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Sample records for alanine-rich c-kinase substrate

  1. Myristoylated Alanine Rich C Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) is essential to β2-integrin dependent responses of equine neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheats, Mary K; Pescosolido, Kimberly C; Hefner, Ethan M; Sung, Eui Jae; Adler, Kenneth B; Jones, Samuel L

    2014-08-15

    Neutrophil infiltration is a prominent feature in a number of pathologic conditions affecting horses including recurrent airway obstruction, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and laminitis. Cell signaling components involved in neutrophil migration represent targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. In order to migrate into tissue, neutrophils must respond to chemoattractant signals in their external environment through activation of adhesion receptors (i.e. integrins) and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C-Kinase Substrate (MARCKS), a highly conserved actin-binding protein, has a well demonstrated role in cytoskeletal dependent cellular functions (i.e. adhesion, spreading, and migration), but the details of MARCKS involvement in these processes remain vague. We hypothesized that MARCKS serves as a link between the actin cytoskeleton and integrin function in neutrophils. Using a MARCKS-specific inhibitor peptide known as MANS on equine neutrophils in vitro, we demonstrate that inhibition of MARCKS function significantly attenuates β2-integrin-dependent neutrophil functions including migration, adhesion, and immune complex-mediated respiratory burst. The MANS peptide did not, however, inhibit the β2-integrin-independent PMA mediated respiratory burst. These results attest to the essential role of MARCKS function in regulating neutrophil responses, and strongly implicate MARCKS as a potential regulator of β2-integrins in neutrophils. PMID:24857637

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of the murine macrophage "68-kDa" protein kinase C substrate and its regulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Seykora, J T; Ravetch, J V; Aderem, A

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a cDNA clone encoding the murine macrophage 68-kDa protein kinase C substrate, which is homologous to the 80- to 87-kDa protein identified by the acronym MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate). The murine MARCKS cDNA clone encodes an acidic protein of 309 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 29,661. Transfection of the murine MARCKS gene into TK-L fibroblasts produced a myristoylated protein kinase C substrate that migrated on SD...

  3. Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase: A novel regulator of intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutao Yan; Didier Merlin

    2008-01-01

    Recently, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been the subject of considerable research, with increasing attention being paid to the loss of intestinal epithelial cell barrier function as a mechanism of pathogenesis. Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) is involved in regulating barrier function. SPAK is known to interact with inflammation-related kinases (such as p38, JNK, NKCC1, PKCθ, WNK and MLCK), and with transcription factor AP-1, resulting in diverse biological phenomena, including cell differentiation, cell transformation and proliferation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and regulation of chloride transport. This review examines the involvement of Ste20-like kinases and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways in the pathogenesis and control of intestinal inflammation. The primary focus will be on the molecular features of intestinal inflammation, with an emphasis on the interaction between SPAK and other molecules, and the effect of these interactions on homeostatic maintenance, cell volume regulation and increased cell permeability in intestinal inflammation.

  4. Overexpression of Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase exacerbates experimental colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yutao; Laroui, Hamed; Ingersoll, Sarah A; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz; Yang, Stephen; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Obertone, Tracy S; Nguyen, Hang; Sitaraman, Shanthi V; Merlin, Didier

    2011-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, mainly Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and altered immune regulation. Colonic Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but its underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Both SPAK-transfected Caco2-BBE cells and villin-SPAK transgenic (TG) FVB/6 mice exhibited loss of intestinal barrier function. Further studies demonstrated that SPAK significantly increased paracellular intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran. In vivo studies using the mouse models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid showed that TG FVB/6 mice were more susceptible to DSS and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid treatment than wild-type FVB/6 mice, as demonstrated by clinical and histological characteristics and enzymatic activities. Consistent with this notion, we found that SPAK increased intestinal epithelial permeability, which likely facilitated the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo, aggravated bacterial translocation in TG mice under DSS treatment, and consequently established a context favorable for the triggering of intestinal inflammation cascades. In conclusion, overexpression of SPAK inhibits maintenance of intestinal mucosal innate immune homeostasis, which makes regulation of SPAK important to attenuate pathological responses in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21705622

  5. Over-expression of Ste20-related proline/alanine rich kinase (SPAK) exacerbates experimental colitis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yutao; Laroui, Hamed; Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz; Yang, Stephen; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Obertone, Tracy S.; Nguyen, Hang; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), mainly Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and altered immune regulation. Colonic Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but its underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Both SPAK-transfected Caco2-BBE cells and villin-SPAK transgenic (TG) FVB/6 mice exhibited loss of intestinal barrier function. Further studies demonstrated that SPAK significantl...

  6. Perspective of future drugs targeting sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase for blood pressure control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen-Min; Lin; Pang-Yen; Liu; Ching-Fen; Wu; Wen-Been; Wang; Chih-Lu; Han

    2015-01-01

    According to a genome-wide association study,intronic SNPs within the human sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase(SPAK) gene was linked to 20% of the general population and may be associated with elevated blood pressure. As cell volume changes,mammalian SPAK kinases respond to phosphorylate and regulate cation-coupled chloride co-transporter activity. To our knowledge,phosphorylation of upstream with-no-lysine(K)(WNK) kinases would activate SPAK kinases. The activation of WNK-OSR1/SPAK cascade on the kidneys and aortic tissue is related to the development of hypertension. Several regulators of the WNK pathway such as the Kelch kinase protein 3-Cullin 3 E3 ligase,hyperinsulinemia,and low potassium intake to mediate hypertension have been identified. In addition,the SPAK kinases may affect the action of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system on blood pressure as well. In 2010,two SPAK knock-in and knock-out mouse models have clarified the pathogenesis of lowering blood pressure by influencing the receptors on the kidneys and aortic smooth muscle. More recently,two novel SPAK inhibitors for mice,Stock 1S-14279 and Closantel were discovered in 2014. Targeting of SPAK seems to be promising for future antihypertensive therapy. Therefore we raised some viewpoints for the issue for the antihypertensive therapy on the SPAK(gene or kinase).

  7. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  8. Expression and significance of Src-suppressed C kinase substrate in rat models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis%Src抑制的蛋白激酶C底物在实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎大鼠脊髓中的表达及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 朱慧; 郭益冰; 戚菁; 施维; 吴信华; 鞠少卿

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究Src抑制的蛋白激酶C底物(Src-suppressed C kinase substrate,SSeCKS)在实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎(experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis,EAE)进程中的表达情况,探讨其在EAE病理过程中可能的功能及意义,为多发性硬化(multiple sclerosis,MS)和EAE提供新的治疗靶点.方法 构建EAE大鼠模型,进行临床打分评估;用HE染色检测EAE大鼠脊髓组织的炎性浸润情况;用western blot检测SSeCKS的表达变化;用免疫组织化学观察SSeCKS在脊髓组织中的分布.结果 髓磷脂碱性蛋白(myelin basic protein,MBP)诱导单相的EAE过程:Lewis大鼠经MBP免疫后7~10 d开始有临床症状,13~16 d达到发病高峰,之后自发地恢复,至30 d左右恢复到病前水平;EAE病程高峰期,大鼠脊髓炎性浸润情况显著;SSeCKS蛋白表达在EAE起始E1期显著增加,E3期达到高峰,之后开始下降,恢复期基本恢复到正常水平.结论 本实验成功构建了Lewis大鼠的EAE模型;EAE病理过程中,SSeCKS蛋白表达水平发生变化,提示SSeCKS可能参与了EAE过程.%Objective To observe the expression patterns of Src-suppressed C kinase substrate (SSeCKS) in rat models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis ( EAE), and investigate the possible functions of SSeCKS in the pathogenesis to find new therapeutic strategies against EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS).Methods The model was prepared in Lewis rat induced by myelin basic protein (MBP).The rats were sacrificed at different phase after immunization.Inflammatory cell infiltration was observed by H-E staining.Western blot was used to detect the changes of SSeCKS expression during EAE and the distribution of SSeCKS in spinal cord of EAE rats was investigated by immunohistochemisty staining.Results Monophasic EAE process was induced by MBP in Lewis rats.EAE onset in rats occurred during the days 7 to 10 after immunization, peaked at the days 13 to 16, and exhibited spontaneous remission until the day 30.The

  9. Dioxin modulates expression of receptor for activated C kinase (RACK-1) in developing neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.H.; Kim, S.Y.; Lee, H.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Lee, J.H.; Chae, W.G. [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    TCDD is sensitive to the central nerve system of the developing brain. The TCDD-induced neurodevelopmental deficits include the cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. While TCDD may lead to neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral deficit, it is not known which molecular substances are intracellular targets for TCDD. Since TCDD accumulates in brain and the brain contains the Ah receptor, it is possible that TCDD may act at the target site such as cerebellum, which is responsible for cognitive abilities and motor function. A recent in vitro studies using cerebellar granule cells demonstrated a translocation of PKC-{alpha} and {epsilon} following the TCDD or PCB exposure. One of the most pivotal second messenger molecules involved in neuronal function and development is protein kinase C (PKC). PKC signaling pathways have been implicated as an important factor in learning and memory processes. PKC signaling events are optimized by the adaptor proteins, which organize PKCs near their selective substrates and away from others. RACK-1(receptor for activated C-kinase) is one of adaptor proteins that anchor the activated PKC at the site of translocation 6. RACKs bind PKC only in the presence of PKC activators. RACKs are 30- and 36-kDa proteins located in cytoskeletal compartment and play a key role in PKC activation and in membrane amchoring. Since different PKC isoforms translocate to distinct subcellular sites on activation, it is suggested that isoform-specific RACK may be present. Activation of certain PKC isoforms (PKC-a and {beta}II) is preferentially associated with RACK-1. While TCDD modulates PKC signaling pathway, role of RACK-1 on TCDD-mediated signaling pathway is not known. To identify the intracellular target for TCDD and understand a mechanism of signaling pathway in the developing brain, the present study attempted to analyze effects of RACK-1 in the cerebellar granule cells following TCDD exposure.

  10. Multiple faces of protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1): Structure, function, and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Hong; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Shen, Ying; Wang, Yin

    2016-09-01

    Protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) has received considerable attention because it is the only protein that contains both PSD-95/DlgA/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain. Through PDZ and BAR domains, PICK1 binds to a large number of membrane proteins and lipid molecules, and is thereby of multiple functions. PICK1 is widely expressed in various tissues, particularly abundant in the brain and testis. In the central nervous system (CNS), PICK1 interacts with numerous neurotransmitters receptors, transporters, ion channels, and enzymes, and controls their trafficking. The best characterized function of PICK1 is that it regulates trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit GluA2 during long-term depression and long-term potentiation. Recent evidence shows that PICK1 participates in various diseases including neurobiological disorders, such as chronic pain, epilepsy, oxidative stress, stroke, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and non-neurological disorders, such as globozoospermia, breast cancer, and heart failure. In this review, we will summarize recent advances focusing on the structure and regulation of PICK1 and its functions in protein trafficking, neurological and non-neurological diseases. PMID:26970394

  11. The Receptor for Activated C Kinase in Plant Signaling: Tale of a Promiscuous Little Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Islas Flores

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two decades after the first report of the plant homologue of the Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1 in cultured tobacco BY2 cells, a significant advancement has been made in the elucidation of its celular and molecular role. The protein is now implicated in many biological functions including protein translation, multiple hormonal responses, developmental processes, pathogen infection resistance, environmental stress responses, and miRNA production. Such multiple functional roles are consistent with the scaffolding nature of the plant RACK1 protein. A significant advance was achieved when the β-propeller structure of the Arabidopsis RACK1A isoform was elucidated, thus revealing that its conserved seven WD repeats also assembled into this typical topology. From its crystal structure, it became apparent that it shares the structural platform for the interaction with ligands identified in other systems such as mammals. Although RACK1 proteins maintain conserved Protein Kinase C binding sites, the lack of a bona fide PKC adds complexity and enigma to the nature of the ligand partners with which RACK1 interacts in plants. Nevertheless, ligands recently identified using the split-ubiquitin based and conventional yeast two-hybrid assays, have revealed that plant RACK1 is involved in several processes that include defense response, drought and salt stress, ribosomal function, cell wall biogenesis, and photosynthesis. The information acquired indicates that, in spite of the high degree of conservation of its structure, the functions of the plant RACK1 homologue appear to be distinct and diverse from those in yeast, mammals, insects, etc. In this review, we take a critical look at the novel information regarding the many functions in which plant RACK1 has been reported to participate, with a special emphasis on the information on its currently identified and missing ligand partners.

  12. CALPAIN AND MARCKS PROTEIN REGULATION OF AIRWAY MUCIN SECRETION

    OpenAIRE

    Lampe, W. Randall; Park, Joungjoa; Fang, Shijing; Crews, Anne L; Adler, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Hypersecretion of mucin plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, and cystic fibrosis. Myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein has been shown to play an important role in regulation of airway mucin secretion, as peptides analogous to the amino (N)-terminus of MARCKS attenuate mucin secretion by airway epithelium in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated a potential role for the protease C...

  13. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    The scaffolding protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and a central lipid-binding Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain. PICK1 is thought to regulate trafficking of its PDZ binding partners but different and even opposing functi...

  14. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  15. Searching for novel Cdk5 substrates in brain by comparative phosphoproteomics of wild type and Cdk5-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Contreras-Vallejos

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5-/- embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC, which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5-/- brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1. MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate.

  16. Searching for Novel Cdk5 Substrates in Brain by Comparative Phosphoproteomics of Wild Type and Cdk5−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A.; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5−/− embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5−/− brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate. PMID:24658276

  17. Assembly Properties of an Alanine-Rich, Lysine-Containing Peptide and the Formation of Peptide/Polymer Hybrid Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Grieshaber, Sarah E.; Nie, Ting; Yan, Congqi; Zhong, Sheng; Teller, Sean S.; Clifton, Rodney J.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in developing peptide/polymer hybrid hydrogels that are chemically diverse and structurally complex. Towards this end, an alanine-based peptide doped with charged lysines with a sequence of (AKA3KA)2 (AK2) was selected from the crosslinking regions of the natural elastin. Pluronic® F127, known to self-assemble into defined micellar structures, was employed as the synthetic building blocks. Fundamental investigations on the environmental effects on the secondary structure and...

  18. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  19. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas;

    2014-01-01

    substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...... and breaking. DLC coating with thicknesses between 25 and 105 nm is found to considerably increase the mechanical strength of the substrates while at the same time ensuring conservation of sufficient field enhancements of the gold plasmonic substrates....

  20. Biaxially textured composite substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, James R.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.

    2005-04-26

    An article including a substrate, a layer of a metal phosphate material such as an aluminum phosphate material upon the surface of the substrate, and a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the metal phosphate material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon a layer of a buffer material such as a SrTi.sub.x Ru.sub.1-x O.sub.3 layer.

  1. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  2. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  3. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  4. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  5. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, Manuel Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine Wk; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-03-29

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  6. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry N.; Patterson, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  7. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  8. A Novel Radiative Substrate Heater

    OpenAIRE

    CEYLAN, Abdullah; Kaynak, Erdal; ÖZCAN, Şadan; Firat, Tezer

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a new low cost radiative substrate heater for deposition of high-Tc superconducting thin films. It has all the features required for the preparation of high quality superconducting thin films. It is possible to reach ~ 800 °C substrate temperature with it by using only one 250 W halogen projector bulb.

  9. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  10. Substrate-Sensitive Graphene Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Yin, Jun; Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Jidong; Zhang, Jiahuan; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-03-01

    The inertness of graphene toward reaction with ambient molecules is essential for realizing durable devices with stable performance. Many device applications require graphene to contact with substrates, but whose impact on the chemical property of graphene has been largely overlooked. Here, we combine comprehensive first-principles analyses with experiments to show that graphene oxidation is highly sensitive to substrates. Graphene remains inert on SiO2 and hexagonal boron nitride but becomes increasingly weak against oxidation on metal substrates because of enhanced charge transfer and chemical interaction between them. In particular, Ni and Co substrates lead to spontaneous oxidation of graphene, while a Cu substrate maximally promotes the oxygen diffusion on graphene, with an estimated diffusivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than that on freestanding graphene. Bilayer graphene is revealed to have high oxidation resistance independent of substrate and thus is a better choice for high-performance nanoelectronics. Our findings should be extendable to a wide spectrum of chemical functionalizations of two-dimensional materials mediated by substrates. PMID:26884318

  11. Substrate integrated antennas and arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Yu Jian

    2015-01-01

    Substrate Integrated Antennas and Arrays provides a single source for cutting-edge information on substrate integrated circuits (SICs), substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) feeding networks, SIW slot array antennas, SIC traveling-wave antennas, SIW feeding antennas, SIW monopulse antennas, and SIW multibeam antennas. Inspired by the author's extensive research, this comprehensive book:Describes a revolutionary SIC-based antenna technique with the potential to replace existing antenna technologiesExamines theoretical and experimental results connected to electrical and mechanical performanceExp

  12. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  13. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  14. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Dupuis; J M Yeomans

    2005-06-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann algorithm which can be used to explore the spreading of droplets on chemically and topologically patterned substrates. As an example we use the method to show that the final configuration of a drop on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle collects water from the wind.

  15. Film Growth on Nanoporous Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James; Zhao, Chenwei; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James

    Self-ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) provides an easy way to fabricate nano structured material, such as nano wires and nano particles. We employ AAO as substrates and focus on the thermally evaporated film growth on the surface of the substrate. With various materials deposited onto the substrate, we find the films show different structures, e,g. ordered array of nano particles for Lead and nanohoneycomb structure for Silver. We relate the differing behaviors to the difference of surface energy and diffusion constant. To verify this, the effect of substrate temperature on the film growth has been explored and the structure of the film has been successfully changed through the process. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grants No. DMR-1307290.

  16. Microstrip antenna on tunable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Mohanan, P.

    1995-05-01

    The tunable patch antenna configurations are becoming popular and attractive in many aspects. This was mainly due to the advent of ferrite thin film technology and tunable substrate materials. The integration of monolithic microwave circuits and antennas are becoming easy today. In the development of magnetic tuning of microstrip patch on ferrite substrate is presented by Rainville and Harackewiez. Radiation characteristics of such antennas are presented by Pozer. Band width and radiation characteristics of such tunable antennas are measured and compared. Usually the substrate losses are considered in the analysis and metallization losses are assumed to be ideal. The analysis of magnetic tunable radiator including metallization and ferrite substrate losses are presented. However, all such tuning and integration of circuits and antennas are mainly on ferrite substrate due to magnetic tuning. Recently, Varadan et al. established that the BaxSr1-xTiO3 series ferroelectric materials such as Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) are well suited for microwave phase shifter applications. It could be possible to change the dielectric constant of these materials more than 50% depending on the BST composition, by changing the applied bias voltage. Also, the porosity of BST can be controlled during processing to produce dielectric constants in the range of 15 to 1500, with some trade off in tunability. In this paper, we are presenting the possibility of designing a microstrip patch antenna on such tunable substrate. Such antennas are having the major advantage of electronic tunability and compact size.

  17. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Cornick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5 whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS. This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis.

  18. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s) responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5) whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK) and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS). This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27073869

  19. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  20. Semiconductor films on flexible iridium substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2005-03-29

    A laminate semiconductor article includes a flexible substrate, an optional biaxially textured oxide buffer system on the flexible substrate, a biaxially textured Ir-based buffer layer on the substrate or the buffer system, and an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor. Ir can serve as a substrate with an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor thereon.

  1. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  2. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  3. Modeling graphene-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amlaki, Taher

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I focussed on the interactions between graphene-like materials (grapheme and germanene) and various substrates. The attractive properties of graphene like a high carrier mobility, its single-atomic thickness and its theoretical magic have made graphene a very popular and promising can

  4. Substrate preferences in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Reenen, van K.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the substrate preference of laying hens with respect to dustbathing and foraging behaviour, in order to determine which resources should be provided in laying hen housing systems for the expression of these behaviours. The consumer demand approach was used to study the strength of pr

  5. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results: Neuropathologic

  6. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  7. Methods of repairing a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  8. Polymer Adsorption on Disordered Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Hwa, T; Cule, D.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the recently proposed "pattern-matching" phase of a Gaussian random heteropolymer adsorbed on a disordered substrate [S. Srebnik, A.K. Chakraborty and E.I. Shakhnovich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3157 (1996)]. By mapping the problem to that of a directed homopolymer in higher-dimensional random media, we show that the pattern-matching phase is asymptotically weakly unstable, and the large scale properties of the system are given by that of an adsorbed homopolymer.

  9. Lubricated friction between incommensurate substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio; Braun, O. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is part of a study of the frictional dynamics of a confined solid lubricant film - modelled as a one-dimensional chain of interacting particles confined between two ideally incommensurate substrates, one of which is driven relative to the other through an attached spring moving at constant velocity. This model system is characterized by three inherent length scales; depending on the precise choice of incommensurability among them it displays a strikingly different tribological beha...

  10. CLONING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF A GENE ENCODING THE RECEPTOR OF ACTIVATED PROTEIN C KINASE(RACK) FROM LEISHMANIA BRAZILIENSIS PARASITES%巴西利什曼原虫激活蛋白激酶C受体的基因克隆化与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成军; 夏小兵; 王刚; 刘妍; 钟彦伟

    2001-01-01

    体外培养巴西利什曼原虫(Lb,Leishmania braziliensis)株无鞭毛体,常规方法提取制备基因组DNA.以公开发表的婴儿利什曼原虫(Li,Leishmania in fantum)的激活蛋白激酶C受体RACK(receptor for activated protein C kinase)基因核苷酸序列为参照,设计并合成利什曼原虫RACK基因序列特异性的引物.以巴西利什曼原虫的基因组DNA为模板,利用多聚酶链反应(PCR)技术,扩增获得巴西利什曼原虫RACK的全长编码基因.基因序列测定结果表明,巴西利什曼原虫RACK基因序列长度为1 025 bp,开放读码框架由939 bp组成,编码产物为312个氨基酸残基.获得的巴西利什曼原虫的RACK基因与报导的婴儿利什曼原虫的RACK基因编码产物的序列同源性达99%(310/312).本研究克隆了巴西利什曼原虫的RACK基因,为应用诱导T细胞免疫应答抗原的编码基因进行巴西利什曼原虫的基因疫苗研究奠定了基础.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  12. Interactive paper as security substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Jean J.

    1997-08-01

    The threat of counterfeiting Bank Notes and other security documents is steadily increasing with the continuous improvement of printing and copying technologies. The perfect reproduction of a document is indeed reachable with the right combination of technique and economics. Our only protection is to make it difficult by introducing artifacts which appear only through the counterfeiting process or reduce significantly the efficiency of that process. A number of methods are available to defeat counterfeiting none of which are completely satisfactory. The difficulty is not as much the prevention of the duplication than doing it while safeguarding the intrinsic properties (durability) of the documents as far as permanent readability, resistance to wear, etc. Basic approaches are: (1) The light switch: a transparent coating which becomes opaque during any attempt of duplication. (2) An alternative to this first approach is an ink which becomes transparent at the time of duplication. (3) The use of a substrate (paper stock) whose optical density will rise to that of the printed graphic on the bill at the time of copying. This would be a true interactive paper. (4) Luminescent materials that would blind the photoreceptor during exposure. Such material could be in the substrate or in the printing ink. (5) Introduction of an artefact in the printed copy through a hologram hidden in a transparent coating or embossed in the substrate. All approaches have been investigated to a certain extent with variable success. We report hereafter the results of investigations made by the author on alternatives (1) and (2) in this laboratory and at the University of Texas at El Paso under contract from the National Bank of Belgium and with the collaboration of the CNRS in Paris and the University of Marseille France.

  13. Applications of Hyperbolic Metamaterial Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the properties of hyperbolic metamaterials and show that they are promising candidates as substrates for nanoimaging, nanosensing, fluorescence engineering, and controlling thermal emission. Hyperbolic metamaterials can support unique bulk modes, tunable surface plasmon polaritons, and surface hyperbolic states (Dyakonov plasmons that can be used for a variety of applications. We compare the effective medium predictions with practical realizations of hyperbolic metamaterials to show their potential for radiative decay engineering, bioimaging, subsurface sensing, metaplasmonics, and super-Planckian thermal emission.

  14. Substrate preparation by contactless mechanochemical polish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, S.; Lachish, U.; El-Hanany, U.

    1985-10-01

    A simple, yet effective, polishing technique for substrate preparation is presented. It is contactless chemical polish which does not introduce any defects into the substrate during the process. The method can be readily adopted in all cases where chemical polishing is practical for substrate preparation. Results similar to those obtained by the more sophisticated hydroplaning method can be achieved.

  15. Crack patterns over uneven substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakishore, Pawan; Goehring, Lucas

    2016-02-28

    Cracks in thin layers are influenced by what lies beneath them. From buried craters to crocodile skin, crack patterns are found over an enormous range of length scales. Regardless of absolute size, their substrates can dramatically influence how cracks form, guiding them in some cases, or shielding regions from them in others. Here we investigate how a substrate's shape affects the appearance of cracks above it, by preparing mud cracks over sinusoidally varying surfaces. We find that as the thickness of the cracking layer increases, the observed crack patterns change from wavy to ladder-like to isotropic. Two order parameters are introduced to measure the relative alignment of these crack networks, and, along with Fourier methods, are used to characterise the transitions between crack pattern types. Finally, we explain these results with a model, based on the Griffith criteria of fracture, that identifies the conditions for which straight or wavy cracks will be seen, and predicts how well-ordered the cracks will be. Our metrics and results can be applied to any situation where connected networks of cracks are expected, or found. PMID:26762761

  16. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  17. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinçli, H., E-mail: haldunsevincli@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gülbahçe Kampüsü, 35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Department of Micro- and Nano-technology (DTU Nanotech), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Brandbyge, M., E-mail: mads.brandbyge@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nano-technology (DTU Nanotech), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Center for Nanostructured Graphene(CNG), Department of Micro- and Nano-technology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-10-13

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance in the range between 5% and 47%. We also consider the transmission across linear kinks formed by adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the bends and find that individual kinks suppress thermal conduction substantially, especially at high temperatures. Our analysis show that substrate irregularities can be detrimental for thermal conduction even for small step heights.

  18. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-08-28

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  19. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph; DeChellis, Michael; Koo, Michael

    2014-03-18

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and a processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.

  20. How substrate rigidity regulates the cellular motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates has been recognized as a major regulator of cell motility. We present a simple physical model to study the crawling locomotion of a contractile cell on a soft elastic substrate. The mechanism of rigidity sensing is accounted for using Schwarz's two spring model (Schwarz et al. (2006) BioSystems 83, 225-232). The predicted dependency between the speed of motility and substrate stiffness is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The model demonstrates that the rigidity dependent motility of cells is rooted in the regulation of actomyosin contractile forces by substrate deformation at each anchorage point. On stiffer substrates, the traction forces required for cell translocation acquire larger magnitude but show weaker asymmetry which leads to slower cell motility. On very soft substrates, the model predicts a biphasic relationship between the substrate rigidity and the speed of locomotion, over a narrow stiffness range, which has been observed experimentally for some cell types.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of a receptor of activated protein C kinase (RACK) conding gene from Leishmania donovani 1S%杜氏利什曼原虫激活蛋白激酶C受体的基因克隆化与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成军; 夏小兵; 王刚; 刘妍; 钟彦伟; 王琳; 杨继珍

    2002-01-01

    目的克隆杜氏利什曼原虫(Leishmania donovani Ld)1S株激活蛋白激酶C受体(RACK,receptor of activated protein C kinase)的编码基因,为应用这种编码T细胞抗原的基因进行基因疫苗的研究奠定基础.方法体外培养杜氏利什曼原虫1S株无鞭毛体,常规方法提取制备基因组DNA.以硕大利什曼原虫(Leishmania amjor)的RACK基因的核苷酸序列为参照,设计并合成利什曼原虫RACK基因序列特异性的引物.以杜氏利什曼原虫的基因组DNA为模板,利用多聚酶链反应(PCR)技术,扩增获得了杜氏利什曼原虫RACK的全长编码基因.结果基因序列测定结果表明,杜氏利什曼原虫1S株RACK基因序列长度为981bp,开放读码框架由831bp组成,编码产物为276个氨基酸残基.获得的杜氏利什曼原虫1S株的RACK基因与来源于硕大利什曼原虫的RACK基因序列同源性达98%(264/267).结论本研究克隆了杜氏利什曼原虫的RACK基因,为应用诱导T细胞免疫应答抗原的编码基因进行杜氏利什曼原虫的基因疫苗研究奠定了基础.

  2. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides...... around the phosphorylated residue are important for the binding affinity of ILKAP. We conclude that solid-phase affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures can be applied in phosphoproteomics and systems biology.......Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...

  3. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text. Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired. This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008). The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Quality Of Electrophotographic Prints On Foil Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophotographic printing uses many types of substrates, our study focuses on plastic substrates. Six types ofregular and self-adhesive foil substrates were chosen to be printed using two electrophotographic presses: XeroxColour 1000 Press and Canon imagePress C7000VP. A test chart containing tone value scales and a set of samplesfor profiling was created, spectrophotomety and densitometry was applied to obtain the optical and colorimetricproperties of the substrates investigated. Xerox Color 1000 Press produced larger densities and tone value increaseon every type of substrate. The largest TVI values and reproducible colour gamut was observed on the smoothestfoil in case of both presses. Large colour differences were found between patches of full tone process colors on thedifferent substrates investigated.

  5. Diatomite: a new substrate for hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    Many different substrates are used for plant support in hydroponic culture, but one of the unique requirements for research is that the media be easily separated from the roots. Peat, perlite, and vermiculite are good substrates but roots and root hairs grow into these substrates, so they are unsuitable for studies of root size and morphology. Sand can easily be removed from roots, but roots grown in sand are shorter and thicker than hydroponic roots because the sand particles are...

  6. Casimir Forces between Nanoparticles and Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Román-Velázquez, C E; Villarreal, C; Esquivel-Sirvent, R; Noguez, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    We study the Casimir force between a nanoparticle and a substrate. We consider the interaction of metal nanoparticles with different substrates within the dipolar approximation. We study the force as a function of the distance for gold and potassium spheres, which are over a substrate of titanium dioxide, sapphire and a perfect conductor. We show that Casimir force is important in systems at the nanometer scale. We study the force as a function of the material properties, radii of the spheres, and the distance between the sphere and the substrate.

  7. Nanowires and nanoneedles nucleation on vicinal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxubetter@gmail.com [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Xie, Dan; Huang, Genling [Zhengzhou Railway Vocational and Technical College, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Sun, Xiao-Hong [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2015-01-01

    An analytic stress-driven nucleation model of nanowires (NWs) and nanoneedles (NNs) growing on a mismatched vicinal substrate is proposed. It is demonstrated that the formation enthalpy of NWs and NNs is a function of three independent variables, the base radius, aspect ratio and miscut angle of the vicinal surface. Theoretical analysis shows that the minimum nucleation barrier of an island decreases with increment of substrate misorientation, which means the nucleation of islands on a vicinal substrate is more favorable than that on a flat substrate.

  8. Alternative substrates for higher mushrooms mycelia cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    TETIANA KRUPODOROVA; VICTOR BARSHTEYN

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of 29 species of higher mushroom mycelia on alternative substrates – wastes of Ukrainian oil-fat industry, has been investigated. The amount of mushroom mycelia obtaining on 12 investigated substrates varied significantly, from 1.0 g/L to 22.9 g/L on the 14th day of cultivation. The superficial cultivation adopted in this study allows for easy to choose appropriate medium (substrate) for mycelia production. Alternative substrates (compared to glucose-peptone-yeast medium) were sel...

  9. Photovoltaic cell with nano-patterned substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Zhou, Xiaowang; Zubia, David

    2016-10-18

    A photovoltaic solar cell comprises a nano-patterned substrate layer. A plurality of nano-windows are etched into an intermediate substrate layer to form the nano-patterned substrate layer. The nano-patterned substrate layer is positioned between an n-type semiconductor layer composed of an n-type semiconductor material and a p-type semiconductor layer composed of a p-type semiconductor material. Semiconductor material accumulates in the plurality of nano-windows, causing a plurality of heterojunctions to form between the n-type semiconductor layer and the p-type semiconductor layer.

  10. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H. [Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, Pole STIC-SPI-Math 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 - Mulhouse Cedex (France); Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-09-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength.

  11. Substrate tolerant direct block copolymer nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Zhongli; Schulte, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymer (BC) self-assembly constitutes a powerful platform for nanolithography. However, there is a need for a general approach to BC lithography that critically considers all the steps from substrate preparation to the final pattern transfer. We present a procedure that significantly sim...... plasma treatment enables formation of the oxidized PDMS hard mask, PS block removal and polymer or graphene substrate patterning....... simplifies the main stream BC lithography process, showing a broad substrate tolerance and allowing for efficient pattern transfer over wafer scale. PDMS-rich poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane) (PS-b-PDMS) copolymers are directly applied on substrates including polymers, silicon and graphene. A single oxygen...

  12. Carnosinases, Their Substrates and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bellia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carnosinases are Xaa-His dipeptidases that play diverse functions throughout all kingdoms of life. Human isoforms of carnosinase (CN1 and CN2 under appropriate conditions catalyze the hydrolysis of the dipeptides carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine and homocarnosine (γ-aminobutyryl-L-histidine. Alterations of serum carnosinase (CN1 activity has been associated with several pathological conditions, such as neurological disorders, chronic diseases and cancer. For this reason the use of carnosinase levels as a biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been questioned. The hydrolysis of imidazole-related dipeptides in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is also catalyzed by aminoacyl-histidine dipeptidases like PepD (EC 3.4.13.3, PepV (EC 3.4.13.19 and anserinase (EC 3.4.13.5. The review deals with the structure and function of this class of enzymes in physiological and pathological conditions. The main substrates of these enzymes, i.e., carnosine, homocarnosine and anserine (β-alanyl-3-methyl-L-histidine will also be described.

  13. Carnosinases, their substrates and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, Francesco; Vecchio, Graziella; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Carnosinases are Xaa-His dipeptidases that play diverse functions throughout all kingdoms of life. Human isoforms of carnosinase (CN1 and CN2) under appropriate conditions catalyze the hydrolysis of the dipeptides carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) and homocarnosine (γ-aminobutyryl-L-histidine). Alterations of serum carnosinase (CN1) activity has been associated with several pathological conditions, such as neurological disorders, chronic diseases and cancer. For this reason the use of carnosinase levels as a biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been questioned. The hydrolysis of imidazole-related dipeptides in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is also catalyzed by aminoacyl-histidine dipeptidases like PepD (EC 3.4.13.3), PepV (EC 3.4.13.19) and anserinase (EC 3.4.13.5). The review deals with the structure and function of this class of enzymes in physiological and pathological conditions. The main substrates of these enzymes, i.e., carnosine, homocarnosine and anserine (β-alanyl-3-methyl-L-histidine) will also be described. PMID:24566305

  14. Surface Modification of Nanocellulose Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppe, Justin Orazio

    Cellulose fibers constitute an important renewable raw material that is utilized in many commercial applications in non-food, paper, textiles and composite materials. Chemical functionalization is an important approach for improving the properties of cellulose based materials. Different approaches are used to graft polymeric chains onto cellulose substrates, which can be classified by two principal routes, namely 'grafting onto' or 'grafting from' methods. Never-dried cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or nanowhiskers produced from sulfuric acid hydrolysis of ramie fibers were used as substrates for surface chemical functionalization with various macromolecules. In addition, the use of cellulose nanocrystals to reinforce poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers was studied. Chemical grafting with low molecular weight polycaprolactone diol onto cellulose nanocrystals was carried out in an attempt to improve the interfacial adhesion with the fiber matrix. Significant improvements in the mechanical properties of the nanofibers after reinforcement with unmodified cellulose nanocrystals were confirmed. Fiber webs from PCL reinforced with 2.5% unmodified CNCs showed ca. 1.5-fold increase in Young's modulus and ultimate strength compared to PCL webs. The CNCs were also grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NiPAAm)) brushes via surface-initiated single-electron transfer living radical polymerization (SI-SETLRP) under various conditions at room temperature. The grafting process depended on the initiator and/or monomer concentrations used. No observable damage occurred to the CNCs after grafting, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Size exclusion chromatography analyses of polymer chains cleaved from the cellulose nanocrystals indicated that a higher degree of polymerization was achieved by increasing initiator or monomer loading, most likely caused by local heterogeneities yielding higher rates of polymerization. In addition, the colloidal stability and thermo

  15. Surface Modification of Nanocellulose Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppe, Justin Orazio

    Cellulose fibers constitute an important renewable raw material that is utilized in many commercial applications in non-food, paper, textiles and composite materials. Chemical functionalization is an important approach for improving the properties of cellulose based materials. Different approaches are used to graft polymeric chains onto cellulose substrates, which can be classified by two principal routes, namely 'grafting onto' or 'grafting from' methods. Never-dried cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or nanowhiskers produced from sulfuric acid hydrolysis of ramie fibers were used as substrates for surface chemical functionalization with various macromolecules. In addition, the use of cellulose nanocrystals to reinforce poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers was studied. Chemical grafting with low molecular weight polycaprolactone diol onto cellulose nanocrystals was carried out in an attempt to improve the interfacial adhesion with the fiber matrix. Significant improvements in the mechanical properties of the nanofibers after reinforcement with unmodified cellulose nanocrystals were confirmed. Fiber webs from PCL reinforced with 2.5% unmodified CNCs showed ca. 1.5-fold increase in Young's modulus and ultimate strength compared to PCL webs. The CNCs were also grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NiPAAm)) brushes via surface-initiated single-electron transfer living radical polymerization (SI-SETLRP) under various conditions at room temperature. The grafting process depended on the initiator and/or monomer concentrations used. No observable damage occurred to the CNCs after grafting, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Size exclusion chromatography analyses of polymer chains cleaved from the cellulose nanocrystals indicated that a higher degree of polymerization was achieved by increasing initiator or monomer loading, most likely caused by local heterogeneities yielding higher rates of polymerization. In addition, the colloidal stability and thermo

  16. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz Gustavo; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    We explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate present processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications of CVD graphene can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  17. Phytotoxic evaluation of whole pine tree substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased availability and increased cost of quality substrates are issues facing many horticulture crop producers. Peat moss and pine bark are the most widely used substrate components, yet producers have become more aware of acceptable alternative components. Processed whole pine trees have been i...

  18. A signal-substrate match in the substrate-borne component of a multimodal courtship display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian O. ELIAS, Andrew C. MASON, Eileen A. HEBETS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The environment can impose strong limitations on the efficacy of signal transmission. In particular, for vibratory communication, the signaling environment is often extremely heterogeneous at very small scales. Nevertheless, natural selection is expected to select for signals well-suited to effective transmission. Here, we test for substrate-dependent signal efficacy in the wolf spider Schizocosa stridulans Stratton 1991. We first explore the transmission characteristics of this important signaling modality by playing recorded substrate-borne signals through three different substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and red clay and measuring the propagated signal. We found that the substrate-borne signal of S. stridulans attenuates the least on leaf litter, the substrate upon which the species is naturally found. Next, by assessing mating success with artificially muted and non-muted males across different signaling substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and sand, we explored the relationship between substrate-borne signaling and substrate for mating success. We found that muted males were unsuccessful in obtaining copulations regardless of substrate, while mating success was dependent on the signaling substrate for non-muted males. For non-muted males, more males copulated on leaf litter than any other substrate. Taken together, these results confirm the importance of substrate-borne signaling in S. stridulans and suggest a match between signal properties and signal efficacy – leaf litter transmits the signal most effectively and males are most successful in obtaining copulations on leaf litter [Current Zoology 56 (3: 370–378, 2010].

  19. Nanocrystalline diamond growth on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocomposite films consisting of diamond nanoparticles of 3-5 nm diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix have been deposited by means of microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MWCVD) from CH4/N2 gas mixtures. Si wafers, Si coated with TiN, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and cubic boron nitride films, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy have been used as substrates. Some of the substrates have been pretreated ultrasonically with diamond powder in order to enhance the nucleation density n nuc. It turned out that n nuc depends critically on the chemical nature of the substrate, its smoothness and the pretreatment applied. No differences to the nucleation behaviour of CVD PCD films were observed. On the other hand, the growth process seems to be not affected by the substrate material. The crystallinity (studied by X-ray diffraction) and the bonding environment (investigated by Raman spectroscopy) show no significant differences for the various substrates. The mechanical and tribological properties, finally, reflect again the influence of the substrate material: on TiN, a lower hardness was measured as compared to Si, PCD and c-BN, whereas the adhesion of c-BN/nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) system was determined by that of the c-BN film on the underlying Si substrate

  20. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170 000 cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  1. Modelling substrate specificity and enantioselectivity for lipases and esterases by substrate-imprinted docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Sadhna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, ways to adapt docking programs that were developed for modelling inhibitor-receptor interaction have been explored. Two main issues were discussed. First, when trying to model catalysis a reaction intermediate of the substrate is expected to provide more valid information than the ground state of the substrate. Second, the incorporation of protein flexibility is essential for reliable predictions. Results Here we present a predictive and robust method to model substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases that uses reaction intermediates and incorporates protein flexibility. Substrate-imprinted docking starts with covalent docking of reaction intermediates, followed by geometry optimisation of the resulting enzyme-substrate complex. After a second round of docking the same substrate into the geometry-optimised structures, productive poses are identified by geometric filter criteria and ranked by their docking scores. Substrate-imprinted docking was applied in order to model (i enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B and a W104A mutant, (ii enantioselectivity and substrate specificity of Candida rugosa lipase and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and (iii substrate specificity of an acetyl- and a butyrylcholine esterase toward the substrates acetyl- and butyrylcholine. Conclusion The experimentally observed differences in selectivity and specificity of the enzymes were reproduced with an accuracy of 81%. The method was robust toward small differences in initial structures (different crystallisation conditions or a co-crystallised ligand, although large displacements of catalytic residues often resulted in substrate poses that did not pass the geometric filter criteria.

  2. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.; Fincke, James R.

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  3. Compliance of bio-adhesive substrates controls the kinetics of membrane-substrate association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-10-21

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates is one of the major regulators of the cell adhesion and migration. In this study, we propose a theoretical model for the spontaneous growth of focal adhesion (FA) sites, on compliant elastic substrates, at the early stages of cellular adhesion. Using a purely thermodynamic approach, we demonstrate that the rate of membrane-substrate association decreases with increasing the compliance of the substrate. This can be considered as a reason for smaller spread area of the FA points after the stabilization of adhesion on compliant substrates, as reported by experiments. We also show that the extent to which the compliance of the substrate modulates the growth rate of adhesion site depends on the areal density of cell-adhesive ligands on the substrate. PMID:20655930

  4. Ultrabarrier Flexible Substrates for Flat Panel Displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Paul E.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Martin, Peter M.; Shi, Ming-Kun; Hall, Michael G.; Mast, Eric S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Sullivan, Michael B.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a flexible, transparent plastic substrate for flat panel display applications. Using roll-coating techniques, we apply a composite thin film barrier to commercially available polymers, which restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide in the same roll-coater, yielding an engineered substrate (Barix™) for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. The substrate is sufficiently impermeable to moisture and oxygen for application to moisture-sensitive display applications, such as organic light emitting displays (OLEDs). This enables, for the first time, lightweight and flexible emissive organic displays.

  5. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  6. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  7. Substrate Curvature Gradient Drives Rapid Droplet Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Chen, Chao; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2014-07-01

    Making small liquid droplets move spontaneously on solid surfaces is a key challenge in lab-on-chip and heat exchanger technologies. Here, we report that a substrate curvature gradient can accelerate micro- and nanodroplets to high speeds on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Experiments for microscale water droplets on tapered surfaces show a maximum speed of 0.42 m/s, 2 orders of magnitude higher than with a wettability gradient. We show that the total free energy and driving force exerted on a droplet are determined by the substrate curvature and substrate curvature gradient, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict nanoscale droplets moving spontaneously at over 100 m/s on tapered surfaces.

  8. Wet etching methods for perovskite substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leca, Victor; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan; Blank, Dave H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    2000-01-01

    In oxide electronics substrates with atomically flat terraces are a request for growing high-quality epitaxial thin films. In this paper results on chemical etching of some substrates with perovskite, ABO3, structure (e.g., SrTiO3, LSAT - the (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.35 solid solution, and NdGaO3) ar

  9. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Bissell, Eugene R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate.

  10. Substrate Integrated Evanescent Filters Employing Coaxial Stubs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    Evanescent mode substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) is one of the promising technologies for design of light-weight low-cost microwave components. Traditional realization methods used in the standard evanescent waveguide technology are often not directly applicable to SIW due to dielectric filling and small height of the waveguide. In this work, one of the realization methods of evanescent mode waveguides using a single layer substrate is considered. The method is based on the use of coaxial...

  11. Biochemicalmethane potential (BMP) of solid organic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raposo, F.; Fernández-Cegrí, V.; de la Rubia, M.A.;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper describes results obtained for different participating research groups in an interlaboratory study related to biochemical methane potential (BMP). In this research work, all experimental conditions influencing the test such as inoculum, substrate characteristics and experim......BACKGROUND: This paper describes results obtained for different participating research groups in an interlaboratory study related to biochemical methane potential (BMP). In this research work, all experimental conditions influencing the test such as inoculum, substrate characteristics...

  12. Fermentative hydrogen production from agroindustrial lignocellulosic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, Valeria; Antônio, Regina Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    To achieve economically competitive biological hydrogen production, it is crucial to consider inexpensive materials such as lignocellulosic substrate residues derived from agroindustrial activities. It is possible to use (1) lignocellulosic materials without any type of pretreatment, (2) lignocellulosic materials after a pretreatment step, and (3) lignocellulosic materials hydrolysates originating from a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the current literature data on fermentative H2 production presented in this review, thermophilic conditions produce H2 in yields approximately 75% higher than those obtained in mesophilic conditions using untreated lignocellulosic substrates. The average H2 production from pretreated material is 3.17 ± 1.79 mmol of H2/g of substrate, which is approximately 50% higher compared with the average yield achieved using untreated materials (2.17 ± 1.84 mmol of H2/g of substrate). Biological pretreatment affords the highest average yield 4.54 ± 1.78 mmol of H2/g of substrate compared with the acid and basic pretreatment - average yields of 2.94 ± 1.85 and 2.41 ± 1.52 mmol of H2/g of substrate, respectively. The average H2 yield from hydrolysates, obtained from a pretreatment step and enzymatic hydrolysis (3.78 ± 1.92 mmol of H2/g), was lower compared with the yield of substrates pretreated by biological methods only, demonstrating that it is important to avoid the formation of inhibitors generated by chemical pretreatments. Based on this review, exploring other microorganisms and optimizing the pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions can make the use of lignocellulosic substrates a sustainable way to produce H2. PMID:26273246

  13. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  14. Direct Printing of Graphene onto Plastic Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Daniel; Lock, Evgeniya; Walton, Scott; Baraket, Mira; Laskoski, Matthew; Mulvaney, Shawn; Sheehan, Paul; Lee, Woo; Robinson, Jeremy

    2011-03-01

    Graphene films have been synthesized on metal foils using CVD growth and have the potential to be compatible with roll-to-roll printing. To be usable in electronic devices, these films need to be removed from the metallic substrate. Currently this is accomplished by spin coating a polymer film over the graphene and chemically etching away the metal substrate. We have developed a direct printing method that allows graphene films to be printed off the metal substrate onto a polymer substrate. This printing process does not generate chemical waste, is compatible with roll-to-toll processing and renders the metal foil reusable. Adhesion of the graphene film to the polymer substrate is established by attaching perfluorophenylazides (PFPA) azide linker molecules to a plasma activated polymer surface. The transfer printing was performed by placing the PFPA treated polymer surface in contact with a graphene covered Cu foil and heating under pressure. Graphene films successfully printed onto a polystyrene substrate have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements revealed the presence of Gr on the polymer surface. Details of the printing process along with characteristics of the graphene film after printing will be presented.

  15. Alternative substrates for higher mushrooms mycelia cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TETIANA KRUPODOROVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of 29 species of higher mushroom mycelia on alternative substrates – wastes of Ukrainian oil-fat industry, has been investigated. The amount of mushroom mycelia obtaining on 12 investigated substrates varied significantly, from 1.0 g/L to 22.9 g/L on the 14th day of cultivation. The superficial cultivation adopted in this study allows for easy to choose appropriate medium (substrate for mycelia production. Alternative substrates (compared to glucose-peptone-yeast medium were selected for all studied species, from soybean cake – most suitable for the mycelial growth of 24 species, to walnut cake − suitable only for 2 species. The utilization of substrates has been evaluated by biological efficiency. The best index of biological efficiency varied from 19.0% to 41.6% depending on the mushroom species. It was established high biological efficiency of mycelia cultivation on substrates: wheat seed cake – Pleurotus djamor, Lyophyllum shimeji, Crinipellis schevczenkovi, Phellinus igniarius, Spongipellis litschaueri; oat seed cake – Ganoderma applanatum and G. lucidum; soybean cake – Hohenbuehelia myxotricha, Trametes versicolor, Morchella esculenta, Cordyceps sinensis, C. militaris, and Agrocybe aegerita; rape seed cake – Auriporia aurea; camelina seed cake – Fomes fomentarius. The cultivation of these species are perspective as a biotechnological process of agricultural wastes converted into mycelia, which could be used in different forms of products with therapeutic action: powder or tablets nutraceuticals or ingredients for functional foods.

  16. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  17. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John Allen (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Adams, David Price (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yeager,John (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Nyugen, Thao D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Corona, Edmundo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Cordill, Megan J. (Erich Schmid Institute, Leoben, Austria)

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  18. Structural basis for substrate specificities of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, K.; Ramaswamy, S.; Ljungcrantz, C.;

    2001-01-01

    kinase with ATP at the nucleoside substrate binding site. Compared to the human kinase, the Drosophila kinase has a wider substrate cleft, which may be responsible for the broad substrate specificity of this enzyme. The human deoxyguanosine kinase is highly specific for purine substrates......; this is apparently due to the presence of Arg 118, which provides favorable hydrogen bonding interactions with the substrate. The two new structures provide an explanation for the substrate specificity of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases....

  19. Graphene substrate for inducing neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Soon; Lipatov, Alexey; Ha, Ligyeom; Shekhirev, Mikhail; Andalib, Mohammad Nahid; Sinitskii, Alexander; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-05-01

    A few recent studies demonstrated that graphene may have cytocompatibility with several cell types. However, when assessing cell behavior on graphene, there has been no precise control over the quality of graphene, number of graphene layers, and substrate surface coverage by graphene. In this study, using well-controlled monolayer graphene film substrates we tested the cytocompatibility of graphene for human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell culture. A large-scale monolayer graphene film grown on Cu foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) could be successfully transferred onto glass substrates by wet transfer technique. We observed that graphene substrate could induce enhanced neurite outgrowth, both in neurite length and number, compared with control glass substrate. Interestingly, the positive stimulatory effect by graphene was achieved even in the absence of soluble neurogenic factor, retinoic acid (RA). Key genes relevant to cell neurogenesis, e.g., neurofilament light chain (NFL), were also upregulated on graphene. Inhibitor studies suggested that the graphene stimulation of cellular neurogenesis may be achieved through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. Our data indicate that graphene may be exploited as a platform for neural regenerative medicine, and the suggested molecular mechanism may provide an insight into the graphene control of neural cells. PMID:25778866

  20. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  1. Nanobubble formation on a warmer substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenglong; Peng, Shuhua; Qiao, Greg G; Gutowski, Voytek; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-10-21

    The solvent exchange procedure is an often-used protocol to produce surface nanobubbles. In this procedure, the substrate is exposed to a good solvent for gas which is then mixed and rinsed with a poor solvent for gas and the nanobubbles form on the solid-liquid interface. Here we study the effects of temperatures of the substrate and the first solvent on nanobubble formation. Atomic force microscopy with temperature control was used to examine the formation of nanobubbles at temperatures between 37 °C and 54 °C. It was found that the probability of nanobubble formation was larger on substrates at higher temperatures. Moreover, on warmer substrates we found nanobubbles with lateral extensions up to 8 μm. A morphologic analysis shows that all nanobubbles, including giant nanobubbles, have a similar aspect ratio, independent of the substrate temperature, and that this aspect ratio corresponds to a contact angle between 13° and 22° (on the gas side), much smaller than the macroscopic counterparts. We finally discuss the implications of our results for various theories on nanobubble stability. PMID:25156822

  2. Purification and properties of bovine spleen N-myristoyl-CoA protein:N-myristoyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, R V; Kalra, J; Sharma, R K

    1994-04-22

    Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) catalyzes the addition of myristate to the amino-terminal glycine residue of a number of eukaryotic proteins. In this report, a simple and rapid purification as well as the properties of this enzyme from bovine spleen is described. Using combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, chromatography on SP-Sepharose fast flow, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, and Superose 12 (HR/30) gel filtration fast protein liquid chromatography, the enzyme was purified 1475-fold with a high yield. Under native conditions, the enzyme exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 58 kDa, whereas under denaturing conditions the enzyme represented an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, suggesting that spleen NMT is a monomeric protein. The NMT activity could be greatly activated to severalfold with the use of Tris-HCl buffer. Kinetic properties indicated that spleen NMT had an apparent low Km for pp60src and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate as compared with cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the M2 gene segment of reovirus type 3-derived peptides. Bovine spleen NMT was potently inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by NIP71 (a bovine brain NMT inhibitory protein) with a half-maximal inhibition of 0.816 microgram/ml. Results of this study along with the existing knowledge on NMT indicate that the activity of enzyme resides in a single polypeptide chain of molecular mass between 50 and 68 kDa. PMID:8163512

  3. MARCKS is a natively unfolded protein with an inaccessible actin-binding site: evidence for long-range intramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Hazel; Al-Naggar, Iman M; Yarmola, Elena G; Harrison, Alexis; Shaw, Gerry; Edison, Arthur S; Bubb, Michael R

    2005-03-18

    Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is an unfolded protein that contains well characterized actin-binding sites within the phosphorylation site domain (PSD), yet paradoxically, we now find that intact MARCKS does not bind to actin. Intact MARCKS also does not bind as well to calmodulin as does the PSD alone. Myristoylation at the N terminus alters how calmodulin binds to MARCKS, implying that, despite its unfolded state, the distant N terminus influences binding events at the PSD. We show that the free PSD binds with site specificity to MARCKS, suggesting that long-range intramolecular interactions within MARCKS are also possible. Because of the unusual primary sequence of MARCKS with an overall isoelectric point of 4.2 yet a very basic PSD (overall charge of +13), we speculated that ionic interactions between oppositely charged domains of MARCKS were responsible for long-range interactions within MARCKS that sterically influence binding events at the PSD and that explain the observed differences between properties of the PSD and MARCKS. Consistent with this hypothesis, chemical modifications of MARCKS that neutralize negatively charged residues outside of the PSD allow the PSD to bind to actin and increase the affinity of MARCKS for calmodulin. Similarly, both myristoylation of MARCKS and cleavage of MARCKS by calpain are shown to increase the availability of the PSD so as to activate its actin-binding activity. Because abundant evidence supports the conclusion that MARCKS is an important protein in regulating actin dynamics, our data imply that post-translational modifications of MARCKS are necessary and sufficient to regulate actin-binding activity. PMID:15640140

  4. Determinants of Curvature-Sensing Behavior for MARCKS-Fragment Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Armando J; White, Ormacinda R; Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-05-10

    It is increasingly recognized that membrane curvature plays an important role in various cellular activities such as signaling and trafficking, as well as key issues involving health and disease development. Thus, curvature-sensing peptides are essential to the study and detection of highly curved bilayer structures. The effector domain of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS-ED) has been demonstrated to have curvature-sensing ability. Research of the MARCKS-ED has further revealed that its Lys and Phe residues play an essential role in how MARCKS-ED detects and binds to curved bilayers. MARCKS-ED has the added property of being a lower-molecular-weight curvature sensor, which offers advantages in production. With that in mind, this work investigates peptide-sequence-related factors that influence curvature sensing and explores whether peptide fragments of even shorter length can function as curvature sensors. Using both experimental and computational methods, we studied the curvature-sensing capabilities of seven fragments of MARCKS-ED. Two of the longer fragments were designed from approximately the two halves of the full-length peptide whereas the five shorter fragments were taken from the central stretch of MARCKS-ED. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that the fragments that remain bound to the bilayer exhibit interactions with the bilayer similar to that of the full-length MARCKS-ED peptide. Fluorescence enhancement and anisotropy assays, meanwhile, reveal that five of the MARCKS fragments possess the ability to sense membrane curvature. Based on the sequences of the curvature-sensing fragments, it appears that the ability to sense curvature involves a balance between the numbers of positively charged residues and hydrophobic anchoring residues. Together, these findings help crystallize our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the curvature-sensing behaviors of peptides, which will prove useful in the

  5. Diamond deposition on thin cylindrical substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. RISTIĆ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond coatings were deposited onto different cylindrical substrates (Cu, SiC, W and Mo by the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD method. Continuous, adhered and well-faceted crystalline coatings of diamond were obtained on Cu-wire using a special pretreatment with a mixture of diamond and metal powders as well as carefully controlled deposition at lower power. Diamond deposition on SiC-fiber gave continuous and uniform coatings when only the filament power was properly selected. Uniform, homogeneous, euchedral diamond coatings on W- and Mo-wires, attained at a higher filament power, confirmed once more the convenience of refractory metals as substrates for diamond deposition by the CVD technique. Characterization of the obtained coatings was realized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The obtained results are compared with the literature data. Differences are discussed with regard to the chemical nature of the substrates as well as their thermophysical characteristics.

  6. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  7. Methods of selectively incorporating metals onto substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst; Richard D. (Salt Lake City, UT), Eyring; Edward M. (Salt Lake City, UT), Turpin; Gregory C. (Salt Lake City, UT), Dunn; Brian C. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2008-09-30

    A method for forming multi-metallic sites on a substrate is disclosed and described. A substrate including active groups such as hydroxyl can be reacted with a pretarget metal complex. The target metal attached to the active group can then be reacted with a secondary metal complex such that an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction occurs to form a multi-metallic species. The substrate can be a highly porous material such as aerogels, xerogels, zeolites, and similar materials. Additional metal complexes can be reacted to increase catalyst loading or control co-catalyst content. The resulting compounds can be oxidized to form oxides or reduced to form metals in the ground state which are suitable for practical use.

  8. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Nordlund, Dennis; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  9. Printed electronic on flexible and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futera, Konrad; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Kozioł, Grażyna

    2010-09-01

    Organic electronics is a platform technology that enables multiple applications based on organic electronics but varied in specifications. Organic electronics is based on the combination of new materials and cost-effective, large area production processes that provide new fields of application. Organic electronic by its size, weight, flexibility and environmental friendliness electronics enables low cost production of numerous electrical components and provides for such promising fields of application as: intelligent packaging, low cost RFID, flexible solar cells, disposable diagnostic devices or games, and printed batteries [1]. The paper presents results of inkjetted electronics elements on flexible and glass substrates. The investigations was target on characterizing shape, surface and geometry of printed structures. Variety of substrates were investigated, within some, low cost, non specialized substrate, design for other purposes than organic electronic.

  10. Integration substrate with a ultra-high-density capacitor and a through-substrate via

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, J.H.; Roozeboom, F.; Ruigrok, J.J.M.; Reefman, D.

    2014-01-01

    An integration substrate for a system in package comprises a through-substrate via and a trench capacitor wherein with a trench filling that includes at least four electrically conductive capacitor-electrode layers in an alternating arrangement with dielectric layers. --The capacitor-electrode layer

  11. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  12. Substrate reduction therapy for Krabbe's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; LeVine, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe's disease (KD) is a lysosomal storage disorder in which galactosylceramide, a major glycosphingolipid of myelin, and psychosine (galactose-sphingosine) cannot be adequately metabolized because of a deficiency in galactosylceramidase. Substrate reduction therapy (SRT) has been tested in preclinical studies. The premise of SRT is to reduce the synthesis of substrates that are not adequately digested so that the substrate burden is lowered, resulting in less accumulation of unmetabolized material. SRT is used for Gaucher's disease, in which inhibitors of the terminal biosynthetic step are used. Unfortunately, an inhibitor for the final step of galactosylceramide biosynthesis, i.e., UDP glycosyltransferase 8 (a.k.a. UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase), has not been found. Approaches that inhibit an earlier biosynthetic step or that lessen the substrate burden by other means, such as genetic manipulations, have been tested in the twitcher mouse model of KD. Either as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with other approaches, SRT slowed the disease course, indicating that this approach has potential therapeutic value. For instance, in individuals with adult-onset disease, SRT theoretically could lessen the production of substrates so that residual enzymatic activity could adequately manage the lower substrate burden. In more severe forms of disease, SRT theoretically could be part of a combination therapy. However, SRT has the potential to impair normal function by reducing the synthesis of galactosylceramide to levels that impede myelin function, or SRT could have other deleterious effects. Thus, multiple issues need to be resolved before this approach is ready for testing in humans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638608

  13. Flexible, light trapping substrates for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Tang, Zheng; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Micro-structured organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices on polyethylene terephthalate substrates are produced using direct laser interference patterning (DLIP). The performance of organic solar cells on these substrates is improved by a factor of 1.16, and a power conversion efficiency of 7.70% is achieved. We show that a shorter spatial period of the pattern allows for a stronger light trapping effect in solar cell, as it leads to a longer light path. Moreover, since the patterned structures are located on the outside of the fully encapsulated OPV devices, there are no problems with the roughness induced shunts.

  14. Liquid Crystal Cells Based on Photovoltaic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, L.; Kushnir, K.; Zaltron, A.; Simoni, F.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid crystal cells with LiNbO3:Fe crystals as substrates, are described. The photovoltaic field generated by the substrates is able to reorient the liquid crystal director thus giving rise to a phase shift on the light propagating through the cell, as in liquid crystal light valves. The process does not require the application of an external electric field, thus being potentially useful for applications requiring a high degree of compactness. An efficient optical switch with a high transmission contrast, based on the described optically-induced electric field, is also proposed.

  15. Transferring substrates to the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael; Gordon, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is not only involved in the recycling of amino acids from damaged or misfolded proteins but also represents an essential and deftly controlled mechanism for modulating the levels of key regulatory proteins. Chains of ubiquitin conjugated to a substrate...... protein specifically target it for degradation by the 26S proteasome, a huge multi-subunit protein complex found in all eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have clarified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the transfer of ubiquitinated substrates from the ubiquitination machinery to the proteasome...

  16. Substrates for clinical applicability of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjar Enam; Sha Jin

    2015-01-01

    The capability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs)to differentiate into a variety of cells in the human bodyholds great promise for regenerative medicine. Manysubstrates exist on which hPSCs can be self-renewed,maintained and expanded to further the goal of clinicalapplication of stem cells. In this review, we highlightnumerous extracellular matrix proteins, peptide andpolymer based substrates, scaffolds and hydrogelsthat have been pioneered. We discuss their benefitsand shortcomings and offer future directions as well asemphasize commercially available synthetic peptidesas a type of substrate that can bring the benefits ofregenerative medicine to clinical settings.

  17. Substrate quality alters the microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent, among other factors, on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial decomposition of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days were sufficient to model the decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but were insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality exerts considerable control on the microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and complex substrates.

  18. Bicarbonate is a recycling substrate for cyanase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.V.; Anderson, P.M.

    1987-05-01

    Cyanase catalyzes HCO/sub 3//sup -/-dependent decomposition of cyanate to NH/sub 4//sup +/ and HCO/sub 3//sup -/. Previous studies provided evidence that carbamate is an initial product and that the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium random (HCO/sub 3//sup -/ serving as substrate as opposed to activator). Direct evidence for this mechanism was obtained in this study by (1) identifying the products formed from (/sup 14/C)HCO/sub 3//sup -/ or (/sup 14/C)OCN/sup -/, (2) identifying the products formed from (/sup 13/C)HCO/sub 3//sup -/ in the presence of (/sup 18/O)H/sub 2/O, and (3) determining whether CO/sub 2/ or HCO/sub 3//sup -/ serve as substrate and are formed as product. Carbon dioxide (not HCO/sub 3//sup -/) is produced in stoichiometric amounts from both HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and OCN/sup -/. Bicarbonate (not CO/sub 2/) is the substrate. Oxygen-18 from (/sup 18/O)H/sub 2/O is not incorporated into CO/sub 2/ formed from either HCO/sub 3//sup -/ or OCN/sup -/. These results indicate that decomposition of cyanate is not a hydrolysis reaction and that HCO/sub 3//sup -/ functions as a substrate.

  19. Bicarbonate is a recycling substrate for cyanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W V; Anderson, P M

    1987-07-01

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate to ammonia and bicarbonate. Previous studies provided evidence that carbamate is an initial product and that the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium random (bicarbonate serving as substrate as opposed to activator); the following mechanism was proposed (Anderson, P. M. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 2282-2888; Anderson, P. M., and Little, R. M. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 1621-1626). (formula; see text) Direct evidence for this mechanism was obtained in this study by 1) determining whether CO2 or HCO3- serves as substrate and is formed as product, 2) identifying the products formed from [14C]HCO3- and [14C] OCN-, 3) identifying the products formed from [13C] HCO3- and [12C]OCN- in the presence of [18O]H2O, and 4) determining whether 18O from [18O]HCO3- is incorporated into CO2 derived from OCN-. Bicarbonate (not CO2) is the substrate. Carbon dioxide (not HCO3-) is produced in stoichiometric amounts from both HCO3- and OCN-. 18O from [18O]H2O is not incorporated into CO2 formed from either HCO3- or OCN-. Oxygen-18 from [18O]HCO3- is incorporated into CO2 derived from OCN-. These results support the above mechanism, indicating that decomposition of cyanate catalyzed by cyanase is not a hydrolysis reaction and that bicarbonate functions as a recycling substrate.

  20. Robust fabric substrates for photonic textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Pieterson, L.; Bouten, P.C.P.; Kriege, J.C.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2010-01-01

    A fabric substrate is described for electronic textile with robust interwoven connections between the conductive yarns in it. The fabric's robustness, as a function of the electrical reliability of its conductive yarn connections, is shown to hold over large deformations.This fabric is then used to

  1. MIXED SUBSTRATES IN ENVIRONMENT AND BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern literature and own experimental data on the use of substrates’ mixtures for intensification of microbial synthesis technologies of practically valuable fermentation products (ethanol, lactic acid, butanediol, primary (amino acids, n-hydroxybenzoate, triglycerides and secondary (lovastatin, surfactants metabolites as well as for intensification of biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotics (benzene, cresols, phenols, toluene and pesticides (dimethoate are presented. Special attention is paid on the molecular mechanisms that were established in recent years and underlying the phenomenon catabolic repression in Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas, Escherichia coli bacteria and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and on the use of these data to develop technologies for utilization of plant biomass to produce industrially important metabolites. The survival strategies of heterotrophic microorganisms in natural oligotrophic environments are considered, including the simultaneous use of multiple substrates, allowing improved kinetic characteristics that give them a competitive advantage, also provided significant metabolic/physiological flexibility. The own experimental data on the use of mixtures of growth substrates for the intensification of surfactants’ synthesis of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 are summarized. The dependence of the synthesis of surfactants in a mixture of energy excess (hexadecane and energy deficient (glycerol, ethanol substrates on the way of inoculum preparation, concentration of mono-substrates in the mixture, and their molar ratio were determined.

  2. Drying of Pigment-Cellulose Nanofibril Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Timofeev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new substrate containing cellulose nanofibrils and inorganic pigment particles has been developed for printed electronics applications. The studied composite structure contains 80% fillers and is mechanically stable and flexible. Before drying, the solids content can be as low as 20% due to the high water binding capacity of the cellulose nanofibrils. We have studied several drying methods and their effects on the substrate properties. The aim is to achieve a tight, smooth surface keeping the drying efficiency simultaneously at a high level. The methods studied include: (1 drying on a hot metal surface; (2 air impingement drying; and (3 hot pressing. Somewhat surprisingly, drying rates measured for the pigment-cellulose nanofibril substrates were quite similar to those for the reference board sheets. Very high dewatering rates were observed for the hot pressing at high moisture contents. The drying method had significant effects on the final substrate properties, especially on short-range surface smoothness. The best smoothness was obtained with a combination of impingement and contact drying. The mechanical properties of the sheets were also affected by the drying method and associated temperature.

  3. Nanobubble formation on a warmer substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chenglong; Peng, Shuhua; Ciao, Greg G.; Gutowski, Voytek; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-01-01

    The solvent exchange procedure is an often-used protocol to produce surface nanobubbles. In this procedure, the substrate is exposed to a good solvent for gas which is then mixed and rinsed with a poor solvent for gas and the nanobubbles form on the solid–liquid interface. Here we study the effects

  4. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad;

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a sourc...

  5. Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of nanostructures on glass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narvaez, A.C.; Weppelman, I.G.C.; Moerland, R.J.; Liv, N.; Zonnevylle, A.C.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy is an emerging analysis technique in the fields of biology and photonics, where it is used for the characterization of nanometer sized structures. For these applications, the use of transparent substrates might be highly preferred, but the detection of CL from nan

  6. Biofunctional Micropatterning of Thermoformed 3D Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterkotte, B.; Bally, F.; Nikolov, P.M.; Waldbaur, A.; Rapp, B.E.; Truckenmuller, R.K.; Lahann, J.; Schmitz, K.; Giselbrecht, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mimicking the in vivo microenvironment of cells is a challenging task in engineering in vitro cell models. Surface functionalization is one of the key components providing biochemical cues to regulate the interaction between cells and their substrate. In this study, two different approaches yield bi

  7. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    -phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  8. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Prater, John Thomas; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO3, SrTiO3 (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called "domain matching epitaxy," is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%-25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation "smart" devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin-film heterostructure systems that span a

  9. Self-Assembled Local Artificial Substrates of GaAs on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigeri C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a self-assembling procedure for the fabrication of GaAs islands by Droplet Epitaxy on silicon substrate. Controlling substrate temperature and amount of supplied gallium is possible to tune the base size of the islands from 70 up to 250 nm and the density from 107 to 109 cm−2. The islands show a standard deviation of base size distribution below 10% and their shape evolves changing the aspect ratio from 0.3 to 0.5 as size increases. Due to their characteristics, these islands are suitable to be used as local artificial substrates for the integration of III–V quantum nanostructures directly on silicon substrate.

  10. Fungal and bacterial utilization of organic substrates depends on substrate complexity and N availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koranda, Marianne; Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Kitzler, Barbara; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a direct relationship between microbial community composition and function, which implies that distinct microbial communities vary in their functional properties. The aim of this study was to determine whether differences in initial substrate utilization between distinct microbial communities are due to the activities of certain microbial groups. We performed a short-term experiment with beech forest soils characterized by three different microbial communities (winter and summer community, and a community from a tree-girdling plot). We incubated these soils with different (13) C-labelled substrates with or without inorganic N addition and analyzed microbial substrate utilization by (13) C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Our results revealed that the fate of labile C (glucose) was similar in the three microbial communities, despite differences in absolute substrate incorporation between the summer and winter community. The active microbial community involved in degradation of complex C substrates (cellulose, plant cell walls), however, differed between girdling and control plots and was strongly affected by inorganic N addition. Enhanced N availability strongly increased fungal degradation of cellulose and plant cell walls. Our results indicate that fungi, at least in the presence of a high N supply, are the main decomposers of polymeric C substrates.

  11. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuang; Hauge, Robert H.; Schmidt, Howard K.; Kim, Myung Jong; Kittrell, W. Carter

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  12. Anisotropic artificial substrates for microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvarpour, Attieh

    ) with very low-beam squint, which makes it particularly appropriate for applications in wide band point-to-point communication and radar systems. The antenna is constituted of a mushroom type anisotropic magneto-dielectric artificial grounded slab with uniaxially anisotropic permittivity and permeability tensors. A spectral transmission-line model based on Green functions approach is chosen for the analysis of the structure. A rigorous comparison between the isotropic and anisotropic leaky-wave antennas is performed which reveals that as opposed to anisotropic slabs, isotropic slabs show weak performance in leaky-wave antennas. The properties of planar antennas such as low profile, low cost, compatibility with integrated circuits and their conformal nature have made them appropriate antennas for communications systems. In parallel, bandwidth and miniaturization requirements have increased the demand for millimeter-wave wireless systems, such as radar, remote sensors and highspeed local area networks. However, as frequency increases towards millimeter-wave regime, the radiation efficiency of planar antennas becomes an important issue. This is due to the increased electrical thickness of the substrate and therefore increased number of the excited surface modes which carry part of the energy of the system in the substrate without any efficient contribution to radiation. Therefore, these antennas suffer from low radiation efficiency. This has motivated the third contribution of the thesis which is the interpretation and analysis of the radiation efficiency behavior of the planar antennas on electrically thick substrates. A novel substrate dipole approach is introduced for the explanation of the efficiency behavior. This dipole models the substrate and reduces the problem of the horizontal electric source on the substrate to an equivalent dipole radiating in the free-space. In addition, in this work, some efficiency enhancement solutions at the electrical thicknesses where

  13. New imaging technologies to characterize arrhythmic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Dello Russo, MD, PhD; Sergio Conti, MD; Ghaliah Al-Mohani, MD, Phd; Michela Casella, MD, PhD; Francesca Pizzamiglio, MD; Corrado Carbucicchio, MD; Stefania Riva, MD; Gaetano Fassini, MD; Massimo Moltrasio, MD; Fabrizio Tundo, MD, PhD; Martina Zucchetti, MD; Benedetta Majocchi, MD; Eleonora Russo, MD; Vittoria Marino, MD; Maria Antonietta Dessanai MD; Fabrizio Bologna, MD; Luigi Di Biase, MD, PhD; Andrea Natale, MD; Claudio Tondo , MD, PhD.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cornerstone of the new imaging technologies to treat complex arrhythmias is the electroanatomic (EAM mapping. It is based on tissue characterization and in particular on determination of low potential region and dense scar definition. Recently, the identification of fractionated isolated late potentials increased the specificity of the information derived from EAM. In addition, non-invasive tools and their integration with EAM, such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scanning, have been shown to be helpful to characterize the arrhythmic substrate and to guide the mapping and the ablation. Finally, intracardiac echocardiography, known to be useful for several practical uses in the setting of electrophysiological procedures, it has been also demonstrated to provide important informations about the anatomical substrate and may have potential to identify areas of scarred myocardium.

  14. Evaluation of substrates for butanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The production was evaluated of ethanol, acetone, and butanol from several different carbohydrate materials by five strains of Clostridia and two mixed cultures. The substrates, which were tested at concn ranging between 2.5 and 10% w/v, included pentoses, hexoses, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. The organisms used were Clostridium acetobutylicum strains NRRL B527 and NRRL B3179; Clostridium butylicum strains NRRL B592 and NRRL B593; and Clostridium pasteurianum strain NRRL B598. The mixed cultures contained all of these organisms. Mixed culture 1 contained in addition to the Clostridia, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain NRRL B427. Mixed culture 2 contained mixed culture 1 plus a yeast isolated from kefir culture. Where possible, maxima were found for the conversion of different substrates. 7 tables.

  15. Standard method for characterizing SERS substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Hankus, Mikella E.; Christesen, Steven D.; Fountain, Augustus W., III; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Emmons, Erik D.; Tripathi, Ashish; Wilcox, Phillip; Emge, Darren

    2012-06-01

    We present the methodology and results of a standard assessment protocol to evaluate disparate SERS substrates that were developed for the Defense Advanced Research Programs Agency (DARPA) SERS Science and Technology Fundamentals Program. The results presented are a snapshot of a collaborative effort between the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, and the US Army Research Laboratory-Aldelphi Laboratory Center to develop a quantitative analytical method with spectroscopic figures of merit to unambiguously compare the sensitivity and reproducibility of various SERS substrates submitted by the program participants. We present the design of a common assessment protocol and the definition of a SERS enhancement value (SEV) in order to effectively compare SERS active surfaces.

  16. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  17. On field emission from a semiconducting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Richard; Van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    1999-10-01

    A theoretical examination of field emission from the conduction band of a semiconducting substrate is reported. The analysis includes a comparison with Fowler-Nordheim theory, and it is concluded that the formalism of the Fowler-Nordheim theory is incorrect when applied to carriers originating from a semiconducting substrate. The use of a Fowler-Nordheim analysis results in an error in the extraction of the barrier height that is dependent upon the applied electric field across the oxide, conduction band offset, and temperature. A lower limit of the error was calculated to be between 5% and 15%. An analytical expression is developed to describe the field emission of electrons from the conduction band of a semiconductor.

  18. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  19. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  20. Polarimetric characterization of optically anisotropic flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stchakovsky, M. [HORIBA Jobin-Yvon SAS, Z.A. de la Vigne aux Loups, 5 Avenue Arago, 91380 Chilly-Mazarin (France)], E-mail: michel.stchakovsky@jobinyvon.fr; Caillaud, C. [HORIBA Jobin-Yvon SAS, Z.A. de la Vigne aux Loups, 5 Avenue Arago, 91380 Chilly-Mazarin (France); Foldyna, M.; Ossikovski, R.; Garcia-Caurel, E. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2008-02-15

    Phase Modulated Spectroscopic Ellipsometry as well as Liquid Crystal Mueller Matrix Polarimetry in reflection and in transmission configurations were used to systematically study five types of anisotropic polymer sheets: polyethylene-terephtalate (PET), polyethylene-naphtalate (PEN), polycarbonate (PC), polypropylene (PP) and triacetylcellulose (TAC). The measurements were performed at different sample azimuths in two ellipsometric configurations giving access to both standard ellipsometric data as well as to the entire Mueller matrix. Biaxial anisotropy, a common characteristic to all polymer types, as well as the in-depth optical properties, inhomogeneity present in the sheets were clearly evidenced. The data were interpreted in terms of a model consisting of a thick substrate (several microns) coated with a simple layer. Both, substrate and layer were anisotropic and characterized by a triplet of principal refractive indexes. The orientation of the principal indexes of the bulk and the layer were different revealing the in-depth inhomogeniety of the samples.

  1. Varactor-tuned Substrate Integrated Evanescent Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Acar, Öncel; Dong, Yunfeng

    Evanescent mode waveguides allow for more compact microwave component design in comparison to the traditional fundamental mode waveguide technology. Evanescent waveguides can be integrated into a dielectric substrate in order to further reduce the mass and volume. Unfortunately, traditional...... realization methods used in the standard evanescent waveguides are often not directly applicable to substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology due to dielectric filling and small height of the waveguide. In this work, one of the realization methods of evanescent waveguides using lumped elements...... is considered. In contrast to other methods described in the literature, it avoids etching split ring resonators in the metal layer of the SIW. The filters presented here use varactors as tuning elements. The varactors (as well as DC decoupling circuits) are mounted on the surface of PCB bringing the lower...

  2. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McClelland, John [Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lu, Meng, E-mail: menglu@iastate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  3. Electrodeposition on Superalloy Substrates: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyarzadeh, M. H.; Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reviews various types of coatings, including platinum, platinum alloys, palladium, ruthenium, iridium, nickel, nickel alloys and composite coatings, on superalloy substrates using electrodeposition method. Attempts were carried out to represent an overall view of plating conditions and electrolyte and highlight the importance of the layer regarding to the performance of high-temperature coatings applied on superalloys, which is extensively used on gas-turbine components.

  4. Advanced organics for electronic substrates and packages

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Andrew E

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Organics for Electronic Substrates and Packages provides information on packaging, which is one of the most technologically intensive activities in the electronics industry. The electronics packaging community has realized that while semiconductor devices continue to be improved upon for performance, cost, and reliability, it is the interconnection or packaging of these devices that will limit the performance of the systems. Technology must develop packaging for transistor chips, with high levels of performance and integration providing cooling, power, and interconnection, and yet pre

  5. Insulin and metabolic substrates during human sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Finney, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    Rusavy and colleagues recently endeavoured to dissect out the metabolic effects of insulin in patients with severe sepsis, in the setting of normoglycaemia. Twenty stable patients were studied 3–7 days after admission using a euglycaemic clamp at two supraphysiological insulin levels. Increased doses of exogenous insulin caused preferential use of glucose as a metabolic substrate, while total energy expenditure remained constant. Consequently, hyperinsulinaemia reduced tissue oxygen demand an...

  6. Hydrogenation of biomass-derived substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, John C.; Waidmann, Christopher R.

    2016-06-07

    The .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ketone moiety of a substrate representative of non-food based biomass was hydrogenated to the corresponding saturated alcohol moiety using a composition including (1) a copper salt; (2) a phosphine; (3) a polar aprotic solvent such as acetonitrile, and (4) a compound suitable for providing hydrogen for the hydrogenation, such as a suitable silane material or a suitable siloxane material.

  7. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  8. Method of surface treatment on sapphire substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Xin-huan; LIU Yu-ling; TAN Bai-mei; HAN Li-ying; ZHANG Jian-xin

    2006-01-01

    Sapphire single crystals are widely used in many areas because of the special physic properties and important application value. As an important substrate material,stringent surface quality requirements,i.e. surface finish and flatness,are required. The use of CMP technique can produce high quality surface finishes at low cost and with fast material removal rates. The sapphire substrate surface is treated by using CMP method. According to sapphire substrate and its product properties,SiO2 sol is chosen as abrasive. The particle size is 15-25 nm and the concentration is 40%. According to the experiment results,pH value is 10.5-11.5. After polishing and cleaning the sapphire surface,the surface roughness was measured by using AFM method and the lowest value of Ra 0.1 nm was obtained. From the results,it can be seen that using such method,the optimal sapphire surface can be gotten,which is advantageous for epitaxial growth and device making-up.

  9. Effect of streambed substrate on macroinvertebrate biodiversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua DUAN; Zhaoyin WANG; Shimin TIAN

    2008-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates are important components of stream ecosystems, and are often used as indicator spe-cies for the assessment of river ecology. Numerous studies have shown that substrate is the primary physical envir-onmental variable affecting the taxa richness and density of macroinvertebrates. The aim of this work is to study the effects of the characteristics of streambed substrate, such as grain size, shape, and roughness, on the composition and biodiversity of macroinvertebrates. A field experi-ment was done on the Juma River, a second-order moun-tain stream in northern China. Substrata of cobbles, hewn stones, pebbles, coarse sand, and fine sand were used to replace the original gravel and sand bed in a stretch of 30 m in length. The sampling results indicated that the macroinvertebrate assemblage is significantly affected by the grain size, porosity and interstitial dimension of the substrate, while it is rarely affected by the shape and the surface roughness of the experimental substrata. Macroinvertebrate compositions in cobbles and hewn stones were stable and changed least over time. The taxa richness and density of individuals in the substrata of cobbles, hewn stones, and pebbles are much higher than in those of the coarse sand and fine sand.

  10. Sublittoral hard substrate communities off Helgoland

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kluijver, M. J.

    1991-09-01

    In the Helgoland region eight sublittoral hard substrate communities occur. These communities were stationary in time during the years 1987 1989. The major governing parameters are the available amount of daylight and the degree of exposure to water movement. In the photic zone, three communities are met with, one of which is widespread and appears to be independent of the exposure to water movement. Under exposed conditions, at the lower border of the photic zone, a second community is observed. A third community is established on erosive muschelkalk substrates. In the aphotic zone also, three communities are found. The distribution of these communities is related to the rate of water movement. One community is divided into three variants, with different preferences regarding the angle of inclination and nature of the substrates. In the artificially constructed harbours, where sedimentation exceeds erosion, two different communities have settled. In the community under moderately sheltered conditions many species are found which also occur in the natural photic zone. Under extremely sheltered conditions a group of species has become dominant which is very rare in the Helgoland region outside the quay-walls but which has been described as being characteristic for sheltered localities elsewhere.

  11. Improvement of mechanical properties of glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbay, Ismail Hakki Cengizhan; Budakoglu, Refika; Zayim, Esra Ozkan

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to enhance the mechanical and optical properties of glass substrates with thin films by the sol-gel method. TiO2-SiO2 binary system and Ta2O5 were deposited on glass substrates with high transparency. Ring-on-ring flexure and scratch tests were the main mechanical characterization tests. Herein, we report that the thin films can be used to enhance the mechanical properties of the glass substrates efficiently and effectively. TiO2-SiO2 binary system shows more than two times and Ta2O5 thin films show nearly three times better ultimate strength in the ring-on-ring flexure test. Besides, Ta2O5 thin film samples show superior scratch resistance. Additionally, the finite element method was also used to check the conformity in the application of mechanical properties of composite materials. It is also worth noting that, the finite element method can be used to accurately analyze the mechanical stability of composite materials. The use of the finite element method can reduce the total number of experimental trials without losing reliability.

  12. Substrate-induced strain in carbon nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphitic nanodisks of typically 20–50 nm in thickness, produced by the so-called Kvaerner Carbon Black and Hydrogen Process were dispersed on gold substrate and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the gold surface was drastically changed by annealing at 400 °C. AFM measurements show that this change in the surface roughness induces changes also in the topography of the nanodisks, as they closely follow the corrugation of the gold substrate. This leads to strained nanodisks, which is confirmed also by confocal Raman microscopy. We found that the FE-SEM contrast obtained from the disks depends on the working distance used during the image acquisition by In-lens detection, a phenomenon which we explain by the decrease in the amount of electrons reaching the detector due to diffraction. This process may affect the image contrast in the case of other layered materials, like hexagonal boron nitride, and other planar hybrid nanostructures, too. - Highlights: • Bending of carbon nanodisks is induced by the roughness of the gold substrate. • Confocal Raman microscopy shows a compressive strain induced in the nanodisks. • The electron microscopy contrast of nanodisks depends on the working distance

  13. Plastic substrate technologies for flexible displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Toru; Shiroishi, Isao; Negishi, Tuyoto; Shiro, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    A novel plastic substrate for flexible displays was developed. The substrate consisted of a polycarbonate (PC) base film coated with a gas barrier layer and a transparent conductive thin film. PC with ultra-low intrinsic birefringence and high temperature dimensional stability was developed for the base film. The retardation of the PC base film was less than 1 nm at a wavelength of 550 nm (film thickness, 120 μm). Even at 180 °C, the elastic modulus was 2 GPa, and thermal shrinkage was less than 0.01%. The surface roughness of the PC base film was less than 0.5 nm. A silicon oxide (SiOx) gas barrier layer was deposited on the PC base film by a DC magnetron reactive sputtering method. In addition, a unique organic-inorganic hybrid material is coated on the SiOx to further improve the gas-barrier performance. The water vapor transmission rate of the film was less than 0.05 g/m2/day at 40 °C and 100% relative humidity (RH), and the permeation of oxygen was less than 0.05 cc/m2•day•atm at 40 °C and 90% RH. Indium Zinc Oxide optimized for the plastic substrate was deposited on the other side of the SiOx film by the DC magnetron sputtering method. The transmittance was 87% and the resistivity was 3.5×10-4 ohm•cm.

  14. Spectral Markers of Erythrocytes on Solid Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiziev, Adkhamjon A.; Krakhmalev, V. A.

    Proposed in previous paper [1,2] the new nondestructive method of optical microscopy allows to examine the structures of living cells (human erythrocytes) in their natural colors without its staining by using a specially designed substrate for deposition of biological sample and observing a native blood smears in reflected light. Color interference contrast image is achieved due to special condition of experiment is connected with chose of angle of incidental light, wave length of light of reflected ray, chemical composition of sample, thickness of sample, refractive index of sample, refractive index of substrate, chemical composition of substrate [1,2]. We can identify chemical compounds of erythrocytes after calibration color scale by alternative methods. For comparison we used Synchrotron Radiation based Fourier Transformed Infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy. By focusing of infrared beam of FTIR microscope on cell surface we can screen and distinguish difference erythrocytes by its color. For example on Fig. 49.1 we can see two neighbored erythrocytes where one of them have red color (point 1) and other-green (point 5). To identify their spectral markers we measured IR absorption spectra of cells at different points (1,2,3,4 and 5). Intermediated area (points 3 and 4) correspond to substrate spectra (silicon substrate) and their spectra are same. The peaks at 2,850 and 2,920 cm-1 correspond mainly to the CH2 stretching modes of the methylene chains in membrane lipids. At 1,650 cm-1 the amide I band is observed, which results, principally, from the n(CO) stretching vibrations of the protein amide bonds; the amide II band, near 1,550 cm-1, is a combination of the d(N-H) bending and n(C-N) stretching vibrations of the amide bonds. The peaks at 2,850 and 2,920 cm-1 correspond mainly to the CH2 stretching modes of the methylene chains in membrane lipids [3. The intensities of the absorption bands at 2,920 and 2,850 cm-1 in green erythrocyte (point 5) were also

  15. Effect of substrate roughness on the contact damage of thin brittle films on brittle substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, Mirko [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Borrero-Lopez, Oscar [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Hoffman, Mark, E-mail: mark.hoffman@unsw.edu.a [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil J. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    The effect of substrate and surface roughness on the contact fracture of diamond-like carbon coatings on brittle soda-lime glass substrates has been investigated. The average surface roughness (R{sub a}) of the examined samples ranged from 15 nm to 571 nm. Contact damage was simulated by means of spherical nanoindentation, and fracture was subsequently assessed by focused ion beam microscopy. It was found that, in the absence of sub-surface damage in the substrate, fracture occurs in the coating in the form of radial, and ring/cone cracks during loading, and lateral cracks during unloading. Increasing the surface roughness results in a decrease in the critical load for crack initiation during loading, and in the suppression of fracture modes during unloading from high loads. When sub-surface damage (lateral cracks) is present in the substrate, severe spalling takes place during loading, causing a large discontinuity in the load-displacement curve. The results have implications concerning the design of damage-tolerant coated systems consisting of a brittle film on a brittle substrate.

  16. Report on EUVL Mask Substrate Development: Low-Expansion Substrate Finishing II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.M.; Taylor, J.S.; Hector, S.D.; Shell, M.

    1999-12-08

    This report is a continuation of our assessment of the finishing of low thermal expansion material wafers obtained through three different commercial pathways. This quarter we have patterned and printed a ULE{reg_sign} wafer (Rodel 1) and saw no difference between its images and those from silicon wafer substrates. This further demonstrated that ULE{reg_sign} can be used as the EUVL mask substrate material. We have also evaluated substrates produced by three vendors: Hoya, General Optics, and Rodel. Consistent with our results reported last quarter, surface roughness of the bare substrates from all three companies does not depend on the position. For Hoya, the wafers it produced had a low roughness than those from last quarter. However, the cleanliness of the wafers needs to be improved. For General Optics, the wafer roughness has increased, and it was only able to deliver one wafer this quarter. General Optics will be replaced by Schott ML next quarter. For Rodel, one of its wafers (Rodel 1) that had been cleaned in-house showed excellent finishing and was selected to be patterned. We also observed that the sleeks on the substrates were smoothed by the ML coating. The other two Rodel wafers (Rodel 2 and Rodel 4) had too many defects and the roughness values derived from AFM are not reliable.

  17. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Mendon, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Annavarapu, Suresh (Brookline, MA); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  18. A sparse scattering model for nanoparticles on rough substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Wriedt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present and validate an efficient forward scattering model for nanoparticles on rough contaminated substrates.......We present and validate an efficient forward scattering model for nanoparticles on rough contaminated substrates....

  19. An experimental method for coating-substrate interface investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Wänstrand, Olle; Podgornik, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of coated surfaces indicate that in many cases the coating-substrate interface is the weakest part of the coated component, with the coating-to-substrate adhesion being used to evaluate the strength of the coating-substrate interface. While modeling of the coated surface depends on coating and substrate material properties, which are not easy to determine, standard experimental methods do not allow a direct study of the interface. The aim of the present paper is to describe a s...

  20. SVM-based prediction of caspase substrate cleavage sites

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Lawrence JK; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Background Caspases belong to a class of cysteine proteases which function as critical effectors in apoptosis and inflammation by cleaving substrates immediately after unique sites. Prediction of such cleavage sites will complement structural and functional studies on substrates cleavage as well as discovery of new substrates. Recently, different computational methods have been developed to predict the cleavage sites of caspase substrates with varying degrees of success. As the support vector...

  1. Substrate influences ecophysiological performance of tree seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, Gisela; Hietz, Peter; Delaney, Christina M; Katzensteiner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Unfavourable soil conditions frequently limit tree regeneration in mountain forests on calcareous bedrock. Rocky, shallow organic soils on dolomite pose a particular problem for tree regeneration due to commonly restricted water and nutrient supplies. Moreover, an often dense layer of understorey vegetation competes for the limited resources available. Hence, an array of interacting factors impairs tree seedlings' performance on dolomite, but there is little information on the ecophysiological mechanisms. We studied the effects of substrate, competing vegetation and foliar nutrient concentrations on the photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potentials (ψ) of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and larch (Larix decidua Mill.) under controlled (well-watered/drought-stressed) conditions and under prevailing field conditions. While A and gs of well-watered spruce in the pot experiment were reduced by the mineral substrate, the organic dolomite substrate with dense competing vegetation reduced gs and ψ of sycamore, spruce and larch under drought-stressed conditions in the field. For sycamore and spruce, A and gs were strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) concentrations in the pot experiment. In contrast, soil water primarily affected beech and larch. Finally, dense competing vegetation negatively affected A and gs of spruce and A of larch on dolomite. Our results highlight the critical role of N, K and water availability for tree seedlings in shallow soils on calcareous bedrock. On these sites, natural tree regeneration is at particular risk from episodic drought, a likely consequence of climate change.

  2. Substrate-induced DNA polymerase β activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Batra, Vinod K; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-11-01

    DNA polymerases and substrates undergo conformational changes upon forming protein-ligand complexes. These conformational adjustments can hasten or deter DNA synthesis and influence substrate discrimination. From structural comparison of binary DNA and ternary DNA-dNTP complexes of DNA polymerase β, several side chains have been implicated in facilitating formation of an active ternary complex poised for chemistry. Site-directed mutagenesis of these highly conserved residues (Asp-192, Arg-258, Phe-272, Glu-295, and Tyr-296) and kinetic characterization provides insight into the role these residues play during correct and incorrect insertion as well as their role in conformational activation. The catalytic efficiencies for correct nucleotide insertion for alanine mutants were wild type ∼ R258A > F272A ∼ Y296A > E295A > D192A. Because the efficiencies for incorrect insertion were affected to about the same extent for each mutant, the effects on fidelity were modest (chain generates a population of non-productive ternary complexes. Structures of binary and ternary substrate complexes of the R258A mutant and a mutant associated with gastric carcinomas, E295K, provide molecular insight into intermediate structural conformations not appreciated previously. Although the R258A mutant crystal structures were similar to wild-type enzyme, the open ternary complex structure of E295K indicates that Arg-258 stabilizes a non-productive conformation of the primer terminus that would decrease catalysis. Significantly, the open E295K ternary complex binds two metal ions indicating that metal binding cannot overcome the modified interactions that have interrupted the closure of the N-subdomain. PMID:25261471

  3. Substrate influences ecophysiological performance of tree seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, Gisela; Hietz, Peter; Delaney, Christina M; Katzensteiner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Unfavourable soil conditions frequently limit tree regeneration in mountain forests on calcareous bedrock. Rocky, shallow organic soils on dolomite pose a particular problem for tree regeneration due to commonly restricted water and nutrient supplies. Moreover, an often dense layer of understorey vegetation competes for the limited resources available. Hence, an array of interacting factors impairs tree seedlings' performance on dolomite, but there is little information on the ecophysiological mechanisms. We studied the effects of substrate, competing vegetation and foliar nutrient concentrations on the photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potentials (ψ) of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and larch (Larix decidua Mill.) under controlled (well-watered/drought-stressed) conditions and under prevailing field conditions. While A and gs of well-watered spruce in the pot experiment were reduced by the mineral substrate, the organic dolomite substrate with dense competing vegetation reduced gs and ψ of sycamore, spruce and larch under drought-stressed conditions in the field. For sycamore and spruce, A and gs were strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) concentrations in the pot experiment. In contrast, soil water primarily affected beech and larch. Finally, dense competing vegetation negatively affected A and gs of spruce and A of larch on dolomite. Our results highlight the critical role of N, K and water availability for tree seedlings in shallow soils on calcareous bedrock. On these sites, natural tree regeneration is at particular risk from episodic drought, a likely consequence of climate change. PMID:26446268

  4. Hetero epitaxial graphene on various substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gary; Kaut, Gurpreet; Taylor, Crawford

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale production of graphene is pivotal for the development of graphene-based electronics. These results focus on the synthesis and characterization of graphene layers. Two methods were used to grow graphene films. First, graphene films were epitaxially grown on silicon carbide substrates by thermal decomposition of SiC at high temperature and low pressure. In-house built reactor consisting of induction furnace was used to form epitaxial films for electronic applications. Second, chemical vapor deposition method was used for direct graphene synthesis on 3C-SiC with the use of copper as a catalyst. In thermal CVD process, hydrogen and methane gases were used as precursors. Methane acts as a carbon source and annealing and cooling were done hydrogen environment. Different polytypes of silicon carbide (6H-SiC and 3C-SiC) and their crystal orientations were exploited as substrates to form epitaxial graphene. Hetero epitaxial 3C-SiC epilayer was first deposited on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition technique in cold wall, low pressure, and horizontal CVD reactor. The reactor temperature, argon pressure, flow rates and concentration of different gases (propane, silane, hydrogen and argon) was investigated to control the growth of 3C-SiC and silicon sublimation rate. The resulting graphene films were confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. Further, graphene films have been characterized with the tools of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mobility, electrical resistivity and carrier density measurements were taken using hall measurements. NSF_PRDM

  5. Thin film reactions on alloy semiconductor substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, D.A.

    1990-11-01

    The interactions between Pt and In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As have been studied. In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As substrates with 70nm Pt films were encapsulated in SiO{sub 2}, and annealed up to 600{degree}C in flowing forming gas. The composition and morphology of the reaction product phases were studied using x-ray diffraction, Auger depth profiling, and transmission electron microscopy. The reaction kinetics were examined with Rutherford Backscattering. Results show that Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reacts to form many of the reaction products encountered in the Pt/GaAs and Pt/InP reactions: PtGa, Pt{sub 3}Ga, and PtAs{sub 2}. In addition, a ternary phase, Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}, develops, which is a solid solution between PtIn{sub 2} and PtGa{sub 2}. The amount of Ga in the ternary phase increases with annealing temperature, which causes a decrease in the lattice parameter of the phase. The reaction products show a tendency to form layered structures, especially for higher temperatures and longer annealing times. Unlike the binary case, the PtAs{sub 2}, phase is randomly oriented on the substrate, and is intermingle with a significant amount of Pt(In:Ga){sub 2}. Following Pt/In{sub .53}Ga{sub .47}As reactions, two orientation relationships between the Pt(In:Ga){sub 2} product phase and the substrate were observed, despite the large mismatch with the substrate ({approximately}8%). For many metal/compound semiconductor interactions, the reaction rate is diffusion limited, i.e. exhibits a parabolic dependence on time. An additional result of this study was the development of an In-rich layer beneath the reacted layer. The Auger depth profile showed a substantial increase in the sample at this layer. This is a significant result for the production of ohmic contacts, as the Schottky barrier height in this system lower for higher In concentrations. 216 refs.

  6. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad;

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a source...... of energy is promising. In this study 5 different algae types were tested for biogas potential and two algae were subsequent used for co-digestion with manure. Green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and brown seaweed Laminaria digitata was co-digested with cattle manure at mesophilic and thermophilic condition...

  7. Methods for both coating a substrate with aluminum oxide and infusing the substrate with elemental aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-11-01

    Methods of aluminizing the surface of a metal substrate. The methods of the present invention do not require establishment of a vacuum or a reducing atmosphere, as is typically necessary. Accordingly, aluminization can occur in the presence of oxygen, which greatly simplifies and reduces processing costs by allowing deposition of the aluminum coating to be performed, for example, in air. Embodiments of the present invention can be characterized by applying a slurry that includes a binder and powder granules containing aluminum to the metal substrate surface. Then, in a combined step, a portion of the aluminum is diffused into the substrate and a portion of the aluminum is oxidized by heating the slurry to a temperature greater than the melting point of the aluminum in an oxygen-containing atmosphere.

  8. Hybrid plasmon waveguides with metamaterial substrate and dielectric substrate: A contrastive study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid plasmon waveguides, respectively, with metamaterial substrate and dielectric substrate are investigated and analyzed contrastively with a numerical finite element method. Basic properties, including propagation length Lp, effective mode area Aeff, and energy distribution, are obtained and compared with waveguide geometric parameters at 1.55 μm. For the waveguide with metamaterial substrate, propagation length Lp increases to several tens of microns and effective mode area Aeff is reduced by more than 3 times. Moreover, the near field region is expanded, leading to potential applications in nanophotonics. Therefore, it could be very helpful for improving the integration density in optical chips and developing functional components on a nanometer scale for all optical integrated circuits. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  9. Direct seed germination methods for assessing phytotoxicity of alternative substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduced plant growth in wood-based substrates, compared with traditional substrates, has been overcome with increased fertilizer rates and by storing the material for a period of time. A variety of factors have been attributed to reduced plant growth in whole pine tree substrates including nitrogen ...

  10. Preparation of Porosity-Graded SOFC Anode Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtappels, P.; Sorof, C.; Verbraeken, M.C.; Rambert, S.; Vogt, U.

    2006-01-01

    Porosity graded anode substrates for solid oxide fuel cells are considered to optimise the gas transport through the substrate by maintaining a high electrochemical activity for fuel oxidation at the anode/solid electrolyte interface. In this work, the fabrication of porosity graded anode substrates

  11. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  12. Hormonal control of metabolic substrate use by birds and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The differential use of metabolic substrates by birds is not well understood. Therefore, to clarify which substrates are preferentially utilized, studies were conducted on birds with divergent dietary habits and on a close non-avian relative of birds, alligators. Fasting plasma substrate and hormone...

  13. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja;

    2010-01-01

    molecules adsorbed onto the substrate. The substrates were fabricated in a cleanroom process which only requires two steps to produce well controlled nano-sized high aspect ratio metal pillars. These substrates had superior chemical sensing performance in addition to a more cost effective fabrication...

  14. ERAD substrate recognition in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Ng, Davis T W

    2010-07-01

    During protein synthesis, the orderly progression of folding, modification, and assembly is paramount to function and vis-à-vis cellular viability. Accordingly, sophisticated quality control mechanisms have evolved to monitor protein maturation throughout the cell. Proteins failing at any step are segregated and degraded as a preventative measure against potential toxicity. Although protein quality control is generally poorly understood, recent research advances in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways have provided the most detailed view so far. The discovery of distinct substrate processing sites established a biochemical basis for genetic profiles of model misfolded proteins. Detailed mechanisms for substrate recognition were recently uncovered. For some proteins, sequential glycan trimming steps set a time window for folding. Proteins still unfolded at the final stage expose a specific degradation signal recognized by the ERAD machinery. Through this mechanism, the system does not in fact know that a molecule is "misfolded". Instead, it goes by the premise that proteins past due have veered off their normal folding pathways and therefore aberrant. PMID:20178855

  15. Efficient thermophotovoltaic solar cells on bent substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmavonyan, Gagik; Zadoyan, Ovsanna

    2013-04-01

    Thermophotovoltaic devices show promise as a method of reclaiming waste industrial heat and may provide a competitive and quiet low output heat conversion power supply for remote rural areas. GaSb based devices are well matched to a 1500-2000^oC blackbody emission temperature as well as to the solar spectrum when paired with GaAs. The growth of GaSb on GaAs proceeds via the Stranski-Krastanow mechanism, resulting in rectangular islands of GaSb with their edges orientated along the 110directions. The size of the islands is dependent on the growth temperature with smaller islands being produced for lower temperatures. The rectification behavior of p-GaSb/n-GaAs heterojunctions is also strongly dependent on the growth temperature. Possible mechanisms for the rectification at low temperature include more rapid turnover of interface dislocations and a corresponding reduction in carrier generation/recombination processes or passivation of defect centres by greater incorporation of impurities such as hydrogen. By optimizing the growth conditions, efficient p-GaSb/n-GaAs thermophotovoltaic devices have been produced. A series of GaSb and GaAs epilayers grown onto substrates has been used to investigate the effect of bent substrate on external quantum efficiency and spectral response.

  16. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). (paper)

  17. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, C. D.; Higgins, M. J.; Sullivan, R. P.; Jamali, S. S.; Moulton, S. E.; Wallace, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  18. Patterned melt electrospun substrates for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Paul D; Joergensen, Nanna T [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Cr East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Groll, Juergen; Moeller, Martin [Deutsches Wollforschungsinstitut, Pauwelsstrasse 8, D 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: dalton@dwi.rwth-aachen.de

    2008-09-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds can be built with patterning techniques that allow discrete placement of structures. In this study, electrospun fibres are collected in focused spots; the patterning and drawing of a cell adhesive scaffold is shown. Blends of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) and PCL were melt electrospun onto glass collectors, and the optimal electrospinning parameters determined. The quality of the fibre was largely influenced by the flow rate of the melt to the spinneret; however, this can be adjusted with the voltage. A collection distance between 3 cm and 5 cm was optimal, and at 10 cm the fibres became unfocused in their deposition although the diameter remained similar (0.96 {+-} 0.19 {mu}m). Aligned lines of electrospun fibres 200-400 {mu}m in width could be applied onto the slide with an x-y stage, continuously and discretely. Lines of electrospun fibres could be applied on top of one another and were very uniform in diameter. Fibroblasts adhered primarily in the fibre region, due to the poor cell adhesion to the PEG substrate. Improvements in depositing hydrophilic electrospun fibres that wet and adhere to in vitro substrates and the use of stage automation for the writing interface could provide scaffold-building devices suitable for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Memory Consolidation and Neural Substrate of Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redolar-Ripoll, Diego

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the relationships between reward and learning and memory processes. Different studies have described how information about rewards influences behavior and how the brain uses this reward information to control learning and memory processes. Reward nature seems to be processed in different ways by neurons in different brain structures, ranging from the detection and perception of rewards to the use of information about predicted rewards for the control of goal-directed behavior. The neural substrate underling this processing of reward information is a reliable way of improving learning and memory processes. Evidence from several studies indicates that this neural system can facilitate memory consolidation in a wide variety of learning tasks. From a molecular perspective, certain cardinal features of reward have been described as forms of memory. Studies of human addicts and studies in animal models of addiction show that chronic drug exposure produces stable changes in the brain at the cellular and molecular levels that underlie the long-lasting behavioral plasticity associated with addiction. These molecular and cellular adaptations involved in addiction are also implicated in learning and memory processes. Dopamine seems to be a critical common signal to activate different genetic mechanisms that ultimately remodel synapses and circuits. Despite memory is an active and complex process mediated by different brain areas, the neural substrate of reward is able to improve memory consolidation in a several paradigms. We believe that there are many equivalent traits between reward and learning and memory processes.

  20. Logarithmic Slots Antennas Using Substrate Integrated Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnavi Kachhia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents new generation of slotted antennas for satellite application where the loss can be compensated in terms of power or gain of antenna. First option is very crucial because it totally depends on size of satellite so we have proposed the high gain antenna creating number of rectangular, trapezoidal, and I shape slots in logarithm size in Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW structure. The structure consists of an array of various shape slots antenna designed to operate in C and X band applications. The basic structures have been designed over a RT duroid substrate with dielectric constant of 2.2 and with a thickness of 0.508 mm. Multiple slots array and shape of slot effects have been studied and analyzed using HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator. The designs have been supported with its return loss, gain plot, VSWR, and radiation pattern characteristics to validate multiband operation. All the proposed antennas give gain more than 9 dB and return loss better than −10 dB. However, the proposed structures have been very sensitive to their physical dimensions.

  1. Droplet evaporation on a soluble substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailleur, Alexandra; Pirat, Christophe; Colombani, Jean; CNES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Stains left by evaporated droplets are ubiquitous in everyday life as well as in industrial processes. Whatever the composition of the evaporating liquid (colloidal suspensions, biological fluids...), the stains are mostly constituted by a deposit at the periphery of the dried drop, similar to a coffee stain (Deegan, 1997). All these studies have been carried with non-reacting solids. In this presentation, we focus on the behavior of a pure-water droplet evaporating on a soluble substrate which is more complex, since three phenomena are strongly interacting: the dissolution of the substrate, the diffusion/convection of the dissolved species into the drop and the evaporation of the liquid. NaCl and KCl single crystals have been chosen for this experimental study as they are fast-dissolving solids. We have observed that the dissolution induces a pinning of the triple line from the beginning of the evaporation, leading to a decrease of the contact angle in time. At the end of the evaporation, a peripheral deposit is always formed, proof of an outward flow inside the drop (coffee-ring effect). The authors would like to thank the CNES for the financial support.

  2. Snap-Through Instability of Graphene on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We determine the graphene morphology regulated by substrates with herringbone and checkerboard surface corrugations. As the graphene–substrate interfacial bonding energy and the substrate surface roughness vary, the graphene morphology snaps between two distinct states: (1 closely conforming to the substrate and (2 remaining nearly flat on the substrate. Since the graphene morphology is strongly tied to the electronic properties of graphene, such a snap-through instability of graphene morphology can lead to desirable graphene electronic properties that could potentially enable graphene-based functional electronic components (e.g. nano-switches.

  3. Surprisingly high substrate specificities observed in complex biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kragelund, Caroline;

    to investigate the cell-specific in situ substrate uptake pattern of different bacteria. Different substrates were tested by combination of Microautoradiography and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Conditions applied (different substrate concentrations, starvation, induction with specific substrates, multiple......, microorganisms can regulate their metabolism expressing wide range of uptake and catabolic systems. However, ecophysiological studies of natural biofilms indicate that bacteria are very specialized in their choice of substrate, so even minor changes in substrate composition can affect the community composition...... by selection for different specialized species. We hypothesized that bacteria growing in natural environment express strongly conserved substrate specificity which is independent on short-term (few hours) variations in growth conditions. In this study, biofilm from Aalborg wastewater treatment plant was used...

  4. An Analytical Model for Spectral Peak Frequency Prediction of Substrate Noise in CMOS Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model describing the generation of switching current noise in CMOS substrates. The model eliminates the need for SPICE simulations in existing methods by conducting a transient analysis on a generic CMOS inverter and approximating the switching current waveform us...

  5. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  6. Two arginine residues in the substrate pocket predominantly control the substrate selectivity of thiocyanate hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Toshinori; Namima, Satoshi; Sato, Masa; Hori, Shota; Ohtaki, Akashi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Katayama, Yoko; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2013-07-01

    Thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase) of Thiobacillus thioparus THI115 is a cobalt (Co)-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of thiocyanate (SCN⁻), a major component of wastewater from coke oven factories, to carbonyl sulfide and ammonia. Although SCNase exhibits high structural similarities to Co-type nitrile hydratase (NHase), including a unique Co³⁺ catalytic center with two oxidized Cys ligands, both SCNase and NHase exclusively catalyze only their own substrates. Based on the differences in the substrate-binding pockets of these enzymes, βArg90 and γArg136 of SCNase, with side chains extending toward the pocket, were separately substituted with Phe and Trp, the corresponding residues, respectively, in Co-type NHase. Both SCNase βArg90 and SCNase γArg136 mutants showed no SCN⁻ hydrolysis activity but did catalyze the hydration of nitriles. The estimated kcat values (∼2 s⁻¹) corresponded to approximately 0.2% of that of Co-type NHase for nitrile hydration and approximately 3% of that of wild-type SCNase for SCN⁻ hydrolysis. The crystal structure of SCNase γR136W is essentially identical to that of the wild-type, including the Co³⁺ center having Cys oxidations; the size of the substrate pocket was enlarged because of conformational changes on the side chains of the mutated residue. Discussion of the difference in the environments around the substrate-binding pockets among the wild-type and mutant SCNases and Co-type NHase strongly suggests that βArg90 and γArg136, positioned at the top of the Co³⁺ center, predominantly control the substrate selectivity of SCNase. PMID:23453853

  7. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  8. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-11-20

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness.

  9. Substrate Strengthening of CVD Coated Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.Kessler; M.Heidkamp; F.Hoffmann; P.Mayr

    2004-01-01

    Properties of components and tools can be improved by the combination of coating and heat treatment processes due to the addition of single process advantages and due to the utilization of process interactions. Several low and high alloyed, structural and tool steels (AISI 4140, 52100, H13, A2, D2, etc.) have been treated by CVD-TiN-coating plus laser beam hardening respectively carburizing plus CVD-TiN-coating. Homogeneous, dense TiN-coatings with high hardness,high compressive residual stresses and good adhesion were supported by high strength substrate surfaces. Especially CVD plus laser beam hardening offers the possibility to reduce distortion due to the small heated surface volume.

  10. Micropatterned substrates for studying astrocytes in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the physiological roles of astrocytes have ignited renewed interest in the functional significance of these glial cells in the central nervous system. Many of the newly discovered astrocytic functions were initially demonstrated and characterized in cell culture systems. We discuss the use of microculture techniques and micropatterning of cell-adhesive substrates in studies of astrocytic Ca2+ excitability and bidirectional neuron-astrocyte signaling. This culturing approach aims to reduce the level of complexity of the system by limiting the interacting partners and by controlling the localization of cells. It provides tight control over experimental conditions allowing detailed characterization of cellular functions and intercellular communication. Although such a reductionist approach yields some difference in observations between astrocytic properties in culture and in situ, general phenomena discovered in cell culture systems, however, have also been found in vivo.

  11. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  12. Substrate Market. Compilation and analysis of substrate market; Substratmarknadsanalys. Sammanstaellning och analys av substratmarknaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holgersson, Pernilla (SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut (Sweden)); Newborg, Aase; Hellstroem, Chris (Kan Energi Sweden AB (Sweden)); Mc Cann, Michael; Oestervall, Sara Linnea (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB (Sweden)); Fagerstroem, Erik (Lund Univ., Faculty of Engineering, LTH (Sweden)); Thomten, Maria (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    A great potential exists to produce more biogas from anaerobic digestion in Sweden and local authorities are working to develop the required production, distribution and retail systems to aid the realisation of such potential. Vaestra Goetaland, which lies on the west coast of Sweden, has a goal to produce 1,2 TWh of biogas each year by 2020 and by 2013, intends to produce 0,3 TWh each year. Skaane in the south of Sweden, has a similar goal to produce 1,4 TWh of biogas each year by 2020. The goal of the project for which this study was initiated, is to define the regional market for biogas substrate in order to determine current supply and demand and predict supply and demand in 2020. The individual substrate types that are included in this study are organic domestic waste (household, restaurants and other food retail), industrial waste products, and animal manure from agriculture. Crops are not included in the study, nor is sewage sludge. Biogas produced via biomass gasification is also not covered. The geographical limit of the study is set to cover biogas plants in Skaane, Halland och Vaestra Goetaland as well as Vaermland, Oerebro, Joenkoeping, Kronoberg and Blekinge. A series of interviews carried out with personnel from the biogas plants reveal that 70 % of the plants experience competition for substrate material. Animal slaughter waste is much sought after for use in Co-digestion plants in Skaane and Halland whereas only one plant in Vaestra Goetaland uses such waste. Plant owners revealed that plants in Vaestra Goetaland use between 50% and 100% organic domestic waste. None of the contacted plants in Vaestra Goetaland use animal manure whereas for biogas plants in Skaane and Halland, use of manure varies between 8% and 80%. The interview results show that waste fired power plants are a considerable competitor for substrate originating from the food industry waste. Competition for substrate has increased over recent years especially for those substrates

  13. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  14. Micro Embossing of Ceramic Green Substrates for Micro Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, X -C; Maw, H P; Lu, C W; Lam, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered ceramic substrates with embedded micro patterns are becoming increasingly important, for example, in harsh environment electronics and microfluidic devices. Fabrication of these embedded micro patterns, such as micro channels, cavities and vias, is a challenge. This study focuses on the process of patterning micro features on ceramic green substrates using micro embossing. A ceramic green tape that possessed near-zero shrinkage in the x-y plane was used, six layers of which were laminated as the embossing substrate. The process parameters that impact on the pattern fidelity were investigated and optimized in this study. Micro features with line-width as small as several micrometers were formed on the ceramic green substrates. The dynamic thermo-mechanical analysis indicated that extending the holding time at certain temperature range would harden the green substrates with little effect on improving the embossing fidelity. Ceramic substrates with embossed micro patterns were obtain d after co-firi...

  15. Influence of the substrate thickness on texture of tape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication of a strong cube texture Ni substrate through thermomechanical process is reported by ORNL research group. Decreasing the substrate thickness, the engineering critical current density will be improved. Rolled substrates are electropolished to the final thichness of 100, 80, 50, 40, and 20 μm, respectively. Electropolished substrates are recrystallized at temperatures between 800-1000C and in a mixed atmosphere of 4% H2 in 99.99% purity Ar. Orientation mappings of recrystallizated tapes are conducted through an EBSD system mounted on a LEO-1450 SEM. The influence of the substrate thickness on texture of the tape is studied in this paper. Results show that with the decrease of substrate thickness, the texture of the tapes with the same recrystallization process is more and more closed to the exact position of cube orientation.

  16. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics. PMID:24135095

  17. Substrate-mediated zero backscattering from dielectric metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Mihail; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Belov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study optical properties of all-dielectric metasurfaces on top of the high-index substrate. We show that matching the magnitudes and setting the {\\pi}-phase difference of the electric and magnetic dipole moments in nanoparticles, one can obtain a suppression of reflection from the substrate coated with metasurface. In contrast to homogeneous environment, where zero backscattering, or Kerker effect, is observed when electric and magnetic moments are in-phase, the blooming of the substrate occurs when the out-of-phase condition is satisfied, i.e. for the wavelength between the resonances of electric and magnetic dipole moments. We perform numerical simulations of spherical and disk nanoparticle arrays for different permittivities of the substrate, and confirm our model by numerically separating the contributions into the total reflection from nanoparticle arrays and bare substrate. The influence of high-index substrate is crucial for designing optical metasurfaces and photovoltaic elements with...

  18. Modelling of Amperometric Biosensors in the Case of Substrate Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulys, Juozas; Baronas, Romas

    2006-01-01

    The response of an amperometric biosensor at mixed enzyme kinetics and diffusion limitations was modelled digitally in the case of substrate inhibition. Digital simulations were carried out using a finite difference technique. Calculations showed complex kinetics of biosensor response. At low enzyme activity and substrate concentration (S0), the response of the sensor looks like it is limited by a simple substrate diffusion. At substrate concentration comparable to the Michaelis-Menten constant (KM), the response change shows a maximal value. A sharp response change was indicated at high enzyme activity and high (4.9 > S0/KM > 4.5) substrate concentration. This was explained by multi-concentration of substrate generation inside the enzyme layer. This conclusion was confirmed by the analytical solution of the simplified biosensor model with external diffusion limitation at steady-state conditions. The complex kinetics of response change produces different calibration graphs for biosensor response at transition and steady state.

  19. Microstrip Antenna Arrays on Multilayer LCP Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dane; Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan; Wang, Guoan; Kingsley, Nickolas D.; Papapolymerou, Ioannis; Tenteris, Emmanouil M.; DeJean, Gerald; Li, RonglLin

    2007-01-01

    A research and development effort now underway is directed toward satisfying requirements for a new type of relatively inexpensive, lightweight, microwave antenna array and associated circuitry packaged in a thin, flexible sheet that can readily be mounted on a curved or flat rigid or semi-rigid surface. A representative package of this type consists of microwave antenna circuitry embedded in and/or on a multilayer liquid- crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The circuitry typically includes an array of printed metal microstrip patch antenna elements and their feedlines on one or more of the LCP layer(s). The circuitry can also include such components as electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches for connecting and disconnecting antenna elements and feedlines. In addition, the circuitry can include switchable phase shifters described below. LCPs were chosen over other flexible substrate materials because they have properties that are especially attractive for high-performance microwave applications. These properties include low permittivity, low loss tangent, low water-absorption coefficient, and low cost. By means of heat treatments, their coefficients of thermal expansion can be tailored to make them more amenable to integration into packages that include other materials. The nature of the flexibility of LCPs is such that large LCP sheets containing antenna arrays can be rolled up, then later easily unrolled and deployed. Figure 1 depicts a prototype three- LCP-layer package containing two four-element, dual-polarization microstrip-patch arrays: one for a frequency of 14 GHz, the other for a frequency of 35 GHz. The 35-GHz patches are embedded on top surface of the middle [15-mil (approx.0.13-mm)-thick] LCP layer; the 14- GHz patches are placed on the top surface of the upper [9-mil (approx. 0.23-mm)-thick] LCP layer. The particular choice of LCP layer thicknesses was made on the basis of extensive analysis of the effects of the

  20. Image analysis of neuronal pathfinding on microfabricated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockberger, Philip E.; Soekarno, Anita

    1994-08-01

    We have used digital imaging microscopy to evaluate possible guidance mechanisms of mouse neuroblastoma cells cultured on microfabricated glass substrates. Substrates were bound with either small charged amine or uncharged alkane molecules using silane-coupling chemistry or covered with proteins (laminin, collagen, fibronectin, albumin) by adsorption. Photolithographic procedures were used to pattern substrates with amine - alkane, amine - protein and alkane - protein combinations. Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) was used to visualize sites of cellular attachment on substrates (focal and close contacts), and image processing techniques were used to quantify the results in three different ways: total cellular area in contact with a substrate, area corresponding to focal and close contacts, and the percentage of focal and close contacts on each substrate. Cells attached to and extended neurites on each of the substrates were tested. IRM images of growth cones displayed similar gray levels on amine, alkane, fibronectin, and albumin substrates, whereas images on laminin and collagen were brighter. Brightness on laminin substrates was correlated with less area of focal contact and greater area with no contact. When cells were provided with choices on patterned substrates, they displayed the following preference of attachment: laminin, fibronectin, collagen>amine>alkane>albumin. This hierarchy reflected greater total surface area on preferred substrates. There was, however, no correlation between the hierarchy and the area corresponding to focal and close contacts or the percentage of contacts on different substrates. Our results support several recent observations which demonstrated that guidance was not correlated with differential adhesivity. These results are more in line with the theory that guidance is controlled by a signal transduction mechanism that couples locomotion with activation of membrane receptors.

  1. Method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanasekera, Gamini (Inventor); Sidorov, Anton N. (Inventor); Ouseph, P. John (Inventor); Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M. (Inventor); Cohn, Robert W. (Inventor); Jalilian, Romaneh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate comprises the steps of securing a graphite sample to a first electrode; electrically connecting the first electrode to a positive terminal of a power source; electrically connecting a second electrode to a ground terminal of the power source; placing the substrate over the second electrode; and using the power source to apply a voltage, such that graphene is removed from the graphite sample and deposited on the substrate.

  2. Internal stress and yield strength of copper films on substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian-Min; Zhang Yan; Xu Ke-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Internal stress and yield strength of pure copper films on substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction and thermal-cycle substrate curvature methods. The internal stress was of tension, and decreased with increasing workinggas (argon) pressure and increased with increasing film thickness. Tensile yield strength of copper films on steel substrate was reciprocal to the film thickness. Similarly, the compressive yield strength depended strongly on the film thickness:the thinner the film thickness, the larger the compressive yield strength.

  3. Composite single crystal silicon scan mirror substrates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Single crystal silicon is a desirable mirror substrate for scan mirrors in space telescopes. As diameters of mirrors become larger, existing manufacturing...

  4. Sol-gel derived ceramic electrolyte films on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueper, T.W.

    1992-05-01

    A process for the deposition of sol-gel derived thin films on porous substrates has been developed; such films should be useful for solid oxide fuel cells and related applications. Yttria-stabilized zirconia films have been formed from metal alkoxide starting solutions. Dense films have been deposited on metal substrates and ceramic substrates, both dense and porous, through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques, followed by a heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phases formed and the extent of reactions with various substrates which may be encountered in gas/gas devices. Surface coatings have been successfully applied to porous substrates through the control of substrate pore size and deposition parameters. Wetting of the substrate pores by the coating solution is discussed, and conditions are defined for which films can be deposited over the pores without filling the interiors of the pores. Shrinkage cracking was encountered in films thicker than a critical value, which depended on the sol-gel process parameters and on the substrate characteristics. Local discontinuities were also observed in films which were thinner than a critical value which depended on the substrate pore size. A theoretical discussion of cracking mechanisms is presented for both types of cracking, and the conditions necessary for successful thin formation are defined. The applicability of these film gas/gas devices is discussed.

  5. Substrate Effects in Wideband SiGe HBT Mixer Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Vidkjær, Jens; Krozer, Viktor

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the influence from substrate effects on the performance of wideband SiGe HBT mixer circuits is investigated. Equivalent circuit models including substrate networks are extracted from on-wafer test structures and compared with electromagnetic simulations. Electromagnetic simulations...... are also applied to predict short distance substrate coupling effects. Simulation results using extracted equivalent circuit models and substrate coupling networks are compared with experimental results obtained on a wideband mixer circuit implemented in a 0.35 μm, 60 GHz ft SiGe HBT BiCMOS process....

  6. Effect of the silicon substrate structure on chip spiral inductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlai XUE; Fei YAO; Buwen CHENG; Qiming WANG

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of the substrate structure on the performance of the spiral inductor is investigated by the 3-D electromagnetic simulator, Ansoft high frequency structure simulator (HFSS). With variations in the substrate structure including substrate conductivity, permittivity and thickness of the dielectric layer, the performance of the inductors has been analyzed in detail. The simulation results and analyses indicate that the performance of the spiral inductor can be mostly improved by lowering the conductivity of the substrate, increasing the thickness of the dielectric layer and using the low K dielectric layer. In the mean time, some guidelines or "design rules" are summarized by the results of this study.

  7. Buckling modes of elastic thin films on elastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Haixia; Huang, Rui; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M.; Yu, Hong-Hui

    2007-04-01

    Two buckling modes have been observed in thin films: buckle delamination and wrinkling. This letter identifies the conditions for selecting the favored buckling modes for elastic films on elastic substrates. Transition from one buckling mode to another is predicted as the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or is predicted for variation of the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or variation of theinterfacial defect size. The theoretical results are demonstrated experimentally by observing the coexistence of both buckling modes and mode transition in one film-substrate system.

  8. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...

  9. Substrate-induced bulk alignment of liquid crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhengping; Chakrabarti, A.; Mouritsen, Ole G.;

    1996-01-01

    The Gay-Berne model for liquid crystals in the presence of a substrate surface is studied using the hybrid Monte Carlo method. A simple non-mean-field substrate-molecule potential is proposed to describe the effects of rubbed polymer-coated substrates on the liquid crystals. Effects of the substr...... of the substrate surface on the bulk alignment of the liquid crystals are studied. It is found that the bulk pretilt angle is controlled by the surface through the orientation of the adsorbed liquid crystal monolayer. This is consistent with the results of recent experimental studies....

  10. A meta-substrate to enhance the bandwidth of metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Wang, Zuojia; Zhang, Runren; Wang, Huaping; Lin, Shisheng; Yu, Faxin; Moser, Herbert O

    2014-06-12

    We propose the concept of a meta-substrate to broaden the bandwidth of left-handed metamaterials. The meta-substrate, which behaves like an inhomogeneous magnetic substrate, is composed of another kind of magnetic metamaterials like metallic closed rings. When conventional metamaterial rings are printed on this kind of meta-substrate in a proper way, the interaction of the metamaterials units can be greatly enhanced, yielding an increased bandwidth of negative permeability. An equivalent circuit analytical model is used to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon. Both numerical and experimental demonstrations are carried out, showing good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  11. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  12. A caged substrate peptide for matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaneto, Elena; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Heise, Inge; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Knipp, Markus

    2015-02-01

    Based on the widely applied fluorogenic peptide FS-6 (Mca-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2; Mca = methoxycoumarin-4-acetyl; Dpa = N-3-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)l-α,β-diaminopropionyl) a caged substrate peptide Ac-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Lys*-Lys-Ala-Arg-NH2 (*, position of the cage group) for matrix metalloproteinases was synthesized and characterized. The synthesis implies the modification of a carbamidated lysine side-chain amine with a photocleavable 2-nitrobenzyl group. Mass spectrometry upon UV irradiation demonstrated the complete photolytic cleavage of the protecting group. Time-resolved laser-flash photolysis at 355 nm in combination with transient absorption spectroscopy determined the biphasic decomposition with τa = 171 ± 3 ms (79%) and τb = 2.9 ± 0.2 ms (21%) at pH 6.0 of the photo induced release of the 2-nitrobenzyl group. The recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of human membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) was used to determine the hydrolysis efficiency of the caged peptide before and after photolysis. It turned out that the cage group sufficiently shields the peptide from peptidase activity, which can be thus controlled by UV light.

  13. Dropwise condensation on a cold gradient substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Distributions of drops that arise from dropwise condensation evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence of drops. An understanding of how surface-energy gradients applied to the substrate affect drop growth and coalescence is needed for design of effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation. Transient dropwise condensation from a vapor phase onto a cold and chemically treated surface is reported. The surfaces were treated to deliver either a uniform contact-angle or a gradient of contact-angles by silanization. The time evolution of drop-size and number-density distributions is reported. For a typical condensation experiment, the drop distributions advance through two stages: an increase in drop density as a result of nucleation and a decrease in drop density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Because the experiment is transient in nature, the shape of the distribution can be used to predict the number of drop generations and their stage of development. Preliminary results for gradient surfaces will be discussed and compared against observations of behavior on uniformly coated surfaces. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  14. Neural substrates underlying delusions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiajia; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Liu, Feng; Xu, Lixue; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-01-01

    Delusions are cardinal positive symptoms in schizophrenia; however, the neural substrates of delusions remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of delusions in schizophrenia using multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Diffusion, structural and perfusion MRIs were performed in 19 schizophrenia patients with severe delusions, 30 patients without delusions and 30 healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA), gray matter volume (GMV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were voxel-wisely compared among the three groups. Although patients without delusions exhibited decreased FA in white matter regions and decreased GMV in gray matter regions relative to controls, patients with severe delusions demonstrated comparable FA in all of these white matter regions and similar GMV in most of these gray matter regions. Both patient subgroups had less GMV in the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex than controls. Although two patient subgroups showed consistent CBF changes relative to controls, only CBF in the anterior cingulate cortex was lower in patients with severe delusions than in patients without delusions. These findings suggest that schizophrenia patients with severe delusions have relatively normal structural integrity. Importantly, the excessively reduced perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex may be associated with the development of delusions in schizophrenia. PMID:27651212

  15. Neural substrates of trait ruminations in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Darcy; Siegle, Greg J; Shutt, Luann; Feldmiller, Josh; Thase, Michael E

    2014-02-01

    Rumination in depression is a risk factor for longer, more intense, and harder-to-treat depressions. But there appear to be multiple types of depressive rumination-whether they all share these vulnerability mechanisms, and thus would benefit from the same types of clinical attention is unclear. In the current study, we examined neural correlates of empirically derived dimensions of trait rumination in 35 depressed participants. These individuals and 29 never-depressed controls completed 17 self-report measures of rumination and an alternating emotion-processing/executive-control task during functional MRI (fMRI) assessment. We examined associations of regions of interest--the amygdala and other cortical regions subserving a potential role in deficient cognitive control and elaborative emotion-processing--with trait rumination. Rumination of all types was generally associated with increased sustained amygdala reactivity. When controlling for amygdala reactivity, distinct activity patterns in hippocampus were also associated with specific dimensions of rumination. We discuss the possibly utility of targeting more basic biological substrates of emotional reactivity in depressed patients who frequently ruminate. PMID:24661157

  16. Polarimetric studies of polyethylene terephtalate flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stchakovsky, M.; Garcia-Caurel, E.; Warenghem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Polymer sheets are currently used worldwide in a wide range of applications. The manufacturing process of these sheets involves extruding machines that stretch the material in both lateral and longitudinal directions with respect to the machine direction, thus inducing birefringence. In most cases, the film obtained is optically biaxial. Polarimetric spectroscopy (Ellipsometry and Mueller Matrix) combined with conoscopic observation are the methods of choice to study these properties. In this work we report an analysis of commercially available polyethylene terephtalate (PET) films used as substrate for food packaging as well as for embedded electronic devices such as solar cells or flexible displays. Initial observation of these films through polarizing microscope in conoscopic mode reveals first the trace of optical axis plane with respect to the film surface and second, whether the optical axis is acute or not. This preliminary study allows optimal sample positioning for further polarimetric studies. The measurements and modelling are done in both reflection and transmission mode on several spectroscopic polarimetric setups from UV to NIR. The models give as a main result, the dielectric tensor of the film as well as its orientation with respect to the laboratory reference frame.

  17. Neurophysical substrates of arousal and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanov, Jordan; Pop-Jordanova, Nada

    2009-02-01

    The study of arousal and attention could be of prominent importance for elucidating both fundamental and practical aspects of the mind-brain puzzle. Defined as "general activation of mind" (Kahnemann in Attention and effort. Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1973), or "general operation of consciousness" (Thacher and John in Functional neuroscience: foundations of cognitive processing. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, 1977), arousal can be considered as a starting point of fundamental research on consciousness. Similar role could be assigned to attention, which can be defined by substituting the attributes "general" with "focused". Concerning the practical applications, the empirically established correlation between neuronal oscillations and arousal/attention levels is widely used in research and clinics, including neurofeedback, brain-computer communication, etc. However, the neurophysical mechanism underlying this correlation is still not clear enough. In this paper, after reviewing some present classical and quantum approaches, a transition probability concept of arousal based on field-dipole quantum interactions and information entropy is elaborated. The obtained analytical expressions and numerical values correspond to classical empirical results for arousal and attention, including the characteristic frequency dependence and intervals. Simultaneously, the fundamental (substrate) role of EEG spectrum has been enlightened, whereby the attention appears to be a bridge between arousal and the content of consciousness. Finally, some clinical implications, including the brain-rate parameter as an indicator of arousal and attention levels, are provided. PMID:18975019

  18. Heat transfer simulation in solid substrate fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Castañeda, G; Gutiérrez-Rojas, M; Bacquet, G; Raimbault, M; Viniegra-González, G

    1990-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed and tested to simulate the generation and transfer of heat in solid substrate fermentation (SSF). The experimental studies were realized in a 1-L static bioreactor packed with cassava wet meal and inoculated with Aspergillus niger. A simplified pseudohomogeneous monodimensional dynamic model was used for the energy balance. Kinetic equations taking into account biomass formation (logistic), sugar consumption (with maintenance), and carbon dioxide formation were used. Model verification was achieved by comparison of calculated and experimental temperatures. Heat transfer was evaluated by the estimation of Biot and Peclet heat dimensionless numbers 5-10 and 2550-2750, respectively. It was shown that conduction through the fermentation fixed bed was the main heat transfer resistance. This model intends to reach a better understanding of transport phenomena in SSF, a fact which could be used to evaluate various alternatives for temperature control of SSF, i.e., changing air flow rates and increasing water content. Dimensionless numbers could be used as scale-up criteria of large fermentors, since in those ratios are described the operating conditions, geometry, and size of the bioreactor. It could lead to improved solid reactor systems. The model can be used as a basis for automatic control of SSF for the production of valuable metabolites in static fermentors.

  19. Bimodal lipid substrate dependence of phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1990-07-24

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was solubilized from rat liver microsomes and partially purified by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and Reactive Green 19-Superose. Examination of the ATP dependence using a mixed micellar assay gave a Km of 120 microM. The dependence of reaction rate on PI was more complicated. PI kinase bound a large amount of Triton X-100, and as expected for a micelle-associated enzyme utilizing a micelle-associated lipid substrate, the reaction rate was dependent on the micellar mole fraction, PI/(PI + Triton X-100), with a Km of 0.02 (unitless). Activity showed an additional dependence on bulk PI concentration at high micelle dilution. These results demonstrated two kinetically distinguishable steps leading to formation of a productive PI/enzyme(/ATP) complex. The rate of the first step, which probably represents exchange of PI from the bulk micellar pool into enzyme-containing micelles, depends on bulk PI concentration. The rate of the second step, association of PI with enzyme within a single micelle, depends on the micellar mole fraction of PI. Depression of the apparent Vmax at low ionic strength suggested that electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged PI/Triton X-100 mixed micelles inhibits PI exchange, consistent with a model in which intermicellar PI exchange depends on micellar collisions.

  20. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  1. Effect of substrate bias on the structural and electrical properties of sputtered Mo thin films on flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaxiong

    2016-01-01

    The metal molybdenum (Mo) thin films deposited on flexible substrates can act as the contact electrode of flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se2 or Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells. In this work, in order to enhance the structural and electrical characteristics of flexible Mo thin films, a negative substrate bias was applied during the direct current sputtering of Mo thin films. The flexible substrates used for growing the Mo films were stainless steel foils and polyimides. The characteristics of Mo thin films were studied by x-ray diffraction and sheet resistance measurements. The measured results reveal that an optimal value of negative substrate bias can be found for improving the electrical and structural characteristics of Mo thin films on flexible substrates. The minimum sheet resistances of Mo thin films are 2.50 Ω/sq and 2.73 Ω/sq for the stainless steel foil and polyimide substrates, respectively. PMID:27339280

  2. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yin-quan; Zou Xian-wu; Jin Zhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systems confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  3. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanYin-quan; ZouXian-wu; JinZhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systerns confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  4. Shared neural substrates of apraxia and aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Georg; Randerath, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Apraxia is regularly associated with aphasia, but there is controversy whether their co-occurrence is the expression of a common basic deficit or results from anatomical proximity of their neural substrates. However, neither aphasia nor apraxia is an indivisible entity. Both diagnoses embrace diverse manifestations that may occur more or less independently from each other. Thus, the question whether apraxia is always accompanied by aphasia may lead to conflicting answers depending on which of their manifestations are considered. We used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) for exploring communalities between lesion sites associated with aphasia and with apraxia. Linguistic impairment was assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) subtests naming, comprehension, repetition, written language, and Token Test. Apraxia was examined for imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures and for pantomime of tool use. There were two areas of overlap between aphasia and apraxia. Lesions in the anterior temporal lobe interfered with pantomime of tool use and with all linguistic tests. In the left inferior parietal lobe there was a large area where lesions were associated with defective imitation of hand postures and with poor scores on written language and the Token Test. Within this large area there were also two spots in supramarginal and angular gyrus where lesions were also associated with defective pantomime. We speculate that the coincidence of language impairment and defective pantomime after anterior temporal lesions is due to impaired access to semantic memory. The combination of defective imitation of hand postures with poor scores on Token Test and written language is not easily compatible with a crucial role of parietal regions for the conversion of concepts of intended actions into motor commands. It accords better with a role of left inferior parietal lobe regions for the categorical perception of spatial relationships. PMID:26004063

  5. Microbial growth with vapor-phase substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, Joanna; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y., E-mail: lukas.wick@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Limited information exists on influences of the diffusive transport of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) on bacterial activity in the unsaturated zone of the terrestrial subsurface. Diffusion of VOC in the vapor-phase is much more efficient than in water and results in effective VOC transport and high bioavailability despite restricted mobility of bacteria in the vadose zone. Since many bacteria tend to accumulate at solid-water, solid-air and air-water interfaces, such phase boundaries are of a special interest for VOC-biodegradation. In an attempt to evaluate microbial activity toward air-borne substrates, this study investigated the spatio-temporal interplay between growth of Pseudomonas putida (NAH7) on vapor-phase naphthalene (NAPH) and its repercussion on vapor-phase NAPH concentrations. Our data demonstrate that growth rates of strain PpG7 were inversely correlated to the distance from the source of vapor-phase NAPH. Despite the high gas phase diffusivity of NAPH, microbial growth was absent at distances above 5 cm from the source when sufficient biomass was located in between. This indicates a high efficiency of suspended bacteria to acquire vapor-phase compounds and influence headspace concentration gradients at the centimeter-scale. It further suggests a crucial role of microorganisms as biofilters for gas-phase VOC emanating from contaminated groundwater or soil. - Research highlights: > Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene. > Bacteria influence NAPH vapor-phase concentration gradients at centimeter-scale. > Microbial growth on vapor-phase naphthalene is inversely correlated to its source. > Bacteria are good biofilters for gas-phase NAPH emanating from contaminated sites. - Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene and effectively influence vapor-phase naphthalene concentration gradients at the centimeter scale.

  6. Long-Range Surface Plasmons on Highly Anisotropic Dielectric Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumen, L.; Nagaraj; Neogi, A.; Krokhin, A.

    We calculate the propagation length of surface plasmons in metal-dielectric structures with anisotropic substrates. We show that the Joule losses can be minimized by appropriate orientation of the optical axis of a birefringent substrate and that the favorable orientation of the axis depends on ω. A simple Kronig-Penney model for anisotropic plasmonic crystal is also proposed.

  7. Secretory Phospholipase A(2) Activity toward Diverse Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Linderoth, Lars; Subramanian, Arun Kumar;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied secretory phospholipase A(2)-IIA (sPLA(2)) activity toward different phospholipid analogues by performing biophysical 1 characterizations and molecular dynamics simulations. The phospholipids were natural substrates, triple alkyl phospholipids, a prodrug anticancer etherlipid, and...... charged residues, but relatively large fluctuations are observed, suggesting that these interactions are not necessarily important for stabilizing substrate binding to the enzyme....

  8. Modelling anaerobic biomass growth kinetics with a substrate threshold concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribes, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Spanjers, H.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Many bacteria have been observed to stop growing below a certain substrate threshold concentration. In this study, a modification of the Monod kinetics expression has been proposed to take into account this substrate threshold concentration observed in bacterial growth. Besides the threshol

  9. The Effect of Substrate Topography on Coating Cathodic Delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus E.; Sørensen, Per A.; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of steel substrate topography on coating cathodic delamination. The study showed that the surface preparation can be used to control and minimize the rate of cathodic delamination. The coating should have maximum wetting properties so that substrates with high...

  10. Through-substrate via and redistribution layer with metal paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozeboom, F.; Grunsven, E.C.E. van; Sanders, F.H.M.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    A semiconductor device and a method for manufacturing such semiconductor device for use in a stacked configuration of the semiconductor device are disclosed. The semiconductor device includes a substrate including at least part of an electronic circuit provided at a first side thereof. The substrate

  11. Antigravitational Instability of Cosmic Substrate in the Newtonian Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHECHIN L. M.

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new version of the forming Universe large-scale structures is proposed, based on the refuse of analyses of only the gravitational instability of the cosmological substrate. Vacuum, i.e. The dominant nonbaryonic matter in the Universe, creates the antigravitational instability of the baryonic cosmic substrate itself and causes the formation of galaxies.

  12. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert; Rydström, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  13. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  14. Confining substrate for micron-thick liquid films

    OpenAIRE

    Kuech, T. F.; McCaldin, J. O.

    1980-01-01

    Suitable combinations of surface geometry and material enable a substrate to hold a thin liquid film captive on its surface. Though only at metastable equilibrium, such films can survive a moderate amount of processing. They may be suited to the growth of semiconductor single-crystal films on amorphous substrates.

  15. Nanopore fabrication by heating au particles on ceramic substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, de Lennart J.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    We found that gold nanoparticles, when heated to close to their melting point on substrates of amorphous SiO2 or amorphous Si3N4, move perpendicularly into the substrate. Dependent on applied temperatures, particles can become buried or leave nanopores of extreme aspect ratio (diameter congruent to

  16. Use of neem cake as an organic substrate component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursery and greenhouse growers continue to seek materials to decrease costs of plant production while maintaining environmental stewardship. Incorporation of neem cake as a substrate component could potentially impact nitrogen release as a result of altering substrate bacterial activity. The study...

  17. Multi-Substrate Terpene Synthases: Their Occurrence and Physiological Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazouki, Leila; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15), and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), and diterpenes (C20). Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles. PMID:27462341

  18. Surface stress of graphene layers supported on soft substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feng; Huang, Jianyong; Duan, Huiling; Xiong, Chunyang; Wang, Jianxiang

    2016-05-01

    We obtain the surface stress of a single layer and multilayers of graphene supported on silicone substrates by measuring the deformation of the graphene-covered substrates induced by the surface tension of liquid droplets together with the Neumann’s triangle concept. We find that the surface stress of the graphene-covered substrate is significant larger than that of the bare substrate, and it increases with increasing graphene layers, and finally reaches a constant value of about 120 mN/m on three and more layers of graphene. This work demonstrates that the apparent surface stress of graphene-substrate systems can be tuned by the substrate and the graphene layers. The surface stress and the tuning effect of the substrate on it may have applications in design and characterization of graphene-based ultra-sensitive sensors and other devices. Moreover, the method may also be used to measure the surface stress of other ultrathin films supported on soft substrates.

  19. Capacitive pressure sensor in post-processing on LTCC substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.G.H.; Nieuwkoop, E.; Veninga, E.P.; Meuwissen, M.H.H.; Tijdink, M.W.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    A capacitive pressure sensor was realized by means of a post-processing step on a low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) substrate. The new sensor fabrication technology allows for integration of the sensor with interface circuitry and possibly also wireless transmission circuits on LTCC substrate

  20. Substrate recognition by the 2-hydroxycarboxylate transport proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandell, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The object of the research described in this thesis was to identify substrate-protein interactions that provide affinity and specificity for CitPLEME from Lc.mesenteroides and MlePLALA form L.lactis. The ability of these transporters to transport substrates that differ in structure and charge implie

  1. Development of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme function is central to student understanding of multiple topics within the biochemistry curriculum. In particular, students must understand how enzymes and substrates interact with one another. This manuscript describes the development of a 15-item Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory (ESICI) that measures student understanding…

  2. Method and apparatus for depositing atomic layers on a substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A.J.P.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Deelen, J. van

    2016-01-01

    Method of depositing an atomic layer on a substrate. The method comprises supplying a precursor gas from a precursor-gas supply of a deposition head that may be part of a rotatable drum. The precursor gas is provided from the precursor-gas supply towards the substrate. The method further comprises m

  3. Stem Cutting Propagation in Whole Pine Tree Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood-based substrates have been identified as substitutes for pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) in container production of ornamental crops. Ideally, these substrates would be used for the propagation and production of such crops. An experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of processe...

  4. Physical Properties and Microbial Activity in Forest Residual Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many growers in the horticulture industry have expressed concern that switching from a pine bark-based substrate to one with a significant wood content will increase microbial activity, resulting in nitrogen (N) immobilization. This study evaluated four growth substrates (pine bark, peat moss and tw...

  5. Rooting Rose Cuttings in Whole Pine Tree Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased demand for alternatives to pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) has led to extensive research on wood-based substrates, such as processed whole pine trees (WPT), for nursery and greenhouse crop production. Limited information is available on how WPT may perform as a rooting substrate for cutti...

  6. Strawberry Production in Soilless Substrate Troughs – Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilless substrates made of peat moss, coconut coir, perlite, rockwool or bark are pathogen free and they have been used in strawberry production in Europe in troughs or containers. Open field strawberry production in soilless substrate is new to California growers. The objective of this study was t...

  7. Multi-Substrate Terpene Synthases: Their Occurrence and Physiological Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazouki, Leila; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15), and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), and diterpenes (C20). Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles. PMID:27462341

  8. Thin film with oriented cracks on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bao; McGilvray, Andrew; Shi, Bo

    2010-07-27

    A thermoelectric film is disclosed. The thermoelectric film includes a substrate that is substantially electrically non-conductive and flexible and a thermoelectric material that is deposited on at least one surface of the substrate. The thermoelectric film also includes multiple cracks oriented in a predetermined direction.

  9. Lantibiotic Reductase LtnJ Substrate Selectivity Assessed with a Collection of Nisin Derivatives as Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Dongdong; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Deng, Jingjing; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-06-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides characterized by the presence of dehydrated amino acids, dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine, and (methyl)lanthionine rings. In addition to these posttranslational modifications, some lantibiotics exhibit additional modifications that usually confer increased biological activity or stability on the peptide. LtnJ is a reductase responsible for the introduction of D-alanine in the lantibiotic lacticin 3147. The conversion of L-serine into D-alanine requires dehydroalanine as the substrate, which is produced in vivo by the dehydration of serine by a lantibiotic dehydratase, i.e., LanB or LanM. In this work, we probe the substrate specificity of LtnJ using a system that combines the nisin modification machinery (dehydratase, cyclase, and transporter) and the stereospecific reductase LtnJ in Lactococcus lactis. We also describe an improvement in the production yield of this system by inserting a putative attenuator from the nisin biosynthesis gene cluster in front of the ltnJ gene. In order to clarify the sequence selectivity of LtnJ, peptides composed of truncated nisin and different mutated C-terminal tails were designed and coexpressed with LtnJ and the nisin biosynthetic machinery. In these tails, serine was flanked by diverse amino acids to determine the influence of the surrounding residues in the reaction. LtnJ successfully hydrogenated peptides when hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, Phe, and Ala) were flanking the intermediate dehydroalanine, while those in which dehydroalanine was flanked by one or two polar residues (Ser, Thr, Glu, Lys, and Asn) or Gly were either less prone to be modified by LtnJ or not modified at all. Moreover, our results showed that dehydrobutyrine cannot serve as a substrate for LtnJ.

  10. Enumeration and activity of nitrifying bacteria in zeoponic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, Robyn Leigh

    Regenerative life-support systems are needed for long-term space missions. One component of a proposed life-support system is the use of zeoponic growth substrates, which slowly release NH4 into 'soil' solution for the production of plants. Nitrifying bacteria that convert NH4 to NO3 are among the important microbial components of these systems. Some evidence suggests that a balance between NH4 and NO3 is desirable in promoting plant growth and seed development. Therefore, enumeration of nitrifying bacteria and evaluation of the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates warrants investigation. A method for rapid detection and enumeration of a commercial inoculum of nitrifying bacteria in a zeoponic substrate was developed using a most probable number (MPN)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach, and a TaqMan probe-based assay. The detection limit of the MPN-PCR methodology was 2,000 cells per assay. Detection sensitivity for the TaqMan assay was determined to be 60 cells. The quantitative assay demonstrated that the zeoponic substrate was capable of supporting 105 to 107 Nitrobacter cells g-1 substrate. The MPN-PCR method and TaqMan probe-based assay can be effective and rapid approaches to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in zeoponic substrates. Column studies and a growth chamber study were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2 and NO3, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Quantities of NH4 oxidized, 10 mug N g-1 h-1, to NO2 and NO3 in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant uptake. Acidification as a result of NH4 oxidation resulted in decline of pH to 5.5. The zeoponic substrate showed limited pH buffering capacity. Survival of nitrifying bacteria during periods of desiccation was evaluated, as the zeoponic substrate would likely be stored in an air-dry state between croppings. Substrate was enriched for

  11. Nanostructure patterning on flexible substrates using electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, K. S.; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Patterning nanostructures on flexible substrates plays a key role in the emerging flexible electronics technology. The flexible electronic devices are inexpensive and can be conformed to any shape. The potential applications for such devices are sensors, displays, solar cells, RFID, high-density biochips, optoelectronics etc. E-beam lithography is established as a powerful tool for nanoscale fabrication, but its applicability on insulating flexible substrates is often limited because of surface charging effects. This paper presents the fabrication of nanostructures on insulating flexible substrates using low energy E-beam lithography along with metallic layers for charge dissipation. Nano Structures are patterned on different substrates of materials such as acetate and PET foils. The fabrication process parameters such as the proximity gap of exposure, the exposure dosage and developing conditions have been optimized for each substrate.

  12. Wrinkling of graphene membranes supported by silica nanoparticles on substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William; Fuhrer, Michael; Einstein, Theodore; Department of Physics, University of Maryland Team

    2011-03-01

    The challenging endeavor of modulating the morphology of graphene via a patterned substrate to produce a controlled deformation has great potential importance for strain engineering the electronic properties of graphene. An essential step in this direction is to understand the response of graphene to substrate features of known geometry. Here we employ silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 10-100 nm to uniformly decorate Si O2 and mica substrates before depositing graphene, to promote nanoscale modulation of graphene geometry. The morphology of graphene on this modified substrate is then characterized by atomic force spectroscopy. We find that graphene on the substrate is locally raised by the supporting nanoparticles, and wrinkling propagates radially from the protrusions to form a ridge network which links the protrusions. We discuss the dependence of the wrinkled morphology on nanoparticle diameter and graphene thickness in terms of graphene elasticity and adhesion energy. Supported by NSF-MRSEC, Grant DMR 05-20471

  13. Thermodynamic model of coherent island formation on vicinal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxubetter@gmail.com; Sun, Xiao-Hong [Henan Key Laboratory of Laser and Opto-electric Information Technology, School of Information Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Yu, Yanguang [School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Ren, Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2014-04-28

    A thermodynamic model has been proposed to address the formation of coherent island on the vicinal substrate. The morphological transition from square based island to elongated based one with various substrate misorientations is described. The initial stage of nucleation and growth process of islands in Stranski–Krastanow system is studied by taking into account the elastic deformations and the change of energy in the case of two-dimensional growth mode. The theoretical analysis shows the minimum nucleation barrier of island is on the decrease with increment of substrate misorientation, which means the nucleation of island on vicinal substrate is more favorable than that on flat substrate. By using the fitting data of experimental results done by Persichetti et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 036104 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 82, 121309(R) (2010)], we provide a meaningful explanation of the experimental observations.

  14. Modelling of Amperometric Biosensors in the Case of Substrate Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romas Baronas

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The response of an amperometric biosensor at mixed enzyme kinetics anddiffusion limitations was modelled digitally in the case of substrate inhibition. Digitalsimulations were carried out using a finite difference technique. Calculations showedcomplex kinetics of biosensor response. At low enzyme activity and substrate concentration(S0, the response of the sensor looks like it is limited by a simple substrate diffusion. Atsubstrate concentration comparable to the Michaelis-Menten constant (KM, the responsechange shows a maximal value. A sharp response change was indicated at high enzymeactivity and high (4.9 > S0/KM > 4.5 substrate concentration. This was explained by multiconcentrationof substrate generation inside the enzyme layer. This conclusion wasconfirmed by the analytical solution of the simplified biosensor model with externaldiffusion limitation at steady-state conditions. The complex kinetics of response changeproduces different calibration graphs for biosensor response at transition and steady state.

  15. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  16. Smart substrates: Making multi-chip modules smarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunsch, T.F.; Treece, R.K.

    1995-05-01

    A novel multi-chip module (MCM) design and manufacturing methodology which utilizes active CMOS circuits in what is normally a passive substrate realizes the `smart substrate` for use in highly testable, high reliability MCMS. The active devices are used to test the bare substrate, diagnose assembly errors or integrated circuit (IC) failures that require rework, and improve the testability of the final MCM assembly. A static random access memory (SRAM) MCM has been designed and fabricated in Sandia Microelectronics Development Laboratory in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this concept and to examine design and manufacturing issues which will ultimately determine the economic viability of this approach. The smart substrate memory MCM represents a first in MCM packaging. At the time the first modules were fabricated, no other company or MCM vendor had incorporated active devices in the substrate to improve manufacturability and testability, and thereby improve MCM reliability and reduce cost.

  17. Magnetic dipole radiation tailored by substrates: numerical investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry L; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high refractive index materials can possess strong magnetic polarizabilities and give rise to artificial magnetism in the optical spectral range. While the response of individual dielectric or metal spherical particles can be described analytically via multipole decomposition in the Mie series, the influence of substrates, in many cases present in experimental observations, requires different approaches. Here, the comprehensive numerical studies of the influence of a substrate on the spectral response of high- index dielectric nanoparticles were performed. In particular, glass, perfect electric conductor, gold, and hyperbolic metamaterial substrates were investigated. Optical properties of nanoparticles were characterized via scattering cross-section spectra, electric field profiles, and induced electric and magnetic moments. The presence of substrates was shown to introduce significant impact on particle's magnetic resonances and resonant scattering cross-sections. Variation of substrate mat...

  18. Reliability Analysis of III-V Solar Cells Grown on Recycled GaAs Substrates and an Electroplated Nickel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Hua Horng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study involved analyzing the reliability of two types of III-V solar cells: (1 III-V solar cells grown on new and recycled gallium arsenide (GaAs substrates and (2 the III-V solar cells transferred onto an electroplated nickel (Ni substrate as III-V thin-film solar cells by using a cross-shaped pattern epitaxial lift-off (CPELO process. The III-V solar cells were grown on new and recycled GaAs substrates to evaluate the reliability of the substrate. The recycled GaAs substrate was fabricated by using the CPELO process. The performance of the solar cells grown on the recycled GaAs substrate was affected by the uneven surface morphology of the recycled GaAs substrate, which caused the propagation of these dislocations into the subsequently grown active layer of the solar cell. The III-V solar cells were transferred onto an electroplated Ni substrate, which was also fabricated by using CPELO technology. The degradation of the III-V thin-film solar cell after conducting a thermal shock test could have been caused by microcracks or microvoids in the active layer or interface of the heterojunction, which resulted in the reduction of the external quantum efficiency response and the increase of recombination loss.

  19. Comparison of filters: Inkjet printed on PEN substrate versus a laser-etched on LCP substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Arabi, Eyad A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, microstrip-based bandpass filters on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and liquid crystal polymers (LCP) are presented to investigate the performance of filters on ultra-thin substrates. PEN (with a thickness of 120 μm) has been characterized and used for a filter for the first time. In addition to being low cost and transparent, it demonstrates comparable RF performance to LCP. The conductor losses are compared by fabricating filters with inkjet printed lines as well as laser etched copper clad LCP sheets. With 5 layers of inkjet printing, and a curing temperature below 200°C, a final silver thickness of 2 μm and conductivity of 9.6 × 106 S/m are achieved. The designs are investigated at two frequencies, 24 GHz as well as 5 GHz to assess their performance at high and low frequencies respectively. The 24 GHz inkjet printed filter shows an insertion loss of 2 dB, while the 5 GHz design gives an insertion loss of 8 dB. We find that thin substrates have a strong effect on the insertion loss of filters especially as the frequency is reduced. The same design, realized on LCP (thickness of 100 μm) through laser etching, demonstrates a very similar performance, thus verifying this finding. © 2014 European Microwave Association.

  20. Substrate Handbook for Biogas Production; Substrathandbok foer biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina (AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Today, co-digestion plants in Sweden treat a broad range of different substrates, of which some have not previously been used for anaerobic digestion. The major part of this organic waste derives from households, restaurants, food industries and farms. When evaluating a new substrate as feed for anaerobic digestion, several different aspects need to be taken into consideration, such as anaerobic degradability, TS/VS content, nutrient composition and risk for mechanical problems. Consequently, there is a need for practical guidelines on how to evaluate new substrates as raw materials for biogas production, including not only gas yield but also what practical and microbiological problems that may arise when the specific substrate is treated together with other substrates in the plant. The aim with this handbook is to provide a basis on how to evaluate new substrates as feed for anaerobic digestion. The intention is that this material will save time and effort for the personnel at the plant when they come in contact with new types of waste. Also, the aim is to facilitate the process of identifying new substrates within the ABP-regulation (1774/2002) and what requirements are then demanded on handling. The work with the handbook has been divided in three different parts; (1) an extensive literature study and a compilation of the achieved results, (2) interviews with personnel at most of the Swedish co-digestion plants to identify substrates and problems of interest, and (3) lab tests of selected substrates. The lab tests included Bio Methane Potential (BMP) tests as well as a simple characterization of each substrate based on fat/protein/carbohydrate content. All data origins from anaerobic digestion within the mesophilic temperature range, but the results and discussion are applicable also for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The result of this work is a written report together with an Excel file which are to be directly used by the biogas plants as a basis in the

  1. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  2. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr D.F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1 On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate

  3. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  4. Periphyton biomass on artificial substrates during the summer and winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altevir Signor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the periphyton production on artificial substrates considering it as a source of low cost live food for fish. Blades of artificial substrates such as wood, black plastic, acrylic, fiberglass, ceramics and glass (all with 144cm2 blades, 24 for each substrate were submerged 20.0cm below the water column for 35 days in the winter and 42 days in the summer. The blades were randomly installed in 200m3 pond and evaluated for the biomass production at different phases during the summer and winter. Four blades of each substrate were collected weekly, and the periphytic community was carefully scraped with a spatula and fixed in 4% formaldehyde. The periphytic biomass productivity was evaluated by artificial substrate area and per day. The results evidenced the characteristic periodicity in periphyton biomass production and a significant variability in the collect period and season in the different artificial substrates used. Ceramic and wood showed the best results in the summer while wood showed the best results in the winter. The priphyton biomass productions differ among periods, substrates and seasons. Wood and ceramics could be indicated for periphyton biomass production in either winter or summer.

  5. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  6. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  7. Expression and phosphorylation of a MARCKS-like protein in gastric chief cells: further evidence for modulation of pepsinogen secretion by interaction of Ca2+/calmodulin with protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, J P; Malhotra, R; Xie, Q; Raffaniello, R D

    1997-03-01

    In gastric chief cells, agents that activate protein kinase C (PKC) stimulate pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of an acidic 72-kDa protein. The isoelectric point and molecular mass of this protein are similar to those for a common PKC substrate; the MARCKS (for Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) protein. We examined expression and phosphorylation of the MARCKS-like protein in a nearly homogeneous suspension of chief cells from guinea pig stomach. Western blotting of fractions from chief cell lysates with a specific MARCKS antibody resulted in staining of a myristoylated 72-kDA protein (pp72), associated predominantly with the membrane fraction. Using permeabilized chief cells, we examined the effect of PKC activation (with the phorbol ester PMA), in the presence of basal (100 nM) or elevated cellular calcium (1 microM), on pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of the 72-KDa MARCKS-like protein. Secretion was increased 2.3-, 2.6-, and 4.5-fold by incubation with 100 nM PMA, 1 microM calcium, and PMA plus calcium, respectively. A PKC inhibitor (1 microM CGP 41 251) abolished PMA-induced secretion, but did not alter calcium-induced secretion. This indicates that calcium-induced secretion is independent of PKC activation. Chief cell proteins were labeled with 32P-orthophosphate and phosphorylation of pp72 was detected by autoradiography of 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. In the presence of basal calcium, PMA (100 nM) caused a > two-fold increase in phosphorylation of pp72. Without PMA, calcium did not alter phosphorylation of pp72. However, 1 microM calcium caused an approx. 50% attenuation of PMA-induced phosphorylation of pp72. Experiments with a MARCKS "phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain peptide" indicated that calcium/calmodulin inhibits phosphorylation of pp72 by binding to the phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain and not by inhibiting PKC activity. These observations support the hypothesis that, in gastric chief cells

  8. Structure-based substrate screening for an enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dongzhi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, more and more novel enzymes can be easily found in the whole enzyme pool with the rapid development of genetic operation. However, experimental work for substrate screening of a new enzyme is laborious, time consuming and costly. On the other hand, many computational methods have been widely used in lead screening of drug design. Seeing that the ligand-target protein system in drug design and the substrate-enzyme system in enzyme applications share the similar molecular recognition mechanism, we aim to fulfill the goal of substrate screening by in silico means in the present study. Results A computer-aided substrate screening (CASS system which was based on the enzyme structure was designed and employed successfully to help screen substrates of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB. In this system, restricted molecular docking which was derived from the mechanism of the enzyme was applied to predict the energetically favorable poses of substrate-enzyme complexes. Thereafter, substrate conformation, distance between the oxygen atom of the alcohol part of the ester (in some compounds, this oxygen atom was replaced by nitrogen atom of the amine part of acid amine or sulfur atom of the thioester and the hydrogen atom of imidazole of His224, distance between the carbon atom of the carbonyl group of the compound and the oxygen atom of hydroxyl group of Ser105 were used sequentially as the criteria to screen the binding poses. 223 out of 233 compounds were identified correctly for the enzyme by this screening system. Such high accuracy guaranteed the feasibility and reliability of the CASS system. Conclusion The idea of computer-aided substrate screening is a creative combination of computational skills and enzymology. Although the case studied in this paper is tentative, high accuracy of the CASS system sheds light on the field of computer-aided substrate screening.

  9. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  10. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  11. Investigation of (111 wafers and comparison with (100 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bahari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In the last decade, Si(100 has been used as a suitable substrate in field effect transistors. Some issues such as leakage current and tunneling current through the ultrathin films have been increased with shrinking the electronic devices – particularly, field effect transistors – to nanoscale, which is threatening more use of Si(100. We have thus demonstrated a series of experiments to grow ultrathin films on both Si(100 and Si(111 substrates and studied their nanostructural properties to see the possibility of replacing Si(100 with Si(111. The obtained results indicate that Si(111 substrate with silicon nitride film on top is desirable.

  12. Substrate channelling as an approach to cascade reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Minteer, Shelley D.; Banta, Scott; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Atanassov, Plamen; Sigman, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Millions of years of evolution have produced biological systems capable of efficient one-pot multi-step catalysis. The underlying mechanisms that facilitate these reaction processes are increasingly providing inspiration in synthetic chemistry. Substrate channelling, where intermediates between enzymatic steps are not in equilibrium with the bulk solution, enables increased efficiencies and yields in reaction and diffusion processes. Here, we review different mechanisms of substrate channelling found in nature and provide an overview of the analytical methods used to quantify these effects. The incorporation of substrate channelling into synthetic cascades is a rapidly developing concept, and recent examples of the fabrication of cascades with controlled diffusion and flux of intermediates are presented.

  13. Modelling amperometric enzyme electrode with substrate cyclic conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas C

    2004-03-15

    A mathematical model of amperometric enzyme electrodes in which chemical amplification by cyclic substrate conversion takes place in a single enzyme membrane has been developed. The model is based on non-stationary diffusion equations containing a non-linear term related to Michaelis-Menten kinetic of the enzymatic reaction. The digital simulation was carried out using the finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration, the maximal enzymatic rate as well as the membrane thickness on the biosensor response was investigated. The numerical experiments demonstrate significant (up to dozens of times) gain in biosensor sensitivity at low concentrations of substrate when the biosensor response is under diffusion control. PMID:15128111

  14. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffbauer; Mark , Akhadov; Elshan

    2010-07-20

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  15. Microgravimetric Studies of Selenium Electrodeposition Onto Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of selenium electrodeposition from sulfuric acid solution on different substrates was studied with the electrochemical techniques. The cyclic voltammetry was combined with the quartz crystal microbalance technique to analyze selenium deposition process. The electrochemical reduction of selenous acid on gold, silver and copper electrodes was investigated. It was found that reduction of selenous acid is a very complex process and it strongly depends from the applied substrate. The voltammetric measurements indicate the range of potentials in which the process of reduction of selenous acids on the applied substrate is possible. Additionally, the microgravimetric data confirm the deposition of selenium and they reveal the mechanism of the deposition process.

  16. Substrate-adsorbate coupling in CO-adsorbed copper

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, S P; Lewis, Steven P.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational properties of carbon monoxide adsorbed to the copper (100) surface are explored within density functional theory. Atoms of the substrate and adsorbate are treated on an equal footing in order to examine the effect of substrate--adsorbate coupling. This coupling is found to have a significant effect on the vibrational modes, particularly the in-plane frustrated translation, which mixes strongly with substrate phonons and broadens into a resonance. The predicted lifetime due to this harmonic decay mechanism is in excellent quantitative agreement with experiment.

  17. Method of Forming Textured Silicon Substrate by Maskless Cryogenic Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Homyk, Andrew P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a textured substrate comprising a base comprising silicon, the base having a plurality of needle like structures depending away from the base, wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a depth of greater than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined perpendicular to the base, and wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a width of less than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined parallel to the base. An anode and a lithium ion battery comprising the textured substrate, and a method of producing the textured substrate are also disclosed.

  18. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  19. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  20. Bending characteristic of a cantilevered magnetostrictive film-substrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.; Narsu

    2007-01-01

    The bending problem of a film-substrate cantilever with arbitrary film-to-substrate thickness ratio is solved exactly by employing the force equilibrium equation, and then the optimization and application of the bending characteristic of the magne-tostrictive cantilever is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of geometrical and physical parameters of the two cantilever components on the maximum free-end deflection of the cantilever is addressed. The results indicate that as the substrate thickness is kept constant, the greater film-to-substrate stiffness ratio will induce a larger deflection, while for the case of fixed total cantilever thickness, the optimal cantilever deflection is independent of the physical parameters of the materials such as Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio.

  1. Bending characteristic of a cantilevered magnetostrictive film-substrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Narsu; YUN GuoHong

    2007-01-01

    The bending problem of a film-substrate cantilever with arbitrary film-to-substrate thickness ratio is solved exactly by employing the force equilibrium equation, and then the optimization and application of the bending characteristic of the magnetostrictive cantilever is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of geometrical and physical parameters of the two cantilever components on the maximum free-end deflection of the cantilever is addressed. The results indicate that as the substrate thickness is kept constant, the greater film-to-substrate stiffness ratio will induce a larger deflection, while for the case of fixed total cantilever thickness, the optimal cantilever deflection is independent of the physical parameters of the materials such as Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  2. Modelling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for UWB Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    The last chapter of this first part of the book, chapter seven, is devoted to Modeling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for Ultrawideband (UWB) systems, and is written by Ming Shen, Jan H. Mikkelsen, and Torben Larsen from Aalborg University, Denmark. In highly integrated mixed...... with narrow-band circuits. This chapter presents a study on the modeling and mitigation of substrate noise in mixed-signal integrated circuits (ICs), focusing on UWB system/circuit designs. Experimental impact evaluation of substrate noise on UWB circuits is presented. It shows how a wide-band circuit can...... be affected by substrate noise. This chapter also presents a new analytical model for the estimation of the spectral content of the switching noise. In addition a novel active noise mitigation scheme based on spectral information is presented....

  3. Collapse of molecularly thin lubricant layers between elastic substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of layering transitions and other structure formation processes in molecularly thin liquid films upon reducing the separation between two atomically smooth mica substrates. Using a newly developed surface forces apparatus with two-dimensional imaging capability, we followed the hydrodynamic processes during drainage with unprecedented precision. Depending on the substrate elasticity and the approach rate, drainage occurs either in a series of consecutive layering transitions or in a single step. In the latter case, nanoscopic amounts of liquid are trapped inside the contact area transiently. The experimental observations are explained qualitatively by combining hydrodynamic effects with elastic deformations of the substrates. Furthermore, we present evidence for anisotropy in the fluid dynamics induced by the lattice symmetry of the substrates.

  4. Fibrinogen patterns and activity on substrates with tailored hydroxy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Hernández, José Carlos; Rico, Patricia; Moratal, David; Monleón Pradas, Manuel; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel

    2009-08-11

    The influence of the surface fraction of OH groups on fibrinogen (FG) adsorption is investigated in copolymers of ethyl acrylate and hydroxy ethylacrylate. The amount of adsorbed FG, quantified by western-blotting combined with image analysis of the corresponding bands, decreases as the hydrophilicity of the substrate increases. The influence of substrate wettability on FG conformation and distribution is observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The most hydrophobic substrate promotes FG fibrillogenesis, which leads to a fibrin-like appearance in the absence of any thrombin. The degree of FG interconnection was quantified by calculating the fractal dimension of the adsorbed protein from image analysis of the AFM results. The biological activity of the adsorbed FG is correlated to cell adhesion on FG-coated substrates.

  5. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M;

    1999-01-01

    muscle and the substrate and metabolite concentrations are representative can be a problem; (2) the placement of the venous catheter can be critical, and it should be secured so that the blood sample represents blood from the active muscle with a minimum of contamination from other muscles and tissues......; (3) the use of net limb glycerol release to estimate lipolysis is probably not valid (triacylglycerol utilization by muscle), since glycerol can be metabolized in skeletal muscle; (4) the precision of blood-borne substrate concentrations during exercise measured by a-v difference is hampered since......The aim of the present article is to evaluate critically the various methods employed in studies designed to quantify precisely skeletal muscle substrate utilization during exercise. In general, the pattern of substrate utilization during exercise can be described well from O2 uptake measurements...

  6. Highly Sensitive Filter Paper Substrate for SERS Trace Explosives Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Fierro-Mercado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel and extremely low-cost surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS substrate fabricated depositing gold nanoparticles on common lab filter paper using thermal inkjet technology. The paper-based substrate combines all advantages of other plasmonic structures fabricated by more elaborate techniques with the dynamic flexibility given by the inherent nature of the paper for an efficient sample collection, robustness, and stability. We describe the fabrication, characterization, and SERS activity of our substrate using 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene as analytes. The paper-based SERS substrates presented a high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility for analytes employed, demonstrating a direct application in forensic science and homeland security.

  7. Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation on nonuniform substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang Wen Ze; Zou Xian Wu; Jin Zhun Zhi

    2003-01-01

    Pattern of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on nonuniform substrate was investigated by computer simulations. The nonuniform substrates are represented by Leath percolations with the probability p. p stands for the degree of nonuniformity and takes values in the range p sub c<=p<=1, where p sub c is the threshold of percolation. The DLA cluster grows up on the Leath percolation substrate. The patterns of the DLA clusters appear asymmetrical and nonuniform, and the branches are relative few for the case p is close to p sub c. In addition, the pattern depends on the shape of substrate. As p increases from p sub c to 1, cluster changes to pure DLA gradually. Correspondingly, the fractal dimension increases from 1.46 to 1.68. Also, the random walks on Leath percolations through the range p sub c<=p<=1 were examined. Our simulations show the Honda-Toyoki-Matsushita relation is still reasonable for fractional dimensional systems.

  8. Modeling of the substrate influence on multielement THz detector operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakhno, M; Sizov, F

    2015-01-01

    The development of THz multielement uncooled imagers based on focal plane arrays (FPAs) requires an optimization of the system parameters to achieve a homogeneous sensitivity of the array elements. Results of numerical simulation of the eight-element linear array of planar antennas with detecting elements, on a substrate of finite dimensions are presented. We establish how the substrate thickness h and the relative permittivity epsilon influence antenna pattern and antenna-detector matching for each element. We show that the antenna pattern depends on the detector position more than the antenna-detector impedance matching. The gain of array elements, the antenna-detector matching, and the homogeneity of the detector sensitivity can be simultaneously optimized by the proper choice of the substrate thickness h and the relative permittivity epsilon. We show that multielement systems with large substrate thickness and high relative permittivity are not suitable for the imaging system implementation. To achieve un...

  9. ADHESION STRENGTH OF COATING SUBSTRATE AND SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF PRETREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Premature failure of coated tool often results from a poor adhesion of coating-substrate and shortens the lifetime of the tool.The results of increasing the adhesion strength of thin film coatings on cutting tool inserts by pretreating the inserts with sandblasting technique to obtain a desirable surface morphology of the inserts are presented.A geometric model representing the ideal surface morphology is established to enhance the nucleation density and adhesion strength of coating-substrate.Thin film coating experiment is conducted on the substrates of four different sample groups.Indentation and wear tests are performed on coated inserts to evaluate the effect of sandblasting on the adhesion strength of the coatings.A theoretical analysis is provided on the formation and growth of atom clusters in terms of the contact angle and the thermodynamic barrier of a substrate to predict thin film nucleation.

  10. Integrated Broadband Bowtie Antenna on Transparent Silica Substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Shiyi; Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Zhan, Qiwen; Chen, Ray T

    2016-01-01

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent silica substrate. The bowtie antenna is designed with broad RF bandwidth to cover the X-band in the electromagnetic spectrum. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. Taking advantage of the low-k silica substrate, high enhancement factor can be achieved without the unwanted reflection and scattering from the backside silicon handle which is the issue of using an SOI substrate. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on silica substrates and then measuring their resonance frequencies. In addition, the far-field rad...

  11. Substrate specificity of the ubiquitin and Ubl proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Beckmann, John F; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) to cellular proteins are highly regulated processes integral to cellular homeostasis. Most often, the C-termini of these small polypeptides are attached to lysine side chains of target proteins by an amide (isopeptide) linkage. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and Ubl-specific proteases (ULPs) comprise a diverse group of proteases that recognize and remove ubiquitin and Ubls from their substrates. How DUBs and ULPs distinguish among different modifiers, or different polymeric forms of these modifiers, remains poorly understood. The specificity of ubiquitin/Ubl-deconjugating enzymes for particular substrates depends on multiple factors, ranging from the topography of specific substrate features, as in different polyubiquitin chain types, to structural elements unique to each enzyme. Here we summarize recent structural and biochemical studies that provide insights into mechanisms of substrate specificity among various DUBs and ULPs. We also discuss the unexpected specificities of non-eukaryotic proteases in these families. PMID:27012468

  12. Substrate vibrations during courtship in three Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mazzoni

    Full Text Available While a plethora of studies have focused on the role of visual, chemical and near-field airborne signals in courtship of Drosophila fruit flies, the existence of substrate-borne vibrational signals has been almost completely overlooked. Here we describe substrate vibrations generated during courtship in three species of the D. melanogaster group, from the allegedly mute species D. suzukii, its sister species D. biarmipes, and from D. melanogaster. In all species, we recorded several types of substrate vibrations which were generated by locomotion, abdominal vibrations and most likely through the activity of thoracic wing muscles. In D. melanogaster and D. suzukii, all substrate vibrations described in intact males were also recorded in males with amputated wings. Evidence suggests that vibrational signalling may be widespread among Drosophila species, and fruit flies may provide an ideal model to study various aspects of this widespread form of animal communication.

  13. Plasma enhanced diamond deposition on steel and Si substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Li; Y. Tang; W. Chen; Q. Yang; C. Xiao; A. Hirose

    2009-01-01

    Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al-Si steel and Si substrates was comparatively investigated in microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor with different deposition parameters. Adherent nanocrystalline diamond films were directly deposited on this steel substrate under a typical deposition condition, whereas microcrystalline diamond films were produced on Si wafer. With increasing CH4 concentration, reaction pressure, or the total gas flow rate, the quality of nanocrystalline diamond films formed on Fe-Cr-Al-Si substrates is gradually deteriorated in terms of density and adhesion. This impaired diamond quality on steels is primarily associated with a combined effect by the substrate composition and the specific process conditions that favor excessive nucleation of diamond.

  14. Structural characteristics of titanium coating on copper substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Dasgupta; Akash Singh; Pradyumna Kumar Parida; R Ramaseshan; P Kuppusami; S Saroja; M Vijayalakshmi

    2011-06-01

    The growth characteristics of titanium films deposited on glass, silicon (100) and oxygen free high purity copper substrate using magnetron sputtering have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and scratch indentation techniques. The study of interface between the titanium film and the substrate was carried out to determine coating thickness, as well as intermixing of the elements at the interface. Studies revealed that the interface is free from voids and intermixing of the film and the substrate. Microstructural and diffraction analysis showed that the Ti coating was polycrystalline and exhibited columnar growth. The Ti crystallite size varied between 24 and 58 nmdepending on the substrate. The thickness of the films were typically about 4 m. Scratch test indicated that the films are adherent and the first critical load to failure was observed to be 4.5 N ± 2 N.

  15. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  16. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pal; C Jacob

    2004-12-01

    Generally, GaN-based devices are grown on silicon carbide or sapphire substrates. But these substrates are costly and insulating in nature and also are not available in large diameter. Silicon can meet the requirements for a low cost and conducting substrate and will enable integration of optoelectronic or high power electronic devices with Si based electronics. But the main problem that hinders the rapid development of GaN devices based on silicon is the thermal mismatch of GaN and Si, which generates cracks. In 1998, the first MBE grown GaN based LED on Si was made and now the quality of material grown on silicon is comparable to that on sapphire substrate. It is only a question of time before Si based GaN devices appear on the market. This article is a review of the latest developments in GaN based devices on silicon.

  17. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, M. S., E-mail: sobolev@gmail.com; Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University, Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  18. In situ synthesis of nanoparticles on substrates by inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-12-23

    Nanoparticles may be formed on a substrate by mixing precursor solutions deposited by an inkjet printer. A first solution is deposited on a substrate from a first inkjet print cartridge. Then, a second solution is deposited on the substrate from a second inkjet print cartridge. The solutions may be printed in an array of droplets on the substrate. Nanoparticles form when droplets of the first solution overlap with droplets of the second solution. In one example, the nanoparticles may be gold nanoparticles formed from mixing a first solution of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and oleylamine and a second solution of gold chloride trihydrite and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The nanoparticles may be incorporated into optoelectronic devices.

  19. Substrate utilization and VSS relations in activated sludge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, R.L.; Fernandes, L.; Sun, X. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    A new empirical substrate removal model for activated sludge in continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was developed in this study. This model includes an exponential function of volatile suspended solids to express the active biomass which is actually involved in substrate utilization. Results indicate that the proposed exponential models predict more accurately effluent COD in CFSTR and SBR systems than the first or zero order models. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Mode structure of planar optical antennas on dielectric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Word, Robert C; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical study, supported by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), of sub-micron planar optical antennas on transparent substrate. We find these antennas generate intricate near-field spatial field distributions with odd and even numbers of nodes. We show that the field distributions are primarily superpositions of planar surface plasmon polariton modes confined to the metal/substrate interface. The mode structure provides opportunities for coherent switching and optical control in sub-micron volumes.

  1. Development of a fluorescent substrate to measure hyaluronidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Shu; Mummert, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel fluorescent substrate (termed FRET-HA) to quantitatively assess hyaluronidase activity was developed. Hyaluronan (HA), the major substrate for hyaluronidase, was dual labeled with fluorescein amine and rhodamine B amine. The fluorescein amine fluorescence signal was significantly quenched while the rhodamine B amine signal was significantly enhanced due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the presence of bovine testes hyaluronidase, cleavage of HA disrupted FRET resul...

  2. Coating-substrate-simulations applied to HFQ® forming tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a comparative analysis of coating-substrate simulations applied to HFQTM forming tools is presented. When using the solution heat treatment cold die forming and quenching process, known as HFQTM, for forming of hardened aluminium alloy of automotive panel parts, coating-substrate-systems have to satisfy unique requirements. Numerical experiments, based on the Advanced Adaptive FE method, will finally present.

  3. Broadband antireflection nanodome structures on SiC substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong; Møller, Uffe Visbech;

    2013-01-01

    Nanodome structures are demonstrated on the SiC substrate by using nanosphere lithography and dry etching. Significant surface antireflection has been observed over a broad spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm.......Nanodome structures are demonstrated on the SiC substrate by using nanosphere lithography and dry etching. Significant surface antireflection has been observed over a broad spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm....

  4. CdTe solar cells on thin molybdenum substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas

    2000-10-01

    We report on the development of Mo/(ZnTe:N)/CdTe/CdS/ITO (inverted structure) solar cells grown by radio frequency sputtering. The 0.1 mm thick molybdenum substrate is lightweight and flexible which is advantageous for both terrestrial and space applications. Conversion efficiencies close to 8 percent have been achieved for 5 square millimeter area devices. The photovoltaic activity has also been observed on similar cells deposited on Mo coated kapton and stainless steel substrates.

  5. Substrate Specificity of Peptide Adsorption: A Model Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, Michael; Janke, Wolfhard

    2007-01-01

    Applying the contact density chain-growth algorithm to lattice heteropolymers, we identify the conformational transitions of a nongrafted hydrophobic-polar heteropolymer with 103 residues in the vicinity of a polar, a hydrophobic, and a uniformly attractive substrate. Introducing only two system parameters, the numbers of surface contacts and intrinsic hydrophobic contacts, respectively, we obtain surprisingly complex temperature and solvent dependent, substrate-specific pseudo-phase diagrams.

  6. Designer substrate library for quantitative, predictive modeling of reaction performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bess, Elizabeth N.; Bischoff, Amanda J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Product distributions of chemical reactions are dictated by a myriad of interactions between molecular species. Identifying which of these features affects reaction selectivity is a key facet for mechanistically understanding a transformation. Such insight often facilitates optimization as well as indicates which types of substrates (substrate scope) are well suited to the method. Unfortunately, the assessment of impactful features is frequently a qualitative endeavor that would significantly...

  7. Progress Towards III-V Photovoltaics on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; Clark, Eric B.; Sayir, Ali; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Maurer, William F.; Fritzemeier, Les

    2008-01-01

    Presented here is the recent progress of the NASA Glenn Research Center OMVPE group's efforts in the development of high efficiency thin-film polycrystalline III-V photovoltaics on optimum substrates. By using bulk polycrystalline germanium (Ge) films, devices of high efficiency and low mass will be developed and incorporated onto low-cost flexible substrates. Our progress towards the integration of high efficiency polycrystalline III-V devices and recrystallized Ge films on thin metal foils is discussed.

  8. Tuning Fluorescence Direction with Plasmonic Metal–Dielectric– Metal Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the emission properties of fluorophores is essential for improving the performance of fluorescence-based techniques in modern biochemical research, medical diagnosis, and sensing. Fluorescence emission is isotropic in nature, which makes it difficult to capture more than a small fraction of the total emission. Metal– dielectric–metal (MDM) substrates, discussed in this Letter, convert isotropic fluorescence into beaming emission normal to the substrate. This improves fluorescence ...

  9. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  10. Anisotropic Assembly of Colloidal Nanoparticles: Exploiting Substrate Crystallinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hayton, JA; Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Moriarty, P.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the crystal structure of a substrate can be exploited to drive the anisotropic assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. Pentanethiol-passivated Au particles of approximately 2 nm diameter deposited from toluene onto hydrogen-passivated Si(111) surfaces form linear assemblies (rods) with a narrow width distribution. The rod orientations mirror the substrate symmetry, with a high degree of alignment along principal crystallographic axes of the Si(111) surface. There is a strong prefere...

  11. Investigation of the monopole antenna performance on hybrid material substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Ong Teik; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md.; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize bin; Malek, Mohd. Fareq Abd.

    2015-05-01

    In the current telecommunication system, more applications such as GPS and video conferencing which need higher data rate has been discovered. In order to provide higher data rate, wider system bandwidth is needed for transferring data in a shorter time. Thus, an antenna which can provide wide bandwidth is significant to cover the desired system bandwidth. Recent researches also show that the using of hybrid substrate can improve the antenna performance. This paper investigates the monopole antenna performance on hybrid material substrate. The monopole antenna has been simulated in Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software in open space condition to investigate the antenna performance in resonant frequency, bandwidth, return loss, gain, directivity, and efficiency. Investigation shows that the increment of dielectric constant of hybrid material substrate, ɛr2 increases the return loss of frequency band from 2.9-6.6GHz without affecting the operating bandwidth. Notably, the increment of ɛr2 also brought to a forming of new frequency band at around 8.8GHz. Furthermore, increment on the thickness of hybrid material substrate will cause the return loss at first operating frequency band to be increased. However, the changes has lowered the frequency band and decreased the return loss until it formed a new broadband at 8GHz. The changes in position of second material substrate have also brought to a narrower bandwidth of the first operating frequency band for FR4-Copper-Hybrid Substrate (FCH) and FR4-Hybrid Substrate-Copper (FHC) configuration. Remarkably, Copper-FR4-Hybrid Substrate (CFH) configuration has maintained the bandwidth but increased the return loss of the first operating band.

  12. Characterization of Hydroxyapatite Film on Titanium Substrate by Sputtering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequent magnetron sputtering technique was used to produce calcium phosphate coated on the titanium substrates, and the sputtered coating films were crystallized in an autoclave at 110 ℃ using a low temperature hydrothermal technique. The crystallization of as- sputtered coating film on the titanium substrates were amorphous calcium phosphate film. However, after the hydrothermal technique, calcium phosphate crystals grew and these were columnar crystal. The Ca/ P ratio of sputtered coating films in 1.6 to 2.0.

  13. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Alyssa Y Stark; Palecek, Amanda M.; Argenbright, Clayton W.; Craig Bernard; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Ali Dhinojwala

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we f...

  14. Dewetting of thin films on heterogeneous substrates: Pinning vs. coarsening

    OpenAIRE

    Brusch, Lutz; Kuehne, Heiko; Thiele, Uwe; Baer, Markus

    2001-01-01

    We study a model for a thin liquid film dewetting from a periodic heterogeneous substrate (template). The amplitude and periodicity of a striped template heterogeneity necessary to obtain a stable periodic stripe pattern, i.e. pinning, are computed. This requires a stabilization of the longitudinal and transversal modes driving the typical coarsening dynamics during dewetting of a thin film on a homogeneous substrate. If the heterogeneity has a larger spatial period than the critical dewettin...

  15. Graphene oxide as a substrate for Raman enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weizi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Wang, Yan; Lin, Wang

    2012-10-01

    We report the properties of graphene oxide, a two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial, as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The graphene oxide substrate produced Raman enhancement for rhodamine 6G, melamine, and cephalexin. Intense characteristic D and G peaks of graphene oxide were observed when positively charged rhodamine 6G and melamine were used as the Raman probe. We attribute the appearance of D and G peaks to the aggregation of negatively charged graphene oxide.

  16. Ultrasound-Enhanced Biogas Production from Different Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Timmers, Rudolphus Antonius; Ruiz, Begona;

    2015-01-01

    Among the biofuel production processes using different substrates, the biogas generation process is one of the simplest. Compared with bioethanol or biodiesel production processes, anaerobic digestion is a process where all the organic matter (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) can be biologically...... production. The present chapter is dedicated to providing a review of ultrasound pretreatment applied to different substrates (lignocelullosic materials, manures, sludge and microalgae). The advantages and constraints, that ultrasound pretreatment exhibit towards biogas production, are discussed and compared...

  17. Ecomorphology of Astyanax species in streams with different substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela A. Souza; Daniela C. Fagundes; Cecília G. Leal; Paulo S. Pompeu

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the ecomorphology of two species of Astyanax in streams with different substrates found in the Rio São Francisco Basin. The dominant substrate of each stream was defined as either "fine" (0 to 2 mm), "gravel" (2 to 250 mm), "rock" (> 250 mm), or "leaf bank". We analyzed a total of 22 ecomorphological attributes of Astyanax intermedius Eigenmann, 1908 (127 individuals) and Astyanax rivularis (Lütken, 1875) (238 individuals) adults. We detected significant ecom...

  18. Adsorption Behaviour of Liquid 4He on Cesium Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Iov, Valentin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the wetting properties of 4He on cesium substrates using optical and electrical methods. Due to the fact that the cesium substrates are deposited at low temperatures onto a thin silver underlayer, it is necessary firstly to study and understand the adsorption of helium on silver. The work presented here is structured as follows: some of the fundamental concepts on the theory of physisorbed films, such as van der Waals interaction, adsorption isotherms ...

  19. Sea Urchin Recruitment: Effect of Substrate Selection on Juvenile Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, R. A.; Schroeter, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Intertidal field observations have shown that juvenile purple sea urchins Strongylocentwtus purpuratus are found in higher densities near adults . The same is true for subtidal populations of juvenile red sea urchins 5. franciscanus. These distribution patterns could be influenced by any of three elements: substrate selection, early juvenile mortality or juvenile migration. Using laboratory-reared larvae, we conducted experiments designed to gauge the effect of substrate selection on ju...

  20. Wetting of Au and Ag particles on monocrystalline graphite substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joonho Lee; Toshihiro Tanaka; Kazufumi Seo; Nobumitsu Hirai; Jung-Goo Lee; Hirotaro Mori

    2006-01-01

    The wetting behavior of Au and Ag particles on a monocrystalline graphite substrate was investigated using the microscopic sessile drop method under a purified Ar atmosphere at 1300 K. The measured contact angles of the liquid Au and Ag on monocrystalline graphite substrates of (0001) face were 129° and 124°, respectively. It is believed that the interaction at the interface is dominated by the physical bonding (van der Waal's interaction).

  1. Transfer of CVD-grown monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ji Won; Kitt, Alexander; Magnuson, Carl W; Hao, Yufeng; Ahmed, Samir; An, Jinho; Swan, Anna K; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-09-27

    Reproducible dry and wet transfer techniques were developed to improve the transfer of large-area monolayer graphene grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The techniques reported here allow transfer onto three different classes of substrates: substrates covered with shallow depressions, perforated substrates, and flat substrates. A novel dry transfer technique was used to make graphene-sealed microchambers without trapping liquid inside. The dry transfer technique utilizes a polydimethylsiloxane frame that attaches to the poly(methyl methacrylate) spun over the graphene film, and the monolayer graphene was transferred onto shallow depressions with 300 nm depth. The improved wet transfer onto perforated substrates with 2.7 μm diameter holes yields 98% coverage of holes covered with continuous films, allowing the ready use of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to study the intrinsic properties of CVD-grown monolayer graphene. Additionally, monolayer graphene transferred onto flat substrates has fewer cracks and tears, as well as lower sheet resistance than previous transfer techniques. Monolayer graphene films transferred onto glass had a sheet resistance of ∼980 Ω/sq and a transmittance of 97.6%. These transfer techniques open up possibilities for the fabrication of various graphene devices with unique configurations and enhanced performance. PMID:21894965

  2. Effects Of Substrate Scattering On Bar-Code Scanning Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Eric; Sklar, David

    1983-04-01

    When a beam of light strikes a piece of paper or similar substrate, a portion of its energy penetrates into the bulk and, due to multiple scattering, may re-emerge at some distance from the point of entry. We refer to this phenomenon as substrate scattering. In this paper we describe a general model for scattering substrates and, using linear systems theory, we investigate its implications for bar-code scanning. We show that the effects of substrate scattering can be represented as a modified reflectance distribution associated with the original printed reflectance pattern. This effective distribution is shown to be independent of the details of scanning system configuration. We show that under a broad range of conditions substrate scattering will decrease modulation and will cause scanners to overestimate barwidths. A specific diffusion model of the scattering process is developed, providing a family of functions which can be used in empirical studies. We conclude that the scattering distributions will not even be approximately Gaussian. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with this conclusion and inconsistent with a Gaussian model. Further experimental results are presented which show that, for typical substrates, depth of modulation may be decreased by 20 percent or more and perceived bar-width increases will be on the order of one mil.

  3. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  4. Inducing endoderm differentiation by modulating mechanical properties of soft substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Maria; Singh, Satish S; Velankar, Sachin; Kumta, Prashant N; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2015-01-01

    Early embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation is marked by the formation of three germ layers from which all tissues types arise. Conventionally, ESCs are differentiated by altering their chemical microenvironment. Recently however, it was established that a mechanical microenvironment can also contribute towards cellular phenotype commitment. In this study, we report how the cellular mechanical microenvironment of soft substrates affects the differentiation and phenotypic commitment of ESCs. Mouse ESCs were cultured in a fibrin hydrogel matrix in 2D and 3D cultures. The gelation characteristics of the substrates were modulated by systematically altering the fibrinogen concentration and the fibrinogen-thrombin crosslinking ratio. Analysis of the ESCs cultured on different substrate conditions clearly illustrated the strong influence that substrate physical characteristics assert on cellular behaviours. Specifically, it was found that ESCs had a higher proliferation rate in gels of lower stiffness. Early differentiation events were studied by analyzing the gene and protein expression levels of early germ layer markers. Our results revealed that lower substrate stiffness elicited stronger upregulation of endoderm related genes Sox17, Afp and Hnf4 compared to stiffer substrates. While both 2D and 3D cultures showed a similar response, the effects were much stronger in 3D culture. These results suggest that physical cues can be used to modulate ESC differentiation into clinically relevant tissues such as liver and pancreas. PMID:23008262

  5. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  6. Colloidal quantum dot solar cells on curved and flexible substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2014-10-20

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized with, processed in, and deposited from the solution phase, potentially enabling low-cost, facile manufacture of solar cells. Unfortunately, CQD solar cell reports, until now, have only explored batch-processing methods - such as spin-coating - that offer limited capacity for scaling. Spray-coating could offer a means of producing uniform colloidal quantum dot films that yield high-quality devices. Here, we explore the versatility of the spray-coating method by producing CQD solar cells in a variety of previously unexplored substrate arrangements. The potential transferability of the spray-coating method to a roll-to-roll manufacturing process was tested by spray-coating the CQD active layer onto six substrates mounted on a rapidly rotating drum, yielding devices with an average power conversion efficiency of 6.7%. We further tested the manufacturability of the process by endeavoring to spray onto flexible substrates, only to find that spraying while the substrate was flexed was crucial to achieving champion performance of 7.2% without compromise to open-circuit voltage. Having deposited onto a substrate with one axis of curvature, we then built our CQD solar cells onto a spherical lens substrate having two axes of curvature resulting in a 5% efficient device. These results show that CQDs deposited using our spraying method can be integrated to large-area manufacturing processes and can be used to make solar cells on unconventional shapes.

  7. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (Rb) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that Rb and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions

  8. Drying and substrate concentrations interact to inhibit decomposition of carbon substrates added to combusted Inceptisols from a boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    German, DP; Allison, SD

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Climate change is expected to alter the mechanisms controlling soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization. Under climate change, soil warming and drying could affect the enzymatic mechanisms that control SOM turnover and dependence on substrate concentration. Here, we used a greenhouse climate manipulation in a mature boreal forest soil to test two specific hypotheses: (1) Rates of decomposition decline at lower substrate concentrations, and (2) reducti...

  9. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C., E-mail: chirosreepram@yahoo.com [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Pal, D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R{sub b}) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R{sub b} and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions.

  10. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek S.; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K.; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  11. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guanzhong; Chen, Tien-Hao; Srivastava, Abhishek S; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  12. Myrtle Bend Substrate Enhancement Pilot Project Extent, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The substrate enhancement pilot project (SEPP) extent GIS layer represents an area where an artificial substrate will be placed. The artificial substrate,...

  13. Shorty's Island Substrate Enhancement Pilot Project Extent, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The substrate enhancement pilot project (SEPP) extent GIS layer represents an area where an artificial substrate will be placed. The artificial substrate,...

  14. Optimization of the enzyme system for hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates; Optimering av enzymsystemet foer hydrolys av foerbehandlade lignocellulosa substrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjerneld, Folke [Lund univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2000-06-01

    This project aims to clarify the reasons for the slow and incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis of certain lignocellulose substrates, particularly softwood e.g. spruce. Based on this knowledge we will optimize the enzyme system so that the yield of fermentable sugars is increased as well as the rate of hydrolysis. We will also study methods for recycling of the enzymes in the process by adsorption on fresh substrate. Progress in these areas will lead to improved process economy in an ethanol process. We collaborate with Chemical Engineering on hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates and with Analytical Chemistry and Applied Microbiology on analysis of potential inhibitors. Within this main research direction the work at Biochemistry during this project period (since 970701) has been focused on the following areas: (1) Studies of the role of substrate properties in the enzymatic hydrolysis to clarify the reasons for the decrease in the rate of hydrolysis; (2) enzyme adsorption on lignin; (3) studies of recently identified low molecular weight endo glucanases which may be used for more effective penetration of small pores in pretreated substrates (this part is financed by the Nordic Energy Research Program). Central results during the period: In order to study the role of substrate properties for hydrolysis we have initiated investigations on steam pretreated substrates with several techniques. Measurements of pore sizes have been done with probe molecules of known molecular weights. Results show that probe molecules with diameters larger than 50 Aangstroem can more easily penetrate pretreated willow compared with spruce, which can be a part of the explanation for the better hydrolysability of hardwood substrates compared with softwood. We have started studies with electron microscopy of pretreated substrates at different degrees of enzymatic hydrolysis. With scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we can see significant differences in substrate structure in

  15. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Major

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis. The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue: Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high

  16. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Juergen M.; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Lukasz; Teichert, Christian; Hartmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum) with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis). The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue): Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high and the initial

  17. Oriented growth and assembly of zeolite crystals on substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ming; ZHANG BaoQuan; LIU XiuFeng

    2008-01-01

    The aligned array and thin film of zeolites and molecular sieves possess a variety of potential applica-tions in membrane separation and catalysis, chemical sensors, and microelectronic devices. There are two main synthesis methods for manufacturing the aligned arrays and thin films of zeolites and mo-lecular sieves, i.e. in situ hydrothermal reaction and self-assembly of crystal grains on substrates. Both of them have attracted much attention in the scientific community worldwide. A series of significant progress has been made in recent years. By the in situ hydrothermal synthesis, the oriented nucleation and growth of zeolite and molecular sieve crystals can be achieved by modifying the surface properties of substrates or by changing the composition of synthesis solutions, leading to the formation of uni-formly oriented multicrystal-aligned arrays or thin films. On the other hand, the crystal grains of zeo-lites and molecular sieves can be assembled onto the substrate surface in required orientation using different bondages, for instance, the microstructure in the array or thin film can be controlled. This review is going to summarize and comment the significant results and progress reported recently in manufacturing highly covered and uniformly aligned arrays or thin films of zeolites and molecular sieves. It involves (1) in situ growth of highly aligned zeolite arrays and thin films via embedding func-tional groups on the substrate surface, modifying the surface microstructure of substrates, as well as varying the composition of synthesis solutions; (2) assembly of zeolite and molecular sieve crystals on various substrates to form aligned arrays and thin films with full coverage by covalent, ionic, and in-termolecular coupling interactions between crystals and substrates; (3) coupling surface assembly with microcontact printing or photoetching technique to produce patterned zeolite arrays and thin films. Finally, the functionality and applications of zeolite

  18. Substrate stiffness regulates filopodial activities in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and

  19. Ligand Binding and Substrate Discrimination by UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Todd D.; Borrok, M. Jack; Westler, William M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Galactofuranose (Galf) residues are present in cell wall glycoconjugates of numerous pathogenic microbes. Uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate (UDP) Galf, the biosynthetic precursor of Galf-containing glycoconjugates, is produced from UDP-galactopyranose (UDP-Galp) by the flavoenzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM). The gene encoding UGM (glf) is essential for the viability of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this finding underscores the need to understand how UGM functions. Considerable effort has been devoted to elucidating the catalytic mechanism of UGM, but progress has been hindered by a lack of structural data for an enzyme-substrate complex. Such data could reveal not only substrate binding interactions but how UGM can act preferentially on two very different substrates, UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf, yet avoid other structurally related UDP sugars present in the cell. Herein, we describe the first structure of a UGM-ligand complex, which provides insight into the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis for substrate selectivity. The structure of UGM from Klebsiella pneumoniae bound to the substrate analog UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) was solved by X-ray crystallographic methods and refined to 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. The ligand is proximal to the cofactor, a finding that is consistent with a proposed mechanism in which the reduced flavin engages in covalent catalysis. Despite this proximity, the glucose ring of the substrate analog is positioned such that it disfavors covalent catalysis. This orientation is consistent with data indicating that UDP-Glc is not a substrate for UGM. The relative binding orientations of UDP-Galp and UDP-Glc were compared using saturation transfer difference NMR. The results indicate that the uridine moiety occupies a similar location in both ligand complexes, and this relevant binding mode is defined by our structural data. In contrast, the orientations of the glucose and galactose sugar moieties differ. To understand the

  20. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK, which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B, has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development.

  1. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  2. Study of water infiltration in a lightweight green roof substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomankova, Klara; Holeckova, Martina; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Snehota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs have a positive impact on the environment (e.g. improving microclimate and air quality in cities, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). A laboratory infiltration experiment was conducted on the narrow flume serving as 2D vertical model of a green roof. The lightweight Optigreen substrate Type M was used (depth of 20 cm). The front wall of the flume was transparent and inspected by digital camera. The experiment was designed to measure pressure head, volumetric water content and calculate water retention in the substrate. Experiment comprised three artificial rainfall intensities with different values of initial water content of the substrate. The experimental results confirmed that green roofs have the ability to retain rainwater and thus have a beneficial effect on reducing runoff. In the experiment with the artificial 10 minutes rainfall event (total precipitation of 29 mm), the air dry substrate retained 95.9 % of precipitation. On the other hand for moist initial condition 4.2 % of precipitations amount was captured in the substrate. Additionally, the analysis of images taken during the experiment confirmed preferential flow and uneven advancement of the wetting front. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  3. Silicon solar cells with low-cost substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotval, P.S.; Strock, H.B.

    1978-11-07

    Epitaxial and diffusion-type planar diodes and solar cells utilize low-cost refined metallurgical silicon substrates having a substantially higher impurity content than conventional high-cost, high purity semiconductor grade silicon. The epitaxial type products have an n-on-p-on-p substrate configuration, while the diffusion-type products have pentavalent impurities diffused therein to form a p-n junction in the low cost silicon substrate. One embodiment employs a multigrained refined metallurgical silicon (RMS) prepared by precipitating essentially iron-free silicon platelets from a solution of metallurgical grade silicon in molten aluminum, melting said refined platelets, in contact with a silica slag and pulling silicon boules from a melt of said refined metallurgical silicon (RMS). By directionally solidifying the refined silicon--slag melt, a multigrained, directionally solidified refined metallurgical silicon (DS/RMS) is obtained, with boules being pulled from a melt thereof for use as said low-cost substrate. The DS/RMS may also be re-melted and directionally solidified a second time with the boules being pulled from said twice directionally solidified material being a desirable, low-cost, single crystal material suitable for use as said substrate for planar diode and solar cell applications.

  4. Array of reconfigurable diffractive lens on flexible substrate (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-03-01

    We designed and fabricated microscale lens arrays on a flexible substrate. The flexibility of the substrate allows for wide field of view imaging as well as optical focus scanning. Fresnel zone plates (FZPs), which are compact and lightweight, are used as microlenses for focusing. The arrangement of FZPs on flexible substrate can be reconfigured to maximize FOV. Tunable focus can also be achieved by stretching the FZPs laterally. In addition, the lightweight microlenses can be actuated to scan the focus axially. The lenses have a wide range of applications including displays, contact lenses, microscopy, surveillance and optical communications. The diameter of the microlenses ranges from 100 to 500 µm. The thickness of the lenses is 100 µm. Unlike refractive and reflective lenses, the focusing capability of FZPs is achieved via diffraction. FZPs consist of alternating black and white zones to modulate the phase of the incident light. The light diffracted from edge of the regions to achieve multiple focus. Most of the energy is diffracted into the first focus. The dark regions are made of silicon nanowires which are highly absorbent for visible spectrum. Standard processes, including wet and dry etching, are used to etch silicon substrate and form nanowires. The white zones are designed for both reflective and transmissive lenses. The lenses are implemented on PDMS as flexible substrate. The silicon nanowires are embedded into PDMS so that the shape of individual lens as well as the arrangement of the array can be reconfigured. In this article, we report our design, fabrication process and experiments.

  5. Tailoring optical forces for nanoparticle manipulation on layered substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salary, Mohammad M.; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Optical forces can be used to manipulate small particles through various mechanisms. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of optical forces acting on the nanoparticles located over a substrate using different manipulation techniques, as well as the conditions of the optimization of these forces. In particular, we study optical trapping, acceleration, and binding. Calculations are carried out using the exact multipole expansion method combined with Maxwell stress tensor formalism, providing a general framework to study optical forces on particles for arbitrary incident fields using closed-form expressions. The method takes into account multiple scattering between the particles and substrate and allows clear predictive abilities well beyond the dipole model. We consider the interaction of dielectric and metallic nanoparticles with various substrates. The presence of substrate is shown to have a significant impact on the nanoparticles' resonances and provides an additional degree of freedom in tailoring the optical forces. We explore different physical processes contributing to the optical force and their interplay on the mobility of the particle. It is established that engineering layered substrates can broaden the scope of trapping and acceleration and enhance the binding forces. It can also provide a high tunability of the acceleration direction. The analysis presented in this paper provides key physical insights to identify optimum setup for nanoparticles manipulation in various applications.

  6. Growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on organic substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen-xing; WANG Ling-sen; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    The growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on acrylics substrate was studied through experimental investigation of the effect of sputtering voltage, target-to-substrate distance, chamber pressure and sputtering time on the content, growth rate and surface morphology of brass nanofilms. The results show that compared with original brass target, Cu content in brass nanofilms changes by no more than 6.23% (mass fraction). High sputtering voltage and short target-to-substrate distance help to improve brass nanofilm deposition rate. There exists an optimal chamber pressure where deposition rate of nanofilm reaches the maximum. The key factor affecting surface morphology is the kinetic energy of sputtering particles. Low sputtering voltage, large target-to-substrate distance and low chamber pressure are very important for the formation of the high-quality brass nanofilms. The brass films prepared under the conditions of sputtering voltage 1.6 kV, target-to-substrate distance 2.5 cm, chamber pressure 10 Pa and sputtering time 20 min, possess following characteristics: smooth and uniform surface, thickness of 41 nm and Cu content of 71.0% (mass fraction).

  7. A model of cytoskeletal reorientation in response to substrate stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazopoulos K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Living adherent cells change their orientation in response to substrate stretching such that their cytoskeletal components reorganize in a new direction. To study this phenomenon, we model the cytoskeleton as a planar system of elastic cables and struts both pinned at their endpoints to a flat flexible substrate. Tensed (pre-strained cables represent acting stress fibers, whereas compression-bearing struts represent microtubules. We assume that in response to uniaxial substrate stretching the model reorients and deforms into a new configuration that minimizes its total potential energy. Using the Maxwell's global stability criterion, we find global minima configurations during static extension and compression of the substrate. Based on these results, we predict reorientation during cyclic stretching of the substrate. We find that in response to cyclic stretching cells either reorient transversely to the direction of stretching, or exhibit multiple configurations symmetrically distributed relative to the direction of stretching. These predictions are consistent with experimental data on living cells from the literature.

  8. General frost growth mechanism on solid substrates with different stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Julien; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2014-02-01

    Preventing or delaying frost formation on surfaces is of significant importance in many aspects of our daily life. Despite many efforts and improvements recently achieved in the design of new icephobic materials and substrates, not all proposed solutions are universally applicable and frost formation still remains a problem in need of further flexible solutions. In this respect, we propose to take benefit from the tunable viscoelastic properties of soft polymer gel substrates, since they are known to strongly influence the dropwise condensation process of water, and to investigate condensation frosting on them. Using polymer gels with different stiffness and a hard substrate as a reference, we demonstrate their ability to delay frost formation compared to recent results reported in the literature on other solid substrates and in particular on superhydrophobic surfaces. By investigating the frost front propagation we singled out a general behavior of its dynamic evolution consisting of two processes presenting two different time scales. This general growth appears to be independent of experimental conditions as well as substrate stiffness.

  9. Effect Of Various Substrates On Eudrilus eugeniae (Oligochaeta Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpoame, M.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the effects of substrate on Eudrilus eugeniae production, 360 worms were raised in plastic buckets containing manure either from cattle (BV, from sheep (CM, from rabbit (CL, and from chicken (FP. At the end of the experiment which lasted 4 months, worm productivity was estimated at 111.9 g/kg of substrate in CL, 86.3 g/kg in CM, and 33.0 g/kg in BV. Substrate FP was inadequate as worms escaped from it. In another trial aiming at determining some of E. Eugeniae's reproductive parameters, each of the 3 substrates BV, CL, and CM was distributed into 15 plastic half bottles and was inoculated with one cocoon. In the 3 substrates cocoon incubation time and growing period were estimated at 3 to 4 weeks and 6 to 7 weeks respectively. Cocoons were laid approximately a week after the pairing of worms. On the average, each worm laid 2 cocoons per week.

  10. Polymer Stamps for Imprinting Nanopatterns in Polymer Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahao; Amirsadeghi, Alborz; Kim, Jinsoo; Park, Sunggook

    2015-01-01

    Using a silicone or metallic stamp for imprinting multiscale patterns comprising micro down to nanoscale patterns into polymer substrates often results in significant deformation in the molded substrate and loss of pattern transfer fidelity for nanopatterns. In the worst case, the expensive stamp can also be damaged. One method to reduce the problem is to use polymer as the stamp material, which will reduce both adhesion and thermal stress generated at the stamp/substrate interface. In this paper, stamps made of three different polymer materials, i.e., polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), PPGDA-based UV resin and TPGDA-based UV-resin, were fabricated from the same master containing nanofluidic structures and the replication fidelity from the master, polymer stamps, to thermal-imprinted poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate (PMMA) was compared. The largest loss of pattern fidelity occurs in the thermal imprinting step. Polymer stamps with higher Young's moduli result in a better fidelity in pattern transfer. With TPGDA-based UV resin stamps, multiscale structures with a nanochannel with minimum width and height of -70 nm can be imprinted onto PMMA substrate together with macro-scale patterns by a single nanoimprinting processes. PMID:26328384

  11. Substrate utilization by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, H.N.; Rollins, D.M.; Weiss, E.

    1986-10-01

    An attempt was made to elucidate in Campylobacter spp. some of the physiologic characteristics that are reflected in the kinetics of CO/sub 2/ formation from four /sup 14/C-labeled substrates. Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli were grown in a biphasic medium, and highly motile spiral cells were harvested at 12 h. The cells were incubated with 0.02 M glutamate, glutamine, ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, or formate, or with concentrations of these substrates ranging from 0.0032 to 0.125 M. All four substrates were metabolized very rapidly by both species. A feature of many of these reactions, particularly obvious with /sup 2/chemically bond-ketoglutarate, was an immediate burst of CO/sub 2/ production followed by CO/sub 2/ evolution at a more moderate rate. These diphasic kinetics of substrate utilization were not seen in comparable experiments with Escherichia coli grown and tested under identical conditions. With C. jejuni, CO/sub 2/ production from formate proceeded rapidly for the entire period of incubation. The rate of metabolism of glutamate, glutamine, and ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate by both species was greatly enhanced by increased substrate concentration. The approach to the study of the metabolism of campylobacters here described may be useful in detecting subtle changes in the physiology of cells as they are maintained past their logarithmic growth phase.

  12. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Palecek, Amanda M; Argenbright, Clayton W; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  13. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Y Stark

    Full Text Available Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.. This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  14. Hydrodynamics of prey capture in sharks: effects of substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Wilga, Cheryl; Sanford, Christopher; Lauder, George

    2007-04-22

    In suction feeding, a volume of water is drawn into the mouth of a predator. Previous studies of suction feeding in fishes have shown that significant fluid velocities are confined to a region within one mouth width from the mouth. Therefore, the predator must be relatively close to the prey to ensure capture success. Here, theoretical modelling is combined with empirical data to unravel the mechanism behind feeding on a substrate. First, we approached the problem theoretically by combining the stream functions of two sinks. Computational fluid dynamics modelling is then applied to make quantitative predictions regarding the effects of substrate proximity on the feeding hydrodynamics of a benthic shark. An oblique circular cylinder and a shark head model were used. To test the models, we used digital particle image velocimetry to record fluid flow around the mouth of white-spotted bamboo sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum, during suction feeding on the substrate and in the water column. Empirical results confirmed the modelling predictions: the length of the flow field can be doubled due to passive substrate effects during prey capture. Feeding near a substrate extends the distance over which suction is effective and a predator strike can be effective further from the prey. PMID:17251144

  15. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available. PMID:27145398

  16. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S.; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A.

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.

  17. Design and optimization of cantilevered magnetostrictive film-substrate microactuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.; Narsu; YUN; GuoHong; RONG; JianHong

    2007-01-01

    The exact solution for the bending problem of a free-end point loaded films-ubstrate cantilever with arbitrary film-to-substrate thickness ratio is obtained by using the basic mechanical equilibrium equation. And then the problem of design and optimization for microactuator buildup of film-substrate cantilever is discussed by taking into account the effect of geometrical and physical parameters of the cantilever components. Furthermore, the optimal condition for actuator application is presented and some theoretical problems are clarified. The results show that, in general, the greater the film-to-substrate thickness ratio, the higher the ability of taking load, namely the larger the exerted force of the cantilever when the thickness of substrate is kept constant. When the total thickness of the cantilever is kept constant, however, the free-end exerted force will experience a maximum and this maximum value of the exerted force will decrease with the increasing film-to-sub- strate stiffness ratio. Meanwhile, the optimal thickness ratio corresponding to this maximum exerted force also decreases with the increasing stiffness ratio. Whether for the cases of fixed substrate or fixed total thickness, the influence of Poisson's ratio of two cantilever components on the exerted force is remarkable, and should not be neglected.

  18. A liquid aluminum corrosion resistance surface on steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of hot dipping pure aluminum on a steel substrate followed by oxidation was studied to form a surface layer of aluminum oxide resistant to the corrosion of aluminum melt. The thickness of the pure aluminum layer on the steel substrate is reduced with the increase in temperature and time in initial aluminizing, and the thickness of the aluminum layer does not increase with time at given temperature when identical temperature and complete wetting occur between liquid aluminum and the substrate surface. The thickness of the Fe-Al intermetallic layer on the steel base is increased with increasing bath temperature and time. Based on the experimental data and the mathematics model developed by the study, a maximum exists in the thickness of the Fe-Al intermetallic at certain dipping temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis reveals that the top portion of the steel substrate is composed of a thin layer of α-Al2O3, followed by a thinner layer of FeAl3, and then a much thicker one of Fe2Al5 on the steel base side. In addition, there is a carbon enrichment zone in diffusion front. The aluminum oxide surface formed on the steel substrate is in perfect condition after corrosion test in liquid aluminum at 750 deg. C for 240 h, showing extremely good resistance to aluminum melt corrosion

  19. Zeta potential of microfluidic substrates: 2. Data for polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brian J; Hasselbrink, Ernest F

    2004-01-01

    Zeta potential data are reviewed for a variety of polymeric microfluidic substrate materials. Many of these materials currently used for microchip fabrication have only recently been employed for generation of electroosmotic flow. Despite their recent history, polymeric microfluidic substrates are currently used extensively for microchip separations and other techniques, and understanding of the surface zeta potential is crucial for experimental design. This paper proposes the use of pC (the negative logarithm of the counterion concentration) as a useful normalization for the zeta potential on polymer substrates in contact with indifferent univalent counterions. Normalizing zeta by pC facilitates comparison of results from many investigators. The sparseness of available data for polymeric substrates prevents complete and rigorous justification for this normalization; however, it is consistent with double layer and adsorption theory. For buffers with indifferent univalent cations, normalization with the logarithm of the counterion concentration in general collapses data onto a single zeta/pC vs. pH curve, and (with the exception of PMMA) the repeatability of the data is quite encouraging. Normalization techniques should allow improved ability to predict zeta potential performance on microfluidic substrates and compare results observed with different parameters.

  20. Molecular docking simulations provide insights in the substrate binding sites and possible substrates of the ABCC6 transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hosen

    Full Text Available The human ATP-binding cassette family C member 6 (ABCC6 gene encodes an ABC transporter protein (ABCC6, primarily expressed in liver and kidney. Mutations in the ABCC6 gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, an autosomal recessive connective tissue disease characterized by ectopic mineralization of the elastic fibers. The pathophysiology underlying PXE is incompletely understood, which can at least partly be explained by the undetermined nature of the ABCC6 substrates as well as the unknown substrate recognition and binding sites. Several compounds, including anionic glutathione conjugates (N-ethylmaleimide; NEM-GS and leukotriene C4 (LTC4 were shown to be modestly transported in vitro; conversely, vitamin K3 (VK3 was demonstrated not to be transported by ABCC6. To predict the possible substrate binding pockets of the ABCC6 transporter, we generated a 3D homology model of ABCC6 in both open and closed conformation, qualified for molecular docking and virtual screening approaches. By docking 10 reported in vitro substrates in our ABCC6 3D homology models, we were able to predict the substrate binding residues of ABCC6. Further, virtual screening of 4651 metabolites from the Human Serum Metabolome Database against our open conformation model disclosed possible substrates for ABCC6, which are mostly lipid and biliary secretion compounds, some of which are found to be involved in mineralization. Docking of these possible substrates in the closed conformation model also showed high affinity. Virtual screening expands this possibility to explore more compounds that can interact with ABCC6, and may aid in understanding the mechanisms leading to PXE.

  1. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  2. MARCKS Signaling Differentially Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Proliferation through a KIS-, p27kip1- Dependent Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yu

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the myristolated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS occurs in vascular proliferative diseases such as restenosis after bypass surgery. MARCKS knockdown results in arrest of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation with little effect on endothelial cell (EC proliferation. We sought to identify the mechanism of differential regulation by MARCKS of VSMC and EC proliferation in vitro and in vivo.siRNA-mediated MARCKS knockdown in VSMCs inhibited proliferation and prevented progression from phase G0/G1 to S. Protein expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, but not p21cip1 was increased by MARCKS knockdown. MARCKS knockdown did not affect proliferation in VSMCs derived from p27kip1-/- mice indicating that the effect of MARCKS is p27kip1-dependent. MARCKS knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p27kip1 at threonine 187 and serine 10 as well as, kinase interacting with stathmin (KIS, cyclin D1, and Skp2 expression. Phosphorylation of p27kip1 at serine 10 by KIS is required for nuclear export and degradation of p27kip1. MARCKS knockdown caused nuclear trapping of p27kip1. Both p27kip1 nuclear trapping and cell cycle arrest were released by overexpression of KIS, but not catalytically inactive KIS. In ECs, MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression and cell proliferation. MARCKS knockdown in a murine aortic injury model resulted in decreased VSMC proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU integration assay, and inhibition of vascular wall thickening. MARCKS knockdown increased the rate of re-endothelialization.MARCKS knockdown arrested VSMC cell cycle by decreasing KIS expression. Decreased KIS expression resulted in nuclear trapping of p27kip1 in VSMCs. MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression in ECs resulting in increased EC proliferation. MARCKS knockdown significantly attenuated the VSMC proliferative response to vascular injury, but accelerated

  3. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malina Halina Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological processes in the cell are regulated by reversible, electrostatic protein-protein interactions. Apoptosis is such a regulated process, which is critically important in tissue homeostasis and development and leads to complete disintegration of the cell. Pathological apoptosis, a process similar to apoptosis, is associated with aging and infection. The current study shows that pathological apoptosis is a process caused by the covalent interactions between the signaling proteins, and a characteristic of this pathological network is the covalent binding of calmodulin to regulatory sequences. Results Small molecules able to bind covalently to the amino group of lysine, histidine, arginine, or glutamine modify the regulatory sequences of the proteins. The present study analyzed the interaction of calmodulin with the BH3 sequence of Bax, and the calmodulin-binding sequence of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate in the presence of xanthurenic acid in primary retinal epithelium cell cultures and murine epithelial fibroblast cell lines transformed with SV40 (wild type [WT], Bid knockout [Bid-/-], and Bax-/-/Bak-/- double knockout [DKO]. Cell death was observed to be associated with the covalent binding of calmodulin, in parallel, to the regulatory sequences of proteins. Xanthurenic acid is known to activate caspase-3 in primary cell cultures, and the results showed that this activation is also observed in WT and Bid-/- cells, but not in DKO cells. However, DKO cells were not protected against death, but high rates of cell death occurred by detachment. Conclusions The results showed that small molecules modify the basic amino acids in the regulatory sequences of proteins leading to covalent interactions between the modified sequences (e.g., calmodulin to calmodulin-binding sites. The formation of these polymers (aggregates leads to an unregulated and, consequently, pathological protein network. The results

  4. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of PTPN12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PTPN12 is an important tumor suppressor that plays critical roles in various physiological processes. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate specificity of PTPN12 remains uncertain. Here, enzymological and crystallographic studies have enabled us to identify two distinct structural features that are crucial determinants of PTPN12 substrate specificity: the pY+1 site binding pocket and specific basic charged residues along its surface loops. Key structurally plastic regions and specific residues in PTPN12 enabled recognition of different HER2 phosphorylation sites and regulated specific PTPN12 functions. In addition, the structure of PTPN12 revealed a CDK2 phosphorylation site in a specific PTPN12 loop. Taken together, our results not only provide the working mechanisms of PTPN12 for desphosphorylation of its substrates but will also help in designing specific inhibitors of PTPN12.

  5. Direct preparation of high quality graphene on dielectric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Bin; Liu, Yunqi

    2016-04-21

    Graphene, an amazing two-dimensional material with excellent physical properties, has attracted great attention in various disciplines. Both fundamental studies and applications require graphene samples with controlled parameters including their quality, size, crystallinity, layer number and so on. While graphene can be prepared by direct exfoliation from mother materials or growth on transition metals, the uncontrolled production or the additional complex transfer process has been challenging for graphene applications. Direct preparation on a desired dielectric substrate is an important research direction that potentially addresses these problems. Many advances have been made in the past few years, and this tutorial review provides a brief summary of ways of preparing graphene on dielectric substrates. Various methods including the annealing method, direct chemical vapor deposition graphene synthesis on conventional dielectric substrates and hexagonal boron nitride layers are systematically reviewed and discussed. The main problems and further directions in this field are also presented. PMID:26847929

  6. Optically transparent frequency selective surfaces on flexible thin plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewani, Aliya A.; O'Keefe, Steven G.; Thiel, David V.; Galehdar, Amir

    2015-02-01

    A novel 2D simple low cost frequency selective surface was screen printed on thin (0.21 mm), flexible transparent plastic substrate (relative permittivity 3.2). It was designed, fabricated and tested in the frequency range 10-20 GHz. The plane wave transmission and reflection coefficients agreed with numerical modelling. The effective permittivity and thickness of the backing sheet has a significant effect on the frequency characteristics. The stop band frequency reduced from 15GHz (no backing) to 12.5GHz with polycarbonate. The plastic substrate thickness beyond 1.8mm has minimal effect on the resonant frequency. While the inner element spacing controls the stop-band frequency, the substrate thickness controls the bandwidth. The screen printing technique provided a simple, low cost FSS fabrication method to produce flexible, conformal, optically transparent and bio-degradable FSS structures which can find their use in electromagnetic shielding and filtering applications in radomes, reflector antennas, beam splitters and polarizers.

  7. Low profile conformal antenna arrays on high impedance substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents electromagnetic (EM) design and analysis of dipole antenna array over high impedance substrate (HIS). HIS is a preferred substrate for low-profile antenna design, owing to its unique boundary conditions. Such substrates permit radiating elements to be printed on them without any disturbance in the radiation characteristics. Moreover HIS provides improved impedance matching, enhanced bandwidth, and increased broadside directivity owing to total reflection from the reactive surface and high input impedance. This book considers different configurations of HIS for array design on planar and non-planar high-impedance surfaces. Results are presented for cylindrical dipole, printed dipole, and folded dipole over single- and double-layered square-patch-based HIS and dogbone-based HIS. The performance of antenna arrays is analyzed in terms of performance parameters such as return loss and radiation pattern. The design presented shows acceptable return loss and mainlobe gain of radiation pattern. Thi...

  8. A simple procedure for preparing substrate for Pleurotus ostreatus cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Daniel; Sánchez, José E; Yamasaki, Keiko

    2003-11-01

    The use of wooden crates for composting a mixture of 70% grass, (Digitaria decumbens), and 30% coffee pulp, combined with 2% Ca(OH)(2), was studied as a method for preparing substrate for the cultivation of Pleurotus ostreatus. Crate composting considerably modified the temperature pattern of the substrate in process, as compared to pile composting, where lower temperatures and less homogeneous distributions were observed. Biological efficiencies varied between 59.79% and 93% in the two harvests. Based on statistical analysis significant differences were observed between the treatments, composting times and in the interactions between these two factors. We concluded that it is possible to produce P. ostreatus on a lignocellulosic, non-composted, non-pasteurized substrate with an initial pH of 8.7, and that composting for two to three days improves the biological efficiency.

  9. Substrate Recognition of Histone H2B by DUBm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Berndsen, Christopher; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2011-03-01

    The SAGA complex is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates gene expression in eukaryotes via histone acetylation and deubiquitination, which are crucial for transcription. Our lab is investigating the SAGA-dependent deubiquitination of histone H2B. The deubiquitinating module (DUBm) of SAGA is comprised of a ubiquitin-specific protease, Ubp8, and three other proteins. It is known that Ubp8 cleaves ubiquitin from histone H2B, however, the specific way in which the enzyme binds to the substrate remains elusive. In order to unravel this mechanism, we attempted to determine the crystal structure of the substrate binding complex. We obtained this substrate by exploiting the techniques of intein chemistry to artificially ubiquitinate a histone H2B peptide, which we then co-crystallized with DUBm. Additionally, we synthesized Ub-K63R-linked chains and Ub-K48-linked chains and co-crystallized them with DUBm.

  10. Ion beam mixing of titanium overlayers with hydroxyapaptite substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, T.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Alford, T.L.; Suchicital, C.; Russell, S.; Luptak, K.; Pizziconi, V.; Mayer, J.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The mixing of titanium overlayers with hydroxyapatite (HA) substrates via ion irradiation has been demonstrated. Analysis via secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) indicates an interfacial broadening of titanium and calcium of the implanted sample compared to that of the unimplanted sample. Attendant to the observed ion beam mixing of titanium into the HA, the oxygen signal of the titanium overlayer increases as a result of ion irradiation. It is supposed that this change is evident of diffusion through the metal layer and possibly from titania formation at the free surface and perovskite formation at the film/substrate interface. This possibility is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Additionally, the force required to separate the film from the substrate increased as a result of ion irradiation, validating the continued study of ion beam processing of Ti/HA systems towards the improvement of long term fixation of implant devices.

  11. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  12. Mechanically flexible optically transparent porous mono-crystalline silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, we present a simple process to fabricate a thin (≥5μm), mechanically flexible, optically transparent, porous mono-crystalline silicon substrate. Relying only on reactive ion etching steps, we are able to controllably peel off a thin layer of the original substrate. This scheme is cost favorable as it uses a low-cost silicon <100> wafer and furthermore it has the potential for recycling the remaining part of the wafer that otherwise would be lost and wasted during conventional back-grinding process. Due to its porosity, it shows see-through transparency and potential for flexible membrane applications, neural probing and such. Our process can offer flexible, transparent silicon from post high-thermal budget processed device wafer to retain the high performance electronics on flexible substrates. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Elastic Analysis of Physisorption-Induced Substrate Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-Qiao; PAN Xia-Hui; YU Shou-Wen; FENG Xi-Qiao

    2008-01-01

    Physisorption may cause a dimple on a deformable solid surface due to adsorbate-substrate interaction.The interactive force between the adsorbate and the crystal atoms depends on their distances,which may change with substrate deformation.This feature of displacement-dependence indicates that the equilibrium problem is a force-deformation coupled nonlinear procedure.In the present study,a continuum mechanics model,in which the force is considered as a function of the displacement field of the medium,is presented to calculate the physisorption-inducad deformation in a semi-infinite elastic medium.It is found that the nonlinear effect due to force-deformation coupling should be taken in consideration in the adsorbate-substrate interaction analysis.

  14. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon

  15. Evaluation of different substrates for inkjet printing of rasagiline mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Janßen, Eva Maria; Breitenbach, Armin;

    2013-01-01

    ) was used as a low-dose active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Flexible doses of the drug in a single unit were obtained by printing several subsequent layers on top of the already printed ones, using an off-the-shelf consumer thermal inkjet (TIJ) printer. The produced drug-delivery systems were subjected...... paper due to absorption of the ink into the matrix of the substrate. The best linear correlation between the dose of the drug and the number of the printing layers was obtained for the porous copy paper. The other two substrates showed poor linearity and unacceptable standard deviations of the printed...... drug substance due to limited absorption of the API ink into the carrier. The shear stress between the substrate, the print head, and the paper feeding rollers caused smearing of the drug that had been surface-deposited during the earlier printing cycles. In conclusion, this study indicates...

  16. Nanoimprinted DWDM laser arrays on indium phosphide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian; Nørregaard, Jesper; Mironov, Andrej;

    2014-01-01

    Dense wavelength division multiplexing lasers play a major role in today's long-haul broadband communication. Typical distributed feedback laser cavities consist of long half-pitch gratings in InGaAsP on InP substrates with grating periods of around 240 nm. The lasers include a quarter wavelength...... shift in the grating, and are single mode with high side-mode suppression. Typically, such lasers are patterned using e-beam lithography (EBL). We present a fabrication method based on patterning by thermal nanoimprint lithography, which is potentially less costly and faster than EBL. Thermal...... nanoimprint lithography of laser gratings raises two types of challenges: (1) The imprint process itself is delicate due to the mechanical fragility of indium phosphide substrates and the thermal mismatch between the substrate and the silicon stamp. (2) The subsequent processing puts requirements on the...

  17. Direct growth of Si nanowires on flexible organic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Di Mario, Lorenzo; Minotti, Antonio; Tiburzi, Giorgio; Mendis, Budhika G.; Zeze, Dagou A.; Martelli, Faustino

    2016-06-01

    A key characteristic of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is that they grow on any substrate that can withstand the growth conditions, paving the way for their use in flexible electronics. We report on the direct growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on polyimide substrates. The Si NWs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which allows the growth to proceed at temperatures low enough to be compatible with plastic substrates (350 °C), where gold or indium are used as growth seeds. In is particularly interesting as the seed not only because it leads to a better NW crystal quality but also because it overcomes a core problem induced by the use of Au in silicon processing, i.e. Au creates deep carrier traps when incorporated in the nanowires.

  18. Substrate specificity within a family of outer membrane carboxylate channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Eren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  19. Variational method for liquids moving on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianmin; Di, Yana; Doi, Masao

    2016-08-01

    A new variational method is proposed to calculate the evolution of liquid film and liquid droplet moving on a solid substrate. A simple time evolution equation is obtained for the contact angle of a liquid film that starts to move on a horizontal substrate. The equation indicates the dynamical transition at the receding side and the ridge formation at the advancing side. The same method is applied for the evolution of a droplet that starts to move on an inclined solid surface, and again the characteristic shape change of the droplet is obtained by solving a simple ordinary differential system. We will show that this method has a potential application to a wide class of problems of droplets moving on a substrate.

  20. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and organic material substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations are widespread and form between ca. two-thirds of all land plants and fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota. The association is a mutualistic symbiosis with the fungi enhancing nutrient capture for the plant while obtaining carbon in return. Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) lack any substantial saprophytic capability they do preferentially associate with various organic substrates and respond by hyphal proliferation, indicating the fungus derives a benefit from the organic substrate. AMF may also enhance decomposition of the organic material. The benefit to the host plant of this hyphal proliferation is not always apparent, particularly regarding nitrogen (N) transfer, and there may be circumstances under which both symbionts compete for the N released given both have a large demand for N. The results of various studies examining AMF responses to organic substrates and the interactions with other members of the soil community will be discussed.

  1. Fourier optics for polymeric substrates and coating textures analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    Several devices for substrate texture detection based on diffractive optics, for paper, textiles and non-wovens have been proposed in the past for direct inspection during the production processes. In spite of the presence of devices totally based on image processing, the use of diffractive optics cannot be considered surpassed for many reasons. Compared with image processing procedures, it is less sensitive to vibrations and does not suffer from the presence of ambient light. Based on transmitted light, it can give information on changes in refractive indexes, thickness variation and surface conditions. We study the use of optical Fourier spectrum to identify textures of polymer films. As the power spectrum reveals, the texture is seldom homogeneous. Here we report investigation on several substrates and on thin ink coatings on substrate. Role of bulk and surface conditions is analysed.

  2. Dynamic buckling behavior of thin metal film lines from substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Heling; Zhang, Jie; Li, Chuanwei

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic buckling behavior of thin films from substrate is studied in this work. The experimental results show that the buckling morphology of the constantan film lines from the polymer substrate is inconsistent and non-sinusoidal, which is different from the sinusoidal form of the buckling morphology under static loads. The plastic deformation of the film lines results in the non-sinusoidal buckling morphology and residual deformation when unloaded. Finite element modeling results with regard to the plastic dissipation of the constantan film lines reveal that the plastic dissipation suppresses the buckling-driven delaminating under impact loads. This study will give some new perspectives on the buckling behavior of thin film from substrate.

  3. Effect of different substrates on Compact stacked square Microstrip Antenna

    CERN Document Server

    De, Asok; Malhotra, Sagar; Arora, Pushkar; Bazaz, Rishik

    2010-01-01

    Selection of the most suitable substrate for a Microstrip antenna is a matter of prime importance. This is because many limitations of the microstrip antenna such as high return loss, low gain and low efficiency can be overcome by selecting an appropriate substrate for fabrication of the antenna, without shifting the resonant frequency significantly. The substate properties such as its dielectric constant, loss tangent have a pronounced effect on the antenna characteristics. Some of the critical properties that are to be taken care of while selecting a dielectric are homogeneity, moisture absorption and adhesion of metal- foil cladding. In this paper a comprehensive study of the effect of variation of substrate material on the antenna properties has been presented.

  4. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  5. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  6. Semipolar GaN grown on foreign substrates: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non- and semipolar GaN-based optoelectronic device structures have attracted much attention in recent years. Best results have been obtained on small bulk substrates cut from thick c-plane epi-wafers. However, owing to the limited size of such substrates, it is very attractive to study hetero-epitaxial approaches on foreign substrates. In this paper, we review the current state of such studies which eventually lead to large area non- or semipolar nitride structures. The simplest approach is to use planar sapphire or SiC wafers of non-c-plane orientations on which potentially less polar GaN can be grown. However, typically huge dislocation and in particular stacking fault densities evolve. More sophisticated approaches make use of the good GaN growth performance in the c-direction, eventually leading anyway to large area non- or semipolar structures. Several such approaches are discussed in this paper

  7. Substrate Integrated Slot Array Antenna with Required Radiation Pattern Envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A substrate integrated slot array antenna with a prescribed radiation pattern is investigated in this paper. To meet the requirement of a certain standard radiation pattern envelope, the array configuration and the element excitation coefficient should be considered together. An efficient and systematic method is proposed to determine the element number and element weights in a planar array. After that, the geometrical dimension of the substrate integrated slot array can be synthesized. As an example, a K-band 16 × 22 slot array antenna based on the substrate integrated waveguide (SIW technology is designed, fabricated, and measured. Its radiation pattern can meet the class 3 antenna radiation pattern envelope of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI standard pattern. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulated ones.

  8. Visualization System for Burrowing Organisms in Granular Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Amos G

    2008-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video demonstrates the capabilities of an experimental setup to visualize organisms burrowing in granular substrates. The setup consists of a tank filled with 1mm soda-lime glass beads, backlit by halogen lights. The walls can be moved such that the space bound by them can expand or contract to fit various organisms. A recirculation system oxygenates and cools the salt water that flows through the substrate. The video shows the burrowing behavior of a razor clam (Ensis directus) and a quahog (Mercenaria mercenaria). Both animals inflate their foot with blood, making the foot a terminal anchor against which they pull their shell downwards. Deformation of the granular substrate can be seen around the animals as they advance downwards.

  9. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to SiC substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam B; Woods, Lilia M

    2016-09-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are quasi-one-dimensional planar graphene allotropes with diverse properties dependent on their width and types of edges. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to substrates is a hybrid system, which offers novel opportunities for property modifications as well as experimental control. Here we present electronic structure calculations of zigzag graphene nanoribbons chemically attached via the edges to the Si or C terminated surfaces of a SiC substrate. The results show that the edge characteristics are rather robust and the properties are essentially determined by the individual nanoribbon. While the localized spin polarization of the graphene nanoribbon edge atoms is not significantly affected by the substrate, secondary energy gaps in the highest conduction and lowest valence region may emerge in the anchored structures. The van der Waals interaction together with the electrostatic interactions due to the polarity of the surface bonds are found to be important for the structure parameters and energy stability. PMID:27392014

  10. Force-driven aggregation of specific bonds on compliant substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2013-07-26

    A thermodynamic model was employed to understand the underlying physics of the force-dependent size of cell's focal adhesions. The model describes the specific adhesion of an elastic membrane to a compliant substrate such that the adhesion site is subjected to the force of a constant pulling traction. The membrane contains mobile adhesion receptors with specific energetic affinities for complimentary ligands on the substrate. The adhesion is resisted by a disjoining pressure induced by a squeezed layer of glycocalyx. The model demonstrates that the enlargement of adhesion area with increasing pulling traction is possible due to a spontaneous response of the adhesion site to attain the state of minimum free energy. The correlation between the force and the adhesion area strongly depends on the rigidity of the substrate. PMID:23764177

  11. Adsorption of Helium Atoms on Two-Dimensional Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burganova, Regina; Lysogorskiy, Yury; Nedopekin, Oleg; Tayurskii, Dmitrii

    2016-01-01

    The study of the adsorption phenomenon of helium began many decades ago with the discovery of graphite as a homogeneous substrate for the investigation of physically adsorbed monolayer films. In particular, helium monoatomic layers on graphite were found to exhibit a very rich phase diagram. In the present work we have investigated the adsorption phenomenon of helium atoms on graphene and silicene substrates by means of density functional theory with Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Helium-substrate and helium-helium interactions were considered from first principles. Vibrational properties of adsorbed monolayers have been used to explore the stability of the system. This approach reproduces results describing the stability of a helium monolayer on graphene calculated by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for low and high coverage cases. However, for the moderate coverage value there is a discrepancy with QMC results due to the lack of helium zero point motion.

  12. Optically transparent frequency selective surfaces on flexible thin plastic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewani, Aliya A., E-mail: a.ashraf@griffith.edu.au; O’Keefe, Steven G.; Thiel, David V.; Galehdar, Amir [School Of Electrical Engineering, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4111 (Australia)

    2015-02-15

    A novel 2D simple low cost frequency selective surface was screen printed on thin (0.21 mm), flexible transparent plastic substrate (relative permittivity 3.2). It was designed, fabricated and tested in the frequency range 10-20 GHz. The plane wave transmission and reflection coefficients agreed with numerical modelling. The effective permittivity and thickness of the backing sheet has a significant effect on the frequency characteristics. The stop band frequency reduced from 15GHz (no backing) to 12.5GHz with polycarbonate. The plastic substrate thickness beyond 1.8mm has minimal effect on the resonant frequency. While the inner element spacing controls the stop-band frequency, the substrate thickness controls the bandwidth. The screen printing technique provided a simple, low cost FSS fabrication method to produce flexible, conformal, optically transparent and bio-degradable FSS structures which can find their use in electromagnetic shielding and filtering applications in radomes, reflector antennas, beam splitters and polarizers.

  13. Substrates of the human oligopeptide transporter hPEPT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongxin; Lu, Kui

    2015-08-01

    Oligopeptide transporters serve important functions in nutrition and pharmacology. In particular, these transporters help maintain the homeostasis of peptides. The peptide-transporter PEPT2 is a high-affinity and low-capacity type oligopeptide transporter from the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family. PEPT2 has recently received attention because of its potential application in targeted drug delivery. PEPT2 is widely distributed in kidney, central nervous system, and lung of organisms. In general, all dipeptides, tripeptides, and peptide-like drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors could be mediated and transported as a substrate of PEPT2. The design of many extant drugs and prodrugs is based on the substrate structure of PEPT2 to accelerate absorption via peptide transporters. Thus, this paper summarizes the substrate features of PEPT2 to promote the rational design of drugs and prodrugs that target peptide transporters. PMID:26355221

  14. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to SiC substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam B.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene nanoribbons are quasi-one-dimensional planar graphene allotropes with diverse properties dependent on their width and types of edges. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to substrates is a hybrid system, which offers novel opportunities for property modifications as well as experimental control. Here we present electronic structure calculations of zigzag graphene nanoribbons chemically attached via the edges to the Si or C terminated surfaces of a SiC substrate. The results show that the edge characteristics are rather robust and the properties are essentially determined by the individual nanoribbon. While the localized spin polarization of the graphene nanoribbon edge atoms is not significantly affected by the substrate, secondary energy gaps in the highest conduction and lowest valence region may emerge in the anchored structures. The van der Waals interaction together with the electrostatic interactions due to the polarity of the surface bonds are found to be important for the structure parameters and energy stability.

  15. Static and kinetic friction characteristics of nanowire on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Nguyen, Gia Hau; Ky, Dinh Le Cao; Tran, Da Khoa; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Friction characteristics of nanowires (NWs), which may be used as building blocks for nano-devices, are crucial, especially for cases where contact sliding occurs during the device operation. In this work, the static and kinetic friction characteristics of oxidized Si NWs deposited on thermally grown SiO2 and chemical vapor-deposited single layer graphene were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Kinetic friction between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was directly measured by the AFM. Static friction was also obtained from the most bent state of the NWs using the individually determined elastic moduli of the NWs from kinetic friction experiments based on elastic beam theory. Furthermore, the shear stress between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was estimated based on adhesive contact theory. It was found that both static and kinetic friction increased as the radius of the NWs increased. The friction of the oxidized Si NWs on the graphene substrate was found to be smaller than that on the SiO2 substrate, which suggests that chemical vapor-deposited graphene can be used as a lubricant or as a protective layer in nano-devices to reduce friction. The shear stress estimated from the kinetic friction data between the oxidized Si NWs and the SiO2 substrate ranged from 7.5 to 12.3 MPa while that between the oxidized Si NWs and the graphene substrate ranged from 4.7 to 7.0 MPa. The result also indicated that the dependence of shear stress on the radius of the NWs was not significant. These findings may provide insight into the friction characteristics of NWs.

  16. Maternal food provisioning in a substrate-brooding African cichlid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Ota

    Full Text Available Fish demonstrate the greatest variety of parental care strategies within the animal kingdom. Fish parents seldom provision food for offspring, with some exceptions predominantly found in substrate-brooding Central American cichlids and mouth-brooding African cichlids. Here, we provide the first evidence of food provisioning in a substrate-brooding African cichlid Neolamprologus mondabu. This fish is a maternal substrate-brooding cichlid endemic to Lake Tanganyika, and feeds on benthic animals using unique techniques-individuals typically feed on the surface of sandy substrates, but also expose prey by digging up substrates with vigorous wriggling of their body and fins. Young also feed on benthos on the substrate surface, but only using the first technique. We observed that feeding induced by digging accounted for 30% of total feeding bouts in adult females, demonstrating that digging is an important foraging tactic. However, parental females fed less frequently after digging than non-parental females, although both females stayed in pits created by digging for approximately 30 s. Instead, young gathered in the pit and fed intensively, suggesting that parental females provision food for young by means of digging. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the feeding frequency of young before and after digging that was simulated by hand, and observed that young doubled their feeding frequency after the simulated digging. This suggests that parental females engage in digging to uncover food items that are otherwise unavailable to young, and provision food for them at the expense of their own foraging. This behavior was similar to what has been observed in Central American cichlids.

  17. A novel optical multilayer hydrophone with a triangular pyramid substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyong Wu; Xingwu Long; Kaiyong Yang; Yun Huang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A novel concept for an optical multilayer ultrasonic hydrophone with the sensing film deposited on a triangular pyramid glass substrate is proposed. Using the calculation model for the spectral coefficients' derivatives of a dielectric multilayer optical coating, the acousto-optic sensitivity characteristic of the hydrophone is analyzed with different measurement laser polarizations and incident angles. We present a reasonable method and adjusting strategy for the optimum working point selection of the ultrasound measurement. Analytic results show that the novel hydrophone possesses all the other merits of a plate glass substrate optical multilayer hydrophone but with improved detection sensitivity. A longer measurement time without distortion decreases the difficulty of high frequency signal circuits. Spatial split of the ultrasound signal caused by the substrate's triangular pyramid roof simplifies the spatial spot area correction,which contributes to the accurate calibration of the hydrophone's wideband frequency response.%A novel concept for an optical multilayer ultrasonic hydrophone with the sensing film deposited on a triangular pyramid glass substrate is proposed. Using the calculation model for the spectral coefficients'derivatives of a dielectric multilayer optical coating, the acousto-optic sensitivity characteristic of the hydrophone is analyzed with different measurement laser polarizations and incident angles. We present a reasonable method and adjusting strategy for the optimum working point selection of the ultrasound measurement. Analytic results show that the novel hydrophone possesses all the other merits of a plate glass substrate optical multilayer hydrophone but with improved detection sensitivity. A longer measurement time without distortion decreases the difficulty of high frequency signal circuits. Spatial split of the ultrasound signal caused by the substrate's triangular pyramid roof simplifies the spatial spot area correction

  18. Silicon thin-film transistor backplanes on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattamis, Alexis Z.

    Flexible large area electronics, especially for displays, is a rapidly growing field. Since hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistors (a-Si:H TFTs) have become the industry standard for liquid crystal displays, it makes sense that they be used in any transition from glass substrates to flexible substrates. The goal of this thesis work was to implement a-Si:H backplane technology on stainless steel and clear plastic substrates, with minimal recipe changes to ensure high device quality. When fabricating TFTs on flexible substrates many new issues arise, from thin-film fracture to overlay alignment errors. Our approach was to maintain elevated deposition temperatures (˜300°C) and engineer methods to minimize these problems, rather than reducing deposition temperatures. The resulting TFTs exhibit more stable operation than their low temperature counterparts and are therefore similar to the TFTs produced on glass. Two display projects using a-Si:H TFTs will be discussed in detail. They are an active-matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) on stainless steel and an active-matrix electrophoretic display (AMEPD) on clear plastic, with TFTs deposited at 250°C-280°C. Achieving quality a-Si:H TFTs on these substrates required addressing a host of technical challenges, including surface roughness and feature misalignment. Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) was also implemented on a clear plastic substrate as a possible alternative to a-Si:H. nc-Si:H TFTs can be deposited using the same techniques as a-Si:H but yield carrier mobilities one order of magnitude greater. Their large mobilities could enable high resolution OLED displays and system-on-panel electronics.

  19. Composition of agarose substrate affects behavioral output of Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi Aristomenis Apostolopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the Drosophila larva has evolved into a simple model organism offering the opportunity to integrate molecular genetics with systems neuroscience. This led to a detailed understanding of the functional neuronal networks for a number of sensory functions and behaviors including olfaction, vision, gustation and learning and memory. Typically, behavioral assays in use exploit simple Petri dish setups with either agarose or agar as a substrate. However, neither the quality nor the concentration of the substrate is generally standardized across these experiments and there is no data available on how larval behavior is affected by such different substrates. Here, we have investigated the effects of different agarose concentrations on several larval behaviors. We demonstrate that agarose concentration is an important parameter, which affects all behaviors tested: preference, feeding, learning and locomotion. Larvae can discriminate between different agarose concentrations, they feed differently on them, they can learn to associate an agarose concentration with an odor stimulus and crawl faster on a substrate of higher agarose concentration. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of agarose concentration on three quinine based behaviors: preference, feeding and learning. We show that in all cases examined the behavioral output changes in an agarose concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that comparisons between experiments performed on substrates differing in agarose concentration should be done with caution. It should be taken into consideration that the agarose concentration can affect the behavioral output and thereby the experimental outcomes per se potentially due to an increased escape response on more rigid substrates.

  20. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde A Miles

    Full Text Available The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001 demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1s(-1, was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1s(-1. We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  1. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  2. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development. PMID:26069962

  3. Structure of human aspartyl aminopeptidase complexed with substrate analogue: insight into catalytic mechanism, substrate specificity and M18 peptidase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaikuad Apirat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Aspartyl aminopeptidase (DNPEP, with specificity towards an acidic amino acid at the N-terminus, is the only mammalian member among the poorly understood M18 peptidases. DNPEP has implicated roles in protein and peptide metabolism, as well as the renin-angiotensin system in blood pressure regulation. Despite previous enzyme and substrate characterization, structural details of DNPEP regarding ligand recognition and catalytic mechanism remain to be delineated. Results The crystal structure of human DNPEP complexed with zinc and a substrate analogue aspartate-β-hydroxamate reveals a dodecameric machinery built by domain-swapped dimers, in agreement with electron microscopy data. A structural comparison with bacterial homologues identifies unifying catalytic features among the poorly understood M18 enzymes. The bound ligands in the active site also reveal the coordination mode of the binuclear zinc centre and a substrate specificity pocket for acidic amino acids. Conclusions The DNPEP structure provides a molecular framework to understand its catalysis that is mediated by active site loop swapping, a mechanism likely adopted in other M18 and M42 metallopeptidases that form dodecameric complexes as a self-compartmentalization strategy. Small differences in the substrate binding pocket such as shape and positive charges, the latter conferred by a basic lysine residue, further provide the key to distinguishing substrate preference. Together, the structural knowledge will aid in the development of enzyme-/family-specific aminopeptidase inhibitors.

  4. Laser assisted removal of fixed contamination from metallic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single mode pulsed fiber laser was used to remove fixed contamination from stainless steel substrate by ablation. Samples were simulated by electro-deposition technique with 232U as the test contaminant. Laser power, repetition rate, laser beam scanning speed and number of passes were optimised to obtain the desired ablation depth in the substrate. Ablation depth varying between few microns to few hundreds of microns could be achieved through careful control of these processing parameters. The absence of any activity in laser treated samples provided experimental signature of the efficacy of the laser assisted removal of fixed contamination. (author)

  5. Optimization of Substrate Feeding for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Nordblad, Mathias;

    2013-01-01

    to be effective in mitigating the effects of substrate inhibition. Using enzymatic biodiesel production as a case study, the volumetric productivity of the reactor is increased while minimizing inactivation of the enzyme due to the alcohol. This is done by using a simple optimization routine where the substrate...... (both the vegetable oil and alcohol) feed rate/concentration is manipulated simultaneously. The results of the simulation were tested in the laboratory and are sufficiently positive to suggest the implementation of a feeding strategy for large scale enzymatic biodiesel production...

  6. Thin Film Substrates from the Raman spectroscopy point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparov, L.; Jegorel, T.; Loetgering, L.; Middey, S.; Chakhalian, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated ten standard single crystal substrates of complex oxides on the account of their applicability in the Raman spectroscopy based thin film research. In this study we suggest a spectra normalization procedure that utilizes a comparison of the substrate Raman spectra to those of well-established Raman reference materials. We demonstrate that MgO, LaGaO3, (LaAlO3)_0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)_0.7 (LSAT), DyScO3, YAlO3, and LaAlO3 can be of potential use for a Raman based thin film research....

  7. Integrated information theory: from consciousness to its physical substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie; Massimini, Marcello; Koch, Christof

    2016-07-01

    In this Opinion article, we discuss how integrated information theory accounts for several aspects of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. Integrated information theory starts from the essential properties of phenomenal experience, from which it derives the requirements for the physical substrate of consciousness. It argues that the physical substrate of consciousness must be a maximum of intrinsic cause-effect power and provides a means to determine, in principle, the quality and quantity of experience. The theory leads to some counterintuitive predictions and can be used to develop new tools for assessing consciousness in non-communicative patients.

  8. Substrate independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, L W-M

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphate release, [Pi], is often measured in an enzymatic reaction in a high throughput setting. Based on the published mechanism, we designed a protocol for our screening for inhibitors of SAICAR synthetase (PurC), and we found a gradual increase in [Pi] in positive control samples over the course of the day. Further investigation indicated that hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by PurC, rather than substrate-related phosphate release, was responsible for a partial contribution to the signals in the control samples. Thus substrate-independent ATPase activity may complicate high throughput screening. PMID:27430931

  9. Influence of nutrition and various substrates on spruce seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Matilda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the influence of main macronutrients (N, P, and K on growth and development of spruce (Picea abies L. Karst one-year old seedlings are presented. They were grown in containers, in nursery conditions, on four different substrates. There is a good influence on biogenous element contents, height, root collar diameter, needle length and mass, root mass as well as physiological vitality of spruce seedlings. It was observed that the effect of nutrition depends also on the type of substrate.

  10. Effects of Substrate Permeation on Kinetics of Phenol Biodegradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冀秀玲; 张金利; 李Wei; 韩振亭; 王一平

    2003-01-01

    Based on the theory of substrate permeation through the cytoplasmic membrane,and considering the effect of initial concentration of substrate,a new kinetic model of phenol degradation process was proposed,Comparing with the widely used Haldane model,which is greatly dependent on the initial phenol concentration,our model can be used to simulate the phenol degradation process in a wide range of initial phenol concentration by using only one set of model parameters ,Therefore,this new kinetic model has much more potential applications to industrial design and operation.

  11. RFID and Memory Devices Fabricated Integrally on Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic identification devices containing radio-frequency identification (RFID) circuits and antennas would be fabricated integrally with the objects to be identified, according to a proposal. That is to say, the objects to be identified would serve as substrates for the deposition and patterning of the materials of the devices used to identify them, and each identification device would be bonded to the identified object at the molecular level. Vacuum arc vapor deposition (VAVD) is the NASA derived process for depositing layers of material on the substrate. This proposal stands in contrast to the current practice of fabricating RFID and/or memory devices as wafer-based, self-contained integrated-circuit chips that are subsequently embedded in or attached to plastic cards to make smart account-information cards and identification badges. If one relies on such a chip to store data on the history of an object to be tracked and the chip falls off or out of the object, then one loses both the historical data and the means to track the object and verify its identity electronically. Also, in contrast is the manufacturing philosophy in use today to make many memory devices. Today s methods involve many subtractive processes such as etching. This proposal only uses additive methods, building RFID and memory devices from the substrate up in thin layers. VAVD is capable of spraying silicon, copper, and other materials commonly used in electronic devices. The VAVD process sprays most metals and some ceramics. The material being sprayed has a very strong bond with the substrate, whether that substrate is metal, ceramic, or even wood, rock, glass, PVC, or paper. An object to be tagged with an identification device according to the proposal must be compatible with a vacuum deposition process. Temperature is seldom an issue as the substrate rarely reaches 150 F (66 C) during the deposition process. A portion of the surface of the object would be designated as a substrate for

  12. Flexible substrates as basis for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob; Mikkelsen, Mette; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A photocatalytic system for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide was designed and constructed. The system relies on thin films of the photocatalyst prepared at low temperature using spray coating. We formulated inks based on the well-known photocatalyst titanium dioxide and characterized...... the performance in this setting. Glass substrates were used for model studies with an active area of 100cm2 and flexible substrates based on polyethyleneterphthalate (PET), polyethylenenaphtalate (PEN) and polyethylene (PE) with a similar area for prototypes of photocatalytic converters. The results from this new...

  13. Microbial transglutaminase displays broad acyl-acceptor substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Gundersen, Maria; Keillor, Jeffrey W.; Pelletier, Joelle N.

    2013-01-01

    , and Trp—but not Ile—also showed reactivity. Extending the search to nonnatural compounds, a ring near the amine group—particularly if aromatic—was beneficial for reactivity, although ring substituents reduced reactivity. Overall, amines attached to a less hindered carbon increased reactivity. Importantly...... understand the nature of nonnatural substrates that are tolerated by MTG, with the aim of diversifying biocatalytic applications of MTG.We show, for the first time, that very short-chain alkyl-based amino acids such as glycine can serve as acceptor substrates. The esterified α-amino acids Thr, Ser, Cys...

  14. Substrate induced crystallization of amorphous solid water at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that N2 monolayer desorption from ice surfaces is a quantitative, highly sensitive method for following the surface crystallization kinetics at low temperatures. Vapor deposited water films on a crystalline ice substrate exhibit amorphous growth at temperatures below ∼110 K. The rate of crystallization for these amorphous films is dramatically accelerated compared to the rate of crystallization observed for the amorphous films deposited directly on Pt(111). We find that the crystalline ice substrate acts as a two-dimensional nucleus for the growth of the crystalline phase, thereby accelerating the crystallization kinetics. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordill, M.J.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. PMID:25641995

  16. Substrate-facilitated nanoparticle sintering and component interconnection procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark; Leppäniemi, Jaakko; Vilkman, Marja; Alastalo, Ari; Mattila, Tomi

    2010-11-26

    Room temperature substrate-facilitated sintering of nanoparticles is demonstrated using commercially available silver nanoparticle ink and inkjet printing substrates. The sintering mechanism is based on the chemical removal of the nanoparticle stabilizing ligand and is shown to provide conductivity above one-fourth that of bulk silver. A novel approach to attach discrete components to printed conductors is presented, where the sintered silver provides the metallic interconnects with good electrical and mechanical properties. A process for printing and chip-on-demand assembly is suggested.

  17. Substrate dependent ultrafast dynamics in thin NiFe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, C. A. C.; Azevedo, A.; Acioli, L. H.

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the ultrafast electronic response of thin NiFe films by femtosecond transient reflectivity measurements. The experiments were performed on films with varying thicknesses, substrates, and pump fluences. It has been observed that for high excitation densities the electron cooling time depends strongly on the nature of the underlying substrate and we attribute our results to transport of hot carriers out of the excited region. In particular, we have observed that for NiFe over NiO, carrier transport should be less important than for NiFe over Si.

  18. QSAR Models for P-450 (2D6) Substrate Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Tine; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov;

    2009-01-01

    drugs and other chemicals. A training set of 747 chemicals primarily based on in vivo human data for the CYP isoenzyme 2D6 was collected from the literature. QSAR models focusing on substrate/non substrate activity were constructed by the use of MultiCASE, Leadscope and MDL quantitative structure......Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a large group of enzymes that possess an essential function in metabolising different exogenous and endogenous compounds. Humans have more than 50 different genes encoding CYP enzymes, among these a gene encoding for the CYP isoenzyme 2D6, a CYP able to metabolise...

  19. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  20. Millimeter-Waves Structures on Benzocyclobutene Dielectric Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Massa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The need of low-loss substrate materials with stable dielectric performances is a strong requirement when working at millimeter frequencies, where standard dielectrics exhibit prohibitive losses. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a polymer material, the benzocyclobutene (BCB, having a low dielectric constant and a low loss tangent, with a stable behavior up to THz frequencies. A specific in-house manufacture technology is described to realize millimeter-wave structures on a BCB dielectric substrate. Experimental validations on BCB-based circuits and antennas prototypes are discussed.

  1. Triple-Point Wetting of Molecular Hydrogen on Tailored Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Sohaili, Masoud; Klier, Jürgen; Leiderer, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Triple-point wetting is a well-known phenomenon of many simple adsorbates on solid substrates. It implies that in the liquid phase above the triple-point temperature, T3, complete wetting with the formation of arbitrarily thick films is observed, whereas below T3 only a few monolayers of the solid phase are adsorbed at saturated vapour pressure. This effect is usually ascribed to substrate-induced strain in the solid film, which occurs due to lattice mismatch and/or the strong van der Waals p...

  2. Optimization of Substrate Feeding for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Nordblad, Mathias;

    to be effective in mitigating the effects of substrate inhibition. Using enzymatic biodiesel production as a case study, the volumetric productivity of the reactor is increased while minimizing inactivation of the enzyme due to the alcohol. This is done by using a simple optimization routine where the substrate...... (both the vegetable oil and alcohol) feed rate/concentration is manipulated simultaneously. The results of the simulation were tested in the laboratory and are sufficiently positive to suggest the implementation of a feeding strategy for large scale enzymatic biodiesel production....

  3. A method of manufacturing graduated substrates for a semiconductor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yosikava, A.; Kadzumura, K.; Ota, K.; Sugino, T.; Vada, M.

    1984-01-12

    A method is patented for manufacturing a substrate with a graduated design for a semiconductor laser with a long service life and the necessary optical characteristics in a 1.5 micrometer spectral range. The laser is manufactured using a GaAs substrate with an active zone based on GaxAll-xAs. In order to achieve this goal, the active layer is equipped with a so called diffusion window whose diameter is chosen so that the threshold pumping current of the laser is less than 30 milliamperes.

  4. Electron beam irradiating process for rendering rough or topographically irregular surface substrates smooth; and coated substrates produced thereby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This disclosure involves a novel process for instantaneous electron-beam curing of very thin low viscosity, solventless coating upon rough, irregular or textured surfaces of a substrate such as paper or the like. Through rather critical timing and energy adjustment procedures, the coating firmly adheres to the surface before the coating can conform to the roughness or texture contour or substantially penetrate into the surface. By this method a solidified very smooth outer surface is provided for the substrate that is particularly used for metalization and other finished layerings. (author)

  5. A Rational Strategy for Graphene Transfer on Substrates with Rough Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Shin, Yong Cheol; Zubair, Ahmad; Mao, Yunwei; Palacios, Tomás; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is transferred by a very simple, yet effective approach from the growth substrate onto substrates with rough features. This novel and facile method not only results in satisfactory transfer on substrates with terraces or grooves, but also gives rise to a successful result for uneven growth substrates. PMID:26808866

  6. Influence of substrate temperature and bias voltage on the optical transmittance of TiN films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durusoy, H.Z.; Duyar, O.; Aydinli, A.; Ay, F.

    2003-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) thin films were prepared by means of reactive DC sputtering on quartz and sapphire substrates. Structural, electrical and optical effects of deposition parameters such as thickness, substrate temperature, substrate bias voltage were studied. The effect of substrate temperature

  7. Chemical analysis of substrates with controlled release fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-soluble fertilizer added to media containing controlled release fertilizer cannot be analysed with the 1:1.5 volume water extract, because the latter increases the element content in the extract. During storage and stirring or mixing the substrate with the extractant, part of the controlled re

  8. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  9. Smoothing of Diamond-Turned Substrates for Extreme Ultraviolet Illuminators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufli, R; Spiller, E; Schmidt, M A; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L; Ratti, S; Johnson, M A; Gullikson, E M

    2003-11-13

    Condenser optics in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) systems are subjected to frequent replacement as they are positioned close to the illumination source, where increased heating and contamination occur. In the case of aspherical condenser elements made by optical figuring/finishing, their replacement can be very expensive (several hundred thousand dollars). One approach to this problem would be to manufacture inexpensive illuminator optics that meet all required specifications and could be replaced at no substantial cost. Diamond-turned metal substrates are a factor of 100 less expensive than conventional aspherical substrates but have insufficient finish, leading to unacceptably low EUV reflectance after multilayer coating. In this work it is shown that, by applying a smoothing film prior to multilayer coating, the high spatial frequency roughness of a diamond-turned metal substrate is reduced from 1.76 to 0.27 nm rms while the figure slope error is maintained at acceptable levels. Metrology tests performed at various stages of the fabrication of the element demonstrated that it satisfied all critical figure and finish specifications as illuminator. Initial experimental results on the stability and performance of the optic under a real EUVL plasma source environment show no accelerated degradation when compared to conventional substrates.

  10. Profluorescent substrates for the screening of olefin metathesis catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Raphael; Ward, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report on a 96-well plate assay based on the fluorescence resulting from the ring-closing metathesis of two profluorophoric substrates. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, four commercially available ruthenium-metathesis catalysts were evaluated in six different solvents. The results from the fluorescent assay agree well with HPLC conversions, validating the usefulness of the approach. PMID:26664607

  11. Energy substrates to support glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M;

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance of glutamatergic and GABAergic activity requires a continuous supply of energy since the exocytotic processes as well as high affinity glutamate and GABA uptake and subsequent metabolism of glutamate to glutamine are energy demanding processes. The main energy substrate for the brain ...

  12. Adsorption of Papain on solid substrates of different hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmanová, Štěpánka; Kolivoška, Viliam; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fanelli, Nicolangelo; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption properties of protein Papain at the solid|liquid (0.1 M KCl) interfaces of different hydrophobicity [highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), bare gold, CH3, OH, and COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers on gold] were studied by a combined quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy techniques. It was found that Papain forms an incomplete monolayer at hydrophobic interfaces (HOPG and CH3-terminated substrate), whereas on more hydrophilic ones, a complete monolayer formation was always observed with either the onset of the formation of a second layer (bare gold substrate) or adsorption in a multilayer fashion, possibly a bilayer formation (OH-terminated substrate). The surface concentration and compact monolayer film thickness was much lower on the COOH-terminated substrate compared to other surfaces studied. This result was explained by partial dissociation of the interfacial COOH groups leading to additional electrostatic interactions between the positively charged protein domains and negatively charged carboxylate anions, as well as to local pH changes promoting protein denaturation. PMID:27405347

  13. Laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on copper substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Changsheng Liu; Xingqi Tao; Suiyuan Chen

    2006-01-01

    The laser cladding of Ni1015 alloy on Cu substrate was prepared by a high power continuous wave CO2 laser. Its microstructure was analyzed by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The average microhardness of the cladding coating was Hv 280, which was almost three times of that of the Cu substrate (Hv 85). OM and SEM observations showed that the obtained coating had a smooth and uniform surface, as well as a metallurgical combination with the Cu substrate without cracks and pores at the interface. With the addition of copper into the nickel-based alloy, the differences of thermal expansion coefficient and melting point between the interlayer and cladding were reduced, which resulted in low stresses during rapid cooling. Moreover, large amount of (Cu, Ni) solid solution formed a metallurgical bonding between the cladding coating and the substrate, which also relaxed the stresses, leading to the reduction of interfacial cracks and pores after laser cladding.

  14. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system. PMID:26896339

  15. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Coutinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT, whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s. Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs.

  16. Wetting morphologies and their transitions in grooved substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, Ralf; Bommer, Stefan; Herrmann, Carsten; Michler, Dominik [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan; Khare, Krishnacharya; Kostourou, Konstantina; Gurevich, Evgeny [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Law, Bruce M; McBride, Sean, E-mail: r.seemann@physik.uni-saarland.de [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2011-05-11

    When exposed to a partially wetting liquid, many natural and artificial surfaces equipped with complex topographies display a rich variety of liquid interfacial morphologies. In the present article, we focus on a few simple paradigmatic surface topographies and elaborate on the statics and dynamics of the resulting wetting morphologies. It is demonstrated that the spectrum of wetting morphologies increases with increasing complexity of the groove structure. On elastically deformable substrates, additional structures in the liquid morphologies can be observed, which are caused by deformations of the groove geometry in the presence of capillary forces. The emergence of certain liquid morphologies in grooves can be actively controlled by changes in wettability and geometry. For electrically conducting solid substrates, the apparent contact angle can be varied by electrowetting. This allows, depending on groove geometry, a reversible or irreversible transport of liquid along surface grooves. In the case of irreversible liquid transport in triangular grooves, the dynamics of the emerging instability is sensitive to the apparent hydrodynamic slip at the substrate. On elastic substrates, the geometry can be varied in a straightforward manner by stretching or relaxing the sample. The imbibition velocity in deformable grooves is significantly reduced compared to solid grooves, which is a result of the microscopic deformation of the elastic groove material close to the three phase contact line.

  17. A substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, surface gradients have attracted significant interest for various research and technological applications. In this paper, we report a facile and versatile method for generating surface gradients of immobilized nanoparticles, nanotopography and ligands that is independent from the substrate material. The method consists of first depositing a functional polymer layer on a substrate and subsequent time controlled immersion of this functionalized substrate in solution gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) or poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Chemical characterization by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and morphological analysis by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) show that the density of nanoparticles and the concentration of PSS across the surface increases in a gradient manner. As expected, time of immersion determines the concentration of surface bound species. We also demonstrate the generation of surface gradients of pure nanotopography. This is achieved by depositing a 5 nm thick plasma polymer layer on top of the number density gradient of nanoparticles to achieve a homogeneous surface chemistry. The surface independent approach for generation of surface gradients presented in this paper may open opportunities for a wider use of surface gradient in research and in various technologies. - Highlights: ► We present a substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients. ► We demonstrate well-defined density gradients of gold and silver nanoparticles. ► We provide an example of pure surface nanotopography gradients. ► We demonstrate concentration gradients of bound ligands

  18. Simulation of the substrate cavity dynamics of quercetinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, M; Swart, M; van Gunsteren, WF; Canters, GW

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on quercetin 2,3 dioxygenase (2,3QD) to study the mobility and flexibility of the substrate cavity. 2,3QD is the only firmly established Cu-containing dioxygenase known so far. It catalyses the breakage of the O-heterocycle of flavonols. The su

  19. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Santos, Juliana Inês; Alves, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be) investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT), whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s). Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs. PMID:27384562

  20. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system.

  1. Growth of white tabebuia seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marichel Canazza de Macedo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the white tabebuia (Tabebuia roseo-alba (Ridl. Sandwith seedlings emergence and growth in the beds according to different substrates. Two independent experiments were conducted. The emergence study was carried out in six substrates: 1- Plantmax®; 2- vermiculite; 3- sand; 4- soil + sand (1:1; 5- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 6- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (2:1:1 (v/v, and the experiment was set up according to a three-replicate randomized complete-block design. The growth study of seedlings was carried out according to a five-replicate randomized complete-block design with five substrates: 1- soil + sand (1:1; 2- soil + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1; 3- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 4- soil + sand + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1:1; 5- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (1:1:1 (v/v. The height results of seedling emergence, emergence speed index and the stem height were observed with Plantmax®, vermiculite, soil + carbonized rice husk and soil + sand + carbonized rice husk. The best results of seedling height, stem diameter, chlorophyll index, leaf area, root length and the stem dry mass weight and root were observed in the substrates with semi decomposed chicken manure. It is recommended the use of P, V, SC or SAC for seedling germination and emergence and SACF or SCF for seedling growth of white tabebuia.

  2. The technology of microcircuit assembly on flexible polyimide substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plis N. I.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is devoted to technology of microcircuit assembly on flexible polyimide substrate. It is proved that such microcircuits provide high reliability and have advantage over other IC models when applied in hermetic micro-assemblies in microelectronic devices that operate under high accelerations, shocks and strong radiation.

  3. Foldable Transparent Substrates with Embedded Electrodes for Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hoon; Park, Jin-Woo

    2015-08-26

    We present highly flexible transparent electrodes composed of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks and silica aerogels embedded into UV-curable adhesive photopolymers (APPs). Because the aerogels have an extremely high surface-to-volume ratio, the enhanced van der Waals forces of the aerogel surfaces result in more AgNWs being uniformly coated onto a release substrate and embedded into the APP when mixed with an AgNW solution at a fixed concentration. The uniform distribution of the embedded composite electrodes of AgNWs and aerogels was verified by the Joule heating test. The APP with the composite electrodes has a lower sheet resistance (Rs) and a better mechanical stability compared with APP without aerogels. The APP with the embedded electrodes is a freestanding flexible substrate and can be used as an electrode coating on a polymer substrate, such as polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene terephthalate. On the basis of the bending test results, the APPs with composite electrodes were sufficiently flexible to withstand a 1 mm bending radius (rb) and could be foldable with a slight change in Rs. Organic light emitting diodes were successfully fabricated on the APP with the composite electrodes, indicating the strong potential of the proposed flexible TEs for application as highly flexible transparent conductive substrates. PMID:26258906

  4. Visualization and functional characterization of the postinfarction arrhythmogenic substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessel, Pascalis Franciscus Hubertus Maria van

    2002-01-01

    Much knowledge concerning the mechanisms and nature of the postinfarction arrhythmogenic substrate has been gathered in the past decades. The ever-expanding therapeutic options require more insight in the selection of postinfarction patients at risk for developing life-threatening arrhythmias as wel

  5. Nucleolin (C23), a physiological substrate for casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Issinger, O G

    1988-01-01

    Nucleolin (C23), a 110 kDa phosphoprotein, which is mainly found in the nucleolus has been shown to be a physiological substrate for casein kinase II (CKII). Nucleolin was identified and characterized by immunodetection using an anti-nucleolin antibody. Phosphopeptide patterns from nucleolin...

  6. Designing substrates for silicene and germanene: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. X.; Zhong, Z.; Weinert, M.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a guideline for exploring substrates that stabilize the monolayer honeycomb structure of silicene and germanene while simultaneously preserving the Dirac states: in addition to having a strong binding energy to the monolayer, a suitable substrate should be a large-gap semiconductor with a proper work function such that the Dirac point lies in the gap and far from the substrate states when their bands align. We illustrate our idea by performing first-principles calculations for silicene and germanene on the Al-terminated (0001) surface of Al2O3 . The overlaid monolayers on Al-terminated Al2O3 (0001) retain the main structural profile of the low-buckled honeycomb structure via a binding energy comparable to the one between silicene and Ag(111). An unfolded band structure derived from the k -projection method reveals that a gapped Dirac cone is formed at the K point due to the structural distortion and the interaction with the substrate. The gaps of 0.4 and 0.3 eV, respectively, for the supported silicene and germanene suggest that they may have potential applications in nanoelectronics.

  7. Profluorescent substrates for the screening of olefin metathesis catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Raphael; Ward, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report on a 96-well plate assay based on the fluorescence resulting from the ring-closing metathesis of two profluorophoric substrates. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, four commercially available ruthenium-metathesis catalysts were evaluated in six different solvents. The results from the fluorescent assay agree well with HPLC conversions, validating the usefulness of the approach.

  8. Profluorescent substrates for the screening of olefin metathesis catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Reuter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report on a 96-well plate assay based on the fluorescence resulting from the ring-closing metathesis of two profluorophoric substrates. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, four commercially available ruthenium-metathesis catalysts were evaluated in six different solvents. The results from the fluorescent assay agree well with HPLC conversions, validating the usefulness of the approach.

  9. Profluorescent substrates for the screening of olefin metathesis catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Herein we report on a 96-well plate assay based on the fluorescence resulting from the ring-closing metathesis of two profluorophoric substrates. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, four commercially available ruthenium-metathesis catalysts were evaluated in six different solvents. The results from the fluorescent assay agree well with HPLC conversions, validating the usefulness of the approach. PMID:26664607

  10. Transparent conducting oxides on polymeric substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Jan Matthijn

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the research on thin films of transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) on polymeric substrates manufactured by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). TCOs are an indispensable part in optoelectronic applications such as displays, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, etc. At present, in many

  11. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, T.; Joore, J.; Workum, W. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian s

  12. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  13. Microstructure in electrodeposited copper layers; the role of the substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anette Alsted; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Horsewell, Andy;

    2001-01-01

    The microstructures of Cu layers, ranging in thickness from 3 to 12 microns, were investigated. The layers were electrodeposited from an acidic copper electrolyte onto two distinct substrate materials important for the micro-components industry: an Au layer with a pronounced lll-texture, and a nano...

  14. Glycine betaine as a direct substrate for methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners. PMID:24162571

  15. PROPERTIES OF NEW STRAINS CHEMOLITHOTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM INDUSTRIAL SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was determination of strains Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans MFLv37 and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans MFLad27, isolated from aboriginal consortium of coal beneficiation dumps and fly ash from coal combustion, resistance to heavy metals, forming part of these waste, as well as adaption ability of the strains to new substrates. New strains increased resistance to heavy metal ions as compared to A. ferrooxidans standard and collection strains is found; minimal inhibitory concentrations of heavy and toxic metals are determined; a number of metals that have negative impact on growth of isolated cultures are identified. It is shown that the minimal metals concentrations, at which strains growth still happens, are several times higher than their concentrations in technogenic waste. It has been established that isolated strains differed in their ability to adapt, as well as in growth rate and substrates oxidation. This is due to the specific conditions of microbiocenoses formation in making and further storage of rock dumps and fly ash, whereof the appropriate strains are isolated. The investigations indicate the necessity in directional selection of strains that are resistant to the toxic compounds and are able to oxidize various mineral substrates, as well as in their adaptation to new substrates for the extraction of heavy metals.

  16. Photoinduced absorption of Ag nanoparticles deposited on ITO substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We study photoinduced absorption for two Ag NP deposited on the ITO. → The higher resistance eof the NP favors larger photoinduced changes. → Principal role is played by nanointerfaces. - Abstract: Substantial changes of absorption after illumination by 300 mW continuous wave green laser at 532 nm were observed. The effect of indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate was explored versus Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) size, their regularity and surface plasmon resonance. The ITO substrate features play a crucial role for the formation of homogenous AgNPs. The attachments of AgNPs on ITO surface as well as their homogeneity are significantly changed under the influence of the laser treatment. We study the Ag NP deposited on the two different substrates which play a crucial role in the photoinduced absorption. The dependence of the photoinduced absorption versus the time of optical treatment is explained within a framework of the photopolarization of the particular trapping levels on the borders between the ITO substrate and the Ag NP.

  17. Micronutrient availability from steel slag amendment in peatmoss substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to determine the suitability of a steel slag product for supplying micronutrients to container-grown floriculture crops. Geranium (Pelargonium xhortorum 'Maverick Red') and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon 'Megabite') were grown in 11.4 cm containers with a substrate ...

  18. Substrate Acidification by Geranium (Pelargonium x Hortorum) I: Temperature Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden pH decline (SPD) describes the situation where crops growing at an appropriate pH, suddenly (1-2 weeks) cause the substrate pH to shift downward one to two units. ‘Designer Dark Red’ Geraniums were grown in three experiments to test the effects of temperature on SPD. The first experiment te...

  19. Substrate Reinforcement and Dialectal Differences in Melanesian Pidgin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates substrate reinforcement in the development of three current dialects of Melanesian Pidgin. Evidence of earlier variability is presented and the sociolinguistic conditions that later led to greater stability are described. Grammatical features that differentiate the dialects are examined. For each feature, it is shown that at least two…

  20. Fabrication of Nanoscale Circuits on Inkjet-Printing Patterned Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuoran; Su, Meng; Zhang, Cong; Gao, Meng; Bao, Bin; Yang, Qiang; Su, Bin; Song, Yanlin

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale circuits are fabricated by assembling different conducting materials (e.g., metal nanoparticles, metal nano-wires, graphene, carbon nanotubes, and conducting polymers) on inkjet-printing patterned substrates. This non-litho-graphy strategy opens a new avenue for integrating conducting building blocks into nanoscale devices in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:26011403

  1. Surface instabilities of epitaxial films on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqua, N.; Grilhé, J.

    1993-08-01

    The energy variation of an epitaxial film on a substrate is calculated when sinusoidal roughness appears at the surface, using the method of the surface dislocation model. The energy variation is negative beyond a critical value of wavelength which depends on the thickness of the film and on the ratio of the shear moduli of substrate and film. The kinetic of roughness development during film growing are discussed. La méthode des dislocations de surface est utilisée pour calculer la variation d'énergie d'un film mince en épitaxie sur un substrat lorsqu'une rugosité de forme sinusoïdale apparaît à sa surface. On détermine une longueur d'onde critique dépendant du rapport des coefficients d'élasticité du substrat et du film et aussi de l'épaisseur du film, au-delà de laquelle la variation d'énergie est négative. On discute également de la cinétique du développement de la rugosité.

  2. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A;

    1983-01-01

    Human embryonic skin fibroblasts have been shown to attach and spread on laminin substrates in the absence of protein synthesis and presence of fibronectin-depleted serum and anti-fibronectin antibodies. Rates of attachment and the type of spreading are virtually identical on fibronectin...

  3. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in th

  4. Characterisation of CMP-sialic acid transporter substrate recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, A.; Itzstein, M. von; Guzman, I.B. Rodriguez; Ashikov, A.M.; Stephens, A.S.; Haselhorst, T.; Tiralongo, J.

    2013-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid transporter: We report an in-depth, multidisciplinary, structural study that has identified the amino acid residues intimately involved in CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST) substrate specificity. Our data provide a significant contribution towards a better understanding the structure

  5. Towards easily reproducible nano-structured SERS substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Boisen, Anja; Hübner, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a quick and easy method for producing relatively large areas of substrate that enhance the Raman effect, using standard semiconductor processing techniques such as reactive ion etching of silicon and electron beam metal deposition. As standard cleanroom processes are used...

  6. Substrate as driver of sponge distributions in mangrove ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Hunting; O. Franken; F. Knopperts; M.H.S. Kraak; R. Vargas; W.F.M. Rölling; H.G. van der Geest

    2013-01-01

    Caribbean mangrove-associated sponge communities are very distinct from sponge communities living on nearby reefs, but the mechanisms that underlie this distinction remain uncertain. This study aimed to elucidate the relative importance of substrate and habitat in determining the ability of sponges

  7. Substrate-enzyme interactions and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Hansen, S;

    1992-01-01

    Based on the high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus, the orientation of the phosphatidylcholine substrate in the active site of the enzyme is proposed. The proposal is based on extensive calculations using the GRID program and molecular mechanics...

  8. Growth of Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 on mixed substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick V. Gurgel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 was grown on a mixed substrate comprising glucose and xylose. Inocula were grown using xylose or glucose as carbon source. Results showed that xylose utilization was delayed until glucose was utilized. Inoculum prepared on glucose showed a lag phase in xylose consumption. Cell mass production was higher when glucose was utilized during fermentation.

  9. Ecomorphology of Astyanax species in streams with different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela A. Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we assessed the ecomorphology of two species of Astyanax in streams with different substrates found in the Rio São Francisco Basin. The dominant substrate of each stream was defined as either "fine" (0 to 2 mm, "gravel" (2 to 250 mm, "rock" (> 250 mm, or "leaf bank". We analyzed a total of 22 ecomorphological attributes of Astyanax intermedius Eigenmann, 1908 (127 individuals and Astyanax rivularis (Lütken, 1875 (238 individuals adults. We detected significant ecomorphological differences between the populations of A. rivularis and A. intermedius from habitats with different types of substrates. However, the two species did not show the same morphological differences depending on the type of substrate. These results confirmed the hypothesis that individuals from environments with different characteristics may have different ecomorphological patterns. Knowing that morphology is associated with habitat use and available resources, the loss of a resource or a modification in the environment may directly affect the permanence of a species, leading to a loss of morphologic diversity.

  10. A Novel Substrate Used for Simultaneous SERS and RAIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel substrate, whose silver particles were deposited on both sides of a slide, was made by silver mirror reaction. Its two sides had different thinness and reflectivity and they were suited for the test of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR) technique respectively.

  11. Structural Basis of Substrate Specificity in Geobacter metallireducens SMUG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhemin; Shen, Jiemin; Yang, Ye; Li, Jing; Cao, Weiguo; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-17

    Base deamination is a common type of DNA damage that occurs in all organisms. DNA repair mechanisms are critical to maintain genome integrity, in which the base excision repair pathway plays an essential role. In the BER pathway, the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily is responsible for removing the deaminated bases from DNA and generates apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. Geobacter metallireducens SMUG1 (GmeSMUG1) is an interesting family 3 enzyme in the UDG superfamily, with dual substrate specificities for DNA with uracil or xanthine. In contrast, the mutant G63P of GmeSMUG1 has exclusive activity for uracil, while N58D is inactive for both substrates, as we have reported previously. However, the structural bases for these substrate specificities are not well understood. In this study, we solved a series of crystal structures of WT and mutants of GmeSMUG1 at relatively high resolutions. These structures provide insight on the molecular mechanism of xanthine recognition for GmeSMUG1 and indicate that H210 plays a key role in xanthine recognition, which is in good agreement with the results of our EMSA and activity assays. More importantly, our mutant structures allow us to build models to rationalize our previous experimental observations of altered substrate activities of these mutants. PMID:27071000

  12. Mechanical Characterization of Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional IC packages form a rigid shell around silicon IC dies. Their purpose is to provide environmental protection, electrical interconnect and heat dissipation. Despite the fact that majority of current silicon IC′s are realized in a very thin top layer of the silicon substrate (<10µm), the t

  13. Large area flexible SERS active substrates using engineered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Aram J.; Huh, Yun Suk; Erickson, David

    2011-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an analytical sensing method that provides label-free detection, molecularly specific information, and extremely high sensitivity. The Raman enhancement that makes this method attractive is mainly attributed to the local amplification of the incident electromagnetic field that occurs when a surface plasmon mode is excited at a metallic nanostructure. Here, we present a simple, cost effective method for creating flexible, large area SERS-active substrates using a new technique we call shadow mask assisted evaporation (SMAE). The advantage of large, flexible SERS substrates such as these is they have more area for multiplexing and can be incorporated into irregular surfaces such as clothing. We demonstrate the formation of four different types of nanostructure arrays (pillar, nib, ellipsoidal cylinder, and triangular tip) by controlling the evaporation angle, substrate rotation, and deposition rate of metals onto anodized alumina nanoporous membranes as large as 27 mm. In addition, we present experimental results showing how a hybrid structure comprising of gold nanospheres embedded in a silver nano-pillar structure can be used to obtain a 50× SERS enhancement over the raw nanoparticles themselves.Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an analytical sensing method that provides label-free detection, molecularly specific information, and extremely high sensitivity. The Raman enhancement that makes this method attractive is mainly attributed to the local amplification of the incident electromagnetic field that occurs when a surface plasmon mode is excited at a metallic nanostructure. Here, we present a simple, cost effective method for creating flexible, large area SERS-active substrates using a new technique we call shadow mask assisted evaporation (SMAE). The advantage of large, flexible SERS substrates such as these is they have more area for multiplexing and can be incorporated into irregular surfaces such as

  14. Structural basis for substrate specificity of mammalian neuraminidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Smutova

    Full Text Available The removal of sialic acid (Sia residues from glycoconjugates in vertebrates is mediated by a family of neuraminidases (sialidases consisting of Neu1, Neu2, Neu3 and Neu4 enzymes. The enzymes play distinct physiological roles, but their ability to discriminate between the types of linkages connecting Sia and adjacent residues and between the identity and arrangement of the underlying sugars has never been systematically studied. Here we analyzed the specificity of neuraminidases by studying the kinetics of hydrolysis of BODIPY-labeled substrates containing common mammalian sialylated oligosaccharides: 3'Sia-LacNAc, 3'SiaLac, SiaLex, SiaLea, SiaLec, 6'SiaLac, and 6'SiaLacNAc. We found significant differences in substrate specificity of the enzymes towards the substrates containing α2,6-linked Sia, which were readily cleaved by Neu3 and Neu1 but not by Neu4 and Neu2. The presence of a branching 2-Fuc inhibited Neu2 and Neu4, but had almost no effect on Neu1 or Neu3. The nature of the sugar residue at the reducing end, either glucose (Glc or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc had only a minor effect on all neuraminidases, whereas core structure (1,3 or 1,4 bond between D-galactose (Gal and GlcNAc was found to be important for Neu4 strongly preferring β3 (core 1 to β4 (core 2 isomer. Neu3 and Neu4 were in general more active than Neu1 and Neu2, likely due to their preference for hydrophobic substrates. Neu2 and Neu3 were examined by molecular dynamics to identify favorable substrate orientations in the binding sites and interpret the differences in their specificities. Finally, using knockout mouse models, we confirmed that the substrate specificities observed in vitro were recapitulated in enzymes found in mouse brain tissues. Our data for the first time provide evidence for the characteristic substrate preferences of neuraminidases and their ability to discriminate between distinct sialoside targets.

  15. Broad Band Antireflection Coatings for Silicon and Germanium Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Dirk Francois

    Infrared antireflection coatings for silicon and germanium substrates and some of the associated problems are addressed in this thesis. One of the first problems identified and investigated was that of the adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The cleaning of the Ge discs was evaluated by means of Auger spectroscopy. The main contaminant species found were carbon, oxygen and in the case of germanium substrates sulphur. No sulphur was found on silicon substrates. A wash in a series of organic solutions followed by a bake inside the vacuum chamber lead to much improved though still not acceptable adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The influence of a contact layer between the substrate and ZnS was investigated. Firstly, metal contact layers (Ni, Cr, Cu) were tried to improve the adhesion of the ZnS films. These samples (germanium-metal-zinc sulphide) were annealed in air in order to transfer the germanium -metal film to a germanide region and thus high optical transmission at long wave-lengths. Slight absorption still results even after the annealing of these samples. A dielectric material, Y_2O_3 , was therefore tested replacing the metal films. The system Ge-Y_2O_3 -ZnS in conjunction with an organic wash and vacuum bake lead to excellent adhesion of the ZnS layers to the germanium substrates. The next problem area addressed was that of a low refractive index material replacement for ThF _4. Four materials were investigated, i.e. ZnS, PbF_2, Y_2O _3 and YF_3. The refractive indices found for these compounds in thin film form at a wavelength of 10 μm is 2,18 for ZnS, 1,7 for PbF_2, 1,42 for Y_2O_3 and 1,3 for YF_3. From these results YF_3 was chosen as low refractive index material in the coating designs. Multi-layer coatings incorporating ZnS, Ge and YF_3 films were designed and evaporated. Measured reflectance values below 0,2% were obtained from 9 μm to 11 mum. These systems were stable and robust. Finally, a silicon ball lens was

  16. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  17. Evaluation of different substrates for inkjet printing of rasagiline mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, Natalja; Janßen, Eva Maria; Breitenbach, Armin; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Sandler, Niklas

    2013-11-01

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate applicability of the different model substrates, namely orodispersible films (ODFs), porous copy paper sheets, and water impermeable transparency films (TFs) in preparation of the inkjet-printed drug-delivery systems. Rasagiline mesylate (RM) was used as a low-dose active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Flexible doses of the drug in a single unit were obtained by printing several subsequent layers on top of the already printed ones, using an off-the-shelf consumer thermal inkjet (TIJ) printer. The produced drug-delivery systems were subjected to microscopic and chemical analysis together with solid-state characterization and content uniformity studies. The results revealed that RM recrystallized on the surface of ODFs and TFs, and the printed crystals were arranged in lines. No drug crystals were detected after printing on the surface of the copy paper due to absorption of the ink into the matrix of the substrate. The best linear correlation between the dose of the drug and the number of the printing layers was obtained for the porous copy paper. The other two substrates showed poor linearity and unacceptable standard deviations of the printed drug substance due to limited absorption of the API ink into the carrier. The shear stress between the substrate, the print head, and the paper feeding rollers caused smearing of the drug that had been surface-deposited during the earlier printing cycles. In conclusion, this study indicates that the edible substrates with absorption properties similar to copy paper are favorable for successful preparation of drug-delivery systems by TIJ printers.

  18. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  19. Uric acid and thiocyanate as competing substrates of lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Antonia; Parker, Heather; Turner, Rufus; Dickerhof, Nina; Khalilova, Irada S; Wilbanks, Sigurd M; Kettle, Anthony J; Jameson, Guy N L

    2014-08-01

    The physiological function of urate is poorly understood. It may act as a danger signal, an antioxidant, or a substrate for heme peroxidases. Whether it reacts sufficiently rapidly with lactoperoxidase (LPO) to act as a physiological substrate remains unknown. LPO is a mammalian peroxidase that plays a key role in the innate immune defense by oxidizing thiocyanate to the bactericidal and fungicidal agent hypothiocyanite. We now demonstrate that urate is a good substrate for bovine LPO. Urate was oxidized by LPO to produce the electrophilic intermediates dehydrourate and 5-hydroxyisourate, which decayed to allantoin. In the presence of superoxide, high yields of hydroperoxides were formed by LPO and urate. Using stopped-flow spectroscopy, we determined rate constants for the reaction of urate with compound I (k1 = 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) and compound II (k2 = 8.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). During urate oxidation, LPO was diverted from its peroxidase cycle because hydrogen peroxide reacted with compound II to give compound III. At physiologically relevant concentrations, urate competed effectively with thiocyanate, the main substrate of LPO for oxidation, and inhibited production of hypothiocyanite. Similarly, hypothiocyanite-dependent killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was inhibited by urate. Allantoin was present in human saliva and associated with the concentration of LPO. When hydrogen peroxide was added to saliva, oxidation of urate was dependent on its concentration and peroxidase activity. Our findings establish urate as a likely physiological substrate for LPO that will influence host defense and give rise to reactive electrophilic metabolites.

  20. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond.

  1. From UBE3A to Angelman syndrome: a substrate perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle L Sell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by motor dysfunction, intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures and common features of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Some of these AS related phenotypes can be seen in other neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams, 2011;Tan et al., 2014. AS patients commonly carry mutations that render the maternally inherited UBE3A gene nonfunctional. Duplication of the chromosomal region containing the UBE3A gene is associated with ASDs. Although the causative role for UBE3A gene mutations in AS is well established, a long-standing challenge in AS research has been to identify neural substrates of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A prevailing hypothesis is that changes in UBE3A protein levels would alter the levels of a collection of protein substrates, giving rise to the unique phenotypic aspects of AS and possibly UBE3A associated ASDs. Interestingly, proteins altered in AS are linked to additional ASDs that are not previously associated with changes in UBE3A, indicating a possible molecular overlap underlying the broad-spectrum phenotypes of these neurogenetic disorders. This idea raises the possibility that there may exist a one-size-fits-all approach to the treatment of neurogenetic disorders with phenotypes overlapping AS. Furthermore, while a comprehensive list of UBE3A substrates and downstream affected pathways should be developed, this is only part of the story. The timing of when UBE3A protein functions, through either changes in UBE3A or possibly substrate expression patterns, appears to be critical for AS phenotype development. These data call for further investigation of UBE3A substrates and their timing of action relevant to AS phenotypes.

  2. From UBE3A to Angelman syndrome: a substrate perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Gabrielle L; Margolis, Seth S

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by motor dysfunction, intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures and common features of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Some of these AS related phenotypes can be seen in other neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams, 2011; Tan et al., 2014). AS patients commonly carry mutations that render the maternally inherited UBE3A gene non-functional. Duplication of the chromosomal region containing the UBE3A gene is associated with ASDs. Although the causative role for UBE3A gene mutations in AS is well established, a long-standing challenge in AS research has been to identify neural substrates of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A prevailing hypothesis is that changes in UBE3A protein levels would alter the levels of a collection of protein substrates, giving rise to the unique phenotypic aspects of AS and possibly UBE3A associated ASDs. Interestingly, proteins altered in AS are linked to additional ASDs that are not previously associated with changes in UBE3A, indicating a possible molecular overlap underlying the broad-spectrum phenotypes of these neurogenetic disorders. This idea raises the possibility that there may exist a "one-size-fits-all" approach to the treatment of neurogenetic disorders with phenotypes overlapping AS. Furthermore, while a comprehensive list of UBE3A substrates and downstream affected pathways should be developed, this is only part of the story. The timing of when UBE3A protein functions, through either changes in UBE3A or possibly substrate expression patterns, appears to be critical for AS phenotype development. These data call for further investigation of UBE3A substrates and their timing of action relevant to AS phenotypes. PMID:26441497

  3. Effects of Substrate Local Strain on Microstructure of Electrodeposited Aluminum Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Yuehua; YAN Bo; GAO Ge; YANG Yuxin

    2006-01-01

    The aluminum coating layer was formed on a copper substrate with local strain region by using the electrodeposited method. It was found that the particle shape of the coating deposited on the copper substrate is very sensitive to the strain extent of substrate. The large needle-like aluminum particles were observed on the substrate region with large local strain, indicating that substrate local strain may affect the shape of the deposited particles and promote the nucleation and growth of the deposited particles.

  4. PLASMA POLYMER FILMS AS ADHESION PROMOTING PRIMERS FOR ALUMINUM SUBSTRATES. PART I: CHARACTERIZATION OF FILMS AND FILM/SUBSTRATE INTERFACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films (~800 Å in thickness) were deposited onto aluminum substrates (6111-T4 alloy) in radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) powered reactors to be used as primers for structural adhesive bonding. Processing variables such as sub...

  5. Substrate-dependent modulation of CYP3A4 catalytic activity: analysis of 27 test compounds with four fluorometric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stresser, D M; Blanchard, A P; Turner, S D; Erve, J C; Dandeneau, A A; Miller, V P; Crespi, C L

    2000-12-01

    Inhibition of cytochrome P450 catalytic activity is a principal mechanism for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Rapid, in vitro testing for cytochrome P450 inhibition potential is part of the current paradigm for identifying drug candidates likely to give such interactions. We have explored the extent that qualitative and quantitative inhibition parameters are dependent on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 probe substrate. Inhibition potential (e.g., IC(50) values from 8-point inhibition curves) or activation potential for most compounds varied dramatically depending on the fluorometric probe substrates for CYP3A4 [benzyloxyresorufin (BzRes), 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC), 7-benzyloxyquinoline (BQ), and dibenzylfluorescein (DBF)]. For 21 compounds that were primarily inhibitors, the range of IC(50) values for the four substrates varied from 2.1- to 195-fold with an average of 29-fold. While the rank order of sensitivity among the fluorometric substrates varied among the individual inhibitors, on average, BFC dealkylation was the most sensitive to inhibition, while BQ dealkylation was least sensitive. Partial inhibition was observed with BzRes and BQ but not for BFC and DBF. BzRes was more prone to activation, whereas dramatic changes in IC(50) values were observed when the BQ concentration was below the S(50). Three different correlation analyses indicated that IC(50) values with BFC, BQ, and DBF correlated well with each other, whereas the response with BzRes correlated more weakly with the other substrates. One of these correlation analyses was extended to the percent inhibition of 10 microM inhibitor with the standard CYP3A4 probe substrates testosterone, midazolam, and nifedipine. In this analysis the responses with BQ, BFC and DBF correlated well with testosterone and midazolam but more poorly with nifedipine. In the aggregate, BFC and DBF appear more suitable as an initial screen for CYP3A4 inhibition. However, the substrate-dependent effects

  6. Utilization of pyrolytic substrate by microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: cell membrane property change as a response of the substrate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefei; Jarboe, Laura; Wen, Zhiyou

    2016-05-01

    Acetic acid derived from fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is a promising substrate for microalgae fermentation for producing lipid-rich biomass. However, crude pyrolytic acetic acid solution contains various toxic compounds inhibiting algal growth. It was hypothesized that such an inhibition was mainly due to the cell membrane damage. In this work, the cell membrane property of algal cells was evaluated at various conditions to elucidate the mechanisms of inhibition caused by the pyrolytic substrate solution. It was found that acetic acid itself served a carbon source for boosting algal cell growth but also caused cell membrane leakage. The acetic acid concentration for highest cell density was 4 g/L. Over-liming treatment of crude pyrolytic acetic acid increased the algal growth with a concurrent reduction of cell membrane leakage. Directed evolution of algal strain enhanced cell membrane integrity and thus increased its tolerance to the toxicity of the crude substrate. Statistical analysis shows that there was a significant correlation between the cell growth performance and the cell membrane integrity (leakage) but not membrane fluidity. The addition of cyto-protectants such as Pluronic F68 and Pluronic F127 enhanced the cell membrane integrity and thus, resulted in enhanced cell growth. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of algal cells visually confirmed the cell membrane damage as the mechanism of the pyrolytic substrate inhibition. Collectively, this work indicates that the cell membrane is one major reason for the toxicity of pyrolytic acetic acid when being used for algal culture. To better use this pyrolytic substrate, cell membrane of the microorganism needs to be strengthened through either strain improvement or addition of membrane protectant reagents. PMID:26995605

  7. Electrically robust silver nanowire patterns transferrable onto various substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Shi; Liu, Chuan; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Cao, Wu; Qiu, Jing-Shen; Shieh, Han-Ping D.; Yang, Bo-Ru

    2016-03-01

    We report a facile technique for patterning and transferring silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto various substrates. By employing only UV/O3 and vapor treatment of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), we are able to accurately manipulate the surface energy via alternating the terminal groups of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, so as to assist selective formation and exfoliation of AgNW films. A simple UV/O3 treatment on PDMS enables uniform, well-defined, and highly conductive patterns of AgNWs after spin-coating. A vapor treatment of HMDS lowers the surface energy of the oxidized PDMS so that the patterned AgNWs embedded in an epoxy resin (EPR) are cleanly transferred from the PDMS to the target substrate. It is found that the AgNW-EPR composite on polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) exhibits remarkable durability under the bending test, tape test, ultrasonic treatment in water, and immersion of chemical solvents. In addition, we demonstrate that the AgNW-EPR composite work well as conductive patterns on the oxidized PDMS, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), paper, and curved glass. The facile technique extends the applicability of AgNWs in the field of electronics, and it is potentially applicable to other nanomaterials.We report a facile technique for patterning and transferring silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto various substrates. By employing only UV/O3 and vapor treatment of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), we are able to accurately manipulate the surface energy via alternating the terminal groups of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, so as to assist selective formation and exfoliation of AgNW films. A simple UV/O3 treatment on PDMS enables uniform, well-defined, and highly conductive patterns of AgNWs after spin-coating. A vapor treatment of HMDS lowers the surface energy of the oxidized PDMS so that the patterned AgNWs embedded in an epoxy resin (EPR) are cleanly transferred from the PDMS to the target substrate. It is found that the AgNW-EPR composite on polyethylene

  8. Catalysis of protein disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A; Barrows, Seth R; Raines, Ronald T

    2005-09-13

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a beta hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N and C terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N(epsilon)-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E(o') = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys-Gly-His-Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/K(M) = 1.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude

  9. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  10. Effects of substrate loading on enzymatic hydrolysis and viscosity of pretreated barley straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosgaard, L.; Andric, Pavle; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2007-01-01

    glucose concentration, 78 g/l, after 72 h of reaction, was obtained with an initial, full substrate loading of 15% dry matter weight/weight (w/w DM). Conversely, the glucose yields, in grams per gram of DM, were highest at lower substrate concentrations, with the highest glucose yield being 0.53 g/g DM...... for the reaction with a substrate loading of 5% w/w DM after 72 h. The reactions subjected to gradual loading of substrate or substrate plus enzymes to increase the substrate levels from 5 to 15% w/w DM, consistently provided lower concentrations of glucose after 72 h of reaction; however, the initial rates......In this study, the applicability of a "fed-batch" strategy, that is, sequential loading of substrate or substrate plus enzymes during enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated for hydrolysis of steam-pretreated barley straw. The specific aims were to achieve hydrolysis of high substrate levels, low...

  11. Propagation of surface plasmons on highly anisotropic dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagaraj; Krokhin, Arkadii

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the propagation length of surface plasmons in dielectric-metal-dielectric structures with anisotropic substrates. We show that the proper orientation of the optical axis of the crystal with respect to the metal surface minimizes Joule losses enhancing the propagation length of surface plasmons. The propagation length in a wide range of frequencies including the telecommunications region is analyzed. A simple Kronig-Penney model for anisotropic plasmonic crystal where the substrate is a periodic sequence of dielectric delta-peaks is also proposed. In this model the dispersion relation for surface plasmon has a band structure where the band width tends to zero when the frequency approaches the resonant frequency. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46312.

  12. Thin film transistors for displays on plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. J.; Judge, C. P.; Wright, S. W.

    2000-08-01

    We have successfully made thin film transistors on transparent, flexible polymer substrates. These transistors have electrical properties suitable for driving the pixels in active matrix liquid crystal displays and also for building integrated row driver circuits. The devices are fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate using a low temperature CdSe process at a maximum temperature of 150°C, by evaporation and radio frequency sputtering onto unheated substrates, with pattern definition using standard photolithography and etching. Electrical properties achieved include carrier field effect mobilities of >30 cm 2/V s, threshold voltages of ˜2 V, switching ratio >10 6, an off-state leakage current of 1 μA with a gate voltage swing of electrical properties were found to scale with device channel length and width.

  13. Buffer layers on metal alloy substrates for superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.

    2004-10-05

    An article including a substrate, at least one intermediate layer upon the surface of the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the at least one intermediate layer, and a layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of the SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material in such an article, J.sub.c 's of up to 1.3.times.10.sup.6 A/cm.sup.2 have been demonstrated with projected I.sub.c 's of over 200 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  14. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  15. Electrowetting in a water droplet with a movable floating substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Amir; Masud, A. R.; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-05-01

    Electrowetting (EW) enables facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a hydrophobic surface. In this study, manipulation of an electrolyte droplet having a small floating object on it was investigated on a solid hydrophobic substrate under the EW process. Herein, the floating object exhibited a vertical motion under an applied electric field owing to the spreading and contraction of the droplet on its connecting substrates. The field-induced height variation of the floating object was significantly influenced by the thicknesses of the dielectric and hydrophobic materials. A small mass was also placed on the top floating object and its effect on the spreading of the droplet was observed. In this system, the height of the top floating object is precisely controllable under the application of an electric voltage. The proposed system is expected to be highly useful in the design of nano- and micro-oscillatory systems for microengineering.

  16. Molecular tailoring of interfaces for thin film on substrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha Elizabeth

    Thin film on substrate systems appear most prevalently within the microelectronics industry, which demands that devices operate in smaller and smaller packages with greater reliability. The reliability of these multilayer film systems is strongly influenced by the adhesion of each of the bimaterial interfaces. During use, microelectronic components undergo thermo-mechanical cycling, which induces interfacial delaminations leading to failure of the overall device. The ability to tailor interfacial properties at the molecular level provides a mechanism to improve thin film adhesion, reliability and performance. This dissertation presents the investigation of molecular level control of interface properties in three thin film-substrate systems: photodefinable polyimide films on passivated silicon substrates, self-assembled monolayers at the interface of Au films and dielectric substrates, and mechanochemically active materials on rigid substrates. For all three materials systems, the effect of interfacial modifications on adhesion is assessed using a laser-spallation technique. Laser-induced stress waves are chosen because they dynamically load the thin film interface in a precise, noncontacting manner at high strain rates and are suitable for both weak and strong interfaces. Photodefinable polyimide films are used as dielectrics in flip chip integrated circuit packages to reduce the stress between silicon passivation layers and mold compound. The influence of processing parameters on adhesion is examined for photodefinable polyimide films on silicon (Si) substrates with three different passivation layers: silicon nitride (SiNx), silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), and the native silicon oxide (SiO2). Interfacial strength increases when films are processed with an exposure step as well as a longer cure cycle. Additionally, the interfacial fracture energy is assessed using a dynamic delamination protocol. The high toughness of this interface (ca. 100 J/m2) makes it difficult

  17. Holographic substrate-guided spectrometer for atmospheric sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Fedor I.; Xia, X. W.; Ai, Jun; Rakuljic, Neven; Griffo, Chris; Arik, Engin; Davis, Anthony B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper surveys the need for oxygen A-band spectroscopy to improve our understanding of clouds and their key role in the climate system. We then report on a novel holographic A-band substrate-guided spectrometer device recently developed at Luminit. This A-band spectrometer prototype is based on an innovative structure of two thick reflection substrate-guided wave-based holograms (SGWHs) that act as dispersive and/or imaging elements to enable a sufficient spectral resolution. The technology is made very attractive by its significantly lower cost compared to currently available systems/devices with similar A-band capability, while providing higher light throughput, a better out-of-band rejection ratio, higher resolution at a smaller size, and better stability and reliability.

  18. Selective growth of carbon nanotube on silicon substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOT; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) growth of iron oxide-deposited trench-patterns and the locally-ordered CNT arrays on silicon substrate were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) of ethanol vapor. The CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on trench-patterned silicon substrates. This fabrication process is compatible with currently used semiconductor-processing technologies,and the carbon-nanotube fabrication process can be widely applied for the development of electronic devices using carbon-nanotube field emitters as cold cathodes and can revolutionize the area of field-emitting electronic devices. The site-selective growth of CNT from an iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst patterned were also achieved by drying-mediated self-assembly technique. The present method offers a simple and cost-effective method to grow carbon nanotubes with self-assembled patterns.

  19. A loop of coagulation factor VIIa influencing macromolecular substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelke, Jais R; Persson, Egon; Rasmussen, Hanne B;

    2006-01-01

    . The resulting variant exhibited increased intrinsic activity, concurrent with maturation of the active site, a less accessible N-terminus, and, interestingly, an altered macromolecular substrate specificity reflected in an increased ability to cleave factor IX (FIX) and a decreased rate of FX activation....../Met(298{156})Lys-FVIIa with almost the same activity and specificity profile. We conclude that a lysine residue in position 298{156} of FVIIa requires a hydrophilic environment to be fully accommodated. This position appears critical for substrate specificity among the proteases of the blood coagulation......Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) belongs to a family of proteases being part of the stepwise, self-amplifying blood coagulation cascade. To investigate the impact of the mutation Met(298{156})Lys in FVIIa, we replaced the Gly(283{140})-Met(298{156}) loop with the corresponding loop of factor Xa...

  20. Ductility of copper films on sandblasting polyimide substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Different surface morphologies of polyimide(PI)foils widely applied in flexible electronics were obtained using the technique of sandblasting.Copper(Cu)films were subsequently deposited on the treated surface of PI substrates.Upon tensile loading, the critical strain,crack density and count of cracks were measured to examine the ductility of Cu films on PI substrates.Obtained results show that after sandblasting treatment,the critical strain of Cu film decreases from 8.0%to 6.9%and,in comparison with the case without sandblasting,its surface crack density decreases remarkably,with no saturation of the crack density.The reduced crack density is attributed to the increase of contact area and interfacial adhesion after sandblasting,and whether the crack density is saturated or not is dependent upon the morphology of the cracks formed as a function of tensile strain.