair procedures and any modification of the equipment. Since the adherence of the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) constitutes a major objective of the cyclotron management, it has become imperative to investigate the radiation levels at the workplace and the probable health effects to the worker caused by radiation exposure. The data analysis in this study was based on the individual monitoring records during the period from 2007 to 2011. Monitoring of the workplace was also performed using gamma and neutron detectors to determine the dose rate in various predetermined spots. The results of occupational radiation exposures were analysed and compared with the values established in national standards and international recommendations. Important guidelines have been developed to reduce the individual dose.

  7. Technical basis document for internal dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, D P

    1991-01-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the Chem-Nuclear Geotech (Geotech) internal dosimetry program. Geotech policy describes the intentions of the company in complying with radiation protection standards and the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) program. It uses this policy and applicable protection standards to derive acceptable methods and levels of bioassay to assure compliance. The models and computational methods used are described in detail within this document. FR-om these models, dose- conversion factors and derived limits are computed. These computations are then verified using existing documentation and verification information or by demonstration of the calculations used to obtain the dose-conversion factors and derived limits. Recommendations for methods of optimizing the internal dosimetry program to provide effective monitoring and dose assessment for workers are provided in the last section of this document. This document is intended to be used in establishing an accredited dosi...

  8. New US regulations will demand improved personnel dose tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 1 January 1994 revised Title 10, Code of Federal Regulation Part 20, Standards for protection against radiation (10 CFR 20) will become law, and many radiation protection programmes at US facilities will change. This new regulation reflects the findings of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). As a result of ICRP findings (and other studies) airborne limits for radioactive nuclides have changed. While some limits have been increased, others have been reduced to as little as 1/60th of their previous value. After 10 CFR 20 it is likely that: exposure limits will become more restrictive, because external and internal exposures must be summed; real time exposure tracking will need to reflect both internal and external dose; use of respiratory protection will have to be consistent with maintaining exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA); automated (electronic) record keeping and reporting will be prevalent and will include real time exposure tracking. (Author)

  9. Occupational exposure to external ionising radiation: Personnel monitoring and dose evaluation at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernavoda NPP has two CANDU 600 reactors in commercial operation. For a CANDU reactor the major contributor (95%) to the external dose is gamma radiation. Individual dose monitoring is provided by an accredited dosimetric service, approved by the Romanian regulatory body (CNCAN) at CNE Cernavoda. For all the persons entering radiological controlled areas Health Physics Department provides individual dosimetric surveillance. When entering / working in areas where approved dose rates could be exceeded, beside TLD, an electronic direct reading, a personal alarm dosimeter (PAD) is used. When entering / working in areas with significant neutron dose rates an integrating portable neutron monitor is used. The main purpose of design and implementation of an Individual Dosimetry Program is to measure, assign and record all the significant radiation doses (Hp(10), Hp(0.07) and E50) received by an individual during activities performed at CNE Cernavoda NPP and ensure that all the exposure are kept under ALARA prescriptions. (authors)

  10. Loading, moving, and shipping radioactive waste in reusable radioactive material containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the dismantlement of systems and components at the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant was a monumental task, the loading, movement, temporary storage, and shipping of over 2 1/2 million pounds of contaminated and/or activated material was nearly as difficult. Close coordination and teamwork between such diverse groups as craft labor, health physics, radiation controls, trucking companies and waste volume reducers were crucial elements in performing this work safely, cost effectively, and with particular attention to the station's very aggressive ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) goals. This paper discusses the actual work that was involved from the time the contaminated component was removed from its location in the plant through actual shipment offsite

  11. Problems of communicating radiation doses to aboriginal members of the public in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early 1970s, Aboriginal people of the Alligator Rivers Region have had to come to grips with the effects of uranium mining at Nabarlek and Ranger. One element in their cost-benefit approach to mine operations has been the expectation that bush foods in the region will not be contaminated by the mining operations. Recent studies on radionuclide concentrations in freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi) in the region have shown this species, and perhaps others, to be efficient accumulators of radium. Information concerning natural radium accumulation in mussels and accompanying health risk estimates have been conveyed to Aboriginal people of the area and such information transfer has not been without its problems. Application of the ALARA principle to environmental management of the effluent pathways needs to consider Aboriginal expectations

  12. Opening Address by Liu Hua [NORM VII: 7. International Symposium on Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materialon Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, Beijing (China), 22-26 April 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORM related issues on radiation protection and the radiation environment have attracted global attention. Under the leadership of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, many governments are undertaking research or implementing regulatory measures for NORM. This international symposium on NORM serves as a platform that promotes technical, academic, policy, regulation and standards exchange and cooperation in this field, which has proven to be essential. This NORM VII symposium has already identified several topics, including the management of exposure to natural sources, NORM in industries and regulatory aspects of NORM in meeting the new BSS requirements; environmental aspects of NORM; site specific measurement; dose assessment; application of the ALARA principle; development of NORM measurement methods and strategies; management of NORM residues and wastes; and NORM related transport issues. I believe these topics are conducive to providing insight to NORM and will greatly boost the regulation and management of NORM

  13. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  14. Perspective from a commercial supplier of dosimetry services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional radiation related industries in the United States have matured. The growth rates in the numbers of radiation workers have moderated and ALARA programs have favorably reduced many exposures. Dosimetry testing and accreditation by the National Bureau of Standards have identified those services possessing satisfactory dosimetry systems and technical competence. These developments have influenced the business perspectives. Combined with the overall renewed emphasis on competition and productivity in American business, many dosimetry services have become more aggressive in seeking new markets; residential radon measurements being most obvious. The potential size of these markets is making investments in technical research more attractive. In the past, most research funding was provided by the government. The renewed research interest by the private sector could stimulate the entry of new professionals into radiation measurement research. Research results have the potential for improving traditional services and expanding the applicability of certain measurement methods

  15. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  16. Requirements for industrial x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety code is concerned with the protection of all individuals who may be exposed to radiation emitted by X-ray equipment operating at energies up to 1 MeV as used in industrial radiography. This code presents basic radiation safety information for the protection of personnel operating and servicing X-ray equipment and other workers and the general public in the vicinity of areas where X-ray equipment is in operation. It specifies general safety features of design, construction and functioning of X-ray equipment and facilities; describes the responsibilities of the user, operator and maintenance personnel; contains recommendations to ensure that the X-ray equipment is used and maintained in accordance with the ALARA principle; and describes a program of personnel monitoring and radiation safety surveys. ( 6 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.)

  17. State supervision over radiation protection in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is aimed on the organisation of state supervision over radiation protection and some aspects of the execution of state supervision over radiation protection domain. The radiation protection in the Czech Republic has been from its beginning and it is up to now based on the same principles as in the other developed countries. It was concluded that from professional, technical as well as personnel standpoint, it is essentially provided at a relevant level. Due to changes in the economical and political spheres and in the organisational structure of state administration, the system of the Czech Republic Radiation Protection is now in phase of complete re-organisation: (1) new legislative system including ALARA, QA/QC programmes implementation should be introduced into daily practice of ionizing sources users; (2) new, higher quality licensing and inspection system should be completely introduced and strengthened

  18. Some fundamental philosophy in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a presentation by the author at the Seminar on propaganda and Implementation of 'Regulations for Radiation Protection' sponsored by National Environmental Protection Agency and Institute of Standardization CNNC. The key points are: (1) The sources for different purposes and with different uncontrollable extents can be separately handled and controled, and be practically and reasonable protected individually; (2) The emphasis is laid on the dose limits for stochastic effects recommended by ICRP not the biological quantities based on medical results. Meanwhile, the social, ecomonic and technical factors shold also be considered. This is a supplementation of ALARA principle; (3) The licensing and registering system is an important measure to ensure that radiation sources are under control of responsible persons at all times, which is a system of technical management that needs to be perfected in practice; (4) The principal task of radiation protection is to keep all radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable, based on existing informations, knowledges and experiences

  19. Containment design requirements and their application to 500 MWe plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Containment is the final barrier to the release of fission products from the reactor system to the environment. In the defence in depth philosophy to reactor safety, the containment is one of the four special safety systems. Therefore, comprehensive requirements are specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) in its design code of practice. The code stipulates that in case of double containment, the secondary containment should completely envelope the primary. Further, the annulus space between the primary and secondary containment envelope shall be provided with a purging arrangement to maintain a negative pressure in the space thus ensuring zero ground level release consistent with ALARA principles. In this presentation the various AERB requirements and how these requirements have been met in 500 MWe containment design are discussed. Also containment response to some major accident types have been briefly described. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  20. McGuire snubber elimination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering program has been initiated at McGuire Nuclear Stations 1 and 2 to eliminate all existing snubbers. The elimination is achieved by replacing existing snubbers with limit stop pipe supports. The program establishes plant-wide modification procedures for one-to-one substitution under the 10 CFR 50.59 requirement. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) acceptance is based on the results of both comparison analyses and the hardware implementation of sample piping systems at McGuire nuclear stations. Experimental results obtained on shake table testing and from the NRC sponsored HDR research program are also used to formulate the technical basis and design procedures for plant-wide implementation of the snubber replacement effort. The overall program plan is for nearly 3,000 snubbers to be replaced in phases consistent with the plant scheduled outages. Duke Power estimates the program, when completed, will maintain ALARA, improve reliability, and reduce plant operating costs

  1. Disposal/storage container development experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental work is currently underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design and manufacture a radioactive waste container suitable for both storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. The container is designed to fulfill the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for on-site storage, as well as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's requirements for high integrity containers. The project also involves meeting the strict design and manufacturing ANSI/ASME NQA-1 guidelines. Special provisions of the container include a double containment system, with the inner barrier being corrosion resistant, the capability to monitor the internal cavity of the container, and off-gas venting capability. Further, yet related developmental work includes evaluating the cask for other varied uses, such as a processing cask, an ALARA shield, and even the possibility of Department of Transportation approval for an over-the-road transport cask

  2. Options for radiation dose reduction in CT; Moeglichkeiten der Strahlenreduktion bei der CT des Koerperstamms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euler, Andre; Schindera, Sebastian [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Szuecs-Farkas, Zsolt [Spitalzentrum Biel (Switzerland). Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    The use of a computed tomography (CT) scan for the diagnostic workup of various diseases has increased tremendously within the last 10 years. One major cause of this development is related to the technical advances of the CT scanners, resulting in a growing number of clinical CT indications. Besides the diagnostic benefit for the patient population, the overall radiation exposure to the patient has increased. Thus, to slow down the increase in radiation exposure, methods for dose optimization are necessary. Radiologists and technicians are liable for a responsible utilization of the CT scan, which goes along with the ALARA principle ('as low as reasonably achievable'). In the present article, we present various practicable strategies for a dose optimization. (orig.)

  3. Spent fuel transportation and storage experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Packaging, a Pacific Nuclear Company, is the leading U. S. designer of radioactive material transport packages (casks and overpacks). In 1985, the company designed, fabricated and licensed the first new spent fuel transport container to go into service, in more than a decade. The Model 125-B [USA/9200/B(M)F] rail car mounted, composite lead cask was designed to satisfy unique and demanding requirements associated with transporting damaged nuclear fuel from Three Mile Island Unit 2. Nuclear Packaging has also joined other industry leaders in developing advanced alternative technologies for the interim storage of spent reactor fuel. The storage system design centers around the NuPac CP-9 cask, and emphasizes system economics, operational efficiency, licensability, and shielding effectiveness based on sound ALARA principals. This paper reviews and discusses the basis for these developmental programs, the design considerations and approach, the test program and licensing effort as well as the unique features of both spent fuel container systems

  4. Shot peening of doel 3 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process implementation for DOEL consisted in: developing tooling and test procedures for an industrial application including ALARA considerations; qualifying process, tooling and procedures using representative conditions (full size mock-up, of steam generator channel head and associated working area); Establishing the reliability of tooling and procedures to comply permanently with the required criteria (chiefly Almen Intensity); and training and qualifying personnel. A variety of tests were performed by FRAMATOME and BELGATOM to qualify the process and characterize its effects on both inside and outside diameters of the tubes. These are: Mg Cl2; 10% caustic tests at high temperature and pressure; tetrathionate; strain gauges and X rays stresses measurements; effects on precracked tubes; Leak tests after shot peening. The operation was performed at Doel in July 1985. Laboratory tests performed on mockups by FRAMATOME and BELGATOM could demonstrate that on tubes without cracks no difference was found between Eddy current signals from tubes shot-peened or not

  5. A preliminary assessment of system cost impacts of using transportable storage casks and other shippable metal casks in the utility/DOE spent fuel management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the foregoing, a study was conducted by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. and H and R Technical Associates, Inc. to determine the prospective viability of the use of TSCs and shippable SOCs in the combined utility/DOE system. This study considered costs, ALARA considerations and the logistics of the use and delivery of casks to the DOE system by utilities. It was intended that this study would result in a technical and cost resource base that could be used for evaluating various strategies and scenarios for deploying TSCs or SOCs in the combined utility/DOE spent fuel management system with respect to the prospective economic advantage that could be realized

  6. Robots save money at PSEandG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) programme to develop and apply emerging robotics technology to the field of nuclear operations is focused on the use of mobile robotic devices to lower personnel radiation exposure, consistent with the ALARA concept. A PSE and G corporate task force had been created to develop and transfer the robotics technology to various operations. Four basic robotic or mechanical devices were selected to form a 'tool kit' which was delivered to stations for trials. The four devices are: Kelly; Minirover; Miniscavenger and Superscavenger; and Surbot-T. Also being considered is Cecil - designed for entry into secondary side of PWR steam generators for tube inspection and sludge lancing. (U.K.)

  7. Development of the Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. The monitoring system for high alpha radioactive contamination measurement will be use in the high radioactivity decommissioning sites such as hot-cell or glove box. Also, it will be use in the general nuclear facilities as the radiation monitoring unit. The preparation technology of the radiation sensor for high radioactive contamination measurement will be transferred to the company for the industrialization. The remote monitoring system can prevent the workers exposure using the optical fiber to separate the sensor and electronics

  8. Radiation protection during fluoroscopy of trucks with a mobile linear accelerator by Swiss Customs; Strahlenschutz bei der Durchleuchtung von Lastwagen mit einem mobilen Linearbeschleuniger durch den Schweizer Zoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, Stefan [Suva, Luzern (Switzerland)

    2016-08-01

    In 2015 the Swiss Customs Administration has taken into operation a vehicle inspection system of the newest generation. Higher radiation power yields better image quality. Image quality and the ALARA-principle are in competition with each other. In the drive-by mode the driver's cabin can also be inspected. Instead of limiting the maximum dose rate at the border of the controlled area, the maximum allowable dose per scan was calculated from the utilization frequency, in order to observe the regulations in radiation protection. In the vicinity of hills or tall buildings the limited height of the beam-stop must be taken into consideration. If pulsed X-rays are measured, saturation effects must be considered, which may cause too low measurement values - in particular if measurements of the direct beam are performed.

  9. Koch Process Systems VR-System 350. Technical support document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a conceptual design of a volume reduction system for solid and liquid combustible low-level wastes generated by either PWR or BWR nuclear power plants. The heart of the system is the controlled-air incinerator process which was developed and demonstrated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) for use in the volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) waste. Equipment descriptions of sub-systems and supporting services are included with sizing basis. Instrument control philosophy is described for the system to be operated unattended. The system configuration, design, and analysis of releases are included to represent a system which is effective, flexible, safe, considers ALARA, and has all the basic needs for ultimate licensing by a utility. 18 references, 13 tables

  10. The role of medical physicist in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing Radiation is applied in Radiation Therapy, Nuclear medicine and Diagnostic Radiology. Radiation Protection in Medical Application of Ionizing Radiation requires specific Professional Competence in all relevant details of the radiation source instrumentation / equipment clinical dosimetry application procedures quality assurance medical risk-benefit assessment. Application in general include Justification of practices (sufficient benefit to the exposed individuals) Limitation of doses to individuals (occupational / public exposure) Optimization of Protection (magnitude and likelihood of exposures, and the number of individuals exposed will be ALARA. Competence of persons is normally assessed by the State by having a formal mechanism for registration, accreditation or certification of medical physicists in the various specialties (e.g. diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine). The patient safety in the use of medical radiation will be increased through: Consistent education and certification of medical team members, whose qualifications are recognized nationally, and who follow consensus practice guidelines that meet established national accrediting standards

  11. Decommissioning Experience: Big Rock Point Nuclear Power Plant, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Big Rock Point has successfully employed a well planned and executed process to clean out the fuel pool in around 13 months, as reported by the site decommissioning project. The success was also reported by the contractor and in an independent publication. The reactor was a 67 MW BWR, which was shut down in 1997. Full decommissioning and unrestricted use of the site were achieved in 2007. The contractors were familiar with the site as they had successfully cleaned up another pool on the site in 1996. When completed, approximately 4800 TBq of waste, consisting of channel assemblies, control blades, satellite rollers, in-core detectors and other miscellaneous components, had been removed and shipped for storage or disposal. The project was within the ALARA dose budget, within the project cost budget and schedule, with no reportable incidents. (author)

  12. LADTAP II: technical reference and user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Whelan, G.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission computer program LADTAP II, which performs environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into surface waters. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program.

  13. Modality-dependent dose requirements in the Austrian breast cancer early detection program. First results from technical quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Austrian Breast Cancer Early Detection Program (BKFP) has officially started in January 2014. In order to ensure that all participating women can rely on a sufficient cancer detection rate while at the same time the required dose is as low as reasonably achievable, all participating radiology institutes (approx. 200) have to fulfill strict quality assurance requirements. The control and certification is performed by the Reference Center for Technical Quality Assurance (RefZQS), which has been developing the methods and tolerances in a pilot project since 2007. The limits are defined in the EUREF-Oeprotocol which is based on the European EPQC guidelines. From the requirement for optimized image quality while simultaneously following the ALARA principle, we found modality-dependent dose requirements, which we had expected but which have now been compiled for the first time for Austria.

  14. Design compliance matrix waste sample container filling system for nested, fixed-depth sampling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This design compliance matrix document provides specific design related functional characteristics, constraints, and requirements for the container filling system that is part of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This document addresses performance, external interfaces, ALARA, Authorization Basis, environmental and design code requirements for the container filling system. The container filling system will interface with the waste stream from the fluidic pumping channels of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system and will fill containers with waste that meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) criteria for waste that contains volatile and semi-volatile organic materials. The specifications for the nested, fixed-depth sampling system are described in a Level 2 Specification document (HNF-3483, Rev. 1). The basis for this design compliance matrix document is the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) desk instructions for design Compliance matrix documents (PI-CP-008-00, Rev. 0)

  15. SPS WANF Dismantling: A Large Scale-Decommissioning Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, S; Conan, N; De Paoli, D; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fumey, S; Gaillard, H; Grenard, J L; Grenier, D; Pardons, A; Paulat, E; Seraphin, Y; Tavlet, M; Theis, C; Vincke, H

    2011-01-01

    The operation of the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF) was halted in 1998. In 2010 a large scale-decommissioning of this facility was conducted. Besides CERN’s commitment to remove non-operational facilities, the additional motivation was the use of the installation (underground tunnels and available infrastructure) for the new HiRadMat facility, which is designed to study the impact of high-intensity pulsed beams on accelerator components and materials. The removal of 800 tons of radioactive equipment and the waste management according to the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principles were two major challenges. This paper describes the solutions implemented and the lessons learnt confirming that the decommissioning phase of a particle accelerator must be carefully studied as from the design stage.

  16. Justification and dosimetric issues for new CT practice: heart-scan, colon-scan and full body scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the new computed tomography techniques are to improve diagnostic quality while being less invasive. These examinations have to be justified, in other words their clinical indication has to be confirmed, along with the choice of this technique as being the most appropriate. Correctly managed use of these tools ensures that the patients are guaranteed a risk/benefit ratio that is frequently better than that of other medical exploratory methods. New procedures such as CT colonography and coronary CT angiography are currently being evaluated, even if these examinations can already be justified on the basis of their improved tolerance, rapidity and cost. In any case, in the same way as any other irradiating examination, they must comply in all respects with the ALARA principle. (authors)

  17. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  18. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a large number of sites around the world containing TRU (transuranic) waste, low level waste (LLW), and hazardous areas that require teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Teleoperation of the equipment is required to reduce the risk to operating personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator system (T-Rex) is designed to fill this requirement at low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), multiple end effectors and a quick-change system. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator with a hydraulic control system, the integration of an onboard remote control system, vision system, and the design of a remote control station

  19. Association between passive smoking in adulthood and phalangeal bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, T; Bech, M; Curtis, T;

    2011-01-01

    included a cohort of 15,544 men and women aged 18-95 years, who underwent a BMD scan in the Danish KRAM study. BMD scans of the middle phalanges of the second, third and fourth digits of the non-dominant hand were performed with a compact radiographic absorptiometry system (Alara MetriScan®). Also, height......The study investigates an association between phalangeal bone mineral density (BMD) and self-reported passive smoking using data on 15,038 persons (aged 18-95 years), who underwent a BMD scan in the Danish KRAM study. BMD was significantly lower in persons exposed to long-term passive smoking in...... their home during adulthood. INTRODUCTION: Smoking is associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between BMD at the phalangeal bones and self-reported passive smoking. METHODS: The study...

  20. Remote manipulator experience in target train maintenance at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Fermilab was designed in the late 1960's and early 1970's, it was anticipated that Neutrino target train servicing could be costly in terms of personnel radiation exposure. This was based in part on the expectation that target intensities of at least 1E13 protons/pulse would be required to produce several neutrino interactions in a large bubble chamber detector. This was indeed later proven to be the case and historically the Neutrino beamline has been targeted with about one half of the protons available from the Main Ring. It was believed that much of the occupational radiation dose from the Neutrino Area could be spared by utilization of a remote manipulator system, which was eventually installed. It is the purpose of this report to examine the use of the Fermilab remote manipulator system and evaluate its cost effectiveness and success as an ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) tool. 16 references, 11 figures

  1. Radioprotection: the 5th HSE objective of 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The fifth objective of 2012 in matters of safety at CERN is to increase awareness of best practices in matters of radiation protection and radiation safety all over the laboratory.   The aim of radiation protection is to protect people from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. Naturally, the objective is to keep doses to a person - be they staff, users, contracting personnel or members of the public - to values not only below legal limits but as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This is obtained by a proper knowledge of the risks related to ionising radiation at CERN, individual dosimetry, monitoring of ionising radiation at workplaces and in the environment, accurate planning of interventions in accelerator and experimental areas, etc. The 2012 focus is on job and dose planning, which translates into three main objectives: 1 - Appointment and training of radiation safety support officers (RSSOs) to ensure coverage of all equipment groups working in ra...

  2. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones. Transuranic storage area-retrieval enclosure program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, H.M. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andreychek, T.P.; Beeson, B.K. [Martin Marietta Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States). Aero and Naval Systems

    1993-04-01

    There are a large number of sites around the world containing TRU (transuranic) waste, low level waste (LLW), and hazardous areas that require teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Teleoperation of the equipment is required to reduce the risk to operating personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator system (T-Rex) is designed to fill this requirement at low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), multiple end effectors and a quick-change system. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator with a hydraulic control system, the integration of an onboard remote control system, vision system, and the design of a remote control station.

  3. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, H.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Andreychek, T.P.; Beeson, B.K. (Martin Marietta Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States). Aero and Naval Systems)

    1993-01-01

    There are a large number of sites around the world containing TRU (transuranic) waste, low level waste (LLW), and hazardous areas that require teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Teleoperation of the equipment is required to reduce the risk to operating personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator system (T-Rex) is designed to fill this requirement at low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), multiple end effectors and a quick-change system. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator with a hydraulic control system, the integration of an onboard remote control system, vision system, and the design of a remote control station.

  4. 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program: Air lock cover block refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-density concrete cover blocks shielding the pipe trench in the hot-cell air lock of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells had accumulated fixed radioactivity ranging from 1100 to 22, 000 mrad/hr. A corresponding increase in the radiation exposure to personnel entering the air lock, together with ALARA concerns, led to the removal of the contaminated concrete surface with a hydraulic spaller and the emplacement of a stainless steel covering over a layer of grout. The resultant saving in radiation exposure is estimated to be 7200 mrad for personnel completing burial box runs for the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program. Radiation exposure to all staff members entering the air lock is now at least 50% lower. 3 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab

  5. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. Suggested considerations for EPA's Yucca Mountain repository radiation protection standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among factors that the State of Nevada believes EPA should consider in promulgating a site specific radiation protection standard for a potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada, high-level nuclear waste repository are the following: (1) the standard should be relevant to the Yucca Mountain site, not driven by DOE's Yucca Mountain Project and its perceived data needs; (2) there should be a baseline evaluation of the best protection that current technology can provide; (3) ALARA should be a required demonstration, at least as it relates to thermal loading; (4) any dose standard set should include both individual and population dose limits; and, (5) any standard should take into account the potential additional radionuclide contamination in the area due to activities at the Nevada Test Site and Beatty low-level radioactive waste disposal site

  7. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  8. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  9. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within C Tracts (C-2, C-3, and C-4) for Land Transfer Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three separate Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAPs) were prepared for tracts C-2, C-3, and C-4. The objective of sampling was to confirm, within the stated statistical confidence limits, that the mean levels of potential radioactive residual contamination in soils in the C Tracts are documented, in appropriate units, and are below the 15 mrem/y (150 μSv/y) Screening Action Levels (SALs). Results show that radionuclide concentration upper-bound 95% confidence levels were close to background levels, with the exception of Pu-239 and Cs-137 being slightly elevated above background, and all measurements were below the ALs and meet the real property release criteria for future construction or recreational use. A follow-up ALARA analysis showed that the costs of cleanup of the soil in areas of elevated concentration and confirmatory sampling would far exceed any benefit from dose reduction.

  10. Radiological surveillance in the nuclear fuel fabrication in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to present the obtained results related to the application of the radiological safety programme established at the Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Pilot Plant (NFFPF) in Mexico, such as: surveillance methods, radiological protection criteria and regulations, radiation control and records and the application of ALARA recommendation. During the starting period from April 1994 to April 1995, at the NFFPF were made two nuclear fuel bundles a Dummy and other to be burned up in a BWR the mainly process activities are: UO2 powder receiving, powder pressing for the pellets formation, pellets grinding, cleaning and drying, loading into a rod, Quality Control testing, nuclear fuel bundles assembly. The NFFPF is divided into an unsealed source area (pellets manufacturing plant) and into a sealed source area (rods fabrication plant). The control followed have helped to detect failures and to improve the safety programme and operation. (authors). 1 ref., 3 figs

  11. Chest CT in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful and irreplaceable imaging technique in the evaluation of thoracic disease in infants and children. Recent advances in CT technology, with multi-detector equipment now widely available in most institutions, allowing a highly detailed evaluation of the chest in a short time period has resulted in expanding indications of chest CT in paediatric patients. Its improved diagnostic yield along with a widespread availability has also resulted in an increased number of CT examinations in children, not always with beneficial impact on patient management and outcome. Accordingly with the ALARA concept, a judicious and correct use of CT is strongly advisable in order to reduce unnecessary high dose radiation exposure. The objective of this paper is to review the use of chest CT in paediatric patients focused mainly on basic technical aspects and clinical applications in the evaluation of the lungs, mediastinum and chest wall

  12. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo TLD for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Personnel neutron dosimetry continues to be a difficult science due to the lack of availability of robust passive dosimeters that exhibit tissue- or near-tissue- equivalent response. This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The personal albedo dosimeter was processed on a monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative daily bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average.

  13. Radiation levels at boiling water reactors of a commercial nuclear power plant fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation field control at a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is a complex process that requires the application of both theoretical knowledge and practical experience in order to achieve low radiation fields. Older BWRs were usually designed with cobalt containing components, such as Stellite™ materials in valves, control rod blades, turbine blades and others, that contribute to high radiation fields due to the activation of cobalt to Co-60. Newer BWRs are designed with improvements in these areas; however, only the newest BWRs have been designed using low cobalt source term materials for all components in streams that enter the reactor. Control and minimization of the cobalt source term (material that can be activated to Co-60 in the reactor) will ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) dose rates are achieved during power operation and during refueling outages. (author)

  14. DOE 2009 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2009 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  15. The AL-R8 SI: the next generation staging container for plutonium pits at the USDOE Pantex Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, E J; Vickers, L D

    1999-11-01

    The AL-R8 SI (sealed insert) is the next generation staging container for plutonium pits at the U.S. DOE Pantex Plant. The sealed insert is a stainless steel container that will be placed inside a modified AL-R8 container to stagepits. A pit is a hollow sphere of plutonium metal which is the primary fissionable material in nuclear weapons (warheads and bombs). It is hermetically sealed by a cladding material, which is usually stainless steel. Personnel exposures to ionizing radiation from the pits in storage are expected to decrease due to the attenuation provided by the new SI. All personnel exposures to ionizing radiation at Pantex Plant are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Pantex Plant secures the common defense and national security of the United States by safely staging plutonium pits in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. PMID:10527158

  16. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation.

  17. Environmental policy on radiation in one indicator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pressure indicators are proposed for nuclear installations and the process industry. The environmental quality indicator for radioactive substances in surface waters and suspended matter needs additional investigation. An environmental quality indicator is both possible and desirable for radium in dredged material, although no policy targets are available. However, for the time being construction of an environmental quality indicator for radon and external radiation in dwellings is impossible. Use of the population-averaged dose as an environmental effect indicator is recommended. If only one policy theme indicator for radiation is needed, the preferred choice is the environmental pressure indicator. The reference emission should be derived from the 'secondary (dose) level'. Priority is no longer given by the authorities to the optimalisation of radiation protection, defined in the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle, below this secondary level

  18. Radiation protection laws, competences and organizational structures in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper points out the priorities and peculiarities of German radiation protection laws. With the coming into force of the unification agreement, the Atomic Energy Act, the Radiation Protection Ordinance, and the X-Ray Ordinance became valid in the five new Federal States and Berlin, with slight deviations and amendments. Radiation protection law is Federal law adapted to EC law, with several variations, such as the minimization rule in section 28, para 1, Radiation Protection Ordinance, compared to the ALARA principle, or lower partial body dose limits. The paper discusses licensing and protective regulations; the terms' officer responsible for radiation protection' and 'officer in charge of radiation protection'; radiation pass; physical radiation monitoring, and medical follow-up checks as well as governmental control functions and competences; executive functions of the Federal Government; import and export; Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz; transportation of radioactive materials; radioactive waste management. The annex comprises several tables to illustrate the aforesaid. (HSCH)

  19. Radiation Protection and Control Act, 1982 (South Australia) No.49 of 29 April 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act provides for the control of activities related to radioactive substances and radiation apparatus as well as for protection against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. It also amends the Health Act, 1935-1980 by deleting certain provisions concerning, inter alia, radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. The Act states as its general objective that the competent authorities in the exercise of their duties and any person carrying on activities involving radioactive substances and equipment emitting ionizing radiation shall try to ensure that exposure of persons to ionizing radiation is kept as low as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into account (the ALARA principle recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection). (NEA)

  20. Radiation exposure control during EMCCR campaign at MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enmasse Coolant Channel Replacement (EMCCR) work is second of its kind for Indian PHWR- next to RAPS - 2 campaign- after successful demonstration of ability by NPCIL to carry out such major core component maintenance. The Challenges posed during such campaign are mainly attributed to the radiation field, continuous occupancy, and large quantity of material handling for execution as well as preparing infrastructure, exposure control for large number of workmen. Extensive planning was carried out to address all these issues in order to reduce the downtime of the station keeping the collective dose as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA). This paper highlights the strategy adopted, logistics involved in execution of work and the efforts taken to control radiation exposure during this major campaign. (author)

  1. Cost-benefit considerations in the development of policies and procedures for controlling indoor exposure to radon and its decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of ALARA to the problem of controlling residential radon levels is limited. Cost-benefit considerations can nevertheless be useful in guiding policy in this area. From a societal perspective, the cost-benefit balance for mitigating radon in homes to the EPA action level of 4 pCi/L, or lower, is generally better than for most programs aimed at reducing environmental risks. Reduction of radon levels in new homes tends to be less costly; moreover, reduced radon levels in new construction may be achievable with a net cost savings to the homeowner due to concomitant decreases in energy expenses. Since programs to reduced radon exposure rely on voluntary actions by homeowners, the societal cost-benefit balance cannot dictate the extent of radon mitigation efforts. However, both economic incentives and governmental guidance can influence these efforts. Cost-benefit analysis can be an important tool in formulating such guidance

  2. The operation experience of SG blowdown demineralizers system in Korea's NPP and the best operating method in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steam generator blowdown system(SGBDS)'s are installed to remove the concentrated impurities that are entered with the feedwater or the condensate polishing demineralizer's leakages, to minimize the effluent of radioactive materials in case of the SG's tube rupture and to maintain the lebel of ALARA's guideline in the 10CFR50 App.I. In Korea's NPPs, the SGBDS's design structure and operating procedures are various types although the installing purposes are same. The different designs are the each vessel volume, in series or not, and the resins(cation/anion) mixing ratio, etc. By the analysis results, the best method is the resins mixing ratio is determined by the impurities ratio and the new resin vessel is located after the other vessel to increase the chemical or radioactive material's decontamination factor

  3. Upgrade Strategies for the Proton Synchrotron Booster Dump at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Sarrio Martinez, A; Maglioni, C

    2012-01-01

    CERN’s LHC Injection chain Upgrade (LIU) involves a revision of the Proton Synchrotron Booster dump, which was designed in the 1960’s to cope with beam energies reaching 800 MeV and intensities of 1e+13 particles per pulse. Thermo-mechanical studies highlighted the need for an upgrade of the dump, so that it is capable of withstanding energies in the order of 2 GeV and intensities up to 1e+14 particles per pulse. This paper proposes a new design of the dump in the light of various constraints and choices such as the geometry, materials and the integration of the required cooling system. Further topics discussed include the strategy for dismantling the old device, which has been continuously irradiated for almost 40 years and presents a difficult access. Therefore, a detailed ALARA procedure is being prepared in order to carry out the upgrade works in the area.

  4. Development of the program for identifying high ORD jobs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the requirements of keeping occupational radiation dose (ORD) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), the effective reduction of ORD has always been one of the major concerns in the phases of design as well as operation of a nuclear power plant. But ORD is expected to increase on accounting of NPP(Nuclear Power Plants)-outworn. The cost-effective reduction of ORD at a NPP could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing plants. For this purpose, the ORD data of KOREA NPP during outages are analyzed. Through the analysis of existing ORD data, high ORD jobs are identified. For analysis, two main ORD database program is developed. Using this program, the main high ORD jobs are analyzed according to several factors. From this result, improvement of ORD reduction method is possible to adopting effective means based upon the results of analysis

  5. Soil sampling plan for Shippingport site release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the soil sampling plan developed for the decommissioned Shipping-port Atomic Power Station in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, to ensure that both the radiological and the chemical criteria for release were met. The analytical and technical bases for the selection of sampling frequency and location are also described. The radiological release criteria required that the dose to a future resident not exceed 100 mrem per year and be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This translated to limiting conditions of 6pCi/g Cobalt-60 in the top 3m of soil and 100pCi/G Cobalt-60 in lower layers. Corresponding values were defined for the other radionuclides present, i.e., Cesium-137, Antimony-125, and to a lesser extent, Europium-152. The chemical release criterion required that the residual soil be free of chemicals that would qualify as hazardous waste

  6. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation

  7. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  8. Using of BEPU methodology in a final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) has been established since the discovery of nuclear fission, and the occurrence of accidents in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide has contributed for its improvement. The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) must contain complete information concerning safety of the plant and plant site, and must be seen as a compendium of NRS. The FSAR integrates both the licensing requirements and the analytical techniques. The analytical techniques can be applied by using a realistic approach, addressing the uncertainties of the results. This work aims to show an overview of the main analytical techniques that can be applied with a Best Estimated Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methodology, which is 'the best one can do', as well as the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Moreover, the paper intends to demonstrate the background of the licensing process through the main licensing requirements. (author)

  9. Radiation protection activities in the Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (BG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods for general and individual radiation monitoring applied in the Institute are described. The following data for the period 1962-1992 are discussed: 1) The maximum annual dose absorbed by some staff members does not exceed 40% of the maximum annual permissible dose. 2) The bulk of the personnel have received up to 10% of the maximum annual permissible dose. 3) There are no total radiation burden which exceed the maximum permissible doses for the respective age. These data show that in the course of the whole period of operation of IRT-2000 research reactor and active work with ionizing radiation sources, the ALARA principle has played a leading role in the radiation protection practices of the personnel. (author)

  10. Issues regarding the U.S. F.D.A. Protective Action Guidelines and derived response levels for human food and animal feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A review of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) rationale and methods for determining protective action guidelines (PAGs) and derived response levels (DRLs) (FDAa82, FDAb82) for human food and animal feed reveals the presence of ambiguous and contradictory information that should be clarified in order to improve the usefulness of the guidance. The differences in the criteria used to determine the Preventative and Emergency PAGs and DRLs, for example, are striking. The Preventative PAGs (and DRLs) are based on accepted health physics principles, e.g. risk factors, avoidance of fetal health effects, agricultural models, etc. The Emergency PAGs (and DRLs), however, are based solely on a traditional safety factor of ten. This difference in rationale becomes more conspicuous when the protective actions for these PAGs are compared: preventative protective actions involve low impact actions, e.g. removal of cattle from pasture, storage to allow for radioactive decay, etc., while emergency protective actions involve high impact actions e.g. isolating and condemning food products. These differences result in a contradiction: high impact actions, which may cause considerable problems and loss of income for farmers and food processors, are based on non-technical premises ('tradition'), while the low impact actions, which may only result in minor inconveniences to farmers and food processors, are based on solid scientific principles. Justifying or explaining these differences to farmers or to the media may be very difficult. Clearly there exists a need to review the basis and rationale upon which the Emergency PAGs and DRLs were derived in order to provide a more scientific explanation for their choice and use. In the FDA guidance (FDAa82), references are also made to ALARA and to the use of low-impact actions at doses lower than the PAGs. Although the FDA accepts and endorses the concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, the FDA does not

  11. Tritium-management survey of Wolsong 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commissioned in 1983, Wolsong 1 has had one of the best lifetime capacity factors in the world. It has also maintained tritium emissions and heavy-water losses at or below those of similar CANDU 6 reactors. To further ensure that emissions remain as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Wolsong 1, AECL and the KEPC0 (Korean Electric Power Company)Research Center collaborated on a survey of tritium management at Wolsong 1 during the spring of 1995. This survey identified similarities and differences between Wolsong 1 and the Canadian CANDU 6 stations. It also corroborated several of Wolsong 1's plans to further refine and upgrade tritium management. This report summarizes those aspects of the Wolsong 1 tritium survey. (author)

  12. The issue concerning the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limit for internal radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific, technical, practical, and ethical considerations that relate to the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limitation system for internal radiation protection are evaluated and presented. The concerns about problems associated with the more recent ICRP committed dose recommendations that have been expressed by persons who are currently operating under an annual dose limitation system are reviewed and discussed in terms of the radiation protection programme elements that are required for an effective ALARA programme. We include in this and a follow-up article a comparison of how these alternative dose limitation systems affect the economic and professional livelihood of radiation workers and the requirements that they impose upon employers. Finally, we recommend the use of an ICRP based committed dose limitation system that provides protection of workers over an entire occupational lifetime without undue impact on their livelihood and without undue requirements for employers. (author)

  13. Evironmental assessment factors relating to reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is in two parts. Part I presents the criteria and evaluation factors, based primarily on US experience, which may be used to carry out an environmental assessment of spent fuel reprocessing. The concept of As Low as is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is introduced in limiting radiation exposure. The factors influencing both occupational and general public radiation exposure are reviewed. Part II provides information on occupational and general public radiation exposure in relation to reprocessing taken from various sources including UNSCEAR and GESMO. Some information is provided in relation to potential accidents at reprocessing or MOX fuel refabrication plants. The magnitude of the services, energy, land use and non-radiological effluents for the reference design of reprocessing plant are also presented

  14. Partitioning and transmutation of nuclear waste: the Dutch RAS programme and its relation to international studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper a review of the Dutch RAS programme is presented. The objectives and achievements of the programme are described. Special attention is given to a recent assessment of the international status of P and T that has been made for the Dutch authorities. The major conclusion of this assessment is that P and T is an important instrument in the management of nuclear waste to achieve the technical limits (ALARA) with respect to radiotoxicity of the waste inventory as well as radiological effects of the disposal. The technology for P and T is, however, only partially available at present and recommendations for the directions of the RAS programme are given. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of environmental control technologies for commercial uranium nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present in the United States, there are seven commercial light-water reactor uranium fuel fabrication facilities. Effluent wastes from these facilities include uranium, nitrogen, fluorine, and organic-containing compounds. These effluents may be either discharged to the ambient environment, treated and recycled internally, stored or disposed of on-site, sent off-site for treatment and/or recovery, or sent off-site for disposal (including disposal in low-level waste burial sites). Quantities of waste generated and treatment techniques vary greatly depending on the facility and circuits used internally at the facility, though in general all the fluorine entering the facility as UF6 is discharged as waste. Further studies to determine techniques and procedures that might minimize dose (ALARA) and to give data on possible long-term effects of effluent discharge and waste disposal are needed

  16. Mixed waste characterization and certification at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioactive Waste Management Project (RWMP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was recently granted interim status by the state of Nevada to receive mixed waste (MW). The RCRA Part B permit application has been revised and submitted to the state. Preliminary indications are that the permit will be granted. In conjunction with revision of the Part B Permit application, pertinent DOE guidelines governing waste acceptance criteria (WAC) and waste characterization were also revised. The guidelines balance the need for full characterization of hazardous constituents with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) precepts. Because it is not always feasible to obtain a full chemical analysis without undue or unnecessary radiological exposure of personnel, process knowledge is considered an acceptable method of waste characterization. A balance of administrative controls and verification procedures, as well as careful documentation and high standards of quality assurance, are essential to the characterization and certification program developed for the NTS

  17. Practical limitations for the release of fission products during the operation of a research reactor: a case study of BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joppen, F. [Health Physics and Safety Department, SCK-CEN, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Failure of the cladding of a fuel element is an event occurring from time to time while operating a research reactor. As a consequence, fission products are released in the primary circuit of the reactor. This contamination means no direct hazard for the workers or for the environment in case the reactor has a closed primary circuit. The operator can decide to continue the irradiation to finish a scientific experiment or a commercial isotope production program. However, the operator cannot prolong the cycle regardless the concentration fission products in the primary loop. Beside the limitations imposed by the regulatory authorities, ALARA considerations should be taken into account. An untimely stop of the reactor can have serious financial consequences and prolonged operation causes higher radiation doses. This paper gives an overview of decision process applied in case of detection of fission products in the primary circuit of BR2. (author)

  18. Are we ready to apply the de minimis concept to standard setting: a historical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pros and cons of the de minimis concept is discussed from a historical point of view. The purpose is first to indicate how long ago many common occupational hazards were recognized and second to conclude that there had to be exposure levels that were essentially trivial, i.e., de minimis. Some aspects of the history of radiation protection are presented. The topics of discussion include: empiricism; the tolerance dose; the maximum permissible exposure dose; as low as possible dose (ALAP) and as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA); and the challenge of the '80s. In the '80s with the strong movement to use risk as a basis for both radiation and chemical standards, the need for adding the concept of a trivial risk has taken hold. Some examples of possible de minimis levels, as well as some of the problems and current activities, are presented

  19. MİKROFABRİKASYON TEKNOLOJİSİ VE İlAÇ TAŞIYICI SİSTEMLER ÜZERİNDE UYGULAMALARI

    OpenAIRE

    KARATAŞ, Ayşegül; SONAKIN, Özlem

    2007-01-01

    Mikrofabrikasyon mikrometreden milimetreye değişen boyutlarda objeler yaratmak için kullanılanbir işlemdir. Bu objeler minyatür hareketli parçalara, durağan yapılara ya da herikisine de sahiptir.Yapısal, mekanik ve belki de elektronik özelliklerin kombinasyonuyla terapötik ilaç taşıyıcı sistemlerininyaratılmasına izin veren mikrofabrikasyon teknikleri ile klasik ilaç taşıyıcı sistemlerle yapılan tedavihedeflerinin üstesinden gelinebilir. Bu derlemede, mikrofabrikasyon teknikleri kısaca tanıml...

  20. Radiation dosage during pediatric diagnostic or interventional cardiac catheterizations using the "air gap technique" and an aggressive "as low as reasonably achievable" radiation reduction protocol in patients weighing < 20 kg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A Osei

    2016-01-01

    Results: One-hundred and twenty-seven patients underwent 151 procedures within the study period. The median age was 1.2 years (range: 1 day to 7.9 years and median weight was 8.8 kg (range: 1.9-19.7. Eighty-nine (59% of the procedures were interventional. The median total fluoro time was 13 min [interquartile range (IQR 7.3-21.8]. The median total air Kerma (K product was 55.6 mGy (IQR 17.6-94.2 and dose area product (DAP was 189 Gym2 (IQR 62.6-425.5. Conclusion: Use of a novel ALARA and AGT protocol for cardiac catheterizations in children markedly reduced radiation exposure to levels far below recently reported values.