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Sample records for alanine scanning mutagenesis

  1. Analysis of the contribution of the hinge region of human neutrophil collagenase (HNC, MMP-8) to stability and collagenolytic activity by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knäuper, V; Docherty, A J; Smith, B; Tschesche, H; Murphy, G

    1997-03-17

    Analysis of the hinge region of neutrophil collagenase by alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that this sequence motif has a pronounced effect on the stability and collagenolytic activity of the active enzyme. The mutagenesis of the amino acid residues in the P1' position of the two autoproteolytically cleaved peptide bonds (Leu243 and Ile248) to Ala showed that the mutant enzymes were more resistant to autoproteolysis. However, these mutants were not completely stable and autoproteolysis occurred mainly at the Ala239-Ile240 peptide bond and the half-life of the active enzyme was increased by 50%. In contrast, mutagenesis of Pro247 --> Ala (P1 of the minor cleavage site Pro247-Ile248) lead to increased susceptibility of the enzyme to autoproteolysis. However, when the other P1 position Gly242 was altered to Ala no effect on stability was observed. The analysis of the ability of the mutant active enzymes to hydrolyse 14C-type I collagen was assessed and our results demonstrate that the hinge sequence motif of neutrophil collagenase is important for collagenolytic activity. The alteration of the Gly242-Leu-Ser-Ser-Asn-Pro-Ile-Gln-Pro247 sequence motif to Gly242-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro247 showed that the collagenolytic activity was reduced by 68.4%. In addition, mutagenesis of the downstream sequence motif Pro247-Thr-Gly-Pro-Ser-Thr-Pro-Lys-Pro258 to Pro247-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-Pro258 had an even more marked effect on the collagenolytic activity, which was reduced by 87.4%. When the Pro residues in the hinge motif (Pro247, Pro250, Pro253 and Pro256) were altered to Ala the collagenolytic activity dropped to 1.5% of the value observed for wild-type enzyme.

  2. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes. PMID:25815820

  3. Catalytic residues Lys197 and Arg199 of Bacillus subtilis phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the flexible catalytic loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Bentsen, Ann-Kristin K; Harlow, Kenneth W

    2005-01-01

    Eleven of the codons specifying the amino acids of the flexible catalytic loop [KRRPRPNVAEVM(197-208)] of Bacillus subtilis phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase have been changed individually to specify alanine. The resulting variant enzyme forms, as well as the wildtype enzyme, were produced in a...

  4. Design of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase with altered thioredoxin specificity using computational alanine mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Obiero, Josiah; Sanders, David AR

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase (EC TrxR) and its substrate thioredoxin (Trx) was used as a guide to design a Deinococcus radiodurans TrxR (DR TrxR) mutant with altered Trx specificity. Previous studies have shown that TrxRs have higher affinity for cognate Trxs (same species) than that for Trxs from different species. Computational alanine scanning mutagenesis and visual inspection of the EC TrxR–Trx interface suggested...

  5. Adsorption of L-Alanine on Cu(111) Studied by Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Si-Ping; L(U) Chao; ZHAO Ru-Guang

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of L-alanine on Cu(111)surface is studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy under ultra-high Vacuum conditions.The results show that the adsorbates are chemisorbed on the surface,and can form a two-dimensional gas phase,chain phase and solid phase,depending on deposition rate and amount.The adsorbed molecules can be imaged as individual protrusions and parallel chains in gas and chain phases respectively.It is also found that alanine can form(2×2)superstructure on Cu(111)and copper step facet to directions in solid phase.On the basis of our scanning tunnelling microscopic images,a model js proposed for the Cu(111)(2×2)-alanine superstructure.In the model,we point out the close link between -direction hydrogen bond chains with the same direction copper step faceting.

  6. Systematic dissection and trajectory-scanning mutagenesis of the molecular interface that ensures specificity of two-component signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Capra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems enable bacteria to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Sensor histidine kinases transmit signals to their cognate response regulators via phosphorylation. The faithful transmission of information through two-component pathways and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk require exquisite specificity of histidine kinase-response regulator interactions to ensure that cells mount the appropriate response to external signals. To identify putative specificity-determining residues, we have analyzed amino acid coevolution in two-component proteins and identified a set of residues that can be used to rationally rewire a model signaling pathway, EnvZ-OmpR. To explore how a relatively small set of residues can dictate partner selectivity, we combined alanine-scanning mutagenesis with an approach we call trajectory-scanning mutagenesis, in which all mutational intermediates between the specificity residues of EnvZ and another kinase, RstB, were systematically examined for phosphotransfer specificity. The same approach was used for the response regulators OmpR and RstA. Collectively, the results begin to reveal the molecular mechanism by which a small set of amino acids enables an individual kinase to discriminate amongst a large set of highly-related response regulators and vice versa. Our results also suggest that the mutational trajectories taken by two-component signaling proteins following gene or pathway duplication may be constrained and subject to differential selective pressures. Only some trajectories allow both the maintenance of phosphotransfer and the avoidance of unwanted cross-talk.

  7. GMXPBSA 2.1: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    GMXPBSA 2.1 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes [R.T. Bradshaw et al., Protein Eng. Des. Sel. 24 (2011) 197-207]. GMXPBSA 2.1 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs and it is an improvement of the previous GMXPBSA 2.0 [C. Paissoni et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. (2014), 185, 2920-2929]. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.1 performs different comparative analyses, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complex trajectories, allowing the study of the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS [S. Pronk et al., Bioinformatics 29 (2013) 845-854] and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS [N.A. Baker et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 98 (2001) 10037-10041]. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the

  8. GMXPBSA 2.0: A GROMACS tool to perform MM/PBSA and computational alanine scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paissoni, C.; Spiliotopoulos, D.; Musco, G.; Spitaleri, A.

    2014-11-01

    GMXPBSA 2.0 is a user-friendly suite of Bash/Perl scripts for streamlining MM/PBSA calculations on structural ensembles derived from GROMACS trajectories, to automatically calculate binding free energies for protein-protein or ligand-protein complexes. GMXPBSA 2.0 is flexible and can easily be customized to specific needs. Additionally, it performs computational alanine scanning (CAS) to study the effects of ligand and/or receptor alanine mutations on the free energy of binding. Calculations require only for protein-protein or protein-ligand MD simulations. GMXPBSA 2.0 performs different comparative analysis, including a posteriori generation of alanine mutants of the wild-type complex, calculation of the binding free energy values of the mutant complexes and comparison of the results with the wild-type system. Moreover, it compares the binding free energy of different complexes trajectories, allowing the study the effects of non-alanine mutations, post-translational modifications or unnatural amino acids on the binding free energy of the system under investigation. Finally, it can calculate and rank relative affinity to the same receptor utilizing MD simulations of proteins in complex with different ligands. In order to dissect the different MM/PBSA energy contributions, including molecular mechanic (MM), electrostatic contribution to solvation (PB) and nonpolar contribution to solvation (SA), the tool combines two freely available programs: the MD simulations software GROMACS and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver APBS. All the calculations can be performed in single or distributed automatic fashion on a cluster facility in order to increase the calculation by dividing frames across the available processors. The program is freely available under the GPL license. Catalogue identifier: AETQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing

  9. Species-scanning mutagenesis of the serotonin transporter reveals residues essential in selective, high-affinity recognition of antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Kristensen, A S; Wiborg, O

    2001-01-01

    )tropane, or for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Analysis of six hSERT/bSERT chimeras and subsequent species-scanning mutagenesis of each isoform revealed methionine-180, tyrosine-495, and phenylalanine-513 to be responsible for the increase in citalopram and paroxetine potencies at hSERT and methionine...

  10. Rapid site-directed domain scanning mutagenesis of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli espD

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Qiwen; Luo, Wensheng; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a rapid mutagenesis method based on a modification of the QuikChange® system (Stratagene) to systemically replace endogenous gene sequences with a unique similar size sequence tag. The modifications are as follows: 1: the length of the anchoring homologous sequences of both mutagenesis primers were increased to 16 - 22 bp to achieve melting temperatures greater than 80°C. 2: the final concentrations of both primers were increased to 5-10 ng/μl and the final concentration of templ...

  11. Two distinct promoter elements in the human rRNA gene identified by linker scanning mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Haltiner, M M; Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    A cell-free RNA polymerase I transcription system was used to evaluate the transcription efficiency of 21 linker scanning mutations that span the human rRNA gene promoter. Our analysis revealed the presence of two major control elements, designated the core and upstream elements, that affect the level of transcription initiation. The core element extends from -45 to +18 relative to the RNA start site, and transcription is severely affected (up to 100-fold) by linker scanning mutations in this...

  12. Scanning mutagenesis of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib eAhsan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform scanning mutagenesis of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from phylogenetic analysis of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution.

  13. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  14. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder X-ray diffraction studies on a homologous series of -acyl-L-alanine esters with matched chains ( = 9-18)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Sivaramakrishna; Musti J Swamy

    2015-09-01

    A homologous series of two chain derivatives of L-alanine, namely -acyl L-alanine alkyl esters (NAAEs), bearing matched, saturated, acyl and alkyl chains ( = 9-18) have been synthesized. The thermotropic phase transitions and supramolecular structure of NAAEs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Results obtained from DSC studies indicate that the transition temperatures (t), enthalpies ( t) and entropies ( t) exhibit odd-even alternation with compounds bearing odd acyl and alkyl chains showing higher values of t, t and t as compared to NAAEs with even acyl and alkyl chains. However, the transition enthalpies and entropies of the odd- and even chain length series independently exhibit a linear dependence on the chain length. The -spacings obtained from PXRD increase linearly with chain length with an increment of 1.76 Å/CH2, suggesting that NAAEs adopt either a tilted bilayer structure or a bent structure. The present results provide a thermodynamic and structural basis for investigating the interaction of NAAEs with other membrane lipids, which in turn can shed light in understanding how they can enhance the transdermal permeability of stratum corneum.

  15. Use of pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis for functional mapping of the plum pox virus helper component proteinase suppressor of gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrelmann, Mark; Maiss, Edgar; Pilot, Ruth; Palkovics, Laszlo

    2007-03-01

    Helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of Plum pox virus is a multifunctional potyvirus protein that has been examined intensively. In addition to its involvement in aphid transmission, genome amplification and long-distance movement, it is also one of the better-studied plant virus suppressors of RNA silencing. The first systematic analysis using pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis of the silencing suppression function of a potyvirus HC-Pro is presented here. Sixty-three in-frame insertion mutants, each containing five extra amino acids inserted randomly within the HC-Pro protein, were analysed for their ability to suppress transgene-induced RNA silencing using Agrobacterium infiltration in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing green fluorescent protein. A functional map was obtained, consisting of clearly defined regions with different classes of silencing-suppression activity (wild-type, restricted and disabled). This map confirmed that the N-terminal part of the protein, which is indispensable for aphid transmission, is dispensable for silencing suppression and supports the involvement of the central region in silencing suppression, in addition to its role in maintenance of genome amplification and synergism with other viruses. Moreover, evidence is provided that the C-terminal part of the protein, previously known to be necessary mainly for proteolytic activity, also participates in silencing suppression. Pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis has been shown to be a fast and powerful tool to functionally characterize plant virus proteins. PMID:17325375

  16. Model of the exofacial substrate-binding site and helical folding of the human Glut1 glucose transporter based on scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueckler, Mike; Makepeace, Carol

    2009-06-30

    Transmembrane helix 9 of the Glut1 glucose transporter was analyzed by cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). A cysteine-less (C-less) template transporter containing amino acid substitutions for the six native cysteine residues present in human Glut1 was used to generate a series of 21 mutant transporters by substituting each successive residue in predicted transmembrane segment 9 with a cysteine residue. The mutant proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and their specific transport activities were directly compared to that of the parental C-less molecule whose function has been shown to be indistinguishable from that of native Glut1. Only a single mutant (G340C) had activity that was reduced (by 75%) relative to that of the C-less parent. These data suggest that none of the amino acid side chains in helix 9 is absolutely required for transport function and that this helix is not likely to be directly involved in substrate binding or translocation. Transport activity of the cysteine mutants was also tested after incubation of oocytes in the presence of the impermeant sulfhydryl-specific reagent, p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (pCMBS). Only a single mutant (T352C) exhibited transport inhibition in the presence of pCMBS, and the extent of inhibition was minimal (11%), indicating that only a very small portion of helix 9 is accessible to the external solvent. These results are consistent with the conclusion that helix 9 plays an outer stabilizing role for the inner helical bundle predicted to form the exofacial substrate-binding site. All 12 of the predicted transmembrane segments of Glut1 encompassing 252 amino acid residues and more than 50% of the complete polypeptide sequence have now been analyzed by scanning mutagenesis and SCAM. An updated model is presented for the outward-facing substrate-binding site and relative orientation of the 12 transmembrane helices of Glut1. PMID:19449892

  17. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  18. Lycotoxin-1 insecticidal peptide optimized by amino acid scanning mutagenesis and expressed as a coproduct in an ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Dowd, Patrick F; Hector, Ronald E; Panavas, Tadas; Sterner, David E; Qureshi, Nasib; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Bang, Sookie S; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Eric T; Li, Xin-Liang; Jackson, John S; Caughey, Robert J; Riedmuller, Steven B; Bartolett, Scott; Liu, Siqing; Rich, Joseph O; Farrelly, Philip J; Butt, Tauseef R; Labaer, Joshua; Cotta, Michael A

    2008-09-01

    New methods of safe biological pest control are required as a result of evolution of insect resistance to current biopesticides. Yeast strains being developed for conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol are potential host systems for expression of commercially valuable peptides, such as bioinsecticides, to increase the cost-effectiveness of the process. Spider venom is one of many potential sources of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. Libraries of mutants of the small amphipathic peptide lycotoxin-1 from the wolf spider were produced in high throughput using an automated integrated plasmid-based functional proteomic platform and screened for ability to kill fall armyworms, a significant cause of damage to corn (maize) and other crops in the United States. Using amino acid scanning mutagenesis (AASM) we generated a library of mutagenized lycotoxin-1 open reading frames (ORF) in a novel small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) yeast expression system. The SUMO technology enhanced expression and improved generation of active lycotoxins. The mutants were engineered to be expressed at high level inside the yeast and ingested by the insect before being cleaved to the active form (so-called Trojan horse strategy). These yeast strains expressing mutant toxin ORFs were also carrying the xylose isomerase (XI) gene and were capable of aerobic growth on xylose. Yeast cultures expressing the peptide toxins were prepared and fed to armyworm larvae to identify the mutant toxins with greatest lethality. The most lethal mutations appeared to increase the ability of the toxin alpha-helix to interact with insect cell membranes or to increase its pore-forming ability, leading to cell lysis. The toxin peptides have potential as value-added coproducts to increase the cost-effectiveness of fuel ethanol bioproduction.

  19. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Muhuhi, Joseck M. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Liu, Zhigang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Bencze, Krisztina Z. [Department of Chemistry, Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS 67601 (United States); Koupparis, Kyriacos [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Spaller, Mark R. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C., E-mail: kovari@med.wayne.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  20. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC50: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the 15N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC50: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 15N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV

  1. Mutagenesis and Teratogenesis Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on research with mice in the areas of radioinduced and chemical mutagenesis, cytologic studies, radiation effects on DNA synthesis, radiation effects on germ cells, mutagenicity of coal-conversion products, and others. Research on Drosophila was concerned with mutagenesis and genetics of nucleases. Studies were conducted on hamster cells with regard to cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of alkylating agents, modification of the microtubule system, protein kinase activity, and others. Research on bacteria was concerned with effects of x radiation on bacteriophage of Haemophilus influenzae, x-ray induced DNA polymerase I-directed repair synthesis in Escherichia coli, transformation by DNA polymerase II in Bacillus subtilis, and others. Research on xenopus laevis was conducted in the areas of calcium-induced cleavage of oocytes, yolk degradation in explants, and others

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  3. Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S.; Griswold, Karl E.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    Protein engineering by combinatorial site-directed mutagenesis evaluates a portion of the sequence space near a target protein, seeking variants with improved properties (stability, activity, immunogenicity, etc.). In order to improve the hit-rate of beneficial variants in such mutagenesis libraries, we develop methods to select optimal positions and corresponding sets of the mutations that will be used, in all combinations, in constructing a library for experimental evaluation. Our approach, OCoM (Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis), encompasses both degenerate oligonucleotides and specified point mutations, and can be directed accordingly by requirements of experimental cost and library size. It evaluates the quality of the resulting library by one- and two-body sequence potentials, averaged over the variants. To ensure that it is not simply recapitulating extant sequences, it balances the quality of a library with an explicit evaluation of the novelty of its members. We show that, despite dealing with a combinatorial set of variants, in our approach the resulting library optimization problem is actually isomorphic to single-variant optimization. By the same token, this means that the two-body sequence potential results in an NP-hard optimization problem. We present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm for the one-body case and a practically-efficient integer programming approach for the general two-body case. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in designing libraries for three different case study proteins targeted by previous combinatorial libraries - a green fluorescent protein, a cytochrome P450, and a beta lactamase. We found that OCoM worked quite efficiently in practice, requiring only 1 hour even for the massive design problem of selecting 18 mutations to generate 107 variants of a 443-residue P450. We demonstrate the general ability of OCoM in enabling the protein engineer to explore and evaluate trade-offs between quality and

  4. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a "quenching" effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for "in vivo" dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  5. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  6. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  7. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  8. Crystal structure of L-alanine phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of L-alanine phosphate (C3O2NH7 · H3PO4) is determined by the single-crystal diffraction technique; a 11.918(1) A, b = 9.117(1) A, c = 7.285(1) A, γ = 104.7(1) deg., space group P21, and Z = 4. The amino group of the alanine is protonated by the hydrogen atom of the phosphoric acid. Pairs of H2PO-4 hydrogen-bonded ions are packed into layers alternating with layers of alanine molecules in the crystal. No hydrogen bonds are formed immediately between the alanine molecules

  9. Promoter analysis by saturation mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression and regulation are mediated by DNA sequences, in most instances, directly upstream to the coding sequences by recruiting transcription factors, regulators, and a RNA polymerase in a spatially defined fashion. Few nucleotides within a promoter make contact with the bound proteins. The minimal set of nucleotides that can recruit a protein factor is called a cis-acting element. This article addresses a powerful mutagenesis strategy that can be employed to define cis-acting elements at a molecular level. Technical details including primer design, saturation mutagenesis, construction of promoter libraries, phenotypic analysis, data analysis, and interpretation are discussed.

  10. beta-Chloro-L-alanine inhibition of the Escherichia coli alanine-valine transaminase.

    OpenAIRE

    Whalen, W A; Wang, M D; Berg, C M

    1985-01-01

    beta-Chloro-L-alanine, an amino acid analog which inhibits a number of enzymes, reversibly inhibited the Escherichia coli K-12 alanine-valine transaminase, transaminase C. This inhibition, along with the inhibition of transaminase B, accounted for the isoleucine-plus-valine requirement of E. coli in the presence of beta-chloro-L-alanine.

  11. Optogenetic mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Kentaro; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify and damage DNA. Here we report an optogenetic mutagenesis approach that is free of toxic chemicals and easy to perform by taking advantage of a genetically encoded ROS generator. This method relies on the potency of ROS generation by His-mSOG, the mini singlet oxygen generator, miniSOG, fused to a histone. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing His-mSOG in the germline behave and reproduce normally, without photoinduction. Following exposure to blue light, the His-mSOG animals produce progeny with a wide range of heritable phenotypes. We show that optogenetic mutagenesis by His-mSOG induces a broad spectrum of mutations including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), chromosomal deletions, as well as integration of extrachromosomal transgenes, which complements those derived from traditional chemical or radiation mutagenesis. The optogenetic mutagenesis expands the toolbox for forward genetic screening and also provides direct evidence that nuclear ROS can induce heritable and specific genetic mutations. PMID:26632265

  12. Shuttle mutagenesis: a method of transposon mutagenesis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, H S; Chen, E Y; So, M; Heffron, F

    1986-01-01

    We have extended the method of transposon mutagenesis to the eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A bacterial transposon containing a selectable yeast gene can be transposed into a cloned fragment of yeast DNA in Escherichia coli, and the transposon insertion can be returned to the yeast genome by homologous recombination. Initially, the cloned yeast DNA fragment to be mutagenized was transformed into an E. coli strain containing an F factor derivative carrying the transposable element. The c...

  13. Characterization of the functional role of a flexible loop in the alpha-subunit of tryptophan synthase from Salmonella typhimurium by rapid-scanning, stopped-flow spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzović, P S; Hyde, C C; Miles, E W; Dunn, M F

    1993-10-01

    The function of a flexible loop (loop 6) in the alpha-subunit from the tryptophan synthase alpha 2 beta 2 bienzyme complex has been investigated utilizing rapid-scanning (RSSF) and single-wavelength (SWSF) stopped-flow spectroscopies. Loop 6 is an extended sequence of residues which connects beta-strand 6 with alpha-helix 6 in the beta/alpha-barrel fold of the alpha-subunit. Substitution of Leu for Arg179 near the base of loop 6 does not significantly affect either the association of the alpha- and beta-subunits to form the bienzyme complex or the kinetics of the reaction of indole with L-serine (L-Ser) to form L-tryptophan (L-Trp), the process catalyzed by the wild-type beta-subunit [Kawasaki, H., Bauerle, R., Zon, G., Ahmed, S., & Miles, E. W. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 10678-10683]. However, the alpha-subunit-specific ligand glycerol phosphate (GP), which is an inhibitor of the wild-type beta-reaction, is a much less effective inhibitor of the alpha R179L-catalyzed beta-reaction. Equilibrium titration studies show that the affinity of GP for the alpha-site when either L-Ser or glycine is bound at the beta-site has been reduced by nearly 100- and 200-fold, respectively. SWSF analysis of the reaction of IGP and L-Ser to form L-Trp catalyzed by the bienzyme complex revealed a 15-fold reduction in the binding affinity of the alpha-site substrate 3-indole-D-glycerol 3'-phosphate (IGP) in the reaction catalyzed by the alpha R179L mutant as compared to the wild-type enzyme. These studies show that loop 6 is important both for ligand binding to the alpha-site and for the ligand-induced conformational transition of the alpha-subunit from an "open" to a "closed" structure. Modeling studies, based on extensive structural homology of the alpha-subunit with the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), predict that closure of loop 6 induced by ligand binding at the alpha-active site would effectively sequester the bound substrate from the solvent and trap indole

  14. Beta-alanine synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Cronan, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The enzyme, aspartate 1-decarboxylase (L-aspartate 1-carboxy-lyase; EC 4.1.1.15), that catalyzes the reaction aspartate leads to beta-alanine + CO2 was found in extracts of Escherichia coli. panD mutants of E. coli are defective in beta-alanine biosynthesis and lack aspartate 1-decarboxylase. Therefore, the enzyme functions in the biosynthesis of the beta-alanine moiety of pantothenate. The genetic lesion in these mutants is closely linked to the other pantothenate (pan) loci of E. coli K-12.

  15. Comments on mutagenesis risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several hypotheses and concepts have tended to oversimplify the problem of mutagenesis and can be misleading when used for genetic risk estimation. These include: the hypothesis that radiation-induced mutation frequency depends primarily on the DNA content per haploid genome, the extension of this concept to chemical mutagenesis, the view that, since DNA is DNA, mutational effects can be expected to be qualitatively similar in all organisms, the REC unit, and the view that mutation rates from chronic irradiation can be theoretically and accurately predicted from acute irradiation data. Therefore, direct determination of frequencies of transmitted mutations in mammals continues to be important for risk estimation, and the specific-locus method in mice is shown to be not as expensive as is commonly supposed for many of the chemical testing requirements

  16. Response of Alanine Dosemeter to Heavy Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenjian; SuXu; YangYingjie; YuanJianlei; DangBingrong; WangXiao; MaQiufeng; ZhouLibin; HaoJifang; MaoShuhong

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid L-α-alanine has been investigated for use as a radiation detector in low and high LET radiation fields[1]. The radiatioa detector is cheap and easy to handle. The radiation inducing free radicals are stable at normal laboratory conditions for doses below 104 Gy over a long period of time, which makes the detector useful for intercomparison and documentation purposes. The dosimetric features of alanine-based electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors in high energy electron beams used in radiotherapy were considered[2]. The 5 mm long alanine detectors were found to be the most suitable for carrying out in vivo dosimetry on patients undergoing electron beam radiotherapy. However, data concerning dosimetry of the alanine dosemeter to heavy charged particles are lacking, especially in China.

  17. Applications of alanine-based dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine-based radiation dosimetry and related dosimeters developed at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy, and capable of providing high accuracy absorbed dose determination by ESR are presented. Overall uncertainty is shown to be +-3.9% in the 10 Gy to 3 kGy range. Possible applications to radiotherapy and industry are discussed. Percentage depth dose values and dose profiles measured with alanine dosimeters in phantom are presented. (author)

  18. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  19. Alanine - ESR dosimetry, feasibility and possible applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine ESR dosimetry presents a great interest for quality controls in radiotherapy. This new developed water equivalent alanine dosimeter allows a reproducible dose measurement, by a non-destructive readout technique in a large dose range. In this paper the stability of the dosimeter response has been shown but also its independence with the energy or the dose rate of the absorbed radiation. Through this different studies, one can broaden the application field of alanine / ESR dosimetry especially for in-vivo dosimetry. The results of the experiments and the intra operative treatment, indicate that this kind of dosimetry seems to be a promising technique for in-vivo quality controls in electron beam, γ ray or X ray radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. A study of the irradiation temperature coefficient for L-alanine and DL-alanine dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine dosimetry is now well established both as a reference and routine dosemeter for industrial irradiation processing. Accurate dosimetry under the relatively harsh conditions of industrial processing requires a characterisation of the parameters that influence the dosemeter response. The temperature of the dosemeter during irradiation is a difficult quantity to measure so that the accuracy of the temperature coefficient that governs the dosemeter response becomes a critical factor. Numerous publications have reported temperature coefficients for several types of alanine dosemeters. The observed differences in the measured values were commonly attributed to the differences in the polymer binder or the experimental design of the measurement. However, the data demonstrated a consistent difference in the temperature coefficients between L-alanine and DL-alanine. Since there were no commonalities in the dosemeter composition or the measurement methods applied, a clear conclusion is not possible. To resolve this issue, the two isomeric forms of alanine dosemeters were prepared and irradiated in an identical manner. The results indicated that the DL-alanine temperature coefficient is more than 50% higher than the L-alanine temperature coefficient. (authors)

  1. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    2011-01-01

    . Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine......Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions...... of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations....

  2. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Sun

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development.

  3. Progress in quality control of alanine dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESR/alanine system has been used for different applications, over several years, as a classical routine dosimetry service. This service is based on alanine dosimeters constituted by pellets manufactured by our laboratory, which are presented with some specifications of use and different parameters bound to the intrinsic quality of the dosimeter itself. These parameters were obtained through the strict application of a production protocol and a validation protocol created, tested and validated under a quality assurance system. Every year, one batch of photon dosimeters is produced and controlled using these protocols and the specifications associated with it are checked. Two categories of data are considered separately: physical parameters and experimental data obtained by measurement on our ESR system are given with their associated standard deviation. (author)

  4. Dosimetric applications of α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of solid polycristalline alanine creates a free radical, whose concentration can be measured from its ESR signal. The radical CH3CradicalHCOO- of practically unlimited stability at room temperature shows an electronic absorption spectrum in the UV. Modern methods of diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry allow to measure the radical concentration, which is proportional to the absorbed dose of radiation. The alanine dosimeter is prepared in a thin layer, adequate both for the congested isodose curves in the case of accelerated electrons irradiation and the method of measurement. Thus the proposed dosimeter is applicable not only for gamma, but also for EB radiation processing in the range of 0.1 to 50 kGy. The application of the dosimeter does not demand to use the ESR spectrometer, even of the type dedicated to alanine dosimetry only, but may be performed by UV-VIS spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere, permitting measurements of the Kubelka-Munk function. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig

  5. Depth profiling of irradiated alanine-polymer pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alanine-polyethylene (PE) pellet is used as an alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimeter in radiation facilities. Using the unique depth profiling capability of Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR/PAS), the chemical structure of the alanine-PE pellet and its fading reaction after γ-ray irradiation have been studied. It was found that PE concentration of the alanine-PE pellet in a surface or near surface is larger that in a bulk. The products resulting from fading were observed in the bulk alanine-PE pellet irradiated and stored for 6 months at room temperature. (author)

  6. Alanine flux in obese and healthy humans as evaluated by 15N- and 2H3-labeled alanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of plasma alanine flux as measured in humans using L-[15N]-alanine or L-[3,3,3-2H3]alanine were compared by simultaneous intravenous infusion of both tracers. Plasma isotope enrichments were measured by chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In 16 obese women before and during a hypocaloric diet and in 4 normal men in the postabsorptive and fed states, the fluxes were highly correlated (r2 = 0.93) although plasma alanine flux with the 2H tracer was two to three times greater than that obtained with [15N]alanine. The fluxes decreased with the hypocaloric diet in obese subjects and increased during the fed state in healthy adults. Thus, although the estimates of alanine flux differed according to the tracer used, both appear to give equivalent information about changes in alanine kinetics induced by the nutritional conditions examined

  7. Role of tRNAPro in pretransfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyarshin K. S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the process of tRNA-dependent pretransfer edi- ting of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase of bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (ProRSEf. Methods. Velocity of the editing processes in vitro was determined by ATP hydrolysis by ProRSEf. Pretransfer and posttransfer editing were experimentally separated by site-directed mutagenesis. Results. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing is characterized by three-fold larger velocity then tRNA-independent editing. Effectivity of the process depends on the presence of 2'-hydroxyle group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro selective release of alanyl-AMP occurs simultaneously with tRNA-independent pretransfer editing. Released alanyl-AMP can be re-bound and hydrolyzed. Conclusions. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing of alanine by ProRSEf is the catalytic mechanism, mediated by 2'-hydroxyl group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro tRNA-independent pretransfer editing and selective release of alanyl-AMP occur.

  8. DNA repair and mutagenesis of singlestranded bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, O.P.; Brandenburger, A.; Wagner, R. Jr.; Radman, M. (Brussels Univ. (Belgium)); Godson, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    Virtually all radiation-induced mutagenesis is believed to result from an error-prone repair activity (SOS repair) and to involve mutations occurring both at the site of radiation-induced lesions (targeted mutations) and in undamaged DNA (untargeted mutations). To examine the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to ..gamma.. and ultraviolet (UV) radiation mutagenesis we have determined the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated or unirradiated host bacteria. We have detected no obvious specificity of mutagenesis and find no evidence of a predominance of targeted mutations associated with either UV- or ..gamma..-irradiation of the phages or with the induction of the host SOS repair system. In particular, pyrimidine dimers do not appear to be the principal sites of UV-induced bare substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such UV-induced mutagenesis may be untargeted or occur at sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Li, Lan-Fen [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tang, De-Wei [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liu, Xiang-Yu [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Xiaojun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  10. International society of sports nutrition position stand: Beta-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Wilborn, Colin D; Sale, Craig; Kreider, Richard B; Jäger, Ralf; Earnest, Conrad P; Bannock, Laurent; Campbell, Bill; Kalman, Douglas; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Antonio, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review of the mechanisms and use of beta-alanine supplementation. Based on the current available literature, the conclusions of the ISSN are as follows: 1) Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation (4-6 g daily) significantly augments muscle carnosine concentrations, thereby acting as an intracellular pH buffer; 2) Beta-alanine supplementation currently appears to be safe in healthy populations at recommended doses; 3) The only reported side effect is paraesthesia (tingling), but studies indicate this can be attenuated by using divided lower doses (1.6 g) or using a sustained-release formula; 4) Daily supplementation with 4 to 6 g of beta-alanine for at least 2 to 4 weeks has been shown to improve exercise performance, with more pronounced effects in open end-point tasks/time trials lasting 1 to 4 min in duration; 5) Beta-alanine attenuates neuromuscular fatigue, particularly in older subjects, and preliminary evidence indicates that beta-alanine may improve tactical performance; 6) Combining beta-alanine with other single or multi-ingredient supplements may be advantageous when supplementation of beta-alanine is high enough (4-6 g daily) and long enough (minimum 4 weeks); 7) More research is needed to determine the effects of beta-alanine on strength, endurance performance beyond 25 min in duration, and other health-related benefits associated with carnosine. PMID:26175657

  11. Purification and preliminary crystallization of alanine racemase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im Hookang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past fifteen years, antibiotic resistance in the Gram-positive opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae has significantly increased. Clinical isolates from patients with community-acquired pneumonia or otitis media often display resistance to two or more antibiotics. Given the need for new therapeutics, we intend to investigate enzymes of cell wall biosynthesis as novel drug targets. Alanine racemase, a ubiquitous enzyme among bacteria and absent in humans, provides the essential cell wall precursor, D-alanine, which forms part of the tetrapeptide crosslinking the peptidoglycan layer. Results The alanine racemases gene from S. pneumoniae (alrSP was amplified by PCR and cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The 367 amino acid, 39854 Da dimeric enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and preliminary crystals were obtained. Racemic activity was demonstrated through complementation of an alr auxotroph of E. coli growing on L-alanine. In an alanine racemases photometric assay, specific activities of 87.0 and 84.8 U mg-1 were determined for the conversion of D- to L-alanine and L- to D-alanine, respectively. Conclusion We have isolated and characterized the alanine racemase gene from the opportunistic human pathogen S. pneumoniae. The enzyme shows sufficient homology with other alanine racemases to allow its integration into our ongoing structure-based drug design project.

  12. In vitro mutagenesis of chrysanthemum for breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protocol of in vitro mutagenesis for chrysanthemum was established. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) is about 5.0 kR for calli irradiation. Various growth, developmental, morphological, colour and abnormal shape mutations were identified in M1V4 generation. (author)

  13. Seed mutagenesis in Portulaca grandiflora (Hook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betalain pigments have been used as natural additives. Despite their importance, the biochemistry and genetics of betalain synthesis remain relatively undetermined. Portulaca grandiflora represents an ideal material for genetic analysis. In the present work, seed mutagenesis was examined with a view to enhance the chance of detection of new genetic markers in this species

  14. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  15. Alanine aminotransferase controls seed dormancy in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Yamane, Miki; Yamaji, Nami; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Schwerdt, Julian G; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Dormancy allows wild barley grains to survive dry summers in the Near East. After domestication, barley was selected for shorter dormancy periods. Here we isolate the major seed dormancy gene qsd1 from wild barley, which encodes an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). The seed dormancy gene is expressed specifically in the embryo. The AlaAT isoenzymes encoded by the long and short dormancy alleles differ in a single amino acid residue. The reduced dormancy allele Qsd1 evolved from barleys that were first domesticated in the southern Levant and had the long dormancy qsd1 allele that can be traced back to wild barleys. The reduced dormancy mutation likely contributed to the enhanced performance of barley in industrial applications such as beer and whisky production, which involve controlled germination. In contrast, the long dormancy allele might be used to control pre-harvest sprouting in higher rainfall areas to enhance global adaptation of barley. PMID:27188711

  16. Potential energy surface of alanine polypeptide chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2006-01-01

    The multidimensional potential energy surfaces of the peptide chains consisting of three and six alanine (Ala) residues have been studied with respect to the degrees of freedom related to the twist of these molecules relative to the peptide backbone (these degrees of freedom are responsible...... for the folding of such peptide molecules and proteins). The potential energy surfaces have been calculated ab initio within the framework of the density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The probabilities of transitions between various stable conformations of polypeptide...... molecules are evaluated. The results are compared to the data obtained by molecular dynamics simulations and to the available experimental data. The influence of the secondary structure of the polypeptide chain on its conformational properties with respect to rotations has been studied. It is shown that...

  17. Dosimetry by ESR spectroscopy of alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance analysis of radiation-induced free radicals in amino acids (e.g. L-alanine) is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Typical features are a wide dose range covering more than 5 decades (1-105Gy), energy independent response for photons above 100 keV, long-term stability of the ESR signal, and fast straightforward readout technique. Typical dosimeter samples, consisting of small pellets of microcrystalline amino acids in paraffin, are rugged, non-toxic, and insensitive to surface contaminations. Moreover, they are prepared homogeneously and inexpensively in large batches and can be evaluated repeatedly and supply archival dosimetry data. They have proven to be highly useful in various applications of radiation processing and sterilization dosimetry, food irradiation, quality control, radiation dosimetry, radiation therapy measurements, and as a reference system for dosimetry mailing intercomparisons. (author)

  18. Dosimetry auditing procedure with alanine dosimeters for light ion beam therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ableitinger, Alexander; Vatnitsky, Stanislav; Herrmann, Rochus;

    2013-01-01

    of the biological dose is out of scope of the current work. Materials and methods The audit procedure was based on a homogeneous phantom that mimics the dimension of a head (20 × 20 × 21 cm3). The phantom can be loaded either with an ionisation chamber or 20 alanine dosimeters plus 2 radiochromic EBT films. Dose......Background and purpose In the next few years the number of facilities providing ion beam therapy with scanning beams will increase. An auditing process based on an end-to-end test (including CT imaging, planning and dose delivery) could help new ion therapy centres to validate their entire logistic...... of about 3%. Conclusions Alanine dosimeters are suitable detectors for dosimetry audits in ion beam therapy and the presented end-to-end test is feasible. If further studies show similar results, this dosimetric audit could be implemented as a credentialing procedure for clinical proton and carbon beam...

  19. Cysteine Mutagenesis and Computer Modeling of the S6 Region of an Intermediate Conductance IKCa Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Simoes, Manuel; Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Banderali, Umberto; Hobeila, Fadi; Roux, Benoit; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (SCAM) and computer-based modeling were used to investigate key structural features of the S6 transmembrane segment of the calcium-activated K+ channel of intermediate conductance IKCa. Our SCAM results show that the interaction of [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) with cysteines engineered at positions 275, 278, and 282 leads to current inhibition. This effect was state dependent as MTSET appeared less effective at inhibiting IKCa...

  20. Solution-phase parallel synthesis of a pharmacophore library of HUN-7293 analogues: a general chemical mutagenesis approach to defining structure-function properties of naturally occurring cyclic (depsi)peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Bilban, Melitta; Foster, Carolyn A; Boger, Dale L

    2002-05-15

    HUN-7293 (1), a naturally occurring cyclic heptadepsipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of cell adhesion molecule expression (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin), the overexpression of which is characteristic of chronic inflammatory diseases. Representative of a general approach to defining structure-function relationships of such cyclic (depsi)peptides, the parallel synthesis and evaluation of a complete library of key HUN-7293 analogues are detailed enlisting solution-phase techniques and simple acid-base liquid-liquid extractions for isolation and purification of intermediates and final products. Significant to the design of the studies and unique to solution-phase techniques, the library was assembled superimposing a divergent synthetic strategy onto a convergent total synthesis. An alanine scan and N-methyl deletion of each residue of the cyclic heptadepsipeptide identified key sites responsible for or contributing to the biological properties. The simultaneous preparation of a complete set of individual residue analogues further simplifying the structure allowed an assessment of each structural feature of 1, providing a detailed account of the structure-function relationships in a single study. Within this pharmacophore library prepared by systematic chemical mutagenesis of the natural product structure, simplified analogues possessing comparable potency and, in some instances, improved selectivity were identified. One potent member of this library proved to be an additional natural product in its own right, which we have come to refer to as HUN-7293B (8), being isolated from the microbial strain F/94-499709.

  1. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  2. Comparison of EPR response of alanine and Gd₂O₃-alanine dosimeters exposed to TRIGA Mainz reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, M; Schmitz, T; Gallo, S; Hampel, G; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Tranchina, L

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report some preliminary results regarding the analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets and alanine pellets added with gadolinium used for dosimetry at the TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany. Two set-ups were evaluated: irradiation inside PMMA phantom and irradiation inside boric acid phantom. We observed that the presence of Gd2O3 inside alanine pellets increases the EPR signal by a factor of 3.45 and 1.24 in case of PMMA and boric acid phantoms, respectively. We can conclude that in the case of neutron beam with a predominant thermal neutron component the addition of gadolinium oxide can significantly improve neutron sensitivity of alanine pellets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of both response of alanine and Gd-added alanine pellets with FLUKA code were performed and a good agreement was achieved for pure alanine dosimeters. For Gd2O3-alanine deviations between MC simulations and experimental data were observed and discussed. PMID:26315099

  3. Crystal Structure of a Thermostable Alanine Racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 Reveals the Role of Gln360 in Substrate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Shujing; Ju, Jiansong; Xu, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (PLP) dependent alanine racemase catalyzes racemization of L-Ala to D-Ala, a key component of the peptidoglycan network in bacterial cell wall. It has been extensively studied as an important antimicrobial drug target due to its restriction in eukaryotes. However, many marketed alanine racemase inhibitors also act on eukaryotic PLP-dependent enzymes and cause side effects. A thermostable alanine racemase (AlrTt) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4 contains an evolutionarily non-conserved residue Gln360 in inner layer of the substrate entryway, which is supposed to be a key determinant in substrate specificity. Here we determined the crystal structure of AlrTt in complex with L-Ala at 2.7 Å resolution, and investigated the role of Gln360 by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Compared to typical bacterial alanine racemase, presence of Gln360 and conformational changes of active site residues disrupted the hydrogen bonding interactions necessary for proper PLP immobilization, and decreased both the substrate affinity and turnover number of AlrTt. However, it could be complemented by introduction of hydrophobic amino acids at Gln360, through steric blocking and interactions with a hydrophobic patch near active site pocket. These observations explained the low racemase activity of AlrTt, revealed the essential role of Gln360 in substrate selection, and its preference for hydrophobic amino acids especially Tyr in bacterial alanine racemization. Our work will contribute new insights into the alanine racemization mechanism for antimicrobial drug development. PMID:26218070

  4. Chiral molecule for spin filtering purposes: the study of L- and D-Alanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitamben, Esmeralda; Rosenberg, Richard; Guisinger, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    The field of molecular electronics has attracted scientists by the great opportunities and versatility it offers as a replacement for standard semiconductor electronics with organic materials, thus bringing down the cost, and opening endless possibilities for chemical synthesis, and scientific breakthrough. Of particular interest is the use of chiral molecules, such as alanine, for spin filtering studies in hope of creating highly spin-polarized charge carriers for spintronics applications. Preliminary studies of both L- and D-alanine on Cu(111) were conducted using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, revealing the formation of a 2-dimensional phase at low coverage, a hexagonal ``flower'' pattern at intermediate coverage, and a chain and ring superstructures at high coverage. A model is proposed to explain the surface chemistry and bonding of the molecules on the metallic surface. Current studies of L- and D-alanine on Fe/W show promises in the intermediate coverage regime. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Rosendal, F.; Kofoed, I.M.;

    2009-01-01

    Background. Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low...... methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications....

  6. Alanine EPR dosimeter response in proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a series of measurements directed to assess the suitability of alanine as a mailable dosimeter for dosimetry quality assurance of proton radiation therapy beams. These measurements include dose-response of alanine at 140 MeV, and comparison of response vs energy with a parallel plate ionization chamber. All irradiations were made at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, and the dosimeters were read at NIST. The results encourage us that alanine could be expected to serve as a mailable dosimeter with systematic error due to differential energy response no greater than 3% when doses of 25 Gy are used. (Author)

  7. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  8. Dosimetry auditing procedure with alanine dosimeters for light ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In the next few years the number of facilities providing ion beam therapy with scanning beams will increase. An auditing process based on an end-to-end test (including CT imaging, planning and dose delivery) could help new ion therapy centres to validate their entire logistic chain of radiation delivery. An end-to-end procedure was designed and tested in both scanned proton and carbon ion beams, which may also serve as a dosimetric credentialing procedure for clinical trials in the future. The developed procedure is focused only on physical dose delivery and the validation of the biological dose is out of scope of the current work. Materials and methods: The audit procedure was based on a homogeneous phantom that mimics the dimension of a head (20 × 20 × 21 cm3). The phantom can be loaded either with an ionisation chamber or 20 alanine dosimeters plus 2 radiochromic EBT films. Dose verification aimed at measuring a dose of 10 Gy homogeneously delivered to a virtual-target volume of 8 × 8 × 12 cm3. In order to interpret the readout of the irradiated alanine dosimeters additional Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the energy dependent detector response of the particle fluence in the alanine detector. A pilot run was performed with protons and carbon ions at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy facility (HIT). Results: The mean difference of the absolute physical dose measured with the alanine dosimeters compared with the expected dose from the treatment planning system was −2.4 ± 0.9% (1σ) for protons and −2.2 ± 1.1% (1σ) for carbon ions. The measurements performed with the ionisation chamber indicate this slight underdosage with a dose difference of −1.7% for protons and −1.0% for carbon ions. The profiles measured by radiochromic films showed an acceptable homogeneity of about 3%. Conclusions: Alanine dosimeters are suitable detectors for dosimetry audits in ion beam therapy and the presented end-to-end test is

  9. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Cysteine Residues in Phi-class Glutathione S-transferase F3 from Oryza sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyunjoo; Lee, Juwon; Noh, Jinseok; Kong, Kwanghoon [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To elucidate the roles of cysteine residues in rice Phi-class GST F3, in this study, all three cysteine residues were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis in order to obtain mutants C22A, C73A and C77A. Three mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on immobilized GSH. The substitutions of Cys73 and Cys77 residues in OsGSTF3 with alanine did not affect the glutathione conjugation activities, showing non-essentiality of these residues. On the other hand, the substitution of Cys22 residue with alanine resulted in approximately a 60% loss of specific activity toward ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the K{sub m}{sup CDNB} value of the mutant C22A was approximately 2.2 fold larger than that of the wild type. From these results, the evolutionally conserved cysteine 22 residue seems to participate rather in the structural stability of the active site in OsGSTF3 by stabilizing the electrophilic substrates-binding site's conformation than in the substrate binding directly.

  10. CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  11. Thyroid scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PET scan Skin nodules Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma Toxic nodular goiter ... Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid Tests Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  12. Colorimetry method for estimation of glycine, alanine and isoleucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive colorimetry method has been developed for estimation of amino acids glycine, alanine and isoleucine. Amino acids were derivatized with dichlone in presence of sodium bicarbonate. Amino acids showed maximum absorbance at 470 nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity (5-25 µg/ml for glycine, alanine and isoleucine, precision (intra-day variation 0.13-0.78, 0.22-1.29, 0.58-2.52% and inter-day variation 0.52-2.49, 0.43-3.12, 0.58- 4.48% for glycine, alanine and isoleucine respectively, accuracy (91.43-98.86, 96.26-105.99 and 95.73-104.82 for glycine, alanine and isoleucine respectively, limit of detection (0.6, 1 and 1 µg/ml for glycine, alanine and isoleucine respectively and limit of quantification (5 µg/ml for glycine, alanine and isoleucine. The method was found to be simple and sensitive.

  13. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. (Inst. fur Biotechnologie 1, Julich (Germany))

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  14. Structure of D-alanine-D-alanine ligase from Yersinia pestis: nucleotide phosphate recognition by the serine loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huyen Thi; Hong, Myoung Ki; Ngo, Ho Phuong Thuy; Huynh, Kim Hung; Ahn, Yeh Jin; Wang, Zhong; Kang, Lin Woo

    2016-01-01

    D-Alanyl-D-alanine is an essential precursor of bacterial peptidoglycan and is synthesized by D-alanine-D-alanine ligase (DDL) with hydrolysis of ATP; this reaction makes DDL an important drug target for the development of antibacterial agents. Five crystal structures of DDL from Yersinia pestis (YpDDL) were determined at 1.7-2.5 Å resolution: apo, AMP-bound, ADP-bound, adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate-bound, and D-alanyl-D-alanine- and ADP-bound structures. YpDDL consists of three domains, in which four loops, loop 1, loop 2 (the serine loop), loop 3 (the ω-loop) and loop 4, constitute the binding sites for two D-alanine molecules and one ATP molecule. Some of them, especially the serine loop and the ω-loop, show flexible conformations, and the serine loop is mainly responsible for the conformational change in substrate nucleotide phosphates. Enzyme-kinetics assays were carried out for both the D-alanine and ATP substrates and a substrate-binding mechanism was proposed for YpDDL involving conformational changes of the loops.

  15. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  16. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  17. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  18. Efficient multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from genomic template

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fengtao Luo; Xiaolan Du; Tujun Weng; Xuan Wen; Junlan Huang; Lin Chen

    2012-12-01

    In this article, the traditional multi-site-directed mutagenesis method based on overlap extension PCR was improved specifically for complicated templates, such as genomic sequence or complementary DNA. This method was effectively applied for multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from mouse genomic DNA, as well as for combination, deletion or insertion of DNA fragments.

  19. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  20. Homemade Site Directed Mutagenesis of Whole Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Mark; Boonrod, Kajohn

    2009-01-01

    Site directed mutagenesis of whole plasmids is a simple way to create slightly different variations of an original plasmid. With this method the cloned target gene can be altered by substitution, deletion or insertion of a few bases directly into a plasmid. It works by simply amplifying the whole plasmid, in a non PCR-based thermocycling reaction. During the reaction mutagenic primers, carrying the desired mutation, are integrated into the newly synthesized plasmid. In this video tutorial we demonstrate an easy and cost effective way to introduce base substitutions into a plasmid. The protocol works with standard reagents and is independent from commercial kits, which often are very expensive. Applying this protocol can reduce the total cost of a reaction to an eighth of what it costs using some of the commercial kits. In this video we also comment on critical steps during the process and give detailed instructions on how to design the mutagenic primers. PMID:19488024

  1. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  2. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  3. Alanine dosimeter for practical use using polyethylene as binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Tsuneo (Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan)); Kobayashi, Toshikazu; Iso, Katsuaki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Mamuro, Tetsuo

    1992-02-01

    Alanine dosimeters were manufactured using polyethylene as a binder and their characteristics were studied with the intention of developing cheap dosimeter for practical routine use having high precision in a dose range of 0.1-100 kGy. The effects of temperature and humidity during storage after irradiation on fading of the ESR response, which is proportional to radiation-induced free radicals in alanine, and the influence of ESR measurement conditions on the ESR response were investigated in detail. As the results, it was confirmed that practical dosimetry of satisfactorily high precision is possible with the manufactured dosimeters by following appropriate measurement procedures. (author).

  4. Alanine dosimeter for practical use using polyethylene as binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine dosimeters were manufactured using polyethylene as a binder and their characteristics were studied with the intention of developing cheap dosimeter for practical routine use having high precision in a dose range of 0.1-100 kGy. The effects of temperature and humidity during storage after irradiation on fading of the ESR response, which is proportional to radiation-induced free radicals in alanine, and the influence of ESR measurement conditions on the ESR response were investigated in detail. As the results, it was confirmed that practical dosimetry of satisfactorily high precision is possible with the manufactured dosimeters by following appropriate measurement procedures. (author)

  5. New Poly(amide-imide)/Nanocomposites Reinforced Silicate Nanoparticles Based on N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl Alanine Containing Ether Moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Khalil; Shabanian, Meisam; Dadfar, Ehsan

    2012-02-01

    A series of Poly(amide-imide)/montmorillonite nanocomposites containing N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl alanine moiety in the main chain were synthesized by a convenient solution intercalation technique. Poly(amide-imide) (PAI) 5 as a source of polymer matrix was synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of N-pyromellitimido-L-phenyl alanine 3 with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether 4 in the presence of triphenyl phosphite (TPP), CaCl2, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). The resulting nanocomposite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that organo-modified clay was dispersed homogeneously in PAI matrix. TGA indicated an enhancement of thermal stability of new nanocomposites compared with the pure polymer.

  6. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo. PMID:27130213

  7. Preparation of 15N-labeled L-alanine by coupling the alanine dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple enzymatic procedure for the preparation of L-[15N]alanine, one of the metabolically most active amino acids in all types of cells, is reported. The procedure is based on the coupling of two reactions, one catalyzed by bacterial alanine dehydrogenase, the second catalyzed by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. An impediment in the use of this procedure could be the high cost of commercial AlaDH. However, the enzyme is widespread in the Bacillus species and partially purified samples, adequate preparative purposes, could be obtained relatively easily by chromatography on blue-Sepharose. (Auth.)

  8. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  9. CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... come from a CT scan. Some people have allergies to contrast dye. Let your doctor know if you have ... vein contains iodine. If you have an iodine allergy, a type of contrast may cause nausea or vomiting , sneezing , itching , or ...

  10. DNA MUTAGENESIS IN PANAX GINSENG CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev K.V.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, it is well documented that plant tissue culture induces a number of mutations and chromosome rearrangements termed “somaclonal variations”. However, little is known about the nature and the molecular mechanisms of the tissue culture-induced mutagenesis and the effects of long-term subculturing on the rate and specific features of the mutagenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare DNA mutagenesis in different genes of Panax ginseng callus cultures of different age. It has previously been shown that the nucleotide sequences of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolC locus and the selective marker nptII developed mutations during long-term cultivation of transgenic cell cultures of P. ginseng. In the present work, we analyzed nucleotide sequences of selected plant gene families in a 2-year-old and 20-year-old P. ginseng 1c cell culture and in leaves of cultivated P. ginseng plants. We analysed sequence variability between the Actin genes, which are a family of house-keeping genes; the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and dammarenediol synthase (DDS genes, which actively participate in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides; and the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase (SERK genes, which control plant development. The frequency of point mutations in the Actin, PAL, DDS, and SERK genes in the 2-year-old callus culture was markedly higher than that in cultivated plants but lower than that in the 20-year-old callus culture of P. ginseng. Most of the mutations in the 2- and 20-year-old P. ginseng calli were A↔G and T↔C transitions. The number of nonsynonymous mutations was higher in the 2- and 20-year-old callus cultures than the number of nonsynonymous mutations in the cultivated plants of P. ginseng. Interestingly, the total number of N→G or N→C substitutions in the analyzed genes was 1.6 times higher than the total number of N→A or N→T substitutions. Using methylation-sensitive DNA fragmentation

  11. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  12. Pressure-induced phase transformations in L-alanine crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Gerward, Leif; Freire, P.T.C.;

    2008-01-01

    Raman scattering and synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate the high-pressure behavior of L-alanine. This study has confirmed a structural phase transition observed by Raman scattering at 2.3 GPa and identified it as a change from orthorhombic to tetragonal structure. Another...

  13. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance. PMID:23075550

  14. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Bardaweel

    Full Text Available Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli. Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes, a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  15. Induced Mutagenesis for Crop Improvement in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental mutagenesis has been investigated and applied in crop breeding in various Bulgarian agricultural research institutes during the last half century. In this paper some major accomplishments achieved in Bulgaria are highlighted. Both, physical mutagens (mainly gamma rays) and chemical mutagens (mainly EMS, NMU, NEU), have been used and their proper doses have been established. According to the information available to the author, there are more than 76 new cultivars developed using induced mutants in Bulgaria, namely: barley (5), wheat (5), durum wheat (9), maize (26), sunflower (3), lentil (4), bean (2), pea (1), chickpea and vetch (2), soybean (5), tomato (6), pepper (4), cotton (2), tobacco (2). Some of the mutant cultivars such as maize hybrid Kneja 509 and durum wheat cultivar Gergana have become leading cultivars occupying up to 50% of the growing area of the crop concerned. In durum wheat, mutant cultivars have not only covered almost all the growing areas but also doubled the yield in the past 30 years. The achievements in mutation breeding programmes have also had a significant impact on the progress of genetic research by elucidating the underlying mechanisms of induced mutations and the training of many young researchers and university students through their involvement in various research projects. A number of mutant lines with novel characteristics and mutant cultivars of economical importance together with relevant techniques used in the development and characterization of those mutant lines/cultivars are described in this paper. (author)

  16. Protein engineering: single or multiple site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Chung; Vaisvila, Romualdas

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis techniques are invaluable tools in molecular biology to study the structural and functional properties of a protein. To expedite the time required and simplify methods for mutagenesis, we recommend two protocols in this chapter. The first method for single site-directed mutagenesis, which includes point mutations, insertions, or deletions, can be achieved by an inverse PCR strategy with mutagenic primers and the high-fidelity Phusion(®) DNA Polymerase to introduce a site-directed mutation with exceptional efficiency. The second method is for engineering multiple mutations into a gene of interest. This can be completed in one step by PCR with mutagenic primers and by assembling all mutagenized PCR products using the Gibson Assembly™ Master Mix. This method allows multiple nucleotides to be changed simultaneously, which not only saves time but also reagents compared to traditional methods of mutagenesis. PMID:23423897

  17. Fluorescent protein engineering by in vivo site-directed mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos, Melvys Valledor; Hu, Qinghua; Schiller, Paul,; Myers, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo site-directed mutagenesis by ssDNA recombineering is a facile method to change the color of fluorescent proteins without cloning. Two different starting alleles of GFP were targeted for mutagenesis: gfpmut3* residing in the E. coli genome and egfp carried by a bacterial/mammalian dual expression lentiviral plasmid vector. Fluorescent protein spectra were shifted by subtle modification of the chromophore region and residues interacting with the chromophore of the fluorescent protein. E...

  18. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, ...

  19. Generating Novel Allelic Variation Through Activator Insertional Mutagenesis in Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Ling; Singh, Manjit; Pitt, Lauren; Sweeney, Meredith; Brutnell, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    The maize transposable element Activator (Ac) has been exploited as an insertional mutagen to disrupt, clone, and characterize genes in a number of plant species. To develop an Ac-based mutagenesis platform for maize, a large-scale mutagenesis was conducted targeting the pink scutellum1 locus. We selected 1092 Ac transposition events from a closely linked donor Ac, resulting in the recovery of 17 novel ps1 alleles. Multiple phenotypic classes were identified corresponding to Ac insertions in ...

  20. Assessment of an alanine EPR dosimetry technique with enhanced precision and accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, R B; Wieser, A; Romanyukha, A A; Hardy, B L; Barrus, J K

    2000-01-01

    Dose reconstruction in the course of a series of blind tests demonstrated that an accuracy of 10 mGy for low doses and 1% for high doses can be achieved using EPR spectroscopy. This was accomplished using a combination of methodologies including polynomial filtration of the EPR spectrum, dosimeter rotation during scanning, use of an EPR standard fixed into the resonator and subtraction of all nonradiogenic signals. Doses were reconstructed over the range of 0.01-1000 Gy using this compound spectral EPR analysis. This EPR technique, being equally applicable to fractionated doses (such as those delivered during multiple radiotherapy treatments), was verified to exhibit dose reciprocity. Irradiated alanine dosimeters which were stored exhibited compound spectral EPR signal fading of ca 3% over 9 months. All error estimates given in this paper are given at the 1 standard deviation level and unless otherwise specified do not account for uncertainties in source calibration.

  1. Formation of simple biomolecules from alanine in ocean by impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Y.; Sekine, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kakegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biomolecules on the Earth are thought either to have originated from the extraterrestrial parts carried with flying meteorites or to have been formed from the inorganic materials on the Earth through given energy. From the standpoint to address the importance of impact energy, it is required to simulate experimentally the chemical reactions during impacts, because violent impacts may have occurred 3.8-4.0 Gyr ago to create biomolecules initially. It has been demonstrated that shock reactions among ocean (H2O), atmospheric nitrogen, and meteoritic constitution (Fe) can induce locally reduction environment to form simple bioorganic molecules such as ammonia and amino acid (Nakazawa et al., 2005; Furukawa et al., 2009). We need to know possible processes for alanine how chemical reactions proceed during repeated impacts and how complicated biomolecules are formed. Alanine can be formed from glycine (Umeda et al., in preparation). In this study, we carried out shock recovery experiments at pressures of 4.4-5.7 GPa to investigate the chemical reactions of alanine. Experiments were carried out with a propellant gun. Stainless steel containers (30 mm in diameter, 30 mm long) with 13C-labeled alanine aqueous solution immersed in olivine or hematite powders were used as targets. Air gap was present in the sample room (18 mm in diameter, 2 mm thick) behind the sample. The powder, solution, and air represent meteorite, ocean, and atmosphere on early Earth, respectively. Two powders of olivine and hematite help to keep the oxygen fugacity low and high during experiments, respectively in order to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity on chemical processes of alanine. The recovered containers, after cleaned completely, were immersed into liquid nitrogen to freeze sample solution and then we drilled on the impact surface to extract water-soluble run products using pure water. Thus obtained products were analyzed by LC/MS for four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, and

  2. The Roles of UmuD in Regulating Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylene N. Ollivierre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms are subject to DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. DNA damage that is not fully repaired can lead to mutations. Mutagenesis is now understood to be an active process, in part facilitated by lower-fidelity DNA polymerases that replicate DNA in an error-prone manner. Y-family DNA polymerases, found throughout all domains of life, are characterized by their lower fidelity on undamaged DNA and their specialized ability to copy damaged DNA. Two E. coli Y-family DNA polymerases are responsible for copying damaged DNA as well as for mutagenesis. These DNA polymerases interact with different forms of UmuD, a dynamic protein that regulates mutagenesis. The UmuD gene products, regulated by the SOS response, exist in two principal forms: UmuD2, which prevents mutagenesis, and UmuD2′, which facilitates UV-induced mutagenesis. This paper focuses on the multiple conformations of the UmuD gene products and how their protein interactions regulate mutagenesis.

  3. The effects of beam quality on EPR spectra and alanine dosimetry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitization of L-Alanine dosimetry to neutrons showed that variations in the beam quality, resulting from adding boric acid to L-Alanine samples, affected the intensity and the shape of the lines in the EPR spectra of alanine following irradiation with thermal neutrons. Disintegration of 10B in the (n, α) process, enhances the EPR signal due to increase in the local dose deposition. The relative effectiveness of alanine dosimetry to neutrons was found to be about 0.5. (author)

  4. A study of the composite character of the ESR spectrum of alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both L and DL-alanine ESR powder spectra have been studied in the dose range of 1-106 Gy. By using Maximum Likelihood Common Factor Analysis (MLCFA), it has been demonstrated that the ESR spectrum of L-alanine is at least 3-fold composite over the whole dose range considered. For DL-alanine, in certain dose ranges only two ESR components could be detected. Possible consequences for the application and optimization of alanine dosimetry are discussed. (Author)

  5. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  6. [Rapid site-directed mutagenesis on full-length plasmid DNA by using designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baozhong; Ran, Duoliang; Zhang, Xin; An, Xiaoping; Shan, Yunzhu; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2009-02-01

    To use the designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis technique to perform rapid site-directed mutagenesis on double-stranded plasmid DNA. The target amino acid sequence was reversely translated into DNA sequences with degenerate codons, resulting in large amount of silently mutated sequences containing various restriction endonucleases (REs). Certain mutated sequence with an appropriate RE was selected as the target DNA sequence for designing mutation primers. The full-length plasmid DNA was amplified with high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase and the amplified product was 5' phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and then self-ligated. After transformation into an E. coli host the transformants were rapidly screened by cutting with the designed RE. With this strategy we successfully performed the site-directed mutagenesis on an 8 kb plasmid pcDNA3.1-pIgR and recovered the wild-type amino acid sequence of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). A novel site-directed mutagenesis strategy based on DREAM was developed which exploited RE as a rapid screening measure. The highly efficient, high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase was applied to ensure the efficient and faithful amplification of the full-length sequence of a plasmid of up to 8 kb. This rapid mutagenesis strategy avoids using any commercial site-directed mutagenesis kits, special host strains or isotopes. PMID:19459340

  7. Mutagenesis as a breeding method in lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Mutagenesis was used to develop cultivars with good adaptability to exogenous factors and with increased productivity. By means of this alternative breeding procedure, increases in biological and nutritive value of the seeds were studied. To increase genetic variability in lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) breeding material, experimental mutagenesis was applied parallel to conventional breeding methods. The aim was to characterize the mutant lines as well as determine whether some of them could be directly registered as cultivars or as gene donors in breeding programme. Within the period 1993-1996, eight mutant lentil lines were studied under field conditions. They were obtained as a result of gamma rays (60Co) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) treatment of the small seeded cultivar 'Tadjikskaya 95'. Air-dried seeds were treated. During the vegetative stage, phenological observation was made. The structural elements of productivity were established by biometrical analysis of 25-30 plants from each of the variants. Phytopathological evaluations were made using the scoring procedure established by ICARDA. Protein content was determined by the Kiejdhal method. The technological qualities of the seeds were determined using the method of Tretyakova and Ustinova. The mutant lines differed considerably in their biological traits from the parent cultivar. The vegetative period ranged from 84 to 89 days. The mutant lines were latermaturing than parent variety Tadjikskaya 95 by 1-5 days. As a result of mutagen treatment, the range in plant height was expanded from 1 to 8.3 cm. Line 96-8, obtained after irradiation with gamma rays, was the tallest (40.3 cm). Lodging of the mutant lines was greater than that of the initial cultivar and ranged from 20.0 to 66.7%. The trait varied to a great extent depending on environmental conditions. Mutagenic treatments also caused changes in seed size and seed coat colour. Development of resistance to important diseases of lentil in

  8. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated l-α-alanine (l-α-alanine-d4) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard l-α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated l-α-alanine (CD3CD(NH2)COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R1=CH3C*(H)COOH and R2=H3N+-C*(CH3)COO-, was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard l-α-alanine

  9. Alanine/ Bromophenol Blue Polymeric Films For Radiation Dosimetry Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Polymeric dyed flexible films are considered to be the most commonly used dosimeters for routine dose monitoring in ionizing-radiation processing. Dyed polymer films prepared by simple technique of casting aqueous solution of poly (vinyl alcohol) containing bromophenol blue on horizontal glass plate are useful for high dose dosimetry. Different concentrations of L-alanine were added in presence of bromophenol blue mixed inside PVA films producing a blue film. The color has a variable absorbance with applied dose in the range from 1-35 kGy. Spectrophotometric evaluation at 602 nm for the absorbance intensity of this color was investigated as a function of dose. The used work method is uncomplicated and very easy for routine application. The radiation chemical yield G (value) was calculated in the presence and absence of alanine. Humidity during irradiation was also studied. These films show a good stability before and after irradiation under different storage conditions

  10. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    proportional to absorbed dose. A model by Hansen and Olsen, based on the Track Structure Theory is available, which can predict the relative efficiency of some detectors, when the particle spectrum is known. For alanine detectors the model was successfully validated by Hansen and Olsen for several ion species...... at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...... been simulated with FLUKA. We found an agreement between measured values of the relative efficiency with values predicted by the Hansen and Olsen model with divergence less than 4%. With the implementation in FLUKA we are able to simulate the detector response in the depth dose curves with precisions...

  11. Exercise training and beta-alanine-induced muscle carnosine loading.

    OpenAIRE

    Tine eBex; Weiliang eChung; Audrey eBaguet; Eric eAchten; Wim eDerave

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, thereby promoting high-intensity exercise performance. Trained muscles of athletes have a higher increase in carnosine concentration after BA supplementation compared to untrained muscles, but it remains to be determined whether this is due to an accumulation of acute exercise effects or to chronic adaptations from prior training. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether high-vo...

  12. Exercise Training and Beta-Alanine-Induced Muscle Carnosine Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Bex, Tine; Chung, Weiliang; Baguet, Audrey; Achten, Eric; Derave, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, thereby promoting high-intensity (HI) exercise performance. Trained muscles of athletes have a higher increase in carnosine concentration after BA supplementation compared to untrained muscles, but it remains to be determined whether this is due to an accumulation of acute exercise effects or to chronic adaptations from prior training. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ...

  13. A thermodynamic study of La(III)L-alanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protonation constants of L-alanine and the complex formation constants of its La(III) complexes were determined by potentiometric studies at ionic strengths 0.06, 0.1, and 0.15 mol dm-3 (NaClO4) and at different temperatures 20, 27, and 35OC. The data together with the derived thermodynamic parameters ΔHO, ΔSO, and ΔGO are reported and discussed. (author)

  14. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA) Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  15. The Response of Alanine Dosimeters in Thermal Neutron Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, T; Bassler, Niels; Sharpe, P; Palmans, H.; KRATZ J.v.; Langgruth, P.; HAMPEL G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a special kind of particle therapy, based on the neutron induced fission of the boron isotope 10B [1]. We have performed dosimetry experiments on the mixed neutron and gamma fields at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Mainz. Commonly, dosimetry in such fields is realized by foil activation and ion chambers [2]. Here we investigate alanine as an easier and more robust alternative dosimeter.Methods:We have performed four phantom experiments at...

  16. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  17. Ab initio study of alanine polypeptide chain twisting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the potential energy surfaces for alanine chains consisting of three and six amino acids. For these molecules we have calculated potential energy surfaces as a function of the Ramachandran angles ph$ and psi, which are widely used for the characterization of the polypeptide...... investigated the influence of the secondary structure of polypeptide chains on the formation of the potential energy landscape. This analysis has been performed for the sheet and the helix conformations of chains of six amino acids....

  18. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Metrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. Photon dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. Electron dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved. (author)

  19. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  20. Angular response of alanine samples: From powder to pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine radicals produced by irradiation can be observed through the ESR measurement of powder or in a pellet with an angular response. There are five main peaks in the ESR alanine spectrum. Usually, the central peak amplitude (A1) is chosen to perform dose measurements because it is the largest. Looking at the angular response it seems that the peak amplitude (A2) shows lower maximal deviation and standard deviations. The angular response exists from the first step of the process as powder through the granular form until the final compact pellet form. Results about the angular response on pure alanine powders and its evolution during the manufacturing process of homemade pellets, as well as commercial pellets from different suppliers are presented. The evolution of the angular response with time gives information about the stability of radicals. The manufacturing process of pellet also influences the stabilization of the radicals produced by irradiation; therefore pellet reproducibility. This study raises questions and makes proposals for a better approach to reduce measurement uncertainties for high and low doses measurements

  1. Preparation of α-alanine-3H by the interaction of atomic tritium heated up to 2000 K with a solid alanine target at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of hydrogen by alanine targets, the target behaviour and the yield of α-alanine-3H were studied in experiments involving straight passage of H and T atoms from the sourse (2000 K) to the target (77 K) as a function of the exposure time. In the studies with 3H2 the radioactivity of the gas phase was decreasing more rapidly than the overall pressure of hydrogen: H3H accumulates more rapidly in the gas phase. Alanine decomposition products were identified. The conditions for the studies of α-alanine-3H are suggested

  2. Perineal scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanty, P; d'Alton, M; Romero, R; Hobbins, J C

    1986-10-01

    Although various techniques have been described to aid in the ultrasound diagnosis of placenta previa and incompetent cervix, these maneuvers depend on the precise identification of the internal cervical os, a feat which is notoriously difficult to accomplish consistently. In an attempt to get a closer view of the cervix we tried another approach. This simple technique of perineal scanning has the potential to help considerably with these problems. PMID:3530265

  3. Analysis of an Alanine/Arginine Mixture by Using TLC/FTIR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied TLC/FTIR coupled with mapping technique to analyze an alanine/arginine mixture. Narrow band TLC plates prepared by using AgI as a stationary phase were used to separate alanine and arginine. The distribution of alanine and arginine spots was manifested by a 3D chromatogram. Alanine and arginine can be successfully separated by the narrow band TLC plate. In addition, the FTIR spectra of the separated alanine and arginine spots on the narrow band TLC plate are roughly the same as the corresponding reference IR spectra.

  4. Determination of 14C-labeled plasma L + α-alanine specific radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described, which enables the specific radioactivity of 14C-labeled L + α-alanine in plasma to be determined. Plasma alanine concentration is determined spectrophotometrically using alanine dehydrogenase. In a separate procedure, this enzyme is also used to convert 14C labeled alanine and added carrier alanine, to pyruvate. The phenylhydrazone derivative of the pyruvate is then prepared and assayed for radioactivity after crystallization to constant specific radioactivity. A maximum error of 1.5 percent for any one specific radioactivity determination was found. (U.S.)

  5. 2012 MUTAGENESIS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 19-23, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, Bruce

    2012-08-23

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  6. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚日生; 李曼曼; 邓胜松; 胡华佳; 王淮; 李凤和

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  7. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  8. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  9. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  10. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  11. The mechanisms of radical formation in L-α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling of radical transformations in L-α-alanine after irradiation was performed for isolated radicals and for clusters. Special attention was devoted to the explanation of the experimental results concerning selective proton transfer and behavior of cation-radicals because a unique interpretation of the corresponding experiments is very difficult. Both semi-empirical and ab initio methods were used depending on the size of system under investigation. The results obtained show the usefulness of the computer simulation for processes in rather complex materials used in dosimetry

  12. Multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance of irradiated L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radical generated by γ-irradiation of crystalline L-alanine was examined by continuous wave (CW) and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 1.8, 3.2, 4.9, 9.1 and 19.4 GHz. The spin-flip satellite lines that make a prominent contribution to the saturated spectra at 9.1 GHz are less conspicuous at lower frequencies because of overlap with the allowed transitions. The spin-lattice relaxation times measured by long-pulse saturation recovery and phase memory times measured by electron spin echo increase with increasing microwave frequency. (Author)

  13. The mechanisms of radical formation in L-{alpha}-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugay, A.A.; Onischuk, V.A.; Petrenko, T.L.; Teslenko, V.V

    2000-05-15

    Modeling of radical transformations in L-{alpha}-alanine after irradiation was performed for isolated radicals and for clusters. Special attention was devoted to the explanation of the experimental results concerning selective proton transfer and behavior of cation-radicals because a unique interpretation of the corresponding experiments is very difficult. Both semi-empirical and ab initio methods were used depending on the size of system under investigation. The results obtained show the usefulness of the computer simulation for processes in rather complex materials used in dosimetry.

  14. Heterologous overexpression and mutagenesis of the human bile salt export pump (ABCB11 using DREAM (Directed REcombination-Assisted Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stindt

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-studied process. Here, we describe a yeast-recombination-based approach to construct and mutate plasmids containing the cDNA of the human bile salt export pump (BSEP that has been shown to be unstable in E. coli. Using this approach, we constructed the necessary plasmids for a heterologous overexpression of BSEP in the yeast Pichia pastoris. We then applied a new site-directed mutagenesis method, DREAM (Directed REcombination-Assisted Mutagenesis that completely bypasses E. coli by using S. cerevisiae as the plasmid host with high mutagenesis efficiency. Finally, we show how to apply this strategy to unstable non-yeast plasmids by rapidly turning an existing mammalian BSEP expression construct into a S. cerevisiae-compatible plasmid and analyzing the impact of a BSEP mutation in several mammalian cell lines.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis using Tnt1 retrotransposon in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato is the third most important food crop in the world. However, genetics and genomics research of potato has lagged behind many major crop species due to its autotetraploidy and a highly heterogeneous genome. Insertional mutagenesis using T-DNA or transposable elements, which is available in sev...

  16. OneClick: A Program for Designing Focused Mutagenesis Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Warburton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OneClick is a user-friendly web-based program, developed specifically for quick-and-easy design of focused mutagenesis experiments (e.g., site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis. Written in Perl and developed into a web application using CGI programming, OneClick offers a step-by-step experimental design, from mutagenic primer design to analysis of a mutant library. Upon input of a DNA sequence encoding the protein of interest, OneClick designs the mutagenic primers according to user input, e.g., amino acid position to mutate, type of amino acid substitutions (e.g., substitution to a group of amino acids with similar chemical property and type of mutagenic primers. OneClick has incorporated an extensive range of commercially available plasmids and DNA polymerases suitable for focused mutagenesis. Therefore, OneClick also provides information on PCR mixture preparation, thermal cycling condition, expected size of PCR product and agar plate to use during bacterial transformation. Importantly, OneClick also carries out a statistical analysis of the resultant mutant library, information of which is important for selection/screening. OneClick is a unique and invaluable tool in the field of protein engineering, allowing for systematic construction of a mutant library or a protein variant and simplifying molecular biology work. The program will be constantly updated to reflect the rapid development in the fields of molecular biology and protein engineering.

  17. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  18. MtDNA mutagenesis impairs elimination of mitochondria during erythroid maturation leading to enhanced erythrocyte destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlqvist, K.J.; Leoncini, S.; Pecorelli, A.; Wortmann, S.B.; Ahola, S.; Forsstrom, S.; Guerranti, R.; Felice, C. De; Smeitink, J.; Ciccoli, L.; Hamalainen, R.H.; Suomalainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic progenitor cells show special sensitivity to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis, which suggests that increased mtDNA mutagenesis could underlie anemias. Here we show that elevated mtDNA mutagenesis in mice with a proof-reading deficient mtDNA polymerase (PolG) leads to incomplete m

  19. β-alanine supplementation improves tactical performance but not cognitive function in combat soldiers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Jay R; Landau, Geva; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Dabora, Matan; Moran, Daniel S.; Sharvit, Nurit; Hoffman, Mattan W.; Ben Moshe, Yuval; McCormack, William P.; Hirschhorn, Gil; Ostfeld, Ishay

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no known studies that have examined β-alanine supplementation in military personnel. Considering the physiological and potential neurological effects that have been reported during sustained military operations, it appears that β-alanine supplementation may have a potential benefit in maintaining physical and cognitive performance during high-intensity military activity under stressful conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 28 days of β-alanine...

  20. Ergogenic Effects of β-Alanine and Carnosine: Proposed Future Research to Quantify Their Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    John Caruso; Jessica Charles; Kayla Unruh; Rachel Giebel; Lexis Learmonth; William Potter

    2012-01-01

    β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former’s merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell’s total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that...

  1. Alanine-ESR in vivo dosimetry: a feasibility study and possible applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new alanine-ESR dosimeter has been developed at AERIAL in order to study its potential use in radiotherapy. Alanine-ESR results are compared with ion chamber for depth-dose measurements. A good concordance has been found between provisional dosimetry and absorbed dose during high dose rate and intra operative treatments. The results of the experiments indicate that alanine-ESR dosimetry is suited to check dose optimisation routines and seems to be a promising in vivo dosimetry technique. (Author)

  2. Application of an alanine dosimetry system for industrial irradiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the application of alanine dosimetry in radiation processing. Continuous checks of the EPR measuring conditions as well as using high-quality alanine dosimeters and consistent technique for dose determination guarantee an accuracy of about ± 3% intermediate dose levels. The alanine dosimetry system was applied for dose mapping measurements during irradiator qualification and performance qualification of different products, routine dosimetry, and special radiation protection applications within the gamma irradiator. (author)

  3. Complex time dependence of the EPR signal of irradiated L-α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the EPR signal amplitude of γ-irradiated L-α-alanine with use of an adjacent reference sample have revealed variations in the signal intensity within hours and days after irradiation. The character of the time dependence of the amplitude varies with dose and the amplitude changes reach 1-1.5%. This observation favors the hypothesis that irradiated alanine contains several paramagnetic centers. Usefulness of adjacent reference samples in alanine dosimetry is also demonstrated. (Author)

  4. Polarographic studies on mixed ligand complexes involving amino acids : ternary systems, Cd-α-alanine-oxalate and Cd-β-alanine-oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternary complexes of cadmium(II) with oxalate as primary ligand and α- and β-alanines as secondary ligands have been studied polarographically. Formation of three mixed complex species, [Cd(amino acid) (oxalate)], [Cd(amino acid) (oxalate)2] and [Cd(anino acid)2(oxalate)], is observed in each case. The reduction is reversible and diffusion-controlled. The stability constants have been evaluated usino the method of McMasters. The α-alanine complexes are found to be more stable than the corresponding β-alanine complexes. (author)

  5. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine

  6. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico))

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  7. Helix Scan: A Scan Design for Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HU Yu; LI Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Scan design is a widely used design-for-testability technique to improve test quality and efficiency. For the scan-designed circuit, test and diagnosis of the scan chain and the circuit is an important process for silicon debug and yield learning. However, conventional scan designs and diagnosis methods abort the subsequent diagnosis process after diagnosing the scan chain if the scan chain is faulty. In this work, we propose a design-for-diagnosis scan strategy called helix scan and a diagnosis algorithm to address this issue. Unlike previous proposed methods, helix scan has the capability to carry on the diagnosis process without losing information when the scan chain is faulty. What is more, it simplifies scan chain diagnosis and achieves high diagnostic resolution as well as accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our design.

  8. Microhardness studies on nonlinear optical -alanine single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Hanumantharao; S Kalainathan

    2013-06-01

    Vickers and Knoop microhardness tests were carried out on grown -alanine single crystals by slow evaporation technique over a load range of 10–50 g on selected broad (2 0 3) plane. Vickers (v) and Knoop (k) microhardness for the above loads were found to be in the range of 60–71 kg/mm2 and 35–47 kg/mm2, respectively. Vickers microhardness number (v) and Knoop microhardness number (k) were found to increase with increasing load. Meyer’s index number () calculated from v shows that the material belongs to the soft material category. Using Wooster’s empirical relation, the elastic stiffness constant (11) was calculated from Vickers hardness values. Young’s modulus was calculated using Knoop hardness values. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal.

  9. Alanine aminotransferase variants conferring diverse NUE phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra H McAllister

    Full Text Available Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2, is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent (PLP enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1 knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s previously observed.

  10. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  11. Molecular techniques as complementary tools in orchid mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchid breeders have always been dependent on hybridization technology to produce new orchid hybrids and varieties. The technology has proven very reliable and easy to use and has produced wide range of successful cultivars with attractive combinations of spray length, bud number, flower colour and form, vase life, fragrance, seasonality, and compactness. By introducing mutagenesis however, wide variations of flower colours, form and size can still be obtained in addition to overcoming the problem of sexual incompatibility and sterility. In addition, complementary use of molecular techniques will allow breeders to target more specific characteristic changes and cut short breeding time. PCR-based techniques used to analyse the DNA of mutagenic clones found polymorphic fragments that can be developed as molecular markers. This paper describes how mutagenesis and molecular techniques can be used to enhance orchid breeding efforts. (author)

  12. Photodynamic action of methylene blue: mutagenesis and synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The associated mutagenesis and the interactions with physical agents in order to potencialize its biological effects are studied. The induction of mutation in bacterias due to photodynamic action of methylene blue is presented as well as the induction of single breaks in bacterial DNA and the relationship between the repair systems, especially the SOS one. The interaction of the photodynamic therapy with low intensity electric current is discussed. (M.A.C.)

  13. Mouse Mutagenesis Using N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Andrew P. Salinger and Monica J. Justice1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION This protocol describes chemical mutagenesis of male mice using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), which is the most efficient method for obtaining mouse mutations in phenotype-driven screens. A fractionated dose of ENU, an alkylating agent, can produce a mutation rate as high as 1.5 × 10e−3 in male mouse spermatogonial stem cells. Treatment with ENU pr...

  14. Characterization of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for high dose applications – comparison with alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldeland, Einar; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    signal per ºC change in irradiation temperature) were 0.154 % K−1 and 0.161 % K−1 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. This work demonstrates that lithium formate EPR dosimeters may be suitable for high dose applications, but their signals saturate at lower doses than alanine. The saturation...

  15. SOMA: a single oligonucleotide mutagenesis and cloning approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Pfirrmann

    Full Text Available Modern biology research requires simple techniques for efficient and restriction site-independent modification of genetic material. Classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies are limited by their dependency on restriction sites and the use of complementary primer pairs. Here, we describe the Single Oligonucleotide Mutagenesis and Cloning Approach (SOMA that is independent of restriction sites and only requires a single mutagenic oligonucleotide to modify a plasmid. We demonstrate the broad application spectrum of SOMA with three examples. First, we present a novel plasmid that in a standardized and rapid fashion can be used as a template for SOMA to generate GFP-reporters. We successfully use such a reporter to assess the in vivo knock-down quality of morpholinos in Xenopus laevis embryos. In a second example, we show how to use a SOMA-based protocol for restriction-site independent cloning to generate chimeric proteins by domain swapping between the two human hRMD5a and hRMD5b isoforms. Last, we show that SOMA simplifies the generation of randomized single-site mutagenized gene libraries. As an example we random-mutagenize a single codon affecting the catalytic activity of the yeast Ssy5 endoprotease and identify a spectrum of tolerated and non-tolerated substitutions. Thus, SOMA represents a highly efficient alternative to classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies.

  16. Use of liver cell cultures in mutagenesis studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Jones, C.A.

    1980-09-30

    A sensitive cell-mediated assay has been developed for testing the mutagenesis of liver carcinogens. Mutagenesis was detected in Chinese hamster V79 cells that were cocultivated with hepatocytes isolated after collagenase/hyaluronidase digestion of rat liver slices. Mutations were characterized by resistance to ouabain and 6-thioguanine. Seven of the nitrosamines, which are potent liver carcinogens, exhibited a mutagenic response. Mutagenesis with these carcinogens could be detected at ..mu..molar doses. The polyaromatic hydrocarbon benzo(a)pyrene, which is not a liver carcinogen, but can cause fibrosarcomas, was not mutagenic in this assay, but was mutagenic in a fibroblast-mediated assay. The liver carcinogen, aflatoxin B/sub 1/, which usually does not induce fibrosarcomas, exhibited an inverse situation; it was mutagenic for V79 cells in the presence of liver cells but not in the presence of fibroblasts. We suggest that the use of various cell types, including hepatocytes prepared by the slicing method for carcinogen metabolism, and mutable V79 cells offers a sensitive assay for determining the mutagenic potential of chemical carcinogens, and may also allow a study of their organ specificity.

  17. Transients and stable radical from the deamination of α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objects of investigation were single crystals of L-α-alanine, in which radical anion CH3 C·H CO2- has been formed by radiation induced deamination of alanine. Previously, this stable radical has been spectrally identified (λmax=350 nm, ε=1100 M-1 x cm-1), and its characteristics have found to be identical with characteristics of the same radical obtained by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solution. The mechanism of radical formation in the solid state is not known. Time resolved pulse radiolysis of single crystal alanine has shown more complicated way of the formation of the same radical in solid state than in aqueous solution. The electrons abstracted from the solid alanine molecule neutralise positive the charge of zwitter-ion alanine. Ammonia is leaving the reaction-complex in time of milliseconds, leaving the stable radical anion. (author)

  18. Uses of polymer-alanine film/ESR dosimeters in dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine ESR dosimetry is a reliable method, used in a various fields of ionizing radiation. The polymer-alanine film/ESR dosimeters of 0.3 -0.4 mm thickness were prepared and their dosimetric properties were studied for 60Co γ photons and 3 - 5 MeV electrons in the dose range from 20 Gy to 100 kGy. The results show that under normal conditions the alanine calibration curves are linear in the dose range from 100 Gy to 10kGy. The dose profiles at the electron radiation field were measured with the film alanine dosimeters. The polymer-alanine film dosimeters were used for ion implantation of 400 keV ion implantor. Their dose response and energy dependence were investigated initially. (Author)

  19. Specificity determinants for autoproteolysis of LexA, a key regulator of bacterial SOS mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Birdwell, L Dillon; Kohli, Rahul M

    2014-05-20

    Bacteria utilize the tightly regulated stress response (SOS) pathway to respond to a variety of genotoxic agents, including antimicrobials. Activation of the SOS response is regulated by a key repressor-protease, LexA, which undergoes autoproteolysis in the setting of stress, resulting in derepression of SOS genes. Remarkably, genetic inactivation of LexA's self-cleavage activity significantly decreases acquired antibiotic resistance in infection models and renders bacteria hypersensitive to traditional antibiotics, suggesting that a mechanistic study of LexA could help inform its viability as a novel target for combating acquired drug resistance. Despite structural insights into LexA, a detailed knowledge of the enzyme's protease specificity is lacking. Here, we employ saturation and positional scanning mutagenesis on LexA's internal cleavage region to analyze >140 mutants and generate a comprehensive specificity profile of LexA from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (LexAPa). We find that the LexAPa active site possesses a unique mode of substrate recognition. Positions P1-P3 prefer small hydrophobic residues that suggest specific contacts with the active site, while positions P5 and P1' show a preference for flexible glycine residues that may facilitate the conformational change that permits autoproteolysis. We further show that stabilizing the β-turn within the cleavage region enhances LexA autoproteolytic activity. Finally, we identify permissive positions flanking the scissile bond (P4 and P2') that are tolerant to extensive mutagenesis. Our studies shed light on the active site architecture of the LexA autoprotease and provide insights that may inform the design of probes of the SOS pathway.

  20. Ergogenic Effects of β-Alanine and Carnosine: Proposed Future Research to Quantify Their Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Caruso

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available β-alanine is an amino acid that, when combined with histidine, forms the dipeptide carnosine within skeletal muscle. Carnosine and β-alanine each have multiple purposes within the human body; this review focuses on their roles as ergogenic aids to exercise performance and suggests how to best quantify the former’s merits as a buffer. Carnosine normally makes a small contribution to a cell’s total buffer capacity; yet β-alanine supplementation raises intracellular carnosine concentrations that in turn improve a muscle’s ability to buffer protons. Numerous studies assessed the impact of oral β-alanine intake on muscle carnosine levels and exercise performance. β-alanine may best act as an ergogenic aid when metabolic acidosis is the primary factor for compromised exercise performance. Blood lactate kinetics, whereby the concentration of the metabolite is measured as it enters and leaves the vasculature over time, affords the best opportunity to assess the merits of β-alanine supplementation’s ergogenic effect. Optimal β-alanine dosages have not been determined for persons of different ages, genders and nutritional/health conditions. Doses as high as 6.4 g day−1, for ten weeks have been administered to healthy subjects. Paraesthesia is to date the only side effect from oral β-alanine ingestion. The severity and duration of paraesthesia episodes are dose-dependent. It may be unwise for persons with a history of paraesthesia to ingest β-alanine. As for any supplement, caution should be exercised with β-alanine supplementation.

  1. Anti-oxidative effect of ribonuclease inhibitor by site-directed mutagenesis and expression in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yu; Cui Xiuyun; Wang Jihong; Zhao Peng; Xu Yuefei; Zhao Baochang

    2006-01-01

    Human placental ribonuclease inhibitor(hRI)is an acidic protein of Mr-50kDa with unusually high contents of leucine and cysteine residues.It is a cytosolic protein that protects cells from the adventitious invasion of pancreatic-type ribonuclease.hRI has 32 cysteine residues,and the oxidative formation of disulfide bonds from those cysteine residues is a rapid cooperative process that inactivates hRI.The most proximal cysteine residues in native hRI are two pairs that are adjacent in sequence.In the present aork,two molecules of alanine substituting for Cys328 and Cys329 were performed by site-directed mutagenesis.The site-mutated RI cDNA was constructed into plasmid pPIC9K and then transformed Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation.After colony screening,the bacterium was cultured and the product Was purified with affinity chromatography.The affinity of the recombinant human RI with double site mutation was examined for RNase A and its anti-oxidative effect.Results indicated that there were not many changes in the affinity for RNase A detected when compared with the wild type of RI.But the capacity of anti-oxidative effect increased by 7~9 times.The enhancement in anti-oxidative efrect might be attributed to preventing the formation of disulfide bond between Cys328 and Cys329 and the three dimensional structure of RI was thereby maintained.

  2. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  3. Directed mutagenesis affects recombination in Azospirillum brasilense nif genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Nunes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the gene transfer/mutagenesis system for Azospirillum brasilense, gene-cartridge mutagenesis was used to replace the nifD gene with the Tn5 kanamycin resistance gene. The construct was transferred to A. brasilense by electrotransformation. Of the 12 colonies isolated using the suicide plasmid pSUP202 as vector, only four did not show vector integration into the chromosome. Nevertheless, all 12 colonies were deficient in acetylene reduction, indicating an Nif- phenotype. Four Nif- mutants were analyzed by Southern blot, using six different probes spanning the nif and Km r genes and the plasmid vector. Apparently, several recombination events occurred in the mutant genomes, probably caused mainly by gene disruption owing to the mutagenesis technique used: resistance gene-cartridge mutagenesis combined with electrotransformation.Com o objetivo de melhorar os sistemas de transferência gênica e mutagênese para Azospirillum brasilense, a técnica de mutagênese através do uso de um gene marcador ("gene-cartridge mutagenesis" foi utilizada para substituir a região genômica de A. brasilense correspondente ao gene nifD por um segmento de DNA do transposon Tn5 contendo o gene que confere resistência ao antibiótico canamicina. A construção foi transferida para a linhagem de A. brasilense por eletrotransformação. Doze colônias transformantes foram isoladas com o plasmídeo suicida pSUP202 servindo como vetor. Dessas, somente quatro não possuíam o vetor integrado no cromossomo da bactéria. Independentemente da integração ou não do vetor, as 12 colônias foram deficientes na redução do gás acetileno, evidenciando o fenótipo Nif -. Quatro mutantes Nif - foram analisados através da técnica de Southern blot, utilizando-se seis diferentes fragmentos contendo genes nif, de resistência à canamicina e do vetor como sondas. Os resultados sugerem a ocorrência de eventos recombinacionais variados no genoma dos mutantes. A

  4. Heterologous Overexpression and Mutagenesis of the Human Bile Salt Export Pump (ABCB11) Using DREAM (Directed REcombination-Assisted Mutagenesis)

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Stindt; Philipp Ellinger; Claudia Stross; Verena Keitel; Dieter Häussinger; Smits, Sander H. J.; Ralf Kubitz; Lutz Schmitt

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-studied process. Here, we describe a yeast-recombination-based approach to construct and mutate plasmids containing the cDNA of the human bile salt export pump (BSEP) that has been shown to be unstable in E. coli. Using this approach, we constructed the necessary plasmids for a heterologous overexpression of BSEP in the yeast Pichia pastoris. We then applied a new site-directed mutagenesis method, DREAM (Directed REcombination-Ass...

  5. Preparation of new series of poly(amide-imide) reinforced layer silicate nano composite containing N-trimellitimide-L-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, K.; Soleimani, M. [Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shabanian, M., E-mail: k-faghihi@araku.ac.ir [Young Researches Club, Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    A new poly(amide-imide)-montmorillonite series were generated through solution intercalation technique. Cloisite 20A was used as a modified montmorillonite for ample compatibility with the poly(amide-imide) (PAI) matrix. The PAI 5 chains were synthesized by the direct polycondensation reaction of N-trimellitylimido-L-alanine (3) with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether (4) in the presence of tryphenyl phosphites (TPP), CaCl{sub 2}, pyridine and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Morphology and structure of the resulting PAI-nano composite films 5a-5d with (5-20 Wt%) silicate particles were characterized by Ftir spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of clay dispersion and the interaction between clay and polymeric chains on the properties of nano composites films were investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and water uptake measurements. (Author)

  6. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  7. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  8. Thermochemical Study of Lanthanum Complex Crystal with β-Alanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平初; 屈松生; 詹正坤; 吴新明

    2002-01-01

    Lanthanum complex crystal with β-alanine (1∶3) was synthesized. Through the DTA,TG,chemistry analysis and comparison with literature, it shows that its form is {[La2(β-ala)6* (H2O)4](ClO4)6*H2O}n, and its purity is 98.86%. The dissolution enthalpy of the reactants and products in 2 mol*L-1 HCl solution (298.15K) was measured by using the isoperibol reaction calorimetry. ΔrHm was calculated by a designed thermochemical cycle of the coordination reaction. From the results and other auxiliary quantities, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of [La2(β-ala)6*(H2O)4](ClO4)6*H2O is obtained to be ΔfHm°{[La2(β-ala)6*(H2O)4](ClO4)6*H2O} = - 7062.911 kJ*mol-1.

  9. Detection of low- and high-LET radiation with alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production and accumulation of free radicals in some crystalline biomolecules are relatively stable products of a sequence of events inititated by the absorption of radiation energy. Free radicals can qualitatively and quantitatively be analyzed by means of electron spin resonance, ESR, spectroscopy, and the measure of radical concentration may thus be used for dosimetry purposes. For practical application in radiation dosimetry the crystalline amino acid L-α-alanine is pressed into pellets, 4.5 mm in diameter by 2 mm in thickness, with 5% by weight polyvinyl-pyrrolidinone (C4H6N0-CH=CH2)sub(n) added as a binding material. The dose meter is robust and easy to handle, and the read-out technique is non-destructive with respect to the measured signal. The useful dose range is from 0.5 to 105 Gy with + - 0.4% reproducibility of measurement. Hence, the dose meter can be used in radiation processing of food, for sterilization, as a postal dose meter for intercalibration of radiation facilities, for control and documentation of radiation therapy doses, and as a personal accident dose meter for radiation workers. (author)

  10. Carbon-11 labelled analogs of alanine by the Strecker synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenant, C.; Theobald, A.; Siegel, T.; Joachim, J.; Weber, K.; Haberkorn, U.; Oberdorfer, F. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Derivatives of alanine, {alpha}-[2-sup(11)C]aminoisobutyric acid 1a and {alpha}-(N-methyl)-[2-{sup 11} C]aminoisobutyric acid 1b were prepared for the in-vivo study of amino acid transport phenomena by positron-emission-tomography (PET). Compounds 1a and 1b were obtained by a Zelinski-Stadnikoff variant of the Strecker {alpha}-amino acid synthesis from in-situ formed [{sup 11} C]acetone in presence of sodium cyanide and either ammonium sulfate (for 1a) or methylamine hydrochloride (for 1b). The complete preparation required 50 min from the end of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production, and delivered 1.2 - 2 GBq of labelled product for application (2.4 -4%); not corrected for decay; related to trapped [{sup C}]CO{sub 2}. The specific activity of the labelled products was 16 to 20 GBq{center_dot}{mu}mol{sup -1}. The radiochemical and chemical purity of the preparations was greater than 98%. (Author).

  11. Detection of low- and high-LET radiation with alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.W.; Olsen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Production and accumulation of free radicals in some crystalline biomolecules are relatively stable products of a sequence of events inititated by the absorption of radiation energy. Free radicals can qualitatively and quantitatively be analyzed by means of electron spin resonance, ESR, spectroscopy, and the measure of radical concentration may thus be used for dosimetry purposes. For practical application in radiation dosimetry the crystalline amino acid L-..cap alpha..-alanine is pressed into pellets, 4.5 mm in diameter by 2 mm in thickness, with 5% by weight polyvinyl-pyrrolidinone (C/sub 4/H/sub 6/N0-CH=CH/sub 2/)sub(n) added as a binding material. The dose meter is robust and easy to handle, and the read-out technique is non-destructive with respect to the measured signal. The useful dose range is from 0.5 to 10/sup 5/ Gy with + - 0.4% reproducibility of measurement. Hence, the dose meter can be used in radiation processing of food, for sterilization, as a postal dose meter for intercalibration of radiation facilities, for control and documentation of radiation therapy doses, and as a personal accident dose meter for radiation workers.

  12. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina

    OpenAIRE

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Edwards, Tara N.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Ian A Meinertzhagen

    2012-01-01

    Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly’s entire brain, and is en...

  13. β - Alanine protects mice from memory deficits induced by ageing, scopolamine, diazepam and ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of β-alanine (a glycine agonist, on learning and memory in mice. β-alanine (5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p. was administered for 6 successive days, to young (3 months old and aged-mice (16 months old. The learning and memory parameters were assessed, using elevated plus-maze and passive-avoidance apparatus. The effect of β-alanine (20 mg/kg for 6 days on locomotor function of young and aged mice, was studied using photoactometer, to rule out the increase in locomotor performance of mice. β-alanine at both the doses (10 and 20 mg/kg, significantly improved learning and memory of young- and aged- mice. β-alanine also reversed scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg i.p., ethanol (1.0 g/kg i.p. and diazepam (1.0 mg/kg i.p. -induced amnesia in young mice. There was no significant effect of β-alanine on the locomotor activity of both young and aged mice. The probable underlying mechanism of the memory-enhancing effect of β-alanine appears to be related to its antioxidant, anti-amyloid and procholinergic activities.

  14. Dissecting the engrailed homeodomain-DNA interaction by phage-displayed shotgun scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, K.; Simon, MD; Levin, AM; Shokat, KM; Weiss, GA

    2004-01-01

    Phage-displayed alanine shotgun scanning was used to dissect contributions by engrailed homedomain (En-HD) residues 17 through 46, which indirectly influence recognition of DNA. The relative contributions of such indirect contacts, quantified by shotgun scanning, highlight previously unexplored En-HD residues. Two motifs dominate En-HD function in this region. First, two surface-exposed aromatic residues (F20 and Y25) bracket the hydrophobic core. Second, two sets of turn-forming residues are...

  15. Importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis from alanine during exercise and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, D.H.; Williams, P.E.; Lacy, D.B.; Green, D.R.; Cherrington, A.D.

    1988-04-01

    These studies were performed to assess the importance of intrahepatic mechanisms to gluconeogenesis in the dog during 150 min of treadmill exercise and 90 min of recovery. Sampling catheters were implanted in an artery and portal and hepatic veins 16 days before experimentation. Infusions of (U-/sup 14/C)alanine, (3-/sup 3/H)glucose, and indocyanine green were used to assess gluconeogenesis. During exercise, a decline in arterial and portal vein plasma alanine and in hepatic blood flow led to a decrease in hepatic alanine delivery. During recovery, hepatic blood flow was restored to basal, causing an increase in hepatic alanine delivery beyond exercise rates but still below resting rates. Hepatic fractional alanine extraction increased from 0.26 +/- 0.02 at rest to 0.64 +/- 0.03 during exercise and remained elevated during recovery. Net hepatic alanine uptake was 2.5 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 at rest and remained unchanged during exercise but was increased during recovery. The conversion rate of (/sup 14/C)alanine to glucose had increased by 248 +/- 38% by 150 min of exercise and had increased further during recovery. The efficiency with which alanine was channeled into glucose in the liver was accelerated to a rate of 338 +/- 55% above basal by 150 min of exercise but declined slightly during recovery. In conclusion, 1) gluconeogenesis from alanine is accelerated during exercise, due to an increase in the hepatic fractional extraction of the amino acid and through intrahepatic mechanisms that more efficiently channel it into glucose.

  16. Spectroscopic Evidence for an Oxazolone Structure of the b(2) Fragment Ion from Protonated Tri-Alanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Young, S.; Molesworth, S.; Van Stipdonk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy is used to identify the structure of the b(2)(+) ion generated from protonated tri-alanine by collision induced dissociation (CID). The IRMPD spectrum of b(2)(+) differs markedly from that of protonated cyclo-alanine-alanine, demonstrating t

  17. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  18. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  19. Effect of the ionizing radiation on alanine solution for a dosimeter application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amino acid alanine is well known as a dosimetric detector material for high level dosimetry. Its application is based on the formation of radicals by ionising radiation. In this study the effect of several parameters such as: the ionising radiation, the concentration, the dose on the pH, conductivity and the oscillotitrometric answer of Lalanine solution was investigated. The results show that there is a significant production of new species. The formation of these species increases upon increasing dose. The comparison between the repeatability of the used techniques led us to choose of the system alanine/pH and the alanine/conductivity as the most adapted. (Author)

  20. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylczynski, Z; Sterczynska, A; Wiesner, M, E-mail: zbigtyl@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-09-07

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c{sub 55} component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH{sub 3}{sup +} vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric. (paper)

  1. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c55 component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH3+ vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric. (paper)

  2. Electron spin relaxation times for the alanine radical in two dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spin-lattice relaxation times for the alanine radical in dosimeters were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery and by inversion recovery. The strong dependence of the recovery time constants on experimental conditions show that spectral diffusion processes contribute to enhanced relaxation rates, analogous to what was observed previously for 60Co γ-irradiated polycrystalline L-alanine. The spectral diffusion processes make it possible to run quantitative CW spectra of the alanine radical at substantially higher microwave powers than could be used in the absence of spectral diffusion processes

  3. A thin alanine-polyethylene film dosimetry system with diffuse reflection spectrophotometric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of a new alanine dosimeter in the shape of a thin film, with the measurement of optical absorption of the CH3CHCOO- radical is described. That type of dosimeter, ALA/DRS (for diffuse reflection spectrophotometry) is compared, to an alanine dosimeter with EPR evaluation (ALA/EPR for short). In many respects the simple ALA/DRS version, as the alanine-polyethylene composite is superior. The paper shows the importance of the new experimental approach to free radical research in solid state radiation chemistry. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs

  4. Temperature stabilization of alanine dosimeters used for food processing and sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has established a dose quality audit service for radiation processing facilities. The objective of the service is to provide an independent check on the routine dosimetry system in use at the facility. The audit service is based on the use of alanine EPR dosimetry. Generally, alanine dosimeters are irradiated at the facility together with a product, and the response is then analyzed at the IAEA laboratory. Practice of the audit service has shown that the main uncertainty in alanine dosimetry is due to absence of temperature control at the irradiation facilities. Here, a method for stabilizing the temperature of the dosimeter during irradiation is proposed

  5. Scan BIST with biased scan test signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Dong; CHEN MingJing; SUN JiaGuang

    2008-01-01

    The conventional test-per-scan built-in self-test (BIST) scheme needs a number of shift cycles followed by one capture cycle.Fault effects received by the scan flip-flops are shifted out while shifting in the next test vector like scan testing.Unlike deterministic testing,it is unnecessary to apply a complete test vector to the scan chains.A new scan-based BIST scheme is proposed by properly controlling the test signals of the scan chains,Different biased random values are assigned to the test signals of scan flip-flops in separate scan chains.Capture cycles can be inserted at any clock cycle if necessary.A new testability estimation procedure according to the proposed testing scheme is presented.A greedy procedure is proposed to select a weight for each scan chain.Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve test effectiveness of scan-based BIST greatly,and most circuits can obtain complete fault coverage or very close to complete fault coverage.

  6. Mutagenesis in Newts: Protocol for Iberian Ribbed Newts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Newts have the remarkable capability of organ/tissue regeneration, and have been used as a unique experimental model for regenerative biology. The Iberian ribbed newt (Pleurodeles waltl) is suitable as a model animal. We have established methods for artificial insemination and efficient transgenesis using P. waltl newts. In addition to the transgenic technique, development of TALENs enables targeting mutagenesis in the newts. We have reported that TALENs efficiently disrupted targeted genes in newt embryos. In this chapter, we introduce a protocol for TALEN-mediated gene targeting in Iberian ribbed newts. PMID:26443218

  7. In vivo dosimetry with L-alpha-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boey, R.; Van Der Velden, K. [Industriele Hogeschool van het Gemeenschapsonderwijs Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Schaeken, B. [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    When organic substances are irradiated, stable electrons can be formed. The concentration of these electrons is detected via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), a non-destructive form of dosimetry. L-alpha-alanine is extremely suited as a detector because of its high stability and high yield of unpaired electrons. With an EMS 104 spectrometer, we measure the peak-to-peak value of the first derivate of the resonance-spectrum. This value is proportional to the concentration of unpaired electrons and therefore with the absorbed dose. Prior to the in vivo measurements in teletherapy, a calibration curve had to be established. This clearly showed a linear relationship between the EPR-signal and the absorbed dose, except for very low dose where precision was low (20% 1 sd). This indicates that the background signal of the dosimeter is strongly orientation dependent. For this reason it was decided to use pre-irradiated detectors. A number of in vivo measurements has been performed. It was found that the error propagation plays a major role in the calculation of the measured absorbed dose, in the range 1 Gy-6 Gy. Contrary to in vivo measurements in brachytherapy, where higher doses are measured, large uncertainties (30% 1 sd) on the entry dose calculations were observed. For this reason, it is recommended to use a statistical method of reducing this standard deviation to an acceptable level. The proposed method, consisting of 2 detectors and the usage of weight coefficients on our standard deviations, gave promising results. However, theoretical calculations and in vivo measurements show that this method is still not satisfactory to reduce the uncertainty to an acceptable standard in clinical situations.

  8. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  9. Normal serum alanine aminotransferase activity in uncomplicated obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianluca Iacobellis; Antonio Moschetta; Maria Cristina Ribaudo; Alessandra Zappaterreno; Concetta Valeria Iannucci; Frida Leonetti

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT)activity in a well-characterized group of uncomplicated obese subjects and its correlation with insulin resistance,plasma adiponectin, and leptin concentrations.METHODS: One hundred and five uncomplicatedobese subjects (87 women, 18 men, age 34.3±9.6 years,BMI 39.9±8.3 kg/m2)were studied. Serum ALT activity was evaluated. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (M index) and fasting insulin. Plasma leptin and adiponectin levels were also measured.RESULTS: Serum ALT concentration in the whole group of uncomplicated obese subjects was 17.73±6.33 U/L with none of the subjects presenting ALT levels greater than 43 U/L and only 9 (11%) women and 3 (19%) men showed ALT levels >19 and >30 U/L for women and men,respectively. No significant difference was detected in serum ALT levels between severe obese subjects (BMI >40 kg/m2) and those with BMI <40 kg/m2 (18.63±6.25 vs 17.26±6.02 U/L). ALT was significantly correlated with fasting insulin (r = 0.485, P = 0.02) and triglycerides (r= 0.358, P= 0.03).CONCLUSION: Serum ALT activity is practically normal in uncomplicated obese subjects, independently of their obesity degree. These findings suggest the role of obesityrelated comorbidities and not of BMI as main risk factors for elevated ALT levels in obese subjects.

  10. Exercise training and beta-alanine-induced muscle carnosine loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine eBex

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Beta-alanine (BA supplementation has been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, thereby promoting high-intensity exercise performance. Trained muscles of athletes have a higher increase in carnosine concentration after BA supplementation compared to untrained muscles, but it remains to be determined whether this is due to an accumulation of acute exercise effects or to chronic adaptations from prior training. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether high-volume (HV and/or high-intensity (HI exercise can improve BA-induced carnosine loading in untrained subjects.Methods. All participants (n=28 were supplemented with 6.4 g/day of BA for 23 days. The subjects were allocated to a control group, HV or HI training group. During the BA supplementation period, the training groups performed 9 exercise sessions consisting of either 75–90 min continuous cycling at 35–45% Wmax (HV or 3 to 5 repeats of 30s cycling at 165% Wmax with 4 min recovery (HI. Carnosine content was measured in soleus and gastrocnemius medialis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.Results. There was no difference in absolute increase in carnosine content between the groups in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle. For the average muscle carnosine content, a higher absolute increase was found in HV (+ 2.95 mM; P = 0.046 and HI (+ 3.26 mM; P = 0.028 group compared to the control group (+ 1.91 mM. However, there was no additional difference between the HV and HI training group.Conclusions. HV and HI exercise training showed no significant difference on BA-induced muscle carnosine loading in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle. It can be suggested that there can be a small cumulative effect of exercise on BA supplementation efficiency, although differences did not reach significance on individual muscle level.

  11. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  12. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of ...

  13. Eukaryotic beta-alanine synthases are functionally related but have a high degree of structural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gojkovic, Zoran; Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2001-01-01

    activity was used to clone analogous genes from different eukaryotes. Putative PYD3 sequences from the yeast S. kluyveri, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster complemented the pyd3 defect. When the S. kluyveri PYD3 gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae, which has...... no pyrimidine catabolic pathway, it enabled growth on N-carbamyl- beta -alanine as the sole nitrogen source. The D. discoideum and D. melanogaster PYD3 gene products are similar to mammalian beta -alanine synthases. In contrast, the S. kluyveri protein is quite different from these and more similar to bacterial......-carbamyl-beta -alanine, but not by uracil. This wrork establishes S. kluyveri as a model organism for studying pyrimidine degradation and beta -alanine production in eukaryotes....

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of alkaline alanine racemase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Jiansong; Qi, Jianxun; Xu, Shujing; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Benedik, Michael J.; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2009-01-01

    An alkaline alanine racemase from alkaliphilic B. pseudofirmus OF4 was expressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminarily X-­ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme.

  15. SYNTHESIS OF D-AND L-β-(4-CHLOROPHENYL)-α-ALANINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈宗璇; 张雅文; 顾德本; 滕洪流; 杨冰

    1991-01-01

    N-acetyl-β-(4-chloropheayl)-DL-α-alanine ethyl ester was synthesized from p-chlorobenzyl chloride via diethyl malonate method. The ethyl ester was effectively resofued by enzymatic hydrolysis with using of subtilisin carlsberg.

  16. Second harmonic generation studies in L-alanine single crystals grown from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of L-alanine of dimensions 2×1.1×0.5 cm3 were grown by evaporation method using deionised water as a solvent. The morphology of the grown crystals had (1 2 0) and (0 1 1) as their prominent faces. UV–vis-near IR spectrum shows the transparency range of L-alanine crystal available for frequency doubling from 250 to 1400 nm. Phase-matched second harmonic generation was observed in L-alanine sample by using 7 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with OPO set up. In the present work, phase matching was achieved by angle and wavelength tuning. The angular and spectral phase-matching bandwidths were determined experimentally for a 1.5 mm thick L-alanine crystal and the results have been compared with their theoretical results. Further the possible reasons for the broadening of SHG spectrum have been discussed

  17. ESR investigation of L-α-alanine and sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated sucrose and L-α-alanine radicals produced by heavy ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer). The impact of the heavy ions on the samples produced stable free radicals, which were analyzed by ESR (electron spin resonance). The obtained spectral patterns were the same as those for carbon (C), neon (Ne), and silicon (Si) ion irradiations. The absorbed dose dependences for the irradiated sucrose and alanine samples were examined. The ESR response has a linear relation with the absorbed dose for both compounds. In addition, the total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation correlated logarithmically with the LET. Let Qualitative ESR analyses showed that the production of sucrose and alanine radical depended on both different particle irradiation and the LET under the same dose. Thus, the present ESR results imply that sucrose together with L-α-alanine can be used to investigate radical production processes induced by ionizing particles. (author)

  18. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other 14C-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples

  19. Dosimetry of electron and gamma radiation with alanine/ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the preparation of alanine dosimeters was investigated. The absorbed dose response of these dosimeters was demonstrated for 10 MeV electron and 60Co gamma radiation in the range from 20 Gy to 1.1 kGy. Concentration of the irradiation-induced free radicals in the alanine was determined by ESR spectroscopy. In addition to measurements at ambient temperature, the alanine dosimeters were also subjected to thermal treatment during irradiation (up to about 50 deg. C) in order to assess their performance characteristics under extreme conditions which might arise in future technical applications. The results show that under normal conditions the alanine calibration curves are linear, whereas at higher temperatures the dosimeters require a correction of 0.3%/K for absorbed doses above 200 Gy. (author)

  20. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  1. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  2. In vitro mutagenesis of commercial fern, Asplenium nidus from spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asplenium is a largest, most diverse fern genera. One of the common species is Asplenium nidus, well known as Bird's-nest fern, a medium to large fern with erect, stout, unbranched rhizomes. In creating variability of ferns for the benefit of the ornamental plant industry, in vitro mutagenesis is used. In this study, spores of Asplenium nidus were collected from frond bearing mature sporangia. Spores were cultured in modified 1/2 MS basal medium supplemented with various combinations of 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) and Naphtalene Acetic Acid (NAA). Spore cultures were incubated in incubation room at 24 degree C with 16 hours photoperiod (3500 lux). It was found that, the most effective combinations were 1 mg/1 BAP + 0. 1 mg/1 NAA and 2mg/1 BAP + 0. 1 mg/1 NAA. Prothallus was formed after 10 days of cultures and gametophytes were formed 1 month later. These gametophytes were irradiated with Gamma ray at doses of 0, 20, 90, 120, 150 and 180 Gy. From the preliminary result obtained from this study, for generating variations and desired phenotypic expression for Asplenium nidus, recommended doses for in vitro mutagenesis using spores are between 90 Gy to 150 Gy. Gametophytes were subcultured at monthly interval to ensure further development and propagation. Frequent monitoring for any changes in the morphology of the irradiated Asplenium nidus plants were carried out. (Author)

  3. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs. Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules.

  4. The influence of measurement and storage conditions on alanine ESR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine has several desirable properties as an ESR dosemeter e.g. tissue equivalence, low fading and an approximately linear response for doses up to 10 kGy. This work reports on a simple system to produce the alanine dosemeter, the signal intensity for a range of doses and energies, and the effect of the air humidity and the spectrometer settings on the ESR signal. (Author)

  5. Muscle carnosine metabolism and β-alanine supplementation in relation to exercise and training

    OpenAIRE

    Derave, Wim; Everaert, Inge; Beeckman, Sam; Baguet, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide with a high concentration in mammalian skeletal muscle. It is synthesized by carnosine synthase from the amino acids L-histidine and beta-alanine, of which the latter is the rate-limiting precursor, and degraded by carnosinase. Recent studies have shown that the chronic oral ingestion of beta-alanine can substantially elevate (up to 80%) the carnosine content of human skeletal muscle. Interestingly, muscle carnosine loading leads to improved performance in high-intens...

  6. Dosimetry for radiation processing of wire insulations by using the alanine/ESR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wire insulation can be simulated by an alanine-based dosimeter, i.e. by a polymer containing L-α-alanine. If this system is properly calibrated against a reliable reference dosimeter, it can be used to determine the absorbed dose in the wire insulation, irradiated on an industrial line for electron-beam crosslinking of wire insulations. The evaluation is achieved by ESR spectroscopy. (author) 13 refs.; 3 figs

  7. Polarographic (d.c. and a.c.) behaviour of vanadium-DL-α-alanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed investigation of the d.c. polarographic behaviour of vanadium(V), and (III) and the a.c. polarographic behaviour of vanadium(IV) in α-alanine solution has been made keeping the total α-alanine concentration at 0.1,0.5 and 1.0M and varying the pH of the solution. (M.G.B.)

  8. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterås, Bjørn Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 microm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media. PMID:17148820

  9. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Hole, Eli Olaug [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 {mu}m thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  10. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using DL-alanine for ESR dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential use of alanine for the production of nanoparticles is presented here for the first time. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple green method, namely the thermal treatment of silver nitrate aqueous solutions with DL-alanine. The latter compound was employed both as a reducing and a capping agent. Particles with average size equal to 7.5 nm, face-centered cubic crystalline structure, narrow size distribution, and spherical shape were obtained. Interaction between the silver ions present on the surface of the nanoparticles and the amine group of the DL-alanine molecule seems to be responsible for reduction of the silver ions and for the stability of the colloid. The bio-hybrid nano-composite was used as an ESR dosimeter. The amount of silver nanoparticles in the nanocomposite was not sufficient to cause considerable loss of tissue equivalency. Moreover, the samples containing nanoparticles presented increased sensitivity and reduced energetic dependence as compared with pure DL-alanine, contributing to the construction of small-sized dosimeters. - Highlights: ► The synthesis is environmentally benign, easy to perform, and of low-cost. ► DL-Alanine was employed both as reducing and capping agent. ► Mean size of 7.5 nm, narrow size distribution, and spherical shape of particles. ► Increased sensitivity and reduced energetic dependence compared with pure alanine. ► The nanocomposite has potential application for ESR dosimetry.

  11. An efficient protocol for the complete incorporation of methyl-protonated alanine in perdeuterated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy for the introduction of (1H,13C-methyl)-alanine into perdeuterated proteins is described. Specific protonation of alanine methyl groups to a level of 95% can be achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O based bacterial growth medium supplemented with 800 mg/l of 2-[2H], 3-[13C] l-alanine. However, though simple, this approach results in undesired, non-specific background labeling due to isotope scrambling via different amino acid metabolic pathways. Following a careful analysis of known metabolic pathways we found that co-addition of perdeuterated forms of α-ketoisovalerate-d7, succinate-d4 and l-isoleucine-d10 with labeled l-alanine, reduces undesired background labeling to <1%. When combined with recently developed methyl TROSY experiments, this methyl-specific labeling protocol permits the acquisition of excellent quality correlation spectra of alanine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins. Our cost effective strategy offers a significant enhancement in the level of incorporation of methyl-labeled alanine in overexpressed proteins over previously reported methods

  12. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen.

  13. Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.

    1985-06-01

    Conventional cerebrospinal fluid scanning (CSF scanning) today is mainly carried out in addition to computerized tomography to obtain information about liquor flow kinetics. Especially in patients with communicating obstructive hydrocephalus, CSF scanning is clinically useful for the decision for shunt surgery. In patients with intracranial cysts, CSF scanning can provide information about liquor circulation. Further indications for CSF scanning include the assessment of shunt patency especially in children, as well as the detection and localization of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

  14. Alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and all-cause mortality: results from a population-based Danish twins study alanine aminotransferase, GGT and mortality in elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraser, Abigail; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare;

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background/Aims: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) are widely used markers of liver disease. Several population-based cohort studies have found associations of these liver enzymes with all-cause mortality. None of these studies controlled for genetic...

  15. Radiation-induced mutagenesis of antifungal metabolite producing bacillus sp. HKA-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Senthilkumar, M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Bacillus sp. Strain HKA-17, isolated from the surface sterilized root nodule of Glycine max, inhibited several fungal plant pathogens. It produced a diffusible extracellular antifungal metabolite that was extracted with n-butanol. The crude extract was purified through Superdex{sup TM} 75 10/300 GL FPLC column. FT-IR spectrum of the FPLC purified-antifungal metabolite confirmed the presence of peptide and glycosidic bonds in its structure. Gamma induced mutagenesis of HKA-17 was carried out at an LD{sub 99} dose (8.46 kGy) to generate a mutant library. By screening the mutant library through a duel plate assay with Alternaria alternata, we selected one mutant with enhanced biocontrol activity (HKA-17e1) and two defective mutants (HKA-17d1 and HKA-17d2). Overproducing mutant recorded the largest inhibition zone (16.25 {+-} 0.86 mm) compared to any other mutant clone as well as wild type, and could be used as a potential biocontrol agent for plant disease suppression. The effect of HKA-17 antifungal metabolite on hyphal morphology was clearly demonstrated through scanning electron microscopy. The crude extract of defective mutant HKA-17 d1 did not induce any changes in hyphal morphology of A. alternata. However, antifungal metabolites of HKA-17 induced abnormal hyphal structures such as hyphal shrivelling, the bulging and swelling of intercalary cells, fragmentation, and cell lysis.

  16. Radiation-induced mutagenesis of antifungal metabolite producing bacillus sp. HKA-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus sp. Strain HKA-17, isolated from the surface sterilized root nodule of Glycine max, inhibited several fungal plant pathogens. It produced a diffusible extracellular antifungal metabolite that was extracted with n-butanol. The crude extract was purified through SuperdexTM 75 10/300 GL FPLC column. FT-IR spectrum of the FPLC purified-antifungal metabolite confirmed the presence of peptide and glycosidic bonds in its structure. Gamma induced mutagenesis of HKA-17 was carried out at an LD99 dose (8.46 kGy) to generate a mutant library. By screening the mutant library through a duel plate assay with Alternaria alternata, we selected one mutant with enhanced biocontrol activity (HKA-17e1) and two defective mutants (HKA-17d1 and HKA-17d2). Overproducing mutant recorded the largest inhibition zone (16.25 ± 0.86 mm) compared to any other mutant clone as well as wild type, and could be used as a potential biocontrol agent for plant disease suppression. The effect of HKA-17 antifungal metabolite on hyphal morphology was clearly demonstrated through scanning electron microscopy. The crude extract of defective mutant HKA-17 d1 did not induce any changes in hyphal morphology of A. alternata. However, antifungal metabolites of HKA-17 induced abnormal hyphal structures such as hyphal shrivelling, the bulging and swelling of intercalary cells, fragmentation, and cell lysis

  17. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. We isolated 11 lethal lines that map...

  18. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    OpenAIRE

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded...

  19. Studies of the uptake and release of [3H]β-alanine by frog spinal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]β-alanine was accumulated by frog spinal cord slices by two transport components with estimated Ksub(m) values of μM ('high-affinity') and 11 mM ('low affinity') respectively. The high affinity uptake exhibited sodium ion and energy dependence, temperature sensitivity, had a very low Vsub(max) (10.4 nmol/g/min) compared to GABA and glycine, was competitively inhibited by GABA (Ksub(i) 2μM), and was significantly reduced by the presence of glycine and of taurine in the incubating medium. When slices preloaded with [3H]β-alanine were superfused with medium containing depolarizing concentrations of potassium ions, there was a small, but consistent, increase in [3H]β-alanine efflux: 1.4 times prestimulation rates in 40 mM potassium. When the superfusate was altered by omission of calcium and addition of concentrations of magnesium (10 mM), manganese (1 mM), and cobalt (1 mM) ions sufficient to block reflex transmission in the isolated in vitro frog cord, the potassium-evoked release was not blocked. Release was decreased by lanthanum ions (1 mM). Release of [3H]GABA and [3H]glycine in parallel experiments was inhibited by magnesium, manganese, cobalt and lanthanum. Veratridine significantly increased the release of [3H]GABA and [3H]glycine but not of [3H]β-alanine. These observations demonstrate the non-specificity of β-alanine uptake and the unconventional nature of the calcium-dependence of β-alanine release and therefore do not lend support to the hypothesis that β-alanine functions as a neurotransmitter in frog spinal cord. (author)

  20. Quantitative studies of the mutagenesis of Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferkorn, E.R.; Pfefferkorn, L.C.

    1979-06-01

    The induction of mutants resistant to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUDR) was used to measure the efficiency of various physical and chemical mutagens on extracellular and intracellular Toxoplasma gondii. The frequency of resistant mutant was measured by plaque assay in human fibroblast cultures in the presence and absence of FUDR. When considered as a function of lethality, the most efficient mutagenesis was obtained with nitrosoguanidine treatment of extracellular parasites and with ethylmethane sulfonate treatment of actively growing intracellular parasites. Each of these treatments increased the frequency of FUDR-resistant mutants from less than one to more than 200 per million parasites. Ultraviolet irradiation, X-rays, and the alkylating mustard ICR-191 also induced FUDR-resistant mutants in a dose-dependent fashion.

  1. Radiosensitivity Parameters For Lethal Mutagenesis In Caenorhabditis Elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Wilson, J.W.; Katz, R.

    1994-01-01

    For the first time track structure theory has been applied to radiobiological effects in a living organism. Data for lethal mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, obtained after irradiation with nine different types of ions of atomic number 1-57 and gamma rays have yielded radiosensitivity parameters (E{sub 0}, sigma{sub 0}, Kappa, m = 68 Gy, 2.5 x 10(exp {minus}9) cm (exp 2), 750, 2) comparable with those found for the transformation of C3HT10 1/2 cells (180 Gy, 1.15 x 10(exp {minus}10) cm(exp 2), 750, 2) but remote from those (E{sub 0} and sigma{sub 0} = approx. 2 Gy, approx. 5 x 10(exp {minus}7) cm(exp 2)) for mammalian cell survival.

  2. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  3. Scientific projection paper for mutagenesis, transformation and cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our knowledge about mutagenesis, transformation, and cell killing by ionizing radiation consists of large bodies of data, which are potentially useful in terms of application to human risk assessment and to the constructive use of radiation, as in cancer treatment. The three end-points discussed above are united by at least five significant concepts in radiation research strategy: (1) The inter-relationships among the important end-points, mutation, carcinogenesis, and cell killing. Research on one is meaningful only in the context of information about the other two. (2) The interaction of radiations with other agents in producing these end-points. (3) The mechanisms of action of other environmental mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cytotoxic agents. (4) The use of repair deficient human mutant cells. (5) The study of radiation damage mechanisms. There is no better way to extrapolate laboratory data to the clinical and public worlds than to understand the underlying biological mechanisms that produced the data

  4. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast and E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, C.; Christensen, R.; Christensen, J.R.; O' Brien, T.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments investigating ultraviolet light mutagenesis in either bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or E. coli have led to the following conclusions. First, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers cause most mutations in both organisms; pyrimidine adducts, such as PyC, can account at best for only a small proportion. 86 percent of forward mutations induced at the E. coli lacI locus can be abolished by photoreactivation under conditions which do not alter the level of recA induction. About 75 percent of the forward mutations induced at the CAN1 locus of yeast could be removed by photoreactivation, a value that lies within the range observed previously for the reversion of CYC1 alleles (60 percent - 97 percent). Second, about 10 percent of the lacI forward mutations are untargeted, a smaller fraction than found previously for cycl-91 reversion in yeast. It is not yet clear whether the two species are really different in this respect, of whether the cycl-91 reversion site is a typical of the yeast genome at large. Third, analysis of reversion frequencies of 20 mutant alleles suggests that about 10 to 25 percent of all replication errors produced by mutagenic mechanisms in uv-irradiated yeast involve additions or deletions of base-pairs, indicating that error-prone repair does not just produce substitutions. Last, the REV1 locus in yeast is concerned with the induction of frameshift mutations at some, but not all, genetic sites, just as found previously for substitution mutations. The function of the REV3 gene is more widely, though not universally, required while the function of the RAD6 gene, like that of the recA locus in E. coli, appears to be necessary for all kinds of uv mutagenesis. E coli genes comparable to REV1 and REV3 have not yet been described; conversely, there does not yet appear to be a yeast equivalent of umuC.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  6. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  7. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection.

  8. RBC nuclear scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  9. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  10. Effect of 10 Week Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Competition and Training Performance in Elite Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise M. Burke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships and after (international or national selection meet supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ±0.8%, mean, ±90% confidence limits of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (−1.3%; ±1.0%, there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (−0.2%; ±1.5% and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  11. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on 20 km cycling time trial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Margaret JAMES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity cycling performance and capacity have been evaluated, although the effects on longer duration cycling performance are unclear. Nineteen UK category 1 male cyclists completed four 20 km cycling time trials, two before and two after supplementation with either 6.4 g•d-1 β-alanine (n = 10; BA or a matched placebo (n = 9; P. Performance time for the 20 km time trial and 1 km split times were recorded. There was no significant effect of β-alanine supplementation on 20 km time trial performance (BA-pre 1943 ± 129 s; BA-post 1950 ± 147 s; P-pre 1989 ± 106 s; P-post 1986 ± 115 s or on the performance of each 1 km split. The effect of β-alanine on 20 km time trial performance was deemed unclear as determined by magnitude based inferences. Supplementation with 6.4 g•d-1 of β-alanine for 4 weeks did not affect 20 km cycling time trial performance in well trained male cyclists.

  12. ESR investigation of L-α-alanine and sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated sucrose and L-α-alanine radicals produced by heavy (particle) ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer). The impact of the heavy ions on the samples produced stable free radicals, which were analyzed by ESR (electron spin resonance). Identical spectra were measured after one year. The obtained spectral patterns were the same as those for helium (He), carbon (C), and neon (Ne) ions irradiation. The absorbed dose dependences for the irradiated sucrose and alanine samples were examined. The ESR response has a linear relation with the absorbed dose. The ESR response at 60 Gy was slightly lower than a linear line for sucrose; however, the response showed good linearity for the alanine. In addition, the total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyse showed that the production of sucrose and alanine radicals depended on both different particle irradiation and the LET under the same dose. Thus, the present ESR results imply that sucrose together with L-α-alanine can be used to monitor LET as well as the number of ionizing particle for the production of stable free radicals. (author)

  13. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  14. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care ...

  15. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  16. The role for an invariant aspartic acid in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases is examined using saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyuk, B; Focia, P J; Eakin, A E

    2001-03-01

    The role of an invariant aspartic acid (Asp137) in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs) was examined by site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography using the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi. Alanine substitution (D137A) resulted in a 30-fold decrease of k(cat), suggesting that Asp137 participates in catalysis. Saturation mutagenesis was used to generate a library of mutant HPRTs with random substitutions at position 137, and active enzymes were identified by complementation of a bacterial purine auxotroph. Functional analyses of the mutants, including determination of steady-state kinetic parameters and pH-rate dependence, indicate that glutamic acid or glutamine can replace the wild-type aspartate. However, the catalytic efficiency and pH-rate profile for the structural isosteric mutant, D137N, were similar to the D137A mutant. Crystal structures of four of the mutant enzymes were determined in ternary complex with substrate ligands. Structures of the D137E and D137Q mutants reveal potential hydrogen bonds, utilizing several bound water molecules in addition to protein atoms, that position these side chains within hydrogen bond distance of the bound purine analogue, similar in position to the aspartate in the wild-type structure. The crystal structure of the D137N mutant demonstrates that the Asn137 side chain does not form interactions with the purine substrate but instead forms novel interactions that cause the side chain to adopt a nonfunctional rotamer. The results from these structural and functional analyses demonstrate that HPRTs do not require a general base at position 137 for catalysis. Instead, hydrogen bonding sufficiently stabilizes the developing partial positive charge at the N7-atom of the purine substrate in the transition-state to promote catalysis.

  17. Study of signal transduction mechanism of angiotensin 2 receptor by means of site-directed mutagenesis; Bui totsuzen hen'iho wo mochiita anjiotenshin 2 reseputa no joho dentatsu kiko no kaimei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamano, Yoshiaki [Tottori University, Tottori (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1998-12-16

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In order to clarify the signaling mechanism mediated by angiotensin 2 receptor, Gq-protein binding amino acid residues of this receptor were clarified by site-directed mutagenesis study. Amino acid residues in the carboxyl tail region were changed by alanines, individually. These mutated receptors were expressed stably in CHO cells, and GTP effect and second messenger molecules were determined, and three residues (Y 312, F313 and L 314) in this region were determined to be concerned for the binding of Gq protein. The other signaling systems, Gi, MAP kinase, JAK-STAT mediated, were reported to be concerned for this receptor. Novel drags for high blood pressure therapy would be explored by clarifying these signaling mechanisms. (author)

  18. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  19. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  20. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  1. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  2. The background of the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI GuoRong

    2010-01-01

    @@ The research findings concerning the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA (yeast alanine tRNA) were successively published in Chinese Science Bulletin (1982) and Science in China (1983) [1].The research work started in 1968 and was finished in November 1981.It was the first artificial synthesis of a nucleic acid molecule, which followed the first artificial synthesis of protein, crystalline bovine insulin, in China in 1965, both scientific milestones occurring in China.The composition, sequence and biological functions of the synthesized nucleic acid were identical to those of the natural yeast alanine tRNA.The research lasted for 13 years.From 1982 to 1984, one of the investigators in charge of the research Prof.

  3. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  4. Applicability of EPR/alanine dosimetry for quality assurance in proton eye radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, B; Mierzwinska, G; Ptaszkiewicz, M; Sowa, U; Stolarczyk, L; Weber, A

    2014-06-01

    A new quality assurance and quality control method for proton eye radiotherapy based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetry has been developed. It is based on Spread-Out Bragg Peak entrance dose measurement with alanine detectors. The entrance dose is well correlated with the dose at the facility isocenter, where, during the therapeutic irradiation, the tumour is placed. The unique alanine detector features namely keeping the dose record in a form of stable radiation-induced free radicals trapped in the material structure, and the non-destructive read-out makes this type of detector a good candidate for additional documentation of the patient's exposure over the therapy course. PMID:24876341

  5. The application of Alanine/ESR dosimetry in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Lee, Byung Il [Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Alanine/Electron spin resonance(ESR) has been proven very effective tool which dosimetric characteristics is better suitable than generally used personnel dosimeter for long term dose estimation. L-α-alanine has unusual stability of radiation induced radicals. The fading is known as about 1% a year by IAEA technical documentary. It also has linear signal response on gamma rays over the wide range of dose quantity. Alanine is a kind of unnecessary amino acid in 20 amino acids. Estimation of the accumulated gamma dose is important to predict the life expectancy of cables. However, exact estimation of gamma dose at containment building of NPP is very difficult, because the variability of estimation value is apparently depending on the each installation position in containment building. Especially, some installation positions near reactor change extremely. So, the data from ESR measurement should be checked to the details on referring installation map and pictures.

  6. ESR/L-alanine system as a proposed standard dosimeter for electron-beam irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESR/L-alanine system is a promising dosimeter, as it is characterized by high precision, stable dosimetric response, low value of G(freeradical) and non-toxicity. The scattering and absorption of γ radiation and fast electrons are equivalent for the system, for soft biological tissues, and for water. The possibility of further standardizations of the alanine dosimeter has now been proposed, not only as previously for γ radiation, but also for high-energy electron beam processing which brings high dose rates and side-effect problems. On the basis of the experimental results it seems reasonable to propose a new and more precise approximation of the functional shape describing the response of the L-alanine dosimeter and to express it directly by the radiation chemical yield of free radicals. (author)

  7. ESR/L-alanine system as a proposed standard dosimeter for electron-beam irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panta, P.P.; Strzelczak-Burlinska, G.; Tomasinski, Z. (Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland))

    1989-01-01

    The ESR/L-alanine system is a promising dosimeter, as it is characterized by high precision, stable dosimetric response, low value of G{sub (free} {sub radical)} and non-toxicity. The scattering and absorption of {gamma} radiation and fast electrons are equivalent for the system, for soft biological tissues, and for water. The possibility of further standardizations of the alanine dosimeter has now been proposed, not only as previously for {gamma} radiation, but also for high-energy electron beam processing which brings high dose rates and side-effect problems. On the basis of the experimental results it seems reasonable to propose a new and more precise approximation of the functional shape describing the response of the L-alanine dosimeter and to express it directly by the radiation chemical yield of free radicals. (author).

  8. Radiation chemistry of L-Alanine: application to EPR dosimetry (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy ionizing radiation leaves stable radicals to certain organic materials, such as alanine and tartrate. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the identification and quantification of these radiation-induced radicals. An EPR method has been applied to study the radical characteristics of L-alanine after gamma radiation dose in the range of ∼mGy to 60 kGy. The free radicals induced by gamma radiation were fairly stable, and EPR intensity, radical concentration, was proportional to the absorbed dose up to 60 kGy. From the results of our EPR measurements, it can be concluded that an alanine/EPR method is a useful technique for gamma radiation dosimetry from very low to high dose range

  9. 14N nuclear quadrupole interaction in Cu(II) doped L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole interaction tensor Psub(N) measured by ENDOR in Cu(II) doped L-alanine is analyzed in terms of the Townes and Daily theory assuming a tetra-hedrally bonded N atom. The results of this analysis are compared with those for the 14N in pure L-alanine and it is found that the principal directions of the Psub(N) tensor are drastically changed upon metal complexation as a consequence of the higher electron affinity of Cu(II) with respect to C and H. Comparison of the corresponding bond populations in pure and Cu(II) doped L-alanine indicates that the Cu draws 0.11 more electron from the N than the substituted H atom. (orig.)

  10. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale......-up by traditional phosphoramidite column-based approaches. Here, we describe a novel method to amplify oligos from microarray chips for direct use in MAGE to perturb thousands of genomic sites simultaneously. We demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale mutagenesis by inserting T7 promoters upstream of 2585...

  11. Comparison of CRISPR/Cas9 expression constructs for efficient targeted mutagenesis in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient tool used for genome editing in a variety of organisms. Despite several recent reports of successful targeted mutagenesis using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in plants, in each case the target gene of interest, the Cas9 expression system and guide-RNA (gRNA) used, and the tissues used for transformation and subsequent mutagenesis differed, hence the reported frequencies of targeted mutagenesis cannot be compared directly. Here, we evaluated mutation frequency i...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of alanine boron hydrate for its use in thermal neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine boron hydrate was synthesized for its possible use as intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. The irradiations were performed in the Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The salt was prepared by reacting alanine and boric acid in a (1:1) stoichiometric ratio in neutral pH 7.5 aqueous solution and also in a basic pH 13 solution. The latter reaction was prepared with the addition of ammonia hydroxide (25%). Solutions were stirred and afterwards were let to evaporate. The obtained product in each reaction is a white solid. Dosimeters were prepared with the obtained reaction products and irradiated under thermal neutron flux of 5 x 107 n/cm2 s. For 30 hours. The analysis of irradiated samples was made in a Variant E-15 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer. The observed response of the samples prepared with the reaction product at the basic pH is approximately 50% higher than the neutral pH samples. In order to investigate the optimum signal enhancement samples were prepared in a basic pH medium in the following stoichiometric ratios: (1:0.5); (1:0.75); (1:1.25); (1:1.5) and (1:1.75). It was observed that the samples of the reaction (1:0.75) produced the higher response. The response was 2728% higher than the alanine only dosimeters. The reaction product was chemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Chromatography, Refractometry and Solubility tests. Results indicate that alanine boron hydrate is formed in basic media and in a stoichiometric ratio (1:0.75). The dosimetric characterization of alanine boron hydrate was performed, results are reported. It is concluded that alanine boron hydrate may be a good intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. (Author)

  13. The effect of β-alanine supplementation on cycling time trials of different length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-10-01

    The varying results reported in response to β-alanine supplementation may be related to the duration and nature of the exercise protocol employed. We investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on a wide range of cycling performance tests in order to produce a clear concise set of criteria for its efficacy. Fourteen trained cyclists (Age = 24.8 ± 6.7 years; VO2max = 65.4 ± 10.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Prior to supplementation, subjects completed two (familiarization and baseline) supramaximal cycling bouts until exhaustion (120% pre-supplementation VO2max) and two 1-, 4- and 10-km cycling time trial (TT). Subjects then supplemented orally for 4 weeks with 6.4 g/d placebo or β-alanine and repeated the battery of performance tests. Blood lactate was measured pre-exercise, post-exercise and 5  min post-exercise. β-alanine supplementation elicited significant increases in time to exhaustion (TTE) (17.6 ± 11.5 s; p = 0.013, effect compared with placebo) and was likely to be beneficial to 4-km TT performance time (-7.8 ± 8.1 s; 94% likelihood), despite not being statistically different (p = 0.060). Performance times in the 1- and 10-km TT were not affected by treatment. For the highly trained cyclists in the current study, β-alanine supplementation significantly extended supramaximal cycling TTE and may have provided a worthwhile improvement to 4-km TT performance. However, 1- and 10-km cycling TT performance appears to be unaffected by β-alanine supplementation. PMID:26652037

  14. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, M.; Büermann, L.

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation. Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series. Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series. For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  15. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259–82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication. (paper)

  16. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  17. Radical formation of irradiated α-alanine and N-acetyl alanine with heavy ion beams. Effects of the irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of irradiation with C290 MeV/u ion beams were investigated using X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy for a polycrystalline powder of L-α-alanine at from 77K to 310K. The formed main radicals at 190K∼310K were the deamino radical and the decarboxyl radical. Because of the first-derivative ESR, decarboxyl radical showed an expanded spectral width and a lower peak height because of its amino hydrogen and nitrogen than that of the same amount of deamino radical. The ESR of irradiated L-α-alanine predominantly indicates the spectrum of the deamino radical. On the irradiated, L-α-alanine at from 77K to 310K ESR showed 1:4:6:4:1 lines at 220K and at room temperature, which indicate that the methyl group of the radical was rotating. On the other hand, at 77K ESR the spectrum showed nearly 1:5:5:5:1 lines, like the teeth of a saw, on samples irradiated at 270K∼350K (range IV), and 1:4:6:4:1 lines for those irradiated at 180K∼260K (range II and III), respectively. It is considered that the radical conformation of the deamino radical is planar (most stable conformation) on an irradiated sample in range IV, and a pyramidal structure on the irradiated sample in ranges II and III. (author)

  18. Active Oxygen Radical Scavenging Ability of Water-Soluble β-Alanine C60 Adducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Water-soluble β-alanine C60 adducts were synthesized, and the scavenging ability to superoxygen anion radical O2-and hydroxyl radicalOH were studied by autoxidation ofpyrogallol and chemiluminescence, respectively. It was found that β-alanine C60 adducts showed an excellent efficiency in eliminating superoxygen anion radical and hydroxyl radical. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) for superoxygen anion radical and hydroxyl radical were 0.15 mg/mL and 0.048 mg/mL, respectively. The difference should be mainly attributed to the different scavenging mechanisms.

  19. Standard Enthalpies of Formation of Solid Complexes of Lanthanide Nitrates with Alanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭武; 陈三平; 高胜利; 刘晓华; 史启祯

    2002-01-01

    The combustion energies of fourteen solid complexes of lanthanide nitrate with alanine were determined. The standard enthalpies of combustion, Δc,coor(s)H°, and standard enthalpies of formation, Δf,coor(s)H°, were calculated for these complexes. The relationship of Δc,coor(s)H° and Δf,coor(s)H° with the atomic numbers of the elements in the lanthanide series were examined. The results show that a certain amount of covalence is present in the chemical bond between the lanthanide cations and alanine.

  20. Synthesis, Characterization and Metal Ion Detection of Novel Fluoroionophores Based on Heterocyclic Substituted Alanines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manuela M Raposo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new fluorescent probes containing the thiophene andbenzoxazole moieties combined with an alanine residue is described. The resulting highlyfluorescent heterocyclic alanine derivatives respond via a quenching effect, withparamagnetic Cu(II and Ni(II metal ions and with diamagnetic Hg(II, as shown by theabsorption and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy studies. The formation ofmononuclear or dinuclear metal complexes was postulated based on the presence of thefree carboxylic acid as binding site and also with the interaction with the donor atoms inthe chromophore. Interaction with other important biological metal ions such as Zn(II,Ca(II and Na(I was also explored.

  1. Dose response and fading characteristics of an alanine-agarose gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose response of an alanine-agarose gel, analyzed by ESR spectrometry, and the stability of the radiation-induced free radicals have been investigated. The stability of the ESR signal is higher for dosimeter samples analyzed at 77 K than for dried samples, analyzed at room-temperature. The dose response is linear to within ±2% in the absorbed dose interval 2-100 Gy. The variations in spectral line shape were analyzed at temperatures between 77 and 270 K. The experimental ESR spectrum at 77 K was compared with a simulated spectrum of polycrystals of L-α-alanine. (Author)

  2. EPR study of the annealing effects on the x-ray-irradiated l-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-alanine has been discovered to be one of the best emergency dosimetric materials. In this research, the dosimetric properties of L-alanine were re-examined using an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The intensities of the EPR signal were measured at room temperature after a 30-minute annealing at various temperatures. We investigated the annealing effect on the samples for various temperatures in the range from -10 .deg. C to 50 .deg. C by using EPR. These intensities depend on the areal, daily,and seasonal temperatures

  3. A spectrophotometric readout for γ irradiated alanine solution - a dosimetric application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine is a stable dosimeter of reference in its solid state. Its installation in solution as being a dosimetric system of routine remains very useful. A follow-up of the behaviour of the irradiated alanine solution with 15 kGy according to the concentration is carried out by UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The results obtained prove the difficulty in analytical studies of the radiolysis of aqueous solutions by optical absorption due to the ambiguous broad spectra of the species and the reaction products. (Author). 47 refs

  4. On the Helix-coil Transition in Alanine-based Polypeptides in Gas Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Y; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-01-01

    Using multicanonical simulations, the authors study the effect of charged end groups on helix formation in alanine based polypeptides. They confirm earlier reports that neutral polyalanine exhibits a pronounced helix-coil transition in gas phase simulations. Introducing a charged Lys+ at the C terminal stabilizes the helix and leads to a higher transition temperature. On the other hand, adding the Lys+ at the N terminal inhibits helix formation. Instead, a more globular structure was found. These results are in agreement with recent experiments on alanine based polypeptides in gas phase. They indicate that present force fields describe accurately the intramolecular interactions in proteins.

  5. Stationary-State Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: a Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. K. Mahajan; A. V. S. S. Narayana Rao; S. K. Bhattacharjee

    2000-04-01

    Stationary-phase mutagenesis in nondividing E. coli cells exposed to a nonlethal stress was, a few years ago, claimed to be a likely case of a Lamarckian mechanism capable of producing exclusively useful mutations in a directed manner. After a heated debate over the last decade it now appears to involve a Darwinian mechanism that generates a transient state of hypermutagenesis, operating on a large number of sites spread over the entire genome, at least in a proportion of the resting cells. Most of the studies that clarified this position were on the reversion of a frameshift mutation present in a lacI -- lacZ fusion in E. coli strain FC40. Several groups have extensively examined both the sequence changes associated with these reversions and the underlying genetic requirements. On the basis of our studies on the genomic sequence analysis, we recently proposed a model to explain the specific changes associated with the reversion hotspots. Here we propose a more detailed version of this model that also takes into account the observed genetic requirements of stationary-state mutagenesis. Briefly, G:T/U mismatches produced at methylatable cytosines are preferentially repaired in nondividing cells by the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPMR) mechanism which is itself mutagenic and can produce mutations in very short stretches located in the immediate vicinity of these cytosine methylation sites. This mechanism requires a homologous or homeologous strand invasion step and an error-prone DNA synthesis step and is dependent on RecA, RecBCD and a DNA polymerase. The process is initiated near sequences recognized by Dcm and Vsr enzymes and further stimulated if these sequences are a part of CHI or CHI-like sequences, but a double-strand-break-dependent recombination mediated by the RecBCD pathways proposed by others seems to be nonessential. The strand transfer step is proposed to depend on RecA, RuvA, RuvB and RuvC and is opposed by RecG and MutS. The model also gives

  6. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy

  7. Ultraviolet mutagenesis and inducible DNA repair in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, R.A.

    1984-11-19

    The ability to reactivate ultraviolet (UV) damaged phage phiCbK (W-reactivation) is induced by UV irradiation of Caulobacter crescentus cells. Induction of W-reactivation potential is specific for phage phiCbK, requires protein synthesis, and is greatly reduced in the presence of the rec-526 mutation. The induction signal generated by UV irradiation is transient, lasting about 1 1/2 - 2 h at 30/sup 0/C; if chloramphenicol is present during early times after UV irradiation, induction of W-reactivation does not occur. Induction is maximal when cells are exposed to 5-10 J/m/sup 2/ of UV, a dose that also results in considerable mutagenesis of the cells. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of a UV inducible, protein synthesis requiring, transiently signalled, rec-requiring DNA repair system analogous to W-reactivation in Escherichia coli. In addition, C. crescentus also has an efficient photoreactivation system that reverses UV damage in the presence of strong visible light.

  8. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic Leptospira species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gerald L; Morel, Viviane; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Croda, Julio; Srikram, Amporn; Henry, Rebekah; Ko, Albert I; Dellagostin, Odir A; Bulach, Dieter M; Sermswan, Rasana W; Adler, Ben; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2009-02-01

    Leptospira interrogans is the most common cause of leptospirosis in humans and animals. Genetic analysis of L. interrogans has been severely hindered by a lack of tools for genetic manipulation. Recently we developed the mariner-based transposon Himar1 to generate the first defined mutants in L. interrogans. In this study, a total of 929 independent transposon mutants were obtained and the location of insertion determined. Of these mutants, 721 were located in the protein coding regions of 551 different genes. While sequence analysis of transposon insertion sites indicated that transposition occurred in an essentially random fashion in the genome, 25 unique transposon mutants were found to exhibit insertions into genes encoding 16S or 23S rRNAs, suggesting these genes are insertional hot spots in the L. interrogans genome. In contrast, loci containing notionally essential genes involved in lipopolysaccharide and heme biosynthesis showed few transposon insertions. The effect of gene disruption on the virulence of a selected set of defined mutants was investigated using the hamster model of leptospirosis. Two attenuated mutants with disruptions in hypothetical genes were identified, thus validating the use of transposon mutagenesis for the identification of novel virulence factors in L. interrogans. This library provides a valuable resource for the study of gene function in L. interrogans. Combined with the genome sequences of L. interrogans, this provides an opportunity to investigate genes that contribute to pathogenesis and will provide a better understanding of the biology of L. interrogans. PMID:19047402

  9. ldentification and Mutagenesis of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Chinese Sauerkraut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajing CHAl; Hao SHl; Ri NA

    2015-01-01

    ln order to analyze the fermentation properties of lactic acid bacteria in Chinese sauerkraut and to improve acid production, 21 samples of Chinese sauerkraut from lnner Mongolia and Northeast China were col ected and isolated with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) culture. Sixteen strains of lactic acid bacteria were identified by combining both phenotype and genotype methods. After activation, the 16 strains were inoculated into the MRS medium with a concentration of 4%and then incubated at 37 ℃. The pH and the absorbance of the culture were mea-sured. The activated strains were then mutagenized in a field of 4 KV/cm mutation, with dosages administered within 20 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. The variation curves of the pH and the absorbance of the culture were determined. The experimental results showed that the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the soup were identified as Lactobacil us and the acid production of the bacteria was signifi-cantly improved by the mutagenesis of the corona electric field.

  10. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakanishi

    Full Text Available The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  11. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed. PMID:26503400

  12. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6–7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis. PMID:24363725

  13. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M.O. Rawson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  14. Retroviral vectors for analysis of viral mutagenesis and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-09-24

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  15. In vitro mutagenesis for the improvement of Josapine pineapple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineapple is the most important fruit in terms of revenue earner in Malaysia. There are about 10,000 ha cultivated with this fruit and half of this is owned by estates and planted for the canning industry. The export of canned pineapple is about 2 million standard cases annually valued at RM 60 million, while the export of fresh pineapple is about 40,000 tonnes worth about RM 10 million. The industry for canning is however, an ailing industry with production on the decline since the 70s. Somaclonal variations and induced mutation using irradiation in breeding are least invasive in changes to genetic make-up of an established variety and will be useful for improving the pineapple varieties. The use of tissue culture to generate somaclones with minute genetic changes that do not damage the overall varietal identity would be the most suitable tool to improve the variety. Protocols for the production of tissue culture plantlets of pineapple using bioreactor technology has been developed and proved to be much more efficient and productive compared to conventional method. In vitro mutagenesis using adventitious buds had produced new plants with smooth leaves, vigorous growth and ornamental-like characters. A total of 30,000 plants derived from tissue culture will be planted and screened in the field for the improvement of Josapine pineapple against bacterial heart rot disease and multiple crown. (Author)

  16. A Report on 36 Years of Practical Work on Crop Improvement through Induced Mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced mutagenesis work was conducted from 1971 to July 2007, using both physical and chemical mutagens for improvement of a wide range of crops viz. vegetables, medicinal, pulse, oil-bearing, and ornamental crops. All classical and advanced methods were extensively used for the success of induced mutagenesis for the development of new and novel cultivars of economic importance. Being deeply engaged for the last 30 years on improvement of ornamentals through Gamma-ray induced mutagenesis, I have produced a large number of new and promising varieties in different ornamentals. A good number of ornamental mutant varieties have already been commercialized. A novel technique has been developed for management of floral chimeric sector in chrysanthemum through direct regeneration of mutated individual florets. A series of in vitro experiments were conducted and solid mutants developed through direct regeneration. In vitro mutagenesis has been successfully used for development of a salt-resistant strain in chrysanthemum, supported by biochemical analysis and field trials. (author)

  17. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV.

  18. Fragmentation of alpha- and beta-alanine molecules by ions at Bragg-peak energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bari, S.; Sobocinski, P.; Postma, J.; Alvarado, F.; Hoekstra, R.; Bernigaud, V.; Manil, B.; Rangama, J.; Huber, B.; Schlathoelter, T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of keV He(+), He(2+), and O(5+) ions with isolated alpha and beta isomers of the amino acid alanine was studied by means of high resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We observed a strong isomer dependence of characteristic fragmentation channels which manifests in

  19. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander; Solov'yov, Andrey;

    2006-01-01

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragment...

  20. High-pressure X-ray diffraction of L-ALANINE crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J.S.; Gerward, Leif; Souza, A.G.;

    2006-01-01

    L-ALANINE has been studied by X-ray diffraction at ambient temperature and pressure up to 10.3 GPa. The material is found to transform to a tetragonal structure between 2 and 3 GPa. and to a monoclinic structure between 8 and 10 GPa. The experimental bulk modulus is 25(5) GPa for the orthorhombic...

  1. Yeast beta-alanine synthase shares a structural scaffold and origin with dizinc-dependent exopeptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, S.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Piskur, Jure;

    2003-01-01

    beta-Alanine synthase (betaAS) is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of pyrimidine bases, including several anticancer drugs. In eukaryotes, betaASs belong to two subfamilies, which exhibit a low degree of sequence similarity. We...

  2. Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase-2 Metabolizes Endogenous Methylarginines, Regulates NO, and Controls Blood Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caplin, Ben; Wang, Zhen; Slaviero, Anna; Tomlinson, James; Dowsett, Laura; Delahaye, Mathew; Salama, Alan; Wheeler, David C.; Leiper, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective-Asymmetric dimethylarginine is an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthesis that may mediate cardiovascular disease. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase-2 (AGXT2) has been proposed to degrade asymmetric dimethylarginine. We investigated the significance of AGXT2 in methylarginine metabolism in

  3. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel L. Pey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis.

  4. Degradation of pyrimidines in Saccharomyces kluyveri: transamination of beta-alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnackerz, K D; Andersen, G; Dobritzsch, D;

    2008-01-01

    (GABA-AT). S. kluyveri has two aminotransferases, GABA aminotransferase ((Sk)Uga1p) with 80% and (Sk)Pyd4p with 55% identity to S. cerevisiae GABA-AT. (Sk)Pyd4p is a typical pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aminotransferase, specific for alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha KG), beta-alanine (BAL) and gamma...

  5. Probing the interaction of the amino acid alanine with the surface of ZnO(1010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y K; Traeger, F; Shekhah, O; Idriss, H; Wöll, C

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption modes and stability of the amino acid alanine (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COOH) have been studied on the nonpolar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(1010), experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and computationally using density functional theory (DFT). Deposition at 200 K was found to lead to the formation of multilayers identified by an XPS N1s peak at 401.7 eV assigned to the NH(3)(+) group, a fingerprint of the zwitterionic structure of alanine in the solid state. Heating to 300 K resulted in the removal of most of the multilayers with the remaining surface coverage estimated to 0.4 with respect to Zn cations. At this temperature most of the alanine molecules are found to be deprotonated (dissociated), yielding a carboxylate species (NH(2)-CH(CH(3))-COO(-) (a) + OH (s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) for adsorbed and (s) for surface species). Further heating of the surface resulted in a gradual decrease of the surface coverage and by 500 K a large fraction of adsorbed alanine molecules have desorbed from the surface. Total energy DFT computations of different adsorbate species identified two stable dissociative adsorption modes: bidentate and monodentate. The bidentate species with adsorption energy of 1.75 eV was found to be more stable than the monodentate species by about 0.7 eV. PMID:19596338

  6. Probing the stability of nonglycosylated wild-type erythropoietin protein via reiterative alanine ligations

    OpenAIRE

    Brailsford, John A.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonglycosylated erythropoietin bearing acetamidomethyl protecting groups at the cysteine residues has been synthesized via chemical methods. Alanine ligation was used to assemble four peptide fragments, themselves prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. This work outlines a route for the synthesis of homogeneous glycosylated erythropoietin.

  7. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  8. Study of EPR spectra of radicals from ionizing radiation interaction with alanine and 4-hydroxyproline samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of stable chemical radicals result following irradiation with ionizing rays of α-β-alanine and 4-hydroxyproline. They could be put into evidence using post-irradiation EPR technique. Analysis and inter-comparison of spectra signals become important for a correct assignment of structure and, subsequently of generating mechanisms in amino acids irradiated samples. (author)

  9. Alanine ESR dosimetry as a travelling dosimetric system for intercomparison purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolotta, A. (Palermo Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica); Onori, S.; Pantaloni, M. (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Fisica)

    1990-01-01

    The major features of the ESR alanine dosimetry set up at the ISS are discussed, with particular regards to those aspects which render it suitable as travelling dosimetric system, both for photon and electron beams. The main results of an intercomparison program among the routine dosimetric systems used at the Italian industrial irradiation plants are shown.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance radiation dosimetry: possible inorganic alternatives to the EPR/alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of the EPR spectrum of γ-irradiated L-α-alanine has been accepted by the International Atomic Energy Agency as a secondary standard for high-dose (10-100 000 Gy) dosimetry. The alanine dosimeter is not without its disadvantages, however, and in this article alternative EPR dosimeters are explored. These include SO3- in irradiated K2CH2(SO3)2 and CO2- in irradiated sodium formate (NaHCO2), both of which have some advantages over CH3CHCO2- in L-α-alanine. Using as a readout parameter the peak-to-peak excursion of the strongest line, these systems have a four-fold sensitivity advantage over alanine. The radicals SO3- and CO2- are, moreover, found in a wide variety of matrices, and it may be possible to find one in which they are even stronger. The need to discover a dosimeter material sensitive enough to function in the 'clinical' dose range (below 10 Gy) is emphasized. (author)

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance radiation dosimetry: possible inorganic alternatives to the EPR/alanine dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keizer, P.N.; Morton, J.R.; Preston, K.F. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences)

    1991-10-07

    The intensity of the EPR spectrum of {gamma}-irradiated L-{alpha}-alanine has been accepted by the International Atomic Energy Agency as a secondary standard for high-dose (10-100 000 Gy) dosimetry. The alanine dosimeter is not without its disadvantages, however, and in this article alternative EPR dosimeters are explored. These include SO{sub 3}{sup -} in irradiated K{sub 2}CH{sub 2}(SO{sub 3}){sub 2} and CO{sub 2}{sup -} in irradiated sodium formate (NaHCO{sub 2}), both of which have some advantages over CH{sub 3}CHCO{sub 2}{sup -} in L-{alpha}-alanine. Using as a readout parameter the peak-to-peak excursion of the strongest line, these systems have a four-fold sensitivity advantage over alanine. The radicals SO{sub 3}{sup -} and CO{sub 2}{sup -} are, moreover, found in a wide variety of matrices, and it may be possible to find one in which they are even stronger. The need to discover a dosimeter material sensitive enough to function in the 'clinical' dose range (below 10 Gy) is emphasized. (author).

  12. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessen, Holly Jean (Chanhassen, MN); Liao, Hans H. (Eden Prairie, MN); Gort, Steven John (Apple Valley, MN); Selifonova, Olga V. (Plymouth, MN)

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  13. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of 14C-D-glucose and 14C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 x 10-8M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC50, of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 x 10-8M, and 5.4 x 10-9M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, Ki, 1.5 x 10-8M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 x 10-9M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC50s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins

  14. Mechanism of inactivation of alanine racemase by beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alanine racemases are a group of PLP-dependent bacterial enzymes that catalyze the racemization of alanine, providing D-alanine for cell wall synthesis. Inactivation of the alanine racemases from the Gram-negative organism Salmonella typhimurium and Gram-positive organism Bacillus stearothermophilus with beta, beta, beta-trifluoroalanine has been studied. The inactivation occurs with the same rate constant as that for formation of a broad 460-490-nm chromophore. Loss of two fluoride ions per mole of inactivated enzyme and retention of [1-14C]trifluoroalanine label accompany inhibition, suggesting a monofluoro enzyme adduct. Partial denaturation (1 M guanidine) leads to rapid return of the initial 420-nm chromophore, followed by a slower (t1/2 approximately 30 min-1 h) loss of the fluoride ion and 14CO2 release. At this point, reduction by NaB3H4 and tryptic digestion yield a single radiolabeled peptide. Purification and sequencing of the peptide reveals that lysine-38 is covalently attached to the PLP cofactor. A mechanism for enzyme inactivation by trifluoroalanine is proposed and contrasted with earlier results on monohaloalanines, in which nucleophilic attack of released aminoacrylate on the PLP aldimine leads to enzyme inactivation. For trifluoroalanine inactivation, nucleophilic attack of lysine-38 on the electrophilic beta-difluoro-alpha, beta-unsaturated imine provides an alternative mode of inhibition for these enzymes

  15. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  16. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV–visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated. (paper)

  17. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Bharucha, Nikë; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is an effective method for generating large sets of random mutations in target DNA, with applicability toward numerous types of genetic screens in prokaryotes, single-celled eukaryotes, and metazoans alike. Relative to methods of random mutagenesis by chemical/UV treatment, transposon insertions can be easily identified in mutants with phenotypes of interest. The construction of transposon insertion mutants is also less labor-intensive on a genome-wide scale than methods for targeted gene replacement, although transposon insertions are not precisely targeted to a specific residue, and thus coverage of the target DNA can be problematic. The collective advantages of transposon mutagenesis have been well demonstrated in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, as transposon mutagenesis has been used extensively for phenotypic screens in both yeasts. Consequently, we present here protocols for the generation and utilization of transposon-insertion DNA libraries in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Specifically, we present methods for the large-scale introduction of transposon insertion alleles in a desired strain of S. cerevisiae. Methods are also presented for transposon mutagenesis of C. albicans, encompassing both the construction of the plasmid-based transposon-mutagenized DNA library and its introduction into a desired strain of Candida. In total, these methods provide the necessary information to implement transposon mutagenesis in yeast, enabling the construction of large sets of identifiable gene disruption mutations, with particular utility for phenotypic screening in nonstandard genetic backgrounds. PMID:21815095

  18. Correlation between liver cell necrosis and circulating alanine aminotransferase after ischaemia/reperfusion injuries in the rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Anders R.; Andersen, Kasper J.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen;

    2016-01-01

    performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Alanine transferase peaked after 4 h of reperfusion; however, at this time-point, only mild necrosis was observed, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.663 (P = 0.001). After 24 h of reperfusion, alanine aminotransferase was found to be highly...

  19. Enhanced Thermostability of Lipoxygenase from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Based on Computer-Aided Rational Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Hanwen; Zhang, Chong; Wang, Shuicheng; Lu, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2016-04-01

    Lipoxygenase from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Ana-LOX) was thermally unstable. So, improving the thermostability of the enzyme was quite essential. The target site of Ana-LOX selected for site-directed mutagenesis was based on computer-aided rational design. The thermostability and specific activity of Ana-LOX were improved with replacing valine with alanine at the target site 421 and the site 40. Compared to the wild-type enzyme which has a half-life (T 1/2) of inactivation of 3.8 min at 50 °C, the T 1/2 of mutant enzymes with V421A and V40A substitution increased to 4.4 and 7.0 min, respectively. The double mutant V421A/V40A showed a synergistic effect with a T 1/2 value of 8.3 min, resulting in a 1.18-fold improvement compared to the original Ana-LOX. V421A, V40A, and V421A/V40A also obtained 4.83, 41.58, and 80.07 % increase in specific activity, respectively. This study provides useful theoretical reference for enzyme molecular modification and computer-aided rational design.

  20. Sequence-structure-function relationships of a tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase studied by homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purta, Elzbieta; van Vliet, Françoise; Tricot, Catherine; De Bie, Lara G; Feder, Marcin; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Droogmans, Louis; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2005-05-15

    The Escherichia coli TrmB protein and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Trm8p catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent formation of 7-methylguanosine at position 46 (m7G46) in tRNA. To learn more about the sequence-structure-function relationships of these enzymes we carried out a thorough bioinformatics analysis of the tRNA:m7G methyltransferase (MTase) family to predict sequence regions and individual amino acid residues that may be important for the interactions between the MTase and the tRNA substrate, in particular the target guanosine 46. We used site-directed mutagenesis to construct a series of alanine substitutions and tested the activity of the mutants to elucidate the catalytic and tRNA-recognition mechanism of TrmB. The functional analysis of the mutants, together with the homology model of the TrmB structure and the results of the phylogenetic analysis, revealed the crucial residues for the formation of the substrate-binding site and the catalytic center in tRNA:m7G MTases.

  1. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that ...

  2. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  3. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase...

  4. Abdominal CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than regular x-rays. Many x-rays or CT scans over time may increase your risk for cancer. However, the risk from any one scan is small. Talk to your doctor about this risk and the benefit of the test for getting a correct diagnosis ...

  5. Environmental Scanning Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckee Meadows Community Coll., Sparks, NV.

    This report describes Truckee Meadows Community College's (Nevada) environmental scanning process and results. The college decided that environmental scanning and forecasting techniques should be used to plan for both short-term and long-term external factors that impact programs, enrollment, and budgets. Strategic goals include: (1) keeping pace…

  6. Optical Scanning Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hans

    The successful use of optical scanning at the University of the Pacific (UOP) indicates that such techniques can simplify a number of administrative data processing tasks. Optical scanning is regularly used at UOP to assist with data processing in the areas of admissions, registration and grade reporting and also has applications for other tasks…

  7. Knee CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation Allergy to contrast dye CT scans give off more radiation than ... injected contrast dye. The most common type of contrast contains ... you have this an iodine allergy. If you need to have this kind of ...

  8. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A ...

  9. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de ...

  10. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  11. K-band EPR dosimetry: small-field beam profile determination with miniature alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of small-size alanine dosimeters presents a challenge because the signal intensity is less than the spectrometer sensitivity. K-band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer seems to be a good compromise between size and sensitivity of the sample. Miniature alanine pellets were evaluated for small-field radiation dosimetry. Dosimeters of DL-alanine/PVC with dimensions of 1.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm length with 5 mg mass were developed. These dosimeters were irradiated with 10 MV X-rays in the dose range 0.05-60 Gy and the first harmonic (1 h) spectra were recorded. Microwave power, frequency and amplitude of modulation were optimized to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). For beam profile determination, a group of 25 dosimeters were placed in an acrylic device with dimensions of (7.5x2.5x1) cm3 and irradiated with a (3x3) cm2 10 MV X-rays beam field size. The dose at the central region of the beam was 20 Gy at a depth of 2.2 cm (build up for acrylic). The acrylic device was oriented perpendicular to the beam axis and to the gantry rotation axis. For the purposes of comparison of the spatial resolution, the beam profile was also determined with a radiographic film and 2 mm aperture optical densitometer; in this case the dose was 1 cGy. The results showed a similar spatial resolution for both types of dosimeters. The dispersion in dose reading was larger for alanine in comparison with the film, but alanine dosimeters can be read faster and more directly than film over a wide dose range

  12. Glutamate Racemase Is the Primary Target of β-Chloro-d-Alanine in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Anne; Khoury, Hania; de Chiara, Cesira; Howell, Steve; Snijders, Ambrosius P.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing global prevalence of drug resistance among many leading human pathogens necessitates both the development of antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action and a better understanding of the physiological activities of preexisting clinically effective drugs. Inhibition of peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis and cross-linking has traditionally enjoyed immense success as an antibiotic target in multiple bacterial pathogens, except in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where it has so far been underexploited. d-Cycloserine, a clinically approved antituberculosis therapeutic, inhibits enzymes within the d-alanine subbranch of the PG-biosynthetic pathway and has been a focus in our laboratory for understanding peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibition and for drug development in studies of M. tuberculosis. During our studies on alternative inhibitors of the d-alanine pathway, we discovered that the canonical alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor β-chloro–d-alanine (BCDA) is a very poor inhibitor of recombinant M. tuberculosis Alr, despite having potent antituberculosis activity. Through a combination of enzymology, microbiology, metabolomics, and proteomics, we show here that BCDA does not inhibit the d-alanine pathway in intact cells, consistent with its poor in vitro activity, and that it is instead a mechanism-based inactivator of glutamate racemase (MurI), an upstream enzyme in the same early stage of PG biosynthesis. This is the first report to our knowledge of inhibition of MurI in M. tuberculosis and thus provides a valuable tool for studying this essential and enigmatic enzyme and a starting point for future MurI-targeted antibacterial development. PMID:27480853

  13. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis in plants via gene targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agronomically valuable phenotypes and natural variations seem to be due to point (or only a few) mutations. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis via gene targeting (GT) should be the cleanest, and most direct gene manipulation technique for future molecular breeding in plants. We chose the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene locus of rice as a target for the introduction of point mutations. ALS catalyzes the initial step common to the biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids. Several point mutations in the ALS gene that confer tolerance to several ALS-inhibiting herbicides have been discovered in several plant species. Using a T-DNA-mediated GT strategy, we were able to induce two point mutations in the ALS locus that confer tolerance to the ALS-inhibiting herbicide bispyribac sodium salt (BS). After detailed analysis of GT plants, we confirmed that precise modification of the ALS locus had occurred in several plants. In addition to herbicide tolerance, tolerance against other chemicals is also a potential selectable phenotype. In this context, we are attempting to use GT to introduce point mutations into the rice gene encoding anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (ASA2) -- a key enzyme in tryptophan (Trp) biosynthesis - to produce Trp-accumulating rice. In this study, gene-modified plants can be selected against the Trp analogue 5-methyl-Trp (5MT). We hope to report the phenotype of ASA2-modified plants. On the other hand, many agronomically valuable phenotypes caused by a small number of point mutations are non-selectable at the stage of transformation using current methods. If the frequency of GT can be improved substantially, co-transformation of a selectable marker gene and a non-selectable GT construct, and subsequent identification of desirable targeting events will cope with this problem. We are currently trying to improve GT efficiency in plant. (author)

  15. In vitro mutagenesis for the improvement of vegetatively propagated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of important crops such as banana, plantain, cassava, potato, sweet potato and sugar cane are propagated from corms, tubers and stem cuttings. Some of these plants do not produce seed, and often the size of the propagule is too big to treat large populations with mutagens. In vitro techniques allow mutagenic treatment of large numbers and multiplication of the selected genotypes in a small space and short duration under disease free conditions. After treatment with mutagens, the chimeral tissues can be separated into mutated and non-mutated sectors without loss of plants, which may occur in conventional propagation. Somaclonal variation among plants regenerated from callus and cell suspension cultures may provide additional variation to that induced through mutagenesis. In vitro methods allow induction and expression of recessive mutations in the haploids, producing homozygous doubled haploids. The availability of simple, efficient and rapid techniques for screening large plant populations for desired traits is an essential component of plant breeding. In vitro culture techniques allow selection of the desired variants from large populations of cells and plants. This may be achieved by manipulating the medium composition, e.g. selection for tolerance to salinity and drought, and by co-culturing the plant tissues with pathogens or their toxins, as in the case of selection for disease resistance. The variants thus selected can be subjected to selection in the glasshouse or field. Even though the occurrence of desired mutations is empirical and random, the combination of in vitro and mutation techniques can speed up the breeding of vegetatively propagated plants. (author). 41 refs, 3 tabs

  16. TET2-mediated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine induces genetic instability and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Emna; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Cabagnols, Xenia; Della Valle, Véronique; Secardin, Lise; Rameau, Philippe; Bernard, Olivier A; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Abbes, Salem; Vainchenker, William; Saparbaev, Murat; Plo, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    The family of Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) proteins is implicated in the process of active DNA demethylation and thus in epigenetic regulation. TET 1, 2 and 3 proteins are oxygenases that can hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and further oxidize 5-hmC into 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). The base excision repair (BER) pathway removes the resulting 5-fC and 5-caC bases paired with a guanine and replaces them with regular cytosine. The question arises whether active modification of 5-mC residues and their subsequent elimination could affect the genomic DNA stability. Here, we generated two inducible cell lines (Ba/F3-EPOR, and UT7) overexpressing wild-type or catalytically inactive human TET2 proteins. Wild-type TET2 induction resulted in an increased level of 5-hmC and a cell cycle defect in S phase associated with higher level of phosphorylated P53, chromosomal and centrosomal abnormalities. Furthermore, in a thymine-DNA glycosylase (Tdg) deficient context, the TET2-mediated increase of 5-hmC induces mutagenesis characterized by GC>AT transitions in CpG context suggesting a mutagenic potential of 5-hmC metabolites. Altogether, these data suggest that TET2 activity and the levels of 5-hmC and its derivatives should be tightly controlled to avoid genetic and chromosomal instabilities. Moreover, TET2-mediated active demethylation might be a very dangerous process if used to entirely demethylate the genome and might rather be used only at specific loci. PMID:27289557

  17. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 → Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by α-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme

  18. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-01-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and [gamma]-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by [gamma]-rays, [alpha]-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than [gamma]-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate [gamma]-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed.

  19. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-02-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and {gamma}-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by {gamma}-rays, {alpha}-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than {gamma}-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate {gamma}-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed.

  20. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  1. Mutagenesis and haploid culture for disease resistance in Brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Most winter oilseed rape cultivars share parentage and therefore show little genetic diversity. There is no known resistance to Alternaria spp. in oilseed rape or in any related Brassica species. Experiments with tissue culture yielded only transient, non-genetic resistance. Therefore, mutagenesis may be used to generate heritable resistance to Alternaria spp. Gamma irradiation was applied to seeds of 'Bienvenue', secondary embryoids of cvs 'Primor' and 'Rapora', and buds of cvs 'Primor' and 'Ariana'. Isolated microspores from cv 'Ariana' and rapid cycling B. napus were also treated. The doses used ranged from 0-100 Gy for isolated microspores and buds, up to 600 Gy for seeds and 960 Gy for secondary embryoids. EMS was used to treat seeds of line WRG-42 (supplied by Nickersons RPB) and microspores of cv 'Bienvenue' and rapid cycling B. napus. Seeds were treated with up to 2.0% EMS for 0.2 h. before plating them on the culture medium. Seed irradiation up to 600 Gy did not reduce germination. M1 and M2 progenies were tested both in the laboratory and in field trials, and none of these were found to be resistant to Alternaria. However, considerable variation for other characters was observed. Haploid cultures from these plants were extremely difficult to regenerate, and for this reason no regenerant plants have been tested for resistance. For irradiated secondary embryoids the regeneration capacity decreased with increasing dose. Regenerated plants have been tested for resistance to Alternaria, but stable resistance was not observed. Haploid cultures were obtained from irradiated buds, using both anther and microspore culture. Low irradiation treatment was beneficial to developing embryoids. Some regenerants have been obtained from EMS treated microspores and seeds. Four plants have repeatedly given increased levels of resistance to A. brassicicola, and progenies are being tested to determine the genetic nature of the resistance. (author)

  2. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and γ-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by γ-rays, α-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than γ-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate γ-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed

  3. Scanning with Iodine-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of I125 as I125-iodide for scanning of the thyroid and of thyroid carcinoma métastasés and as I125-labelled Rose Bengal for scanning of the liver has been investigated in our laboratories. In some patients, the thyroid scans and the scans of thyroid carcinoma metastases were repeated with I131. The liver scans were repeated with colloidal Au198. Cold nodules in the thyroid which could not be detected with I131 were clearly seen with I125. Anterior métastasés in the lungs could be differentiated from posterior métastasés with I125, while with I131 this was not possible. Using the same doses of radioactivity the background with I131 was much higher and could not be eliminated, as this would have reduced the counting rate over the lesions to levels which could not be detected. Some of the photoscans and mechanical scans of livers carried out with colloidal Au198 could not be interpreted. However, ''cold'' lesions were clearly seen on the scans of the same livers with I125-labelled Rose Bengal. (author)

  4. Site-specific genomic (SSG and random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honigberg Saul M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A valuable weapon in the arsenal available to yeast geneticists is the ability to introduce specific mutations into yeast genome. In particular, methods have been developed to introduce deletions into the yeast genome using PCR fragments. These methods are highly efficient because they do not require cloning in plasmids. Results We have modified the existing method for introducing deletions in the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome using PCR fragments in order to target point mutations to this genome. We describe two PCR-based methods for directing point mutations into the yeast genome such that the final product contains no other disruptions. In the first method, site-specific genomic (SSG mutagenesis, a specific point mutation is targeted into the genome. In the second method, random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis, a mutation is introduced at random within a specific domain of a gene. Both methods require two sequential transformations, the first transformation integrates the URA3 marker into the targeted locus, and the second transformation replaces URA3 with a PCR fragment containing one or a few mutations. This PCR fragment is synthesized using a primer containing a mutation (SSG mutagenesis or is synthesized by error-prone PCR (RDL mutagenesis. In SSG mutagenesis, mutations that are proximal to the URA3 site are incorporated at higher frequencies than distal mutations, however mutations can be introduced efficiently at distances of at least 500 bp from the URA3 insertion. In RDL mutagenesis, to ensure that incorporation of mutations occurs at approximately equal frequencies throughout the targeted region, this region is deleted at the same time URA3 is integrated. Conclusion SSG and RDL mutagenesis allow point mutations to be easily and efficiently incorporated into the yeast genome without disrupting the native locus.

  5. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, T., E-mail: schmito@uni-mainz.de [Institute for nuclear chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Bassler, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus C, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Blaickner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220 (Austria); Ziegner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220, Austria and TU Wien, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna A-1020 (Austria); Hsiao, M. C. [Insitute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y. H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Koivunoro, H. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FI-00014, Finland and HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Palmans, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Sharpe, P. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Langguth, P. [Department of Pharmacy and Toxicology, University of Mainz, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Hampel, G. [Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz D-55128 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  6. The conical scan radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosch, T.; Hennings, D.

    1982-07-01

    A satellite-borne conical scan radiometer (CSR) is proposed, offering multiangular and multispectral measurements of Earth radiation fields, including the total radiances, which are not available from conventional radiometers. Advantages of the CSR for meteorological studies are discussed. In comparison to conventional cross track scanning instruments, the CSR is unique with respect to the selected picture element size which is kept constant by means of a specially shaped detector matrix at all scan angles. The conical scan mode offers the chance to improve angular sampling. Angular sampling gaps of previous satellite-borne radiometers can be interpolated and complemented by CSR data. Radiances are measured through 10 radiometric channels which are selected to study cloudiness, water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, ground and mean stratospheric temperature, and aerosols.

  7. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  8. Pelvic CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess (collection of pus) Bladder stones Broken bone Cancer Diverticulitis ... scans over time may increase your risk of cancer. But the risk from any ... to contrast dye. Let your provider know if you have ever ...

  9. Sinus CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be due to: Birth defects Bone fractures Cancer Polyps in the sinuses Sinus infection (sinusitis) ... scans over time may increase your risk for cancer. However, the risk ... to contrast dye. Let your provider know if you have ever ...

  10. Mutation in a D-alanine-D-alanine ligase of Azospirillum brasilense Cd results in an overproduction of exopolysaccharides and a decreased tolerance to saline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré, Edgardo; Fischer, Sonia; Príncipe, Analía; Castro, Marina; Ferrari, Walter; Lagares, Antonio; Mori, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are free-living nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacteria that are found in close association with plant roots, where they exert beneficial effects on plant growth and yield in many crops of agronomic importance. Unlike other bacteria, little is known about the genetics and biochemistry of exopolysaccharides in Azospirillum brasilense. In an attempt to characterize genes associated with exopolysaccharides production, we generated an A. brasilense Cd Tn5 mutant that showed exopolysaccharides overproduction, decreased tolerance to saline conditions, altered cell morphology, and increased sensitivity to detergents. Genetic characterization showed that the Tn5 was inserted within a ddlB gene encoding for a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase, and located upstream of the ftsQAZ gene cluster responsible for cell division in different bacteria. Heterologous complementation of the ddlB Tn5 mutant restored the exopolysaccharides production to wild-type levels and the ability to grow in the presence of detergents, but not the morphology and growth characteristics of the wild-type bacteria, suggesting a polar effect of Tn5 on the fts genes. This result and the construction of a nonpolar ddlB mutant provide solid evidence of the presence of transcriptional coupling between a gene associated with peptidoglycan biosynthesis and the fts genes required to control cell division.

  11. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  12. Advanced Network Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiqur Rahman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Network scanning is à procedure for identifying active hosts on a network, either for the purpose of attacking them or for network security assessment. Scanning procedures, such as ping sweeps and port scans, return information about which IP addresses map to live hosts that are active on the Internet and what services they offer. Another scanning method, inverse mapping, returns information about what IP addresses do not map to live hosts; this enables an attacker to make assumptions about viable addresses. Scanning is one of three components of intelligence gathering for an attacker. In the foot printing phase, the attacker creates a profile of the target organization, with information such as its domain name system (DNS and e-mail servers, and its IP address range. Most of this information is available online. In the scanning phase, the attacker finds information about the specific IP addresses that can be accessed over the Internet, their operating systems, the system architecture, and the services running on each computer. In the enumeration phase, the attacker gathers information such as network user and group names, routing tables, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP data

  13. Purification, characterization and gene cloning of thermostable O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase forming β-cyano-L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermophilic and cyanide ion-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus stearothermophilus CN3 isolated from a hot spring in Japan, was found to produce thermostable β-cyano-L-alanine synthase. The enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of β-cyano-L-alanine from O-acetyl-L-serine and cyanide ions. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa and consists of two identical sub-units. It was stable in the pH range of 6.0 to 10.0 and up to 70degC. The enzyme also catalyzes the synthesis of various β-substituted-L-alanine derivatives from O-acetyl-L-serine and nucleophilic reagents. The gene encoding the β-cyano-L-alanine synthase was isolated from B. stearothermophilus CN3. Sequence homology analysis revealed that the β-cyano-L-alanine synthase of the bacterium is O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase. A recombinant plasmid, constructed by ligation of the cloned gene and an expression vector, pKK223-3, was introduced into E. coli JM109. The transformed E. coli cells overexpressed β-cyano-L-alanine synthase. Heat stable β-cyano-L-alanine synthase can be applied to the synthesis of [4-11C]L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as a tracer for positron emission tomography. (author)

  14. New classes of alanine racemase inhibitors identified by high-throughput screening show antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G Anthony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an effort to discover new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB we chose alanine racemase as the target of our drug discovery efforts. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, alanine racemase plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis as it racemizes L-alanine into D-alanine, a key building block in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. Good antimicrobial effects have been achieved by inhibition of this enzyme with suicide substrates, but the clinical utility of this class of inhibitors is limited due to their lack of target specificity and toxicity. Therefore, inhibitors that are not substrate analogs and that act through different mechanisms of enzyme inhibition are necessary for therapeutic development for this drug target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain non-substrate alanine racemase inhibitors, we developed a high-throughput screening platform and screened 53,000 small molecule compounds for enzyme-specific inhibitors. We examined the 'hits' for structural novelty, antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis, general cellular cytotoxicity, and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We identified seventeen novel non-substrate alanine racemase inhibitors that are structurally different than any currently known enzyme inhibitors. Seven of these are active against M. tuberculosis and minimally cytotoxic against mammalian cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlights the feasibility of obtaining novel alanine racemase inhibitor lead compounds by high-throughput screening for development of new anti-TB agents.

  15. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    mitochondrial genome mutagenesis, and antioxidants significantly rescue these events.

  16. Virtual mutagenesis of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 involved in glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-dong; SHI Yan-fang; WANG Hong; WANG Jia-liang; MA Wen-bin; WANG Ren-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Background Site A132Arg mutations potentially impair the affinity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) for its substrate isocitrate (ICT),consequently reducing the production of α-ketoglutarate and leading to tumor growth through the induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway.However,given that the roles of other active sites in IDH1 substrate binding remain unclear,we aimed to investigate IDH1 mutation pattern and its influence on enzyme function.Methods Fifteen IDH1 catalytic active site candidates were selected for in silico mutagenesis and protein homology modeling.Binding free energy of the IDH1/ICT complexes with single-site mutations was compared with that of the wild type.The affinity of 10 IDH1 catalytic active sites for the ICT substrate was further calculated.Results The IDH1 active site included seven residues from chain A (A77Thr,A94Ser,A100Arg,A132Arg,A1O9Arg,A275Asp,and A279Asp) and three residues from chain B (B214Thr,B212Lys,and B252Asp) that constituted the substrate ICT-binding site.These residues were located within 0.5 nm of ICT,indicating a potential interaction with the substrate.IDH1 changes of binding free energy (△E) suggested that the A132Arg residue from chain A contributes three hydrogen bonds to the ICT α-carboxyl and β-carboxyl groups,while the other nine residues involved in ICT binding form only one or two hydrogen bonds.Amino acid substitutes at A132Arg,A109Arg,and B212Lys sites,had the greatest effect on enzyme affinity for its substrate.Conclusions Mutations at sites A132Arg,A109Arg,and B212Lys reduced IDH1 affinity for ICT,indicating these active sites may play a central role in substrate binding.Mutations at sites A77Thr,A94Ser,and A275Asp increased the affinity of IDH1 for ICT,which may enhance IDN1 catalytic activity.Mutant IDH1 proteins with higher catalytic activity than the wild-type IDH1 could potentially be used as a novel gene therapy for glioblastoma multiforme.

  17. Genome-Wide Synthetic Genetic Screening by Transposon Mutagenesis in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Brooke N.; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Transposon-based mutagenesis is an effective method for genetic screening on a genome-wide scale, with particular applicability in organisms possessing compact genomes where transforming DNA tends to integrate by homologous recombination. Methods for transposon mutagenesis have been applied with great success in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In C. albicans, we have implemented transposon mutagenesis to generate heterozygous mutations for the analysis of complex haploinsufficiency, a type of synthetic genetic interaction wherein a pair of non-complementing heterozygous mutations results in a stronger phenotype then either individual mutation in isolation. Genes exhibiting complex haploinsufficiency typically function within a regulatory pathway, in parallel pathways, or in parallel branches within a single pathway. Here, we present protocols to implement transposon mutagenesis for complex haploinsufficiency screening in C. albicans, indicating methods for transposon construction, mutagenesis, phenotypic screening, and identification of insertion sites in strains of interest. In total, the approach is a useful means to implement large-scale synthetic genetic screening in the diploid C. albicans. PMID:25636616

  18. Bromouracil mutagenesis in Escherichia coli evidence for involvement of mismatch repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Bromouracil mutagenesis was studied in several strains of E. coli in combination with measurement of incorporation of bromouracil in DNA. For levels below 10% total replacement of bromouracil for thymine, mutagenesis was negligible compared with higher levels of incorporation. Such a nonlinear response occurred both when the bromouracil was evenly distributed over the genome and when a small proportion of the genome was highly substituted. Also, the mutation frequency could be drastically lowered by amino acid starvation following bromouracil incorporation. These observations suggest the involvement of repair phenomena. Studies of mutagenesis in recA/sup -/ and uvrA/sup -/ mutants, as well as studies of prophage induction, did not support an ''error prone'' repair pathway of mutagenesis. On the other hand, uvrD/sup -/ and uvrE/sup -/ mutants, which are deficient in DNA mismatch repair, had much increased mutation frequencies compared with wild type cells. The mutagenic action of bromouracil showed specificity under the conditions used, as demonstrated by the inability of bromouracil to revert an ochre codon that was easily revertable by ultraviolet light irradiation. The results are consistent with a mechanism of bromouracil mutagenesis involvng mispairing, but suggest that the final mutation frequencies depend on repair that removes mismatched bases.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of alkaline alanine racemase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alkaline alanine racemase from alkaliphilic B. pseudofirmus OF4 was expressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminarily X-ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme. Alanine racemase (DadXOF4), a dimeric endogenous PLP-dependent alkaline enzyme from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with a His6 tag in a form suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K using a solution containing 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 8.2. The protein crystallized in space group P212121, with two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit

  20. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (D, L)-alanine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-10-28

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(L-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(D-Ala-L-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(L-Ala)3-(D-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  1. Brain alanine formation as an ammonia-scavenging pathway during hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Kukolj, Eva; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2013-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a major etiological toxic factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Brain ammonia detoxification occurs primarily in astrocytes by glutamine synthetase (GS), and it has been proposed that elevated glutamine levels during hyperammonemia lead to astrocyte swelling and c...... thereby reducing the glutamine level in brain. Thus, GS could be a potential drug target in the treatment of hyperammonemia in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hyperammonemia is a major etiological toxic factor in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Brain ammonia detoxification occurs primarily in astrocytes by glutamine synthetase (GS), and it has been proposed that elevated glutamine levels during hyperammonemia lead to astrocyte swelling...... and cerebral edema. However, ammonia may also be detoxified by the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) leading to trapping of ammonia in alanine, which in vivo likely leaves the brain. Our aim was to investigate whether the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine...

  2. Membrane topology of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter AspT of Tetragenococcus halophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Ohonishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2005-03-01

    AspT is an electrogenic aspartate:alanine exchange protein that represents the vectorial component of a proton-motive metabolic cycle found in some strains of Tetragenococcus halophilus. AspT is the sole member of a new family, the Aspartate: Alanine Exchanger (AAE) family, in secondary transporters, according to the computational classification proposed by Saier et al. (http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/~msaier/transport/). We analyzed the topology of AspT biochemically, by using fusion methods in combination with alkaline phosphatase or beta-lactamase. These results suggested that AspT has a unique topology; 8 TMS, a large cytoplasmic loop (183 amino acids) between TMS5 and TMS6, and N- and C-termini that both face the periplasm. These results demonstrated a unique 2D-structure of AspT as the novel AAE family. PMID:15670744

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recombinant alanine racemase from the Pseudomonas putida YZ-26, has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å. A recombinant form of alanine racemase (Alr) from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26 has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The crystals belong to the space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.08, b = 141.86, c = 113.83 Å, and contain an Alr dimer in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were calculated to be 2.8 Å3 Da−1 and approximately 50%, respectively

  4. A reference dosimetric system for dose interval of radiotherapy based on alanine/RPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the development of a reference dosimetric system based on alanine/EPR for radiotherapy dose levels. Currently the IPEN is concluding a similar system for the dose range used for irradiation of products, 10-105 Gy. The objective of this work is to present the efforts towards to improve the measure accuracy for doses in the range between 1-10 Gy. This system could be used as reference by radiotherapy services, as much in the quality control of the equipment, as for routine accompaniment of more complex handling where the total doses can reach some grays. The system uses alanine as detector and electronic paramagnetic resonance - EPR as measure technique. To reach accuracy better than 5% mathematical studies on the best optimization of the EPR spectrometer parameters and methods for the handling of the EPR sign are discussed. (author)

  5. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  6. The local atomic structure of di-alanine amino acid derivative of protoporphyrin IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of photosensitizers bearing potential for photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and treatment (PDT) of malignant tissues strictly depend on the details of their chemical processing. In this work, the x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques were applied to determine the nearest neighbourhood of iron in the di-alanine amino acid derivative of protoporphyrin IX (L-alanine diprotoporphyrinate). The investigated compound is a technological precursor for novel-class, highly water-soluble protoporphyrin IX-based photosensitizers, which have potential for applications in PDD and PDT and have just entered phase I clinical trials. Knowing the chemical content and exact atomic structures of the technological precursor, as well as of the high-purity final product, which all might contain some contamination, is a prerequisite for preparing photosensitizers for preliminary clinical tests

  7. Orientation of crystals in alanine dosimeter assessed by DRS, as seen in EPR spectra evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alanine dosimeter made for evaluation by diffuse light reflection spectrophotometry (ALA/DRS) does not show the effect of orientation of crystals. Supposed deviation from random orientation has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy. EPR investigation shows that in spite of the very fine size of L-alanine crystals, they are oriented in thin layers of the polyethylene matrix. Specially prepared films with deliberately well oriented crystals have confirmed this observation. Our ALA/DRS dosimeter can be evaluated by the EPR method for the concentration of free radicals, providing that the dominating crystal orientation in the dosimetric film is indicated on it as an arrow, and the sample is inserted into the magnetic cavity always in the same orientation as has been done during the calibration operation. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  8. A polymer-alanine film for measurements of radiation dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A film dosimeter (0.35 mm thick) composed of polyethylene-vinyl acetate and microcrystalline L-α-alanine has been prepared and investigated with respect to dosimetric properties using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The useful absorbed dose range is ∼ 25 to 105 Gy and no dose-rate dependence of the response is observed between 1 and 107 Gy s-1 within the dose range up to 50 kGy. With irradiation temperature increasing from 25 to 800C, the response increases at most by 10%. The response is stable, within experimental uncertainty, at least up to 2500 h after irradiation. The suitability of the polymer-alanine film for measurements of ionizing photon and electron dose distributions is demonstrated. (author)

  9. Multi-coincidence measurements in gas-phase amino acid alanine after valence level ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first chiral amino acids having distinct enantiomeric structures is the alanine. Therefore the study of such molecules is important for developing our understanding of this class of molecule. In this work, we report coincidence measurements between photoelectron and photoion, and total ion yield (TIY) measurements after valence level ionization of D,L-alanine in gas phase. The experiments were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) at the Toroidal Grating Monochromator beamline (D0-5A TGM) in the 12-35 eV energy range. The end-station of the beamline is composed by a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer specially build for the photoelectron-photoion-photoion (PEPIPICO) measurements. The TIY have been compared with valence photoelectron spectra recorded with synchrotron radiation reported in the literature and have been discussed in a comparative form. The results will be presented during the conference

  10. Radiation-induced reactions in D, L-α-alanine adsorbed in solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior under irradiation of D, L and D-L α-alanine adsorbed in solid surfaces, as possible phase in the chemical evolution that may have occurred on the primitive Earth or in extraterrestrial environments and to evaluate the contribution of solids (a clay mineral) as shields for the adsorbed amino acids against a external energy source. The results show that α-alanine is adsorbed in the surfaces as function of pH and its yield of decomposition in mineral suspension is lower than the system without the solid surface. These results show the importance of nuclear techniques in these types of studies. (author)

  11. The behaviour of alanine dosimeters at temperatures between 100 and 300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, P.H.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.sharpe@npl.co.uk; Sephton, J.P.; Gouldstone, C.A. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    A cryostat has been constructed to enable irradiations in a MDS Nordion Gammacell 220 irradiator to be carried out at selected temperatures between 100 and 300 K. The principle of operation and the performance of this cryostat are described and results are given of a study into the behaviour of alanine dosimeters at cryogenic temperatures. This work extends previously published data to the region between solid CO{sub 2} and liquid N{sub 2} temperatures and has demonstrated complex dose-dependent behaviour. A sharp discontinuity in the effect of temperature on alanine dosimeter response has been found in the region between 150 and 180 K, with no further influence of irradiation temperature on response observed below this point.

  12. The behaviour of alanine dosimeters at temperatures between 100 and 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, P. H. G.; Sephton, J. P.; Gouldstone, C. A.

    2009-07-01

    A cryostat has been constructed to enable irradiations in a MDS Nordion Gammacell 220 irradiator to be carried out at selected temperatures between 100 and 300 K. The principle of operation and the performance of this cryostat are described and results are given of a study into the behaviour of alanine dosimeters at cryogenic temperatures. This work extends previously published data to the region between solid CO 2 and liquid N 2 temperatures and has demonstrated complex dose-dependent behaviour. A sharp discontinuity in the effect of temperature on alanine dosimeter response has been found in the region between 150 and 180 K, with no further influence of irradiation temperature on response observed below this point.

  13. Development of DL-alanine systems for gamma radiation and electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different dosimetric systems using DL-Alanine samples were employed to determine the absorbed dose from 60Co gamma-rays source and electrons emitted from an accelerator. The first dosimetric system is based on the relationship between free radicals produced and the absorbed dose using the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Details on the sample preparation, the spectrometer parameter setting, the analysis of the ESR signal to dose, the influence of dose rate and the radiation type dependence are described. The second dosimetric system is based on the determination by absorbance spectrophotometry of the complex produced, which are formed when the irradiated alanine is dissolved in a solution containing ferrous ammonium sulphate xylenol in 0,05 N H2 SO4 . Different concentrations for each reagents has been analyzed in the preparation of this solution as well as the influence caused by radiation type and dose rate in the absorbance. (author)

  14. Role of alanine-valine transaminase in Salmonella typhimurium and analysis of an avtA::Tn5 mutant.

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, C M; Whalen, W A; Archambault, L B

    1983-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, as in Escherichia coli, mutations in avtA, the gene encoding the alanine-valine transaminase (transaminase C), are silent unless they are combined with mutations involved in isoleucine-valine biosynthesis. avtA is repressed by leucine or alanine but not by valine. Transaminase C is found at reduced levels upon starvation for any one of several amino acids. We hypothesize that this is due to repression of avtA by the elevated alanine and leucine pools found in amino ...

  15. L-{alpha} alanine crystals: theoretical and experimental morphology and habit modifications in CaCO{sub 3} solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimino, F.; Bruno, M.; Rubbo, M.; Aquilano, D. [Dipartimento di Scienze Mineralogiche e Petrologiche, Universita di Torino, via Valperga Caluso 35, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Empirical potential has been modified for {alpha}-alanine intermolecular interaction, in order to perform a Periodic Bond Chain (PBC) analysis. Equilibrium and growth shapes have been predicted in vacuum and the equilibrium shape has been successfully modified by the solvent interaction. {alpha}-alanine crystals have been prepared both in pure and in CaCO{sub 3} aqueous solution. Then, habit modification was observed and surface morphology analysis has been carried out on metallized crystals. Epitaxial model acting at the {alpha}-alanine/ CaCO{sub 3} interfaces is also proposed. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Sequential enzymatic synthesis and separation of 13N-L-glutamic acid and 13N-L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sequential enzymatic synthesis and separation of 13N-L-glutamic acid and 13N-L-alanine are described. Basically, that involves the synthesis of 13N-L-glutamic acid by one enzyme, the transamination of the labeled glutamic acid to form 13N-L-alanine by a second enzyme, and the separation of the two amino acids by rapid column chromatography. The 13N-L-alanine was evaluated in animals by imaging and tissue distribution studies and showed good potential as a pancreatic imaging agent

  17. Electronic structure and first hyperpolarizability of poly(2-L-alanine-3-sodium nitrate (I)) crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Duarte Moller

    2014-10-01

    Poly(2-L-alanine-3-sodium nitrate (I)), -LASN, crystals have been grown by slow evaporation at room temperature. The nominal size of the crystals obtained by the method was of 500 nm. The UV–Vis spectrum shows a wide range, where absorption is lacking around 532 nm, which is required in order to have the second harmonic emission, when an incident radiation of 1064 nm strikes on the crystal. This guarantees the possible use of the crystal in visible light applications. The transparent nature of the crystal in the visible and infrared regions within the transmission spectrum confirms the nonlinear optical properties of the crystal. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy displays its functional groups which correspond to the poly(2-L-alanine-3-sodium nitrate (I)), where the presence of nitrates in the lattice generally can be identified by their characteristic signature within the 1660–1625, 1300–1255, 870–833 and 763–690 cm-1 range. Single crystal diffraction was carried out in order to determine atomic structure and lattice parameter. Structural parameters were = 5.388(9) Å, = 9.315(15) Å and = 13.63(2) Å. The structure of poly(2-Lalanine-3-sodium nitrate (I)) shown by single crystal diffraction shows an asymmetric unit consisting of one sodium and one nitrate ion and one L-alanine molecule. The coordination geometry around the sodium atom was trigonal bipyramidal, with three bidentate nitrate anions coordinating through their oxygen atoms and two L-alanine molecules, each coordinating through one carboxyl oxygen atom. Electronic structure was obtained by using the Becke–Lee–Yang–Part and Hartree–Fock approximations with hybrid exchangecorrelation three-parameter functional and G-311**G() basis set. Theoretical and experimental results were compared and discussed as having an excellent agreement among them.

  18. β-Alanine supplementation enhances human skeletal muscle relaxation speed but not force production capacity.

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, R; Stannard, R. L.; Minshull, C; Artioli, G. G.; Harris, R. C.; Sale, C.

    2015-01-01

    β-Alanine (BA) supplementation improves human exercise performance. One possible explanation for this is an enhancement of muscle contractile properties, occurring via elevated intramuscular carnosine resulting in improved calcium sensitivity and handling. This study investigated the effect of BA supplementation on in vivo contractile properties and voluntary neuromuscular performance. Twenty-three men completed two experimental sessions, pre- and post-28 days supplementation with 6.4 g/day o...

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome May Be Associated with Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kyu-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed close relationships between hepatic injury, metabolic pathways, and gut microbiota. The microorganisms in the intestine also cause irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to examine whether IBS was associated with elevated hepatic enzyme [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) levels, and metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectiona...

  20. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in Shark Fins

    OpenAIRE

    John Pablo; Mash, Deborah C.; Banack, Sandra A; Neil Hammerschlag; Margaret Basile; Kiyo Mondo

    2012-01-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the ...

  1. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sale Craig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg, matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6 or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2% and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9% following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11 = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11 = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05. There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels.

  2. The ESR/alanine dosimeter - power dependence of the X-band spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arber, J.M.; Sharpe, P.H.G. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (UK)); Joly, H.A.; Morton, J.R.; Preston, K.F. (National Research Council, Ottawa (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences)

    1991-01-01

    Satellite lines which accompany the central feature of the X-band ESR spectrum of {alpha}-alanine dosimeters are shown to be due to forbidden ''spin-flip'' transitions associated with methyl protons on nearby molecules. At microwave powers in excess of 1 mW the satellites increase in intensity relative to the central feature, and thus measurements at higher microwave powers must be based on experimentally determined calibration curves at the appropriate power levels. (author).

  3. Peptide conformational preferences in osmolyte solutions: Transfer free energies of deca-alanine

    OpenAIRE

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated simulating a deca-alanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically-relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the d...

  4. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE ACTIVITY OF ALANIN-AMINOTRANSFERASE IN HYPOPHTHALMICHTHYS MOLITRIX AND ARISTICHTHYS NOBILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vasile

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper represents a comparative study on the activity of one aminotransferase - alaninaminotransferase, in the digestive tube of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (silver carp and Aristichthys nobilis (bighead carp. The enzymatic activity has been determined colorimetrically, with 2, 4 - dinitrophenyl hydrazine, the results obtained being expressed as UE / g / min. It was observed that, comparatively with the alanin-aminotransferase activity recorded in silver carp, in the case of bighead carp, the values recorded are much lower.

  5. β-alanine supplementation improves YoYo intermittent recovery test performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders Bryan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-alanine supplementation has been shown to improve high-intensity exercise performance and capacity. However, the effects on intermittent exercise are less clear, with no effect shown on repeated sprint activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of β-alanine supplementation on YoYo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2 (YoYo IR2 performance. Methods Seventeen amateur footballers were allocated to either a placebo (PLA; N = 8 or β-alanine (BA; N = 9 supplementation group, and performed the YoYo IR2 on two separate occasions, pre and post 12 weeks of supplementation during a competitive season. Specifically, players were supplemented from early to mid-season (PLA: N = 5; BA: N = 6 or mid- to the end of the season (PLA: N = 3; BA: N = 3. Data were analysed using a two factor ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc analyses. Results Pre supplementation scores were 1185 ± 216 and 1093 ± 148 m for PLA and BA, with no differences between groups (P = 0.41. YoYo performance was significantly improved for BA (+34.3%, P ≤ 0.001 but not PLA (−7.3%, P = 0.24 following supplementation. 2 of 8 (Early – Mid: 2 of 5; Mid – End: 0 of 3 players improved their YoYo scores in PLA (Range: -37.5 to + 14.7% and 8 of 9 (Early – Mid: 6 of 6; Mid – End: 2 of 3 improved for BA (Range: +0.0 to +72.7%. Conclusions 12 weeks of β-alanine supplementation improved YoYo IR2 performance, likely due to an increased muscle buffering capacity resulting in an attenuation of the reduction in intracellular pH during high-intensity intermittent exercise.

  6. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two types of scans: ventilation and perfusion. The ventilation scan shows where air flows in your lungs. The perfusion scan shows where blood flows in your lungs. Both scans use radioisotopes (a low-risk radioactive substance). For the ventilation scan, you ...

  7. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  8. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  9. Effect of dipeptide of glutamine and alanine on severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG De-lin; XU Jun-fa

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of dipeptide of glutamine and alanine on patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods: A total of 46 patients (31 males and 15 females, aged 7-68 years, (47±9.6) years on average) with severe traumatic brain injury were randomized into two groups: Group G (n=23) and Group C (n=23). The patients in Group G received nutritional remedy with the dipeptide of glutamine and alanine, whereas the patients in Group C received routine nutritional therapy only. GCS changes, the length of stay in the neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU), the mortality,the count of lymphocytes, related complications including lung infection and hemorrhage of alimentary tracts, etc, were examined and recorded. Results: The fatality rate and the length of stay in NICU in Group G was lower than these in Group C (P<0.05), but no obvious difference was found in GCS changes of the patients between the two groups (P>0.05). The patients with lung infection and alimentary tract hemorrhage in Group G were less than those in Group C (P<0.05). The count of lymphocytes in Group G was more than that in Group C (P<0.05), but no difference was found in other nutritional data. Conclusions: Dipeptide of glutamine and alanine can increase the resisting stress and anti-infection ability of patients with severe traumatic brain injury, which can also lower the mortality and shorten the NICU stay.

  10. Radiation chemistry in alanine irradiated with γ-rays and ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to extend the application of alanine dosimetry, the behavior of free radicals in solid α-alanine irradiated with γ-rays and with ion beams was studied by electron spin resonance. Stable neutral radicals are produced through the decomposition of originally generated ion radicals in alanine irradiated at 300 K, while at 77 K the ion radicals are stable, and also do not decompose. The rate of the combination reaction of the neutral radicals and of the ion radicals was studied by measuring the saturation behavior of the radical concentration in γ-radiolysis at 300 and at 77 K. The yield of the neutral radicals was compared between 0.5, 1,2 and 3 MeV H+, 0.5, 1, and 3 MeV He+, 175 MeV Ar8+ and 460 MeV Ar13+ ion irradiations. Dependence of the radical yield on the radiation quality is understood more in terms of the rate of the combination reaction between the ion radicals than with that between the neutral radicals, and has to do with high local dose within the ion tracks. (Author)

  11. Alanine dosimetry using a spectrophotometric ferric-xylenol orange complex readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laere, K. van; Buysse, J.; Berkvens, P. (Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Lab. voor Kernfysica)

    1989-01-01

    The spectrophotometric dosimetric method using the indirect oxidation of ferrous ions after dissolution of irradiated DL-and L-alanine has been thoroughly investigated with respect to its composition, read-out procedure and dose-response. Optimal concentration of 0.10 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 0.2 mM xylenol orange and 0.2 mM Fe{sup 2+} were found, giving an absorption maximum at 547 nm. Standardization of chemical processing procedures allows a reproducibility better than 0.5%. The useful dose range has been extended to 0.03-12 kGy by means of slightly different read-out procedure. The quantitative concept of ''indirect yield'', G{sub id}, was introduced for this procedure as a measure of the indirect oxidation capacity of the radicals. It was found to be G{sub id,0}(Fe{sup 3+}) 7.1 ions/100 eV transferred into the alanine. The spectrophotometric readout combines the highly advantageous use of alanine as a dosemeter with the straightforwardness, accuracy and low costs of the chemical procedure. (author).

  12. Alanine dosimetry using a spectrophotometric ferric-xylenol orange complex readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrophotometric dosimetric method using the indirect oxidation of ferrous ions after dissolution of irradiated DL-and L-alanine has been thoroughly investigated with respect to its composition, read-out procedure and dose-response. Optimal concentration of 0.10 N H2SO4, 0.2 mM xylenol orange and 0.2 mM Fe2+ were found, giving an absorption maximum at 547 nm. Standardization of chemical processing procedures allows a reproducibility better than 0.5%. The useful dose range has been extended to 0.03-12 kGy by means of slightly different read-out procedure. The quantitative concept of ''indirect yield'', Gid, was introduced for this procedure as a measure of the indirect oxidation capacity of the radicals. It was found to be Gid,0(Fe3+) 7.1 ions/100 eV transferred into the alanine. The spectrophotometric readout combines the highly advantageous use of alanine as a dosemeter with the straightforwardness, accuracy and low costs of the chemical procedure. (author)

  13. Selfcalibrated alanine/EPR dosimeters. A new generation of solid state/EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine/EPR dosimeters are well established as secondary, reference dosimeters for high-energy radiation. However, there are various sources of uncertainty in the evaluation of absorbed dose. This arises primarily from the necessity to calibrate each EPR spectrometer and each batch of dosimeters before their use. In order to overcome this disadvantage, a new generation alanine/EPR dosimeter has been developed, and its possibilities as a radiation detector are reported. Principally, it is a mixture of alanine, some quantity of EPR active substance, and a binding material. The EPR active substance, acting as an internal EPR standard, is chosen to have EPR parameters which are independent of the irradiation dose. The simultaneous recording of the spectra of both the sample and the standard under the same experimental conditions and the estimation of the ratio Ialanine/IMn as a function of the absorbed dose strongly reduces the uncertainties. The response of these dosimeters for 60Co γ-radiation exhibits excellent linearity and reproducibility in the range of absorbed dose, 102 - 5 x 104 Gy. (author)

  14. In vivo dosimetry in electron beam teletherapy using electron paramagnetic resonance in L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation doses measured in vivo with the use of ERP/alanine dosimetry with doses calculated using the Cad Plan R.3.1.2 treatment planning system. The doses were measured in vivo using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in L alanine. The detectors consisted of small polyethylene bags filled with crystalline L-alanine. Clinical research was performed on a group of patients undergoing radical and palliative treatment at the Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy of the Medical University of Gdansk. The planned doses were calculated by the Cad Plan R.3.1.2 radiotherapy treatment planning system. The average difference between the measured doses and those calculated by the treatment planning system was, for all 50 fields, 0.6% with a data scatter of 6.3% (standard deviation of a single measurement). The results of in vivo dosimetry showed apt concordance between the prescribed and the actually delivered doses. The 0.6% average difference may be considered satisfactory in routine radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  15. Structural, spectral, thermal, dielectric, mechanical and optical properties of urea L-alanine acetate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaikumar, D. [Department of Physics, Voorhees College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632001 (India); Kalainathan, S., E-mail: kalainathan@yahoo.co [Physics Division, SAS, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [CGC section, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, 110012 (India)

    2010-05-15

    A new organic nonlinear optical crystal, urea L-alanine acetate (ULAA) has been grown by solution growth using slow cooling technique with the vision to improve the properties of the L-alanine crystals. Urea and L-alanine material were mixed in the molar ratio 1:4. Solubility and metastable zone width were determined. Single crystal XRD analyses revealed that the crystal lattice of ULAA is orthorhombic system, primitive lattice with cell parameters a=5.7971 A, b=6.0391 A, c=12.3276 A with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (D{sub 2}{sup 4}). High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) analysis was carried out to study their crystalline perfection. FTIR spectrum was recorded to identify the presence of functional groups and molecular structure was confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. From the mass spectrum, the ratio of compound formation of ULAA was analyzed. Thermal strength of the grown crystal has been studied using thermo-gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Dielectric measurements reveal that the grown crystals have very low dielectric loss. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vickers microhardness test. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. Preliminary measurement using Kurtz powder technique with Nd-YAG laser light of wavelength 1064 nm indicates that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency is roughly equal to that of pure KDP.

  16. Radiation chemistry in alanine irradiated with {gamma}-rays and ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-01-01

    In order to extend the application of alanine dosimetry, the behavior of free radicals in solid {alpha}-alanine irradiated with {gamma}-rays and with ion beams was studied by electron spin resonance. Stable neutral radicals are produced through the decomposition of originally generated ion radicals in alanine irradiated at 300 K, while at 77 K the ion radicals are stable, and also do not decompose. The rate of the combination reaction of the neutral radicals and of the ion radicals was studied by measuring the saturation behavior of the radical concentration in {gamma}-radiolysis at 300 and at 77 K. The yield of the neutral radicals was compared between 0.5, 1,2 and 3 MeV H{sup +}, 0.5, 1, and 3 MeV He{sup +}, 175 MeV Ar{sup 8+} and 460 MeV Ar{sup 13+} ion irradiations. Dependence of the radical yield on the radiation quality is understood more in terms of the rate of the combination reaction between the ion radicals than with that between the neutral radicals, and has to do with high local dose within the ion tracks. (Author).

  17. Bond cleavage reactions in the tripeptide tri-alanine upon free electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we performed dissociative electron attachment (DEA) measurements with the tripeptide tri-alanine, C9H17N3O4, utilizing a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment with high electron energy resolution (about 100 meV). Anion efficiency yields as a function of the incident electron energy are obtained for the most abundant anions up to electron energies of ∼ eV. Quantum chemical calculations are performed to determine the thermochemical thresholds for the anions observed in the measurements. There is no evidence of a molecular anion with lifetime of mass spectrometric timescales. The dehydrogenated closed shell anion (M-H)- is one of the fragment anions observed for which the calculations show that H-loss is energetically possible from carboxyl, as well as amide groups. In contrast to the dipeptide di-alanine and monomer alanine the cleavage of the N-Cα bond in the peptide chain is already possible by attachment of electrons at ∼ 0 eV. (authors)

  18. Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice Using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs), such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system, are powerful tools for understanding gene function and for developing novel traits in plants. In plant species for which transformation and regeneration systems using protoplasts are not yet established, direct delivery to nuclei of SSNs either in the form of RNA or protein is difficult. Thus, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of SSN expression constructs in cultured cells is a practical means of delivering targeted mutagenesis in some plant species including rice. Because targeted mutagenesis occurs stochastically in transgenic cells and SSN-mediated targeted mutagenesis often leads to no selectable phenotype, identification of highly mutated cell lines is a critical step in obtaining regenerated plants with desired mutations. PMID:27557690

  19. Lung scans and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experience of pulmonary isotope scanning carried out with mercury 197 labelled mercury chloride and acetate, cobalt 57-labelled bleomycin, and Cu67 and Cu64 labelled copper citrate was presented. The scans were carried out with various isotopes supplied by the French Atomic Energy Authority, and gave comparable results, which may be summarised as follows: increased uptake in more than 90% of cases of carcinoma, absent uptake in all cases of benign tumour, frequent increased uptake in acute or advanced inflammatory lesions, absence of uptake, very commonly, in tuberculoma and chronic lesions with scar formation. Radio-isotope scan using Cu67 labelled copper citrate permitted discrimination of malignant tumours (increased fixation which showed up best at the 24th hour) from inflammatory lesions (increased fixation which was reduced on the 24th hour). The positive or negative character of the fixation in a given lesions remains the same, whatever the isotope used in our experience

  20. Characterization of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for high dose applications - Comparison with alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium formate and L-α-alanine (alanine) EPR dosimeters were irradiated to doses from 100 Gy to 100 kGy. The irradiations were mainly performed at a Gammacell irradiator with dose rate of approximately 5.5 kGy h-1. Both the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first derivative EPR spectrum and the area under the EPR absorption spectrum were extracted, and the resulting dose dependence of these EPR signal intensity parameters was analyzed. The dependence of the peak-to-peak width of the central resonance in the first derivative EPR spectrum on the dose was also elucidated. In addition, the dependence on dose rate and irradiation temperature for the two materials were measured. Dosimeters were given doses from 100 Gy to 10 kGy at two different Gammacells with dose rates of 5.5 kGy h-1 and 0.6 kGy h-1, respectively, and the results were compared. Furthermore, the EPR signal intensities for dosimeters irradiated to 1 kGy at temperatures from 11 oC to 40 oC were analyzed. By fitting an 'exponential rise to maximum'-function to the dependence of the area under the EPR absorption spectrum on the dose, saturation doses of 53 kGy and 87 kGy for lithium formate and alanine, respectively, were found. Lower estimates were found when analyzing the dose dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude. Furthermore, the peak-to-peak width was found to increase for doses above 10 kGy. No dose rate dependence for any of the studied materials was observed and the temperature coefficients at 25 oC (i.e. change in dosimeter signal per oC change in irradiation temperature) were 0.154% K-1 and 0.161% K-1 for lithium formate and alanine, respectively. This work demonstrates that lithium formate EPR dosimeters may be suitable for high dose applications, but their signals saturate at lower doses than alanine. The saturation doses found for both materials may be used in theoretical calculations of the dosimeter response following hadron beam irradiations.

  1. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  2. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal site of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guang-yu, Gao; Wei, Wang; Shu-feng, Wang; Zhong, Dongping; Qi-huang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is essential for protein activities. To study internal solvation of protein, site-directed mutagenesis is applied. Intrinsic fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into desired position inside protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics researches. We introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside caves of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at internal sites of the caves indicate clear characteristics of local environment. These solvation behaviors correlated to the enzyme activity directly.

  3. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of a thermostable alanine racemase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hui; Xu, Shujing; Lu, Xiaoyun; He, Guangzheng; Zhao, Ranran; Chen, Shuai; Fu, Sheng; Ju, Jiansong

    2013-01-01

    A thermostable alanine racemase from T. tengcongensis MB4 was expressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme.

  5. Painting proteins blue: β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine as a probe for studying protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Yurii S; Binder, Wolfgang; Nygren, Patrik; Caputo, Gregory A; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2013-01-18

    We demonstrated that β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, a fluorescent pseudoisosteric analog of tryptophan, exhibits weak environmental dependence and thus allows for using weak intrinsic quenchers, such as methionines, to monitor protein-protein interactions while not perturbing them.

  6. Alanine Esters of Enterococcal Lipoteichoic Acid Play a Role in Biofilm Formation and Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Fabretti, Francesca; Theilacker, Christian; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Kaczynski, Zbigniew; Kropec, Andrea; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is among the predominant causes of nosocomial infections. Surface molecules like d-alanine lipoteichoic acid (LTA) perform several functions in gram-positive bacteria, such as maintenance of cationic homeostasis and modulation of autolytic activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of d-alanine esters of teichoic acids on biofilm production and adhesion, autolysis, antimicrobial peptide sensitivity, and opsonic killing. A deletion mutant of the d...

  7. Expression profiles of carnosine synthesis–related genes in mice after ingestion of carnosine or ß-alanine

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji Takayuki; Sato Mikako; Maemura Hirohiko; Takahata Yoshihisa; Morimatsu Fumiki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Carnosine is a dipeptide that improves exercise performance. The carnosine synthesis mechanism through carnosine and ß-alanine ingestion remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the tissue distribution of carnosine synthase, ATP-grasp domain-containing protein-1 (ATPGD1) mRNA, and ATPGD1 and carnosine specific dipeptidase (CN1) gene expression profiles in mice that were given carnosine or ß-alanine orally. Methods ddY mice (7-week-old) were randomly divided into three g...

  8. Expression profiles of carnosine synthesis–related genes in mice after ingestion of carnosine or ß-alanine

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, Takayuki; Sato, Mikako; Maemura, Hirohiko; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Morimatsu, Fumiki

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnosine is a dipeptide that improves exercise performance. The carnosine synthesis mechanism through carnosine and ß-alanine ingestion remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the tissue distribution of carnosine synthase, ATP-grasp domain-containing protein-1 (ATPGD1) mRNA, and ATPGD1 and carnosine specific dipeptidase (CN1) gene expression profiles in mice that were given carnosine or ß-alanine orally. Methods ddY mice (7-week-old) were randomly divided into three groups (n ...

  9. ESR response to {gamma}-rays of alanine pellets containing B(OH){sub 3} or Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Unita CNISM, Palermo and Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Gennaro, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Marrale, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Unita CNISM, Palermo and Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); E-mail: marrale@difter.unipa.it; Bartolotta, A. [Dipartimento Farmacochimico Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Unita CNISM, Palermo and Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); D' Oca, M.C. [Dipartimento Farmacochimico Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    ESR response to {gamma}-irradiation (1-50Gy) of blends containing alanine and either B(OH){sub 3} or Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is reported. The sensitivity of the alanine-B(OH){sub 3} blend is comparable to the sensitivity of pure alanine, although its lowest detectable dose, LDD, is smaller ({approx}1.3Gy) than that of pure alanine ({approx}2.9Gy). Alanine with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is about two times more sensitive than pure alanine, and its LDD is 0.8Gy. The better sensitivity and LDD are probably due to the high atomic number (Z=64) of gadolinium, which enhances the interaction probability with photons and, consequently, the radical yield. This study suggests that other high-Z atoms may be useful for increasing the sensitivity of the response of alanine to {gamma}-radiation.

  10. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  11. Scan This Book!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an interview with Brewster Kahle, leader of the Open Content Alliance (OCA). OCA book scan program is an alternative to Google's library project that aims to make books accessible online. In this interview, Kahle discusses his views on the challenges of getting books on the Web, on Google's library…

  12. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Lung Diseases Nuclear Scans Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  13. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11. T...

  14. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  15. Synergistic antibacterial effects of β-Chloro-L-alanine and phosphomycin on urinary tract isolates of E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Hosseini Jazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was the evaluation of the synergistic effect of sub-MIC doses of Phosphomycin with β-Chloro-L-alanine against urinary tract isolates of E. coli. Materials and methods: A total of 40 isolates were collected from urine specimens submitted to the clinical diagnostic Laboratories in Urmia, Iran. The amounts of MIC and MBC for Phosphomycin, β-Chloro-L-alanine or a mixture of 0.5 mM β-Chloro-L-alanine with sub-MIC doses of Phosphomycin were determined and three groups were compared. Results: Of 40 E. coli isolates, 12. 5% were susceptible to all investigated concentrations of phosphomycin and 2. 5% were resistant. The mean MIC value for phosphomycin in the other E. coli isolates was determined as 25. 7± 35. 5 µg/ mL. All of the bacterial isolates were resistant to all investigated concentrations of β-Chloro-L-alanine. Application of β-Chloro-L-alanine and phosphomycin combination decreased the MIC and MBC values in 22. 5% of the isolates. Discussion and conclusion: This study suggests that β-Chloro-L-alanine and phosphomycin combination have in vitro synergistic effect on some isolates of urinary tract E. coli.

  16. Combined effect of amino and carboxyl group in α-alanine on seeded precipitation of sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Bao-lin; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; HU Hui-ping

    2009-01-01

    α-alanine was adopted as a new additive to elucidate the seeded precipitation mechanism of sodium aluminate solution. α-alanine has the inhibitory effect at the initial period of reaction, but the favorable effect in subsequent reaction. The combined effect of amino and carboxyl group in α-alanine was confirmed by investigating the effect of propionic acid, ethamine and the mixture of propionic acid and ethamine (mole ratio 1:1) on the precipitation of sodium aluminate solution, respectively. The inhibitory effect derives from the adsorption of amino or carboxyl group in α-alanine on the active surface sites of gibbsite, which was confirmed by the alleviating inhibitory effects of propionic acid, ethamine and α-alanine due to the double crystal seed mass. The semi-quantitative IR spectrum analysis of the relative concentrations of Al2O(OH)62- with the band at about 550 cm-1 and polynuclear aluminate ion with the bands at about 880 cm-1 and 635 cm-1, indicates that the dynamic balance among some aluminate species present in sodium aluminate solution is broken due to the addition of α-alanine, thus resulting in the change of the seeded precipitation ratio of sodium aluminate solution.

  17. Microhydration of Alanine in Gas Phase Studied by Quantum Chemical Method and ABEEMσπ/MM Fluctuating Charge Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Li-nan; LIU Cui; GONG Li-dong

    2013-01-01

    A fluctuating charge interaction potential function for alanine-water was constructed in the spirit of newly developed ABEEMσπ/MM(atom-bond electronegativity equalization method at the σπ level fused into molecular mechanics).The properties of gaseous neutral alanine-(H2O)n(n=1-7) clusters were systematically investigated by quantum mechanics(QM) and the constructed ABEEMσπ/MM potential,such as conformations,hydrogen bonds (H-bonds),interaction energies,charge distributions,and so on.The results of ABEEMσπ/MM model are in fair agreement with those of QM and available experimental data.For isolated alanine,compared with those of experi-mental structure,the average absolute deviations(AAD) of bond length and bond angle are 0.002 nm and 1.4°,respectively.For alanine-water clusters,the AAD of interaction energies and H-bond lengths are only 3.77 kJ/mol and 0.012 nm,respectively,compared to the results of MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ//MP2/6-311+G** method.The ABEEMσπ charges fluctuate with the changing conformation of the system,and can accurately and reasonably reflect the interpolarization between water and alanine.The presented alanine-water potential function may provide a basis for further simulations on related aqueous solutions of biomolecules.

  18. Workshop on ENU Mutagenesis: Planning for Saturation, July 25-28, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H

    2002-07-25

    The goal of the conference is to enhance the development of improved technologies and new approaches to the identification of genes underlying chemically-induced mutant phenotypes. The conference brings together ENU mutagenesis experts from the United States and aborad for a small, intensive workshop to consider these issues.

  19. Applied an Efficient Site-directed Mutagenesis Method into Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muqing Qiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for conducting site-directed mutagenesis was developed. This method allows the color selection of mutants through the simultaneous activation or deactivation of the α-peptide of ß-galactosidase. The method can efficiently create mutations at multiple sites simultaneously and can be used to perform multiple rounds of mutation on the same construct. In this paper, in order to develop an efficient site-directed mutagenesis method in vivo, the tests were tested by the following methods. The methods that the fragment knock-out ompR gene was constructed through overlapping PCR, digested by Notand SalⅠⅠ, ligated to plasmid pKOV were applied. The recombination plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli WMC-001 strain, integrated into the genomic DNA through two step homologous recombination. The Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR- mutant was obtained due to gene replacement. The fragment of the mutant ompR gene was amplified through overlapping PCR, cloned into pKOV vector. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR- mutant. The Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR mutant was also obtained due to gene replacement. Results: The site-directed mutagenesis has been successfully constructed in the ompR gene by sequencing. Conclusion: The method is effective for construction of gene site-directed mutagenesis in vivo.

  20. Insertion mutagenesis of the yeast Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) by random integration of linear DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of using random insertional mutagenesis to isolate mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata was explored. Mutagenesis was performed by transformation of the yeast with an integrative plasmid containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. The addition of restriction enzyme together with the plasmid (restriction enzyme-mediated integration, REMI) increased the transformation frequency only slightly. Integration of the linearized plasmid occurred randomly in the C. famata genome. To investigate the potential of insertional mutagenesis, it was used for tagging genes involved in positive regulation of riboflavin synthesis in C. famata. Partial DNA sequencing of tagged genes showed that they were homologous to the S. cerevisiae genes RIB1, MET2, and SEF1. Intact orthologs of these genes isolated from Debaryomyces hansenii restored the wild phenotype of the corresponding mutants, i.e., the ability to overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. The Staphylococcus aureus ble gene conferring resistance to phleomycin was used successfully in the study as a dominant selection marker for C. famata. The results obtained indicate that insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for tagging genes in C. famata. PMID:16770625

  1. The hermes transposon of Musca domestica is an efficient tool for the mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertts, Adam G; Plymire, Christopher; Craig, Nancy L; Levin, Henry L

    2007-12-01

    Currently, no transposon-based method for the mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe exists. We have developed such a system based on the introduction of the hermes transposon from the housefly into S. pombe. This system efficiently disrupts open reading frames and allows the insertion sites to be readily identified. PMID:17947404

  2. Using ultra-sensitive next generation sequencing to dissect DNA damage-induced mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaile; Ma, Xiaolu; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Dafei; Sun, Chenyi; Sun, Yazhou; Lu, Xuemei; Wu, Chung-I; Guo, Caixia; Ruan, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have dramatically improved studies in biology and biomedical science. However, no optimal NGS approach is available to conveniently analyze low frequency mutations caused by DNA damage treatments. Here, by developing an exquisite ultra-sensitive NGS (USNGS) platform "EasyMF" and incorporating it with a widely used supF shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, we can conveniently dissect roles of lesion bypass polymerases in damage-induced mutagenesis. In this improved mutagenesis analysis pipeline, the initial steps are the same as in the supF mutation assay, involving damaging the pSP189 plasmid followed by its transfection into human 293T cells to allow replication to occur. Then "EasyMF" is employed to replace downstream MBM7070 bacterial transformation and other steps for analyzing damage-induced mutation frequencies and spectra. This pipeline was validated by using UV damaged plasmid after its replication in lesion bypass polymerase-deficient 293T cells. The increased throughput and reduced cost of this system will allow us to conveniently screen regulators of translesion DNA synthesis pathway and monitor environmental genotoxic substances, which can ultimately provide insight into the mechanisms of genome stability and mutagenesis. PMID:27122023

  3. Insertion mutagenesis of the yeast Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) by random integration of linear DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of using random insertional mutagenesis to isolate mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata was explored. Mutagenesis was performed by transformation of the yeast with an integrative plasmid containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. The addition of restriction enzyme together with the plasmid (restriction enzyme-mediated integration, REMI) increased the transformation frequency only slightly. Integration of the linearized plasmid occurred randomly in the C. famata genome. To investigate the potential of insertional mutagenesis, it was used for tagging genes involved in positive regulation of riboflavin synthesis in C. famata. Partial DNA sequencing of tagged genes showed that they were homologous to the S. cerevisiae genes RIB1, MET2, and SEF1. Intact orthologs of these genes isolated from Debaryomyces hansenii restored the wild phenotype of the corresponding mutants, i.e., the ability to overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. The Staphylococcus aureus ble gene conferring resistance to phleomycin was used successfully in the study as a dominant selection marker for C. famata. The results obtained indicate that insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for tagging genes in C. famata.

  4. Identification of a novel streptococcal gene cassette mediating SOS mutagenesis in Streptococcus uberis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varhimo, Emilia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Jalava, Jari; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Varmanen, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Streptococci have been considered to lack the classical SOS response, defined by increased mutation after UV exposure and regulation by LexA. Here we report the identification of a potential self-regulated SOS mutagenesis gene cassette in the Streptococcaceae family. Exposure to UV light was found t

  5. Random mutagenesis strategies for construction of large and diverse clone libraries of mutated DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2004-01-01

    The first important step toward a successful preparation of large and diverse DNA libraries with desired complexity is to select a suitable mutagenesis strategy. This chapter describes three different methods for random mutagenesis, the use of XL1-red cells, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and degenerate oligonucleotides-Pfu (DOP). These mutagenesis strategies possess different benefits and pitfalls; thus, they are differentially useful for production of DNA libraries with different density and complexity. The use of XL1-red, an engineered Escherichia coli with DNA repair deficiency, is one of the simplest mutagenesis and requires no subcloning step. After plasmid encoding DNA of inter-est is transformed into the cells, the mutations are simply generated during each round of DNA replication. The mutation frequency of this method is reported to be 1 base change per 2000 nucleotides; however, it can be slightly increased by extending the culture period to allow the accumulation of more mutations. This strategy is suitable for generation of random mutations with low frequency in a large target DNA. Error-prone PCR is one of the most widely used random mutagenesis. During DNA amplification, misincorporation of nucleotides can be promoted by altering the nucleotide ratio and the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction. We discovered that, by adjusting template concentration, frequency of mutation could be controlled easily and a library with desired mutation rate could be obtained. Additionally, efficiency of subsequent cloning steps to insert the PCR product into plasmid DNA is also a key factor determining size and complexity of the libraries. DOP mutagenesis is a rapid and effective method for random mutagenesis of small DNA and peptides. This strategy uses two chemically synthesized degenerate oligonucleotides as primers. By controlling the positions and ratios of degenerate nucleotides used during oligonucleotide synthesis, it is possible to

  6. Comparative study of glycine, alanine or casein as inert nitrogen sources in endotoxemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon-Savanovitch, C; Felgines, C; Farges, M C; Raul, F; Cézard, J P; Davot, P; Vasson, M P; Cynober, L A

    1999-10-01

    Pharmacological effects of dietary amino acids (AA) and peptides must be compared to an isonitrogenous control that is as inert as possible. To establish a rationale for the choice of such a control, potential metabolic and nutritional effects of three currently used nitrogenous controls (glycine, alanine, and casein) were evaluated in an endotoxemic rat model that has well-defined alterations in AA and protein metabolism. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (113 +/- 1 g) were randomly assigned to four groups and received at d 0 an intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (3 mg/kg). After withdrawal of food for 24 h, the rats were enterally refed for 48 h with a liquid diet (Osmolite((R))) supplemented with 0.19 g N. kg(-1). d(-1) in the form of glycine [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-GLY group], alanine (LPS-ALA group) or casein (LPS-CAS group). One group (LPS group) received only Osmolite((R)). Plasma, two skeletal muscles, the liver and the intestine were then removed. Body and tissue weights and tissue protein contents did not differ among the four groups. Intestine histomorphometry showed no significant difference among groups. Jejunal hydrolase activities were significantly affected by the nitrogenous supplementations, but no effect was observed in the ileum. Only limited significant effects were observed on plasma and tissue-free AA concentrations, except for an accumulation of glycine in the plasma and tissues from the LPS-GLY group, compared to other groups. Overall, whereas glycine as a nitrogenous control should be used with care, either alanine or casein may be used as the "placebo," with the choice depending on the study to be performed. PMID:10498760

  7. Effects of β-Alanine on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, Jordan J; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Buckley, Amanda L; Urbina, Stacie L; Hayward, Sara; Wingfield, Hailee L; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa; Taylor, Lem W; Wilborn, Colin D

    2016-09-01

    Outlaw, JJ, Smith-Ryan, AE, Buckley, AL, Urbina, SL, Hayward, S, Wingfield, HL, Campbell, B, Foster, C, Taylor, LW, and Wilborn, CD. Effects of β-alanine on body composition and performance measures in collegiate women. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2627-2637, 2016-The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of β-alanine (BA) supplementation and resistance training on body composition and performance. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 16 untrained collegiate females (mean ± SD: 21.0 ± 2.2 years; 64.8 ± 8.5 kg; 164.5 ± 7.0 cm; 30.1 ± 5.1 percent body fat [%BF]) completed 8 weeks of resistance training while consuming either 3.4 g BA or placebo (PL; 5 g maltodextrin) before training sessions. Training consisted of 4 days per week upper- and lower-body exercises. Lean body mass (LBM), fat mass (FM), and %BF were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), aerobic time to exhaustion, Wingate peak power, bench press and leg press 1RM (BPmax; LPmax), and repetitions at 65% (BPreps; LPreps), vertical jump (VJ), and standing broad jump were assessed using standard National Strength and Conditioning Association guidelines. All measurements were taken at baseline (T1), 4 weeks (T2), and 8 weeks (T3). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and 95% confidence intervals were used to determine significance. Body composition (LBM, FM, and %BF) improved over time (p supplementation may be effective for improving lower-body muscular endurance. β-alanine had no additive effects on body composition or maximal strength in collegiate women. PMID:25486294

  8. Accumulation of D- vs. L-isomers of alanine and leucine in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, P.S.; Schmall, B.; Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Kleinert, E.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    It has been reported that tumor tissue may accumulate some D-amino acids preferentially over the L-isomers. In order to investigate the potential use of carbon-11 labeled amino acid isomers for in vivo tumor studies with positron emission tomography in patients, the tissue distributions of alanine and leucine, substrates for the A-type and L-type amino acid transport systems, respectively, were studied in Copenhagen rates bearing the Dunning R3327G prostatic adenocarcinoma. The authors have previously reported differences in the accumulation of A-type vs. L-type amino acids in rat prostatic adenocarcinoma and normal tissues. All compounds were labeled with C-14 in the carboxyl position with specific activities of 30.0-56.6 mCi/mmol. Higher levels of C-14 activity (Relative Concentration (RC)=dpm found per gm tissue + dpm inject per gm animal mass) were observed in tumor tissue using D-alanine (0.71) compared to L- (0.21) or DL-alanine (0.27) at 45 min post-injection. While tumor/prostate and tumor/liver ratios were above 2 for all three substrates, tumor/blood and tumor/muscle were above one for only the D-isomer. Comparisons made with D-, L-, and DL-leucine also demonstrated a higher level of RC in tumor tissue with the D-isomer (0.84) vs. the L-(0.66) and DL-leucine (0.63). In this case, however, tumor/blood, tumor/prostate, and tumor/muscle ratios were above one for all three substrates, while tumor/liver ratios were below one. These results support the observation of a preferential accumulation of D-amino acids in tumor tissue over the natural L-isomers. Observed differences in the accumulation of the isomers in normal tissues are discussed.

  9. Radical formation in the radiolysis of solid alanine by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate Sch. of Eng.; Ichikawa, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate Sch. of Eng.; Yoshida, H. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate Sch. of Eng.; Namba, H. [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-12 (Japan); Taguchi, M. [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-12 (Japan); Kojima, T. [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-12 (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Radical formation in solid {alpha}-alanine irradiated with 175-MeV Ar{sup 8+} and 460-MeV Ar{sup 13+}, 220-MeV C{sup 5+}, and 350-MeV Ne{sup 8+} ions were studied by the ESR method. The radical yield (number of radicals per incident ion) is constant below the critical fluence of about 10{sup 10} ions cm{sup -2} for the Ar ions, 10{sup 11} ions cm{sup -2} for the C ion, and 5.10{sup 11} ions cm{sup -2} for the Ne ion. Above the critical fluence, the yield decreases with increasing ion fluence. G-value of the radical formation was obtained from the constant yield at the low fluences. The G-value is not a simple function of LET. This is ascribed to the difference in lateral dose distribution of ion tracks. Assuming a simple cylindrical shape of the ion tracks, the average dose in and the radius of the ion tracks were estimated from the G-values. The radius is 8-25 nm, which is larger than the radius of 2-5 nm for 0.5-3 MeV H{sup +} and He{sup +} ion-irradiations. The fluence-yield curves were simulated with the cylindrical tracks and with the dose-yield relationship for the radical formation in {gamma}-irradiated alanine. The simulated curves agree well with the experimental ones. With the cylindrical model of ion tracks, the variation of the radical yield at the high fluences can be estimated for solid alanine irradiated with several hundreds of MeV heavy ions. (orig.).

  10. Energy Scan program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poniatowska Katarzyna M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtoscopy of two non-identical particles in heavy ion collisions enables one to study the space-time asymmetry in the particle's emission process. Theoretical studies based on EPOS model performed for collision energies from the Beam Energy Scan program in STAR allow us to investigate the dependence of source sizes and dynamics effects. Obtained information will enable us to predict the collective behaviour of femtoscopic particle's source.

  11. Study of alanine-cadmium complexes in water-alcohol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanine complexes of cadmium have been studied polarographically in aqueous and water-alcohol mixtures. A reversible reduction was observed in aqueous and 20% water-alcohol mixtures (i.e. 20% methanol or ethanol) and hence the stability constants were evaluated using Deford and Hume's method while in the case of 40% water-alcohol mixtures (.i.e. 40% methanol or ethanol) the reduction was quasireversible. The formal potentials were obtained by Gellings method. It was found that the decrease in dielectric constant favours greater association of ions resulting in higher value of stability constants. (author)

  12. Is there an influence of the surrounding material on the response of the alanine dosimetry system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Mathias; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter; Hackel, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    In a combined experimental and Monte Carlo study the possible influence of the surrounding material on the response of the alanine dosimetry system was investigated. The aim of this work was to estimate the uncertainties induced by the surroundings with respect to quality assurance measurements for radiotherapy, for example in humanoid phantoms. Six different materials were tested. The electron density range covered comprises the range present in human tissue. No significant influence of the surrounding material could be found for irradiations in the 60Co reference field of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB).

  13. Small-Field Dosimetry in A 6 MV Photon Beam Using Alanine and Liquid Ionisation Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, S.; Riis, H. L.; Hjelm-Hansen, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Dosimetry of small field sizes in MV photon beams is an increasingly important subject, and a generally accepted guideline for clinical measurements is still lacking. The present comparative study was carried out to further investigate the use of alanine and the PTW microLion...... of each field and depth. This dose maximum was measured for each field using a Scanditronix Wellhöfer photon field diode. The same measurements were carried out using a liquid ionchamber, PTW microLion, irradiated by 500 MU. The output of the accelerator was controlled by a PTW semiflex ion chamber...

  14. Screening for genetic haemochromatosis in blood samples with raised alanine aminotransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavnani, M; Lloyd, D; Bhattacharyya, A.; Marples, J; Elton, P; Worwood, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In the UK approximately 1 in 140 people are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and are at risk from iron overload caused by genetic haemochromatosis (GH). Early detection can prevent organ damage secondary to iron deposition and increase life expectancy.
AIM—To screen for GH in all blood samples sent to the laboratory for routine liver function tests in which raised serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was detected.
METHODS—ALT was measured in sera sent to t...

  15. β-Alanine ingestion increases muscle carnosine content and combat specific performance in soldiers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Jay R; Landau, Geva; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Hoffman, Mattan W.; Shavit, Nurit; Rosen, Philip; Moran, Daniel S.; Fukuda, David H.; Shelef, Ilan; Carmom, Erez; Ostfeld, Ishay

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of β-alanine (BA) ingestion on tissue carnosine levels and the impact such changes would have on combat specific activity. Eighteen soldiers (19.9 ± 0.8 year) from an elite combat unit were randomly assigned to either a BA or placebo (PL) group. Before and following a 30-day supplementation period carnosine content of the gastrocnemius muscle and brain was determined by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During each testing session, par...

  16. Propylthiouracyl-induced severe liver toxicity: An indication for alanine aminotransferase monitoring?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Benyounes; C Sempoux; C Daumerie; J Rahier; AP Geubel

    2006-01-01

    Propylthiouracyl (PTU)-related liver toxicity is likely to occur in about 1% of treated patients. In case of acute or subacute hepatitis, liver failure may occur in about one third. We report two further cases of PTU-induced subacute hepatitis, in whom the delay between occurrence of liver damage after the initiation of treatment, the underestimation of its severity and the delayed withdrawal of the drug were all likely responsible for liver failure.The high incidence of liver toxicity related to PTU, its potential severity and delayed occurrence after initiation of treatment are in favor of monthly alanine aminotransferase monitoring, at least during the first six months of therapy.

  17. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  18. Theoretical investigation of radical species formed from L-α-alanine under gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiated L-α-alanine used in EPR-coupled dosimetry has a complex EPR spectrum at room temperature. Changing the temperature or other conditions of the irradiated samples leads to varied EPR spectrum, i.e., some components disappear and/or new ones are formed. We used both molecular mechanics (MM+) and semiempirical (AM1) methods to perform a theoretical investigation of the seven radical species that have been experimentally detected. We established their order of priority in the given simulation conditions (at 0 K, in vacuo). The formation stages advanced for these long-lived radical species were characterized by a theoretical determination of the reaction enthalpies. (author)

  19. Anomalous temperature dependence in the Raman spectra of l-alanine: Evidence for dynamic localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, A.; Maxton, P.M.; Clogston, A.M.; Zirngiebl, E.; Lowe, M.

    1988-12-15

    We measured the temperature dependence of the intensity of the two lowest Raman modes in single crystals of l-alanine. The sum of the intensities obeys Maxwell-Boltzman statistics accurately from 20 to 340 K but the intensities of the individual lines are anomalous. This behavior is explained by assuming that both lines share the same degrees of freedom but that a mode instability is triggered abruptly at an occupation of seven quanta. This instability, which has an activation energy of 500 K, is observed at temperatures as low as 20 K, possibly indicating the existence of dynamic localization of vibrational energy.

  20. Study of solid-state isotopic exchange of hydrogen in L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid-state isotopic exchange of L-Ala with the spillover tritium activated on Rh(Pd) supported catalysts and the reactivity of hydrogen at C(2) and C(3) carbon atoms of L-Ala were studied using tritium NMR. The activation energy of the catalyzed isotopic exchange was measured. Ab initio calculations of the reaction of hydrogen exchange in the alanine molecule with H3O+ ion were carried out. The mechanism and transition states of this reaction were proposed. 22 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  1. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  2. A better parameter in predicting insulin resistance: Obesity plus elevated alanine aminotransferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-Hao Chen; Jong-Dar Chen; Yu-Cheng Lin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of obesity and elevated alanine aminotransferase with insulin resistance and compare these factors with metabolic syndrome.METHODS: We enrolled a total of 1308 male workers aged from 22 to 63 years. Data was extracted from the workers’ periodic health check-ups in hospitals. All cases were from the community of northern Taiwan.This was a cross-sectional observational study from July to September in 2004. We grouped all cases into four groups, based on the quartile of homeostasis model assessment. The top fourth quartile group was defined as the group with insulin resistance. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis for the odds ratio of the risk factors for insulin resistance.RESULTS: Compared with metabolic syndrome, the coexistence of both factors had a 4.3-fold (95% CI: 2.7-6.8) increased risk, which was more than metabolic syndrome with a 3.6-fold (95% CI: 2.6-5.0) increased risk. The two factors had a synergistic effect. The synergistic index of obesity and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was 2.1 (95% CI: 1.01-4.3).CONCLUSION: Obesity and elevated ALT are associatedwith insulin resistance. The effects are synergistic.Coexistence of them is better than metabolic syndrome in predicting insulin resistance.

  3. Direct detection of second harmonic and its use in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the possible use of the second harmonic EPR signal from irradiated alanine for low radiation dose (∼1 Gy) was explored, aiming applications to HDR brachytherapy and teletherapy. The second harmonic signal was directly detected after overmodulation. A batch of DL-alanine/paraffin small cylindrical pellets was made. A VARIAN E-4 X-Band EPR spectrometer with optimized operation parameters like microwave power and modulation amplitude to obtain a signal with the highest amplitude was used. The modulation frequency and modulation amplitude were 100 kHz and 1.25 mT (to overmodulate the signal) respectively. The second harmonic signal was directly detected at twice the modulation frequency. One group of dosimeters was irradiated with a 192 Ir brachytherapy source and the other in a 10 MeV X-rays linear accelerator, both group at a dose range: 0.5 - 15 Gy. The second harmonic signal showed better resolution than the first harmonic one making possible a more easy localization of the signal. Moreover, for both types of radiation, the dose-response curve showed a good linear behavior for the dose range indicated. (author)

  4. Characterization and biocompatibility of organogels based on L-alanine for parenteral drug delivery implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Aude; Lafleur, Michel; Couffin-Hoarau, Anne-Claude; Hoarau, Didier; Boury, Frank; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The development of simple and efficient drug delivery systems for the sustained release of peptides/proteins and low molecular weight hydrophilic molecules is an ongoing challenge. The purpose of this work was to prepare and characterize novel biodegradable in situ-forming implants obtained via the self-assembly of L-alanine derivatives in pharmaceutical oils. Six different amphiphilic organogelators based on L-alanine were synthesized. These derivatives could successfully gel various vegetable and synthetic oils approved for parenteral administration. Gelation was thermoreversible, and phase transition temperatures depended on gelator structure, concentration and solvent. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions were shown to be the main forces implicated in network formation. Selected formulations were then injected subcutaneously in rats for preliminary assessment of biocompatibility. Histopathological analysis of the surrounding tissues revealed mild, chronic inflammation and an overall good biocompatibility profile of the implants over the 8 wk evaluation period. This study demonstrates that in situ-forming organogels represent a potentially promising platform for sustained drug delivery.

  5. Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and electrical conductivities of aqueous alkali salts of α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermophysical properties of aqueous Na and K salts of α-alanine were studied. • Properties are density, viscosity, refractive indices, and thermal conductivity. • The concentrations of amino acid salt ranges from (0.5 to 3.5) M. • The temperature range studied was (333.15 to 343.15) K. • The measured data were represented satisfactorily by using the applied correlations. - Abstract: In this work, physicochemical properties such as density, viscosity, refractive index, and electrical conductivity of aqueous alkali (potassium or sodium) salts of the amino acid α-alanine (ALA), were measured at temperatures from (303.15 to 343.15) K and concentrations ranging from (0.5 to 3.5) M. Density and viscosity measurements were performed using the vibrating tube and the falling ball techniques, respectively. The refractive index at the sodium D line was measured in an automatic refractometer, while the electrical conductivity was measured using a commercial conductivity meter. An empirical equation was applied to correlate the density, refractive index, and electrical conductivity of the amino acid salt solutions with temperature and amino acid salt concentration, which gave average absolute deviation values of 0.03%, 0.01%, and 0.6%, respectively. The variation of the viscosity as a function of temperature and amino acid salt concentration was accurately represented by a modified Vogel–Tamman–Fulcher equation at an average absolute deviation of 0.5%

  6. Visualization in Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning is essentially a method of making the unknown known, and for the vast majority of scanning work this means making the invisible visible. Visualization is developed as a process involving a model of eye and brain function, display performance and counter performance combined with the spatial frequency components in the object scanned. The performance of a scanner or gamma camera depends in part on its display system and experiments have been performed to determine the fractional change in count-rate which can be perceived by the eye from colour, photoscan and cathode-ray tube displays, for both circular and line sources of radioactivity. For circular sources, colour and photoscan displays are capable of making 10% increases in count-rate perceptible in backgrounds ranging from 5 to 100 counts/s for sources of 1 to 4 cm diameter, whilst cathode-ray tube and black-mark displays show only 20% at best. The results for line sources are also given. In testing for the statistical significance of count-rate differences on a scan, the counts are usually compared for equal areas. On this basis the cathode-ray tube display is only able to show five standard deviations of difference whereas colour and photoscan displays show from 2.5 to 3 standard deviations, levels not usually accepted statistically as significant. It is suggested that if the eye examines the areas surrounding the area of interest then the significance of a count-rate difference may be established more accurately and in general will be increased, thereby accounting for the visualization of apparently 'insignificant' regions. This theory is used to predict the areas of count density which should be visually perceived in the presence of noise, and extended to consider practical display conditions, which have been described in this paper. The performance of a scanner can be considered in terms of its modulation transfer function (derived from a line spread function). Fourier analysis has been performed

  7. A non-enzymic browning induced by gamma cobalt-60 irradiation and heating in a fructose-alanine model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Maillard browning reaction between reducing sugars and amino compounds is important in food chemistry and may considerably affect the colour, aroma and nutritional value of food after thermal processing. In this study, the effect of irradiation combined with heating on the course of browning reaction in the model system of aqueous solution of fructose (0.03M) and alanine (0.01M) was investigated. The optical absorption spectra recorded for irradiated and heated solution of fructose-alanine were different from those of only irradiated or only heated solution. The brown colour of the samples is caused by the extension of the tail-end absorption into the visible region of the spectrum. No absorption maximum appears in the visible range. The heating of irradiated fructose solution with non-irradiated alanine develops markedly more intensive browning than that of the heating of irradiated alanine solution with non-irradiated fructose. The products of fructose radiolysis are responsible for the acceleration of browning in the fructose-alanine system. (author)

  8. A Non-Enzymic Browning Induced by Gamma Cobalt-60 Irradiation and Heating in a Fructose-Alanine Model System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Maillard browning reaction between reducing sugars and amino compounds is important in food chemistry and may considerably affect the colour, aroma and nutritional value of food after thermal processing. In this study, the effect of irradiation combined with heating on the course of browning reaction in the model system of aqueous solution of fructose (0.03M) and alanine (0.01M) was investigated. The optical absorption spectra recorded for irradiated and heated solution of fructose-alanine were different from those of only irradiated or only heated solution. The brown colour of the samples is caused by the extension of the tail-end absorption into the visible region of the spectrum. No absorption maximum appears in the visible range. The heating of irradiated fructose solution with non-irradiated alanine develops markedly more intensive browning than that of the heating of irradiated alanine solution with non-irradiated fructose. The products of fructose radiolysis are responsible for the acceleration of browning in the fructose-alanine system. (author)

  9. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  10. Topology of AspT, the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, Determined by Site-Directed Fluorescence Labeling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Nanatani, Kei; Fujiki, Takashi; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ye, Liwen; WANG, XICHENG; Nakajima, Tasuku; Uchida, Takafumi; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate (Asp) with release of l-alanine (Ala) and CO2. The decarboxylation reaction consists of two steps: electrogenic exchange of Asp for Ala catalyzed by an aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) and intracellular decarboxylation of the transported Asp catalyzed by an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD). AspT belongs to the newly classified aspartate:alanine exchanger family (transporter cla...

  11. Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer Other names for these ... inflammation, or cancer. Use of monoclonal antibodies in nuclear scans A special type of antibody made in ...

  12. Scanned-cantilever atomic force microscope with large scanning range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintao Yang; Wendong Xu

    2006-01-01

    A scanned-cantilever atomic force microscope (AFM) with large scanning range is proposed, which adopts a new design named laser spot tracking. The scanned-cantilever AFM uses the separate flexure x-y scanner and z scanner instead of the conventional piezoelectric tube scanner. The closed-loop control and integrated capacitive sensors of these scanners can insure that the images of samples have excellent linearity and stability. According to the experimental results, the scanned-cantilever AFM can realize maximal 100 × 100 (μm) scanning range, and 1-nm resolution in z direction, which can meet the requirements of large scale sample testing.

  13. Anaerobic metabolism in the N-limited green alga Selenastrum minutum. 3. Alanine is the product of anaerobic ammonium assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have determined the flow of 15N into free amino acids of the N-limited green alga Selenastrum minutum (Naeg.) Collins after addition of 15NH4+ to aerobic or anaerobic cells. Under aerobic conditions, only a small proportion of the N assimilated was retained in the free amino acid pool. However, under anaerobic conditions almost all assimilated NH4+ accumulates in alanine. This is a unique feature of anaerobic NH4+ assimilation. The pathway of carbon flow to alanine results in the production of ATP and reductant which matches exactly the requirements of NH4+ assimilation. Alanine synthesis is therefore an excellent strategy to maintain energy and redox balance during anaerobic NH4+ assimilation

  14. Application of alanine dosimetry in dose assessment for ocular melanoma patients undergoing proton radiotherapy – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mierzwińska Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basing on alanine solid state/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR dosimetry, a supplementary method of cumulatively recording the therapeutic dose received by ocular cancer patients undergoing fractionated proton radiotherapy is proposed. By applying alanine dosimetry during the delivery of consecutive fractions, the dose received within each fraction can be read out by EPR spectrometry and a final permanent cumulative record of the total dose delivered obtained. The dose response of the alanine detector was found to be practically independent on its position within the extended proton Bragg peak region. Dose measurements based on entrance dose recorded in proton beams individually formed for each patient are presented. The described method will be applied as a complementary Quality Assurance procedure for patients undergoing proton radiotherapy at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland (IFJ PAN.

  15. Crystal growth, structure and characterizations of a new semiorganic nonlinear optical material-β-Alanine zinc chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title compound, β-alanine zinc chloride-a new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal was grown by slow evaporation technique. Single crystals of β-alanine zinc chloride have been subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis to determine the crystal structure. The powder X-ray diffractogram of the crystal has also been recorded. The amount of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen in the crystals was also estimated. Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman spectral measurements have been carried out on the grown crystals in order to identify the functional groups. The presence of hydrogen and carbon in the β-alanine zinc chloride was confirmed by using proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses. The percentage of zinc in the crystal was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Optical behavior such as ultraviolet-vis-near infrared transmittance spectrum and second harmonic generation has been investigated. The mechanical strength and thermal behavior of the grown crystal have been analyzed.

  16. Influence of temperature, L-alanine and phosphate buffer on the radiation susceptibility of Bacillus pumilus strain E601

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bacillus pumilus E601 strain has been examined for resistance to gamma and electron irradiation. Decimal reduction doses (D10 values), computed on the basis of recoverable organisms, have been found to depend on the dose rate of pulsed electrons in the range 1-1600krad per 35ns pulse. The highest dose rates in these ranges lead to higher D10 values than have been measured with the 60Co source (gamma irradiation). Treatment of heat-shocked B. pumilus spores with L-alanine in phosphate buffer resulted in a significant reduction in resistance towards both heat and radiation owing to the loss of spore properties. No response to alanine was observed in the absence of buffer. The sensitivity of alanine-germinated spores of B. pumilus (E601) to ionizing radiations was found to be identical with that of vegetative cells of this strain under the same conditions. (author)

  17. Influence of Temperature, L-Alanine and Phosphate Buffer on the Radiation Susceptibility of Bacillus Pumilus Strain E601

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bacillus pumilus E601 strain has been examined for resistance to gamma and electron irradiation. Decimal reduction doses (D10 values), computed on the basis of recoverable organisms, have been found to depend on the dose rate of pulsed electrons in the range 1 -1600 krad per 35 ns pulse. The highest dose rates in these ranges lead to higher D10 values than have been measured with the 60Co source (gamma irradiation). Treatment of heat-shocked B. pumilus spores with L-alanine in phosphate buffer resulted in a significant reduction in resistance towards both heat and radiation owing to the loss of spore properties. No response to alanine was observed in the absence of buffer. The sensitivity of alanine-germinated spores of B. pumilus (E601) to ionizing radiations was found to be identical with that of vegetative cells of this strain under the same conditions. (author)

  18. Transposon mutagenesis as an approach to improved understanding of Borrelia pathogenesis and biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eLin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transposon insertion provides a method for near-random mutation of bacterial genomes, and has been utilized extensively for the study of bacterial pathogenesis and biology. This approach is particularly useful for organisms that are relatively refractory to genetic manipulation, including Lyme disease Borrelia. In this review, progress to date in the application of transposon mutagenesis to the study of Borrelia burgdorferi is reported. An effective Himar1-based transposon vector has been developed and used to acquire a sequence-defined library of nearly 4,500 mutants in the infectious, moderately transformable B. burgdorferi B31 derivative 5A18NP1. Analysis of these transposon mutants using signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM and Tn-seq approaches has begun to yield valuable information regarding the genes important in the pathogenesis and biology of this organism.

  19. Molecular mechanism of mutagenesis and interaction of incident ions with organism implanted by heavy ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a new mutagenesis technique, low energy heavy ion implantation started in China for the study of interaction effect between incident ions and organism, and great achievements have been obtained in crop breeding. The article reviewed the main biological effects induced by heavy ion implantation, including physiology, biochemistry and genetics effects, on levels of cell and chromosome, gene expression, DNA methylation, DNA damage and reparation etc. It compared the differences in mutagenesis for organism by high energy and low energy ion implantation, as well as γ ray radiation. Future investigation topics were proposed, the emphasis of researches in future was pointed out, i.e., the molecular mechanism and effects of gene differential expression of organism treated by ion implantation. (authors)

  20. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Beacham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  1. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  2. Regulation of mutagenesis by exogenous biological factors in the eukaryotic cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukash L. L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The representations of the mutations and the nature of spontaneous mutation process and mutagenesis induced by exogenous oncoviruses, DNAs and proteins-mitogens are analysed. Exogenous biological factors induce DNA damages in regulatory-informational way, acting on the cellular systems for maintenance of genetical stability. Molecular mechanisms are the same as at spontaneous mutagenesis but they are realized with the participation of alien genetical material. Among biological mutagens, the oncoviruses and mobile genetic elements (MGEs are distinguished as the strongest destabilizing factors which direct tumor transformation of somatic mammalian cells. Genetical reprogramming or changing the programs of gene expression at the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells under growth factors and citokines is probably followed by mutations and recombinations as well.

  3. Mechanism of the genetic mutagenesis effects of far infrared ray laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ling-yun; XU Lin; ZHANG Can-bang; WU Guang-min; LI Ling; WEN Chuan-jing; YANG Ji-sheng

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the order-disordering variance due to resonance effect and the nonlinear behavior of far infrared ray laser (FIRL)-biological system interaction.The analytic results show that the interaction between the living biological system and FIRL can produce resonance excitation effect,and so the original high ordered state of the system can be destroyed and thus the conformation variation in the system can be produced under further action of the laser.In addition,we have analyzed the nonlinear properties of the FIRL bio-molecule interaction and explained the mutagenesis effects of FIRL.The theoretic analysis is consistent with the results of FIRL mutagenesis breeding test.

  4. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  5. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen;

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  6. Random transposon mutagenesis of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome reveals additional genes influencing erythromycin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedashchin, Andrij; Cernota, William H; Gonzalez, Melissa C; Leach, Benjamin I; Kwan, Noelle; Wesley, Roy K; Weber, J Mark

    2015-11-01

    A single cycle of strain improvement was performed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB and 15 genotypes influencing erythromycin production were found. Genotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis appeared in the screen at a frequency of ~3%. Mutations affecting central metabolism and regulatory genes were found, as well as hydrolases, peptidases, glycosyl transferases and unknown genes. Only one mutant retained high erythromycin production when scaled-up from micro-agar plug fermentations to shake flasks. This mutant had a knockout of the cwh1 gene (SACE_1598), encoding a cell-wall-associated hydrolase. The cwh1 knockout produced visible growth and morphological defects on solid medium. This study demonstrated that random transposon mutagenesis uncovers strain improvement-related genes potentially useful for strain engineering. PMID:26468041

  7. Back to BAC: The Use of Infectious Clone Technologies for Viral Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn N. Hall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC vectors were first developed to facilitate the propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments in molecular biology studies for uses such as genome sequencing projects and genetic disease models. To facilitate these studies, methodologies have been developed to introduce specific mutations that can be directly applied to the mutagenesis of infectious clones (icBAC using BAC technologies. This has resulted in rapid identification of gene function and expression at unprecedented rates. Here we review the major developments in BAC mutagenesis in vitro. This review summarises the technologies used to construct and introduce mutations into herpesvirus icBAC. It also explores developing technologies likely to provide the next leap in understanding these important viruses.

  8. Radiosensitivity and in vitro mutagenesis in African accessions of cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced mutagenesis holds promise for the subtle manipulation of traits of interest in crop plants. For a vegetatively propagated crop like cassava with severe constraints posed on its genetic improvement by inherent biological systems, the adoption of this methodology seems even the more appealing. However, there is scant information on protocols for inducing mutations in this crop. We present in this report the preliminary data on the determination of radiosensitivities for some African cassava accessions. The optimal doses of gamma ray irradiation varied from as low 12 Gy to 25 Gy. The probable implication of genotypic variation in response to gamma irradiation as was found in this study buttresses the need to carry out this larger scale study in order to avail cassava scientists intending to adopt induced mutagenesis of requisite information in this regard. A modified in vitro culture medium, half strength MS without growth hormones, was also shown to greatly enhance the growth of the plantlets without producing callus. (author)

  9. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  10. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  11. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device. PMID:25608206

  12. Micro scanning probes

    CERN Document Server

    Niblock, T

    2001-01-01

    This thesis covers the design methodology, theory, modelling, fabrication and evaluation of a Micro-Scanning-Probe. The device is a thermally actuated bimorph quadrapod fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems technology. A quadrapod is a structure with four arms, in this case a planar structure with the four arms forming a cross which is dry etched out of a silicon diaphragm. Each arm has a layer of aluminium deposited on it forming a bimorph. Through heating each arm actuation is achieved in the plane of the quadrapod and the direction normal to it. Fabrication of the device has required the development of bulk micromachining techniques to handle post CMOS fabricated wafers and the patterning of thickly sputtered aluminium in bulk micro machined cavities. CMOS fabrication techniques were used to incorporate diodes onto the quadrapod arms for temperature measurement of the arms. Fine tungsten and silicon tips have also been fabricated to allow tunnelling between the tip and the platform at the centr...

  13. Resolution-enhancement of broadened spectra of the UV-light and thermal treated alanine free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods for resolution-enhancing broadened spectra were analyzed. One method was used to treat ESR spectra of the γ-ray induced alanine free radicals and to study the effect when they are subjected to UV-light and heat. Spectral differences are obvious between these treatments. From a combined UV-light and heat treatment of these free radicals, some ESR lines disappear while five broad lines still remain. These spectral differences may clearly suggest the existence of two or more free radical species in γ-ray irradiated alanine that can be predicted at room temperature

  14. Characterization of the factors having an influence on the evolution of the EPR signal of irradiated alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EPR/alanine dosimetry has been used by the LNHB (Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel) since many years for applied metrology. This technic is based on the measurement of the EPR signal of the free radicals induced in alanine by irradiation. The aim of this work is to characterize the factors having an influence on the evolution of the amplitude of the EPR signal of irradiated alanine to limit the uncertainties on the determination of the absorbed dose. The first step of this work has been the choice of the dosimeter. A bibliographic study completed by experiments on the response of alanine isomers to the dose and on its stability with time has lead us to choose L-α-alanine powder as dosimeter. The influence of the recording parameter of the spectrometer on the characteristics of the EPR spectrum has then been studied. This has enabled us to optimize the recording conditions of EPR spectra. As the angular anisotropy of the EPR signal limits the measurements reproducibility, an experimental protocol has been defined to solve this problem. The repeatability of the measurements has been enhanced by modifying the spectrometer and using an internal standard constituted of single crystals of CuSO4.5H2O. As the amplitude of the EPR signal is sensitive to the measurement temperature, a method of normalization of the results to 20 C has been determined. We have studied the influence of an irradiation parameter and of environmental parameters. We have shown that the EPR signal amplitude increases with irradiation temperature. The EPR signal amplitude and its evolution vary strongly with storage conditions (temperature and moisture) of the dosimeter before and after irradiation. The presence of moisture in alanine powder leads to a loss of signal amplitude. The dosimeters exposition to light also entails a loss of amplitude. Oxygen does not influence the EPR spectrum of alanine. We have noticed that the EPR signal amplitude of samples stored in absence of moisture increases

  15. Global Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Ammonium, L-Alanine, or L-Glutamine Limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Grotkjær, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounters a range of nitrogen sources at various concentrations in its environment. The impact of these two parameters on transcription and metabolism was studied by growing S. cerevisiae in chemostat cultures with L-glutamine, L-alanine, or L-ammonium in...... repression (NCR) may be responsible for this regulation. Ninety-one genes had transcript levels on both L-glutamine and ammonium that were decreased compared to those on L-alanine, independent of the concentration. The GATAAG element in these genes suggests two groups of NCR-responsive genes, those that...

  16. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  17. Effects of Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Brain Homocarnosine/Carnosine Signal and Cognitive Function: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Yazigi Solis; Simon Cooper; Hobson, Ruth M; Artioli, Guilherme G.; Otaduy, Maria C.; Hamilton Roschel; Jacques Robertson; Daniel Martin; Vitor S Painelli; Harris, Roger C; Bruno Gualano; Craig Sale

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1) and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2). Methods In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men) and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen...

  18. Transposon mutagenesis as an approach to improved understanding of Borrelia pathogenesis and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tao; Troy, Erin B.; Linden T. Hu; Gao, Lihui; Norris, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Transposon insertion provides a method for near-random mutation of bacterial genomes, and has been utilized extensively for the study of bacterial pathogenesis and biology. This approach is particularly useful for organisms that are relatively refractory to genetic manipulation, including Lyme disease Borrelia. In this review, progress to date in the application of transposon mutagenesis to the study of Borrelia burgdorferi is reported. An effective Himar1-based transposon vector has been dev...

  19. Transposon mutagenesis as an approach to improved understanding of Borrelia pathogenesis and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Tao eLin; Troy, Erin B.; Linden T. Hu; Lihui eGao; Norris, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Transposon insertion provides a method for near-random mutation of bacterial genomes, and has been utilized extensively for the study of bacterial pathogenesis and biology. This approach is particularly useful for organisms that are relatively refractory to genetic manipulation, including Lyme disease Borrelia. In this review, progress to date in the application of transposon mutagenesis to the study of Borrelia burgdorferi is reported. An effective Himar1-based transposon vector has been ...

  20. Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R. Bassett; Charlotte Tibbit; Chris P. Ponting; Ji-Long Liu

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations ofany gene in Drosophila melanogaster through theuse of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularlyinterspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated). We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at...

  1. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  2. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis by microscale 'shot-gun' gene synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Grundström, T; Zenke, W M; Wintzerith, M; Matthes, H W; Staub, A; Chambon, P

    1985-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient microscale method for in vitro site-directed mutagenesis by gene synthesis. Mutants are constructed by "shot-gun ligation" of overlapping synthetic oligonucleotides yielding double stranded synthetic DNA of more than 120 nucleotides in length. The terminal oligonucleotides of the DNA segment to be synthesized are designed to create sticky ends complementary to unique restriction sites of a polylinker present in an M13 vector. The oligonucleotides are hybridiz...

  3. piggyBac-based insertional mutagenesis in the presence of stably integrated P elements in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Häcker, Udo; Nystedt, Sverker; Barmchi, Mojgan Padash; Horn, Carsten; Wimmer, Ernst A.

    2003-01-01

    P element-mediated mutagenesis has been used to disrupt an estimated 25% of genes essential for Drosophila adult viability. Mutation of all genes in the fly genome, however, poses a problem, because P elements show significant hotspots of integration. In addition, advanced screening scenarios often require the use of P element-based tools like the generation of germ-line mosaics using FLP recombinase-mediated recombination or gene misexpression using the UAS/Gal4 system. These techniqu...

  4. A sensitized mutagenesis screen identifies Gli3 as a modifier of Sox10 neurocristopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, Ivana; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Hou, Ling; Incao, Arturo; Silver, Debra L.; Rivas, Cecelia; Elliott, Eugene C.; Baxter, Laura L.; Pavan, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency for the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with the pigmentary deficiencies of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and is modeled in Sox10 haploinsufficient mice (Sox10LacZ/+). As genetic background affects WS severity in both humans and mice, we established an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen to identify modifiers that increase the phenotypic severity of Sox10LacZ/+ mice. Analysis of 230 pedigrees identified three modifiers, named modifier of Sox10 neurocristopat...

  5. Site-specific mutagenesis by triple helix-forming oligonucleotides containing a reactive nucleoside analog

    OpenAIRE

    Nagatsugi, Fumi; Sasaki, Shigeki; Miller, Paul S.; Seidman, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    The specific recognition of homopurine–homo pyrimidine regions in duplex DNA by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provides an attractive strategy for genetic manipulation. Alkylation of nucleobases with functionalized TFOs would have the potential for site-directed mutagenesis. Recently, we demonstrated that a TFO bearing 2-amino-6-vinylpurine derivative, 1, achieves triplex-mediated reaction with high selectivity toward the cytosine of the G-C target site. In this report, we have inves...

  6. A directed mutagenesis screen in Drosophila melanogaster reveals new mutants that influence hedgehog signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, N; van den Heuvel, M

    2000-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway has been recognized as essential for patterning processes in development of metazoan animal species. The signaling pathway is, however, not entirely understood. To start to address this problem, we set out to isolate new mutations that influence Hedgehog signaling. We performed a mutagenesis screen for mutations that dominantly suppress Hedgehog overexpression phenotypes in the Drosophila melanogaster wing. We isolated four mutations that influence Hedgehog sign...

  7. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of NifU from Azotobacter vinelandii

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Richard F.

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the function of the nifU gene product in nitrogenase maturation in Azotobacter vinelandii. the gene product has been hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli and characterized by various biophysical techniques. Following the initial characterization, site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteinyl residues was performed in order to gain further insight into the structure/function relationship of NifU. Both the Fe protein and the MoFe protein of nitrogena...

  8. PiggyBac Transposon Mutagenesis: A Tool for Cancer Gene Discovery in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rad, Roland; Rad, Lena; Wang, Wei; Cadinanos, Juan; Vassiliou, George; Rice, Stephen; Campos, Lia S.; Yusa, Kosuke; Banerjee, Ruby; Li, Meng Amy; de la Rosa, Jorge; Strong, Alexander; Lu, Dong; Ellis, Peter; Conte, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Transposons are mobile DNA segments that can disrupt gene function by inserting in or near genes. Here we show that insertional mutagenesis by the PiggyBac transposon can be used for cancer gene discovery in mice. PiggyBac transposition in genetically engineered transposon/transposase mice induced cancers whose type (hematopoietic versus solid) and latency were dependent on the regulatory elements introduced into transposons. Analysis of 63 hematopoietic tumors revealed the unique qualities o...

  9. Microarray analyses reveal that plant mutagenesis may induce more transcriptomic changes than transgene insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Rita; Saibo, Nelson; Lourenço, Tiago; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2008-01-01

    Controversy regarding genetically modified (GM) plants and their potential impact on human health contrasts with the tacit acceptance of other plants that were also modified, but not considered as GM products (e.g., varieties raised through conventional breeding such as mutagenesis). What is beyond the phenotype of these improved plants? Should mutagenized plants be treated differently from transgenics? We have evaluated the extent of transcriptome modification occurring ...

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of the foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene was mutagenised in its active site. Pst I digestion of the polymerase gene (cDNA) generated a 790 bp fragment containing the critical sequence. This fragment was subcloned in M13mp8 for mutagenesis method. The polymerase gene was then reconstructed and subcloned in pUC19. These mutants will be used to study the enzyme structure and activity and to develop intracellular immunization assays in eukaryotic cells. (author)

  11. Site-specific mutagenesis of histidine residues in the lac permease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Padan, E; Sarkar, H K; Viitanen, P V; Poonian, M S; Kaback, H R

    1985-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes the lac permease, has been modified by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis such that each of the four histidine residues in the molecule is replaced with an arginine residue. Replacement of histidine-35 and histidine-39 with arginine has no apparent effect on permease activity. In contrast, replacement of either histidine-205 or histidine-322 by arginine causes a dramatic loss of transport activity, although the cells contain a ...

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato.

  13. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  14. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  15. UV-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli SOS response: a quantitative model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Krishna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria respond to DNA damage by a highly orchestrated series of events known as the SOS response, regulated by transcription factors, protein-protein binding, and active protein degradation. We present a dynamical model of the UV-induced SOS response, incorporating mutagenesis by the error-prone polymerase, Pol V. In our model, mutagenesis depends on a combination of two key processes: damage counting by the replication forks and a long-term memory associated with the accumulation of UmuD'. Together, these provide a tight regulation of mutagenesis, resulting, we show, in a "digital" turn-on and turn-off of Pol V. Our model provides a compact view of the topology and design of the SOS network, pinpointing the specific functional role of each of the regulatory processes. In particular, we suggest that the recently observed second peak in the activity of promoters in the SOS regulon (Friedman et al., 2005, PLoS Biology 3(7: e238 is the result of positive feedback from Pol V to RecA filaments.

  16. Genome-wide LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and high-throughput insertion detection in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbański, Dorian Fabian; Małolepszy, Anna; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2012-02-01

    Use of insertion mutants facilitates functional analysis of genes, but it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics in most plant species. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis and identification of insertion sites. To date, only floral-dip T-DNA transformation of Arabidopsis has produced independent germinal insertions, thereby allowing generation of mutant populations from seeds of single plants. In addition, advances in insertion detection have been hampered by a lack of protocols, including software for automated data analysis, that take full advantage of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We have addressed these challenges by developing the FSTpoolit protocol and software package, and here we demonstrate its efficacy by detecting 8935 LORE1 insertions in 3744 Lotus japonicus plants. The identified insertions show that the endogenous LORE1 retrotransposon is well suited for insertion mutagenesis due to homogenous gene targeting and exonic insertion preference. As LORE1 transposition occurs in the germline, harvesting seeds from a single founder line and cultivating progeny generates a complete mutant population. This ease of LORE1 mutagenesis, combined with the efficient FSTpoolit protocol, which exploits 2D pooling, Illumina sequencing and automated data analysis, allows highly cost-efficient development of a comprehensive reverse genetic resource.

  17. PiggyBac transposon mutagenesis: a tool for cancer gene discovery in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Roland; Rad, Lena; Wang, Wei; Cadinanos, Juan; Vassiliou, George; Rice, Stephen; Campos, Lia S; Yusa, Kosuke; Banerjee, Ruby; Li, Meng Amy; de la Rosa, Jorge; Strong, Alexander; Lu, Dong; Ellis, Peter; Conte, Nathalie; Yang, Fang Tang; Liu, Pentao; Bradley, Allan

    2010-11-19

    Transposons are mobile DNA segments that can disrupt gene function by inserting in or near genes. Here, we show that insertional mutagenesis by the PiggyBac transposon can be used for cancer gene discovery in mice. PiggyBac transposition in genetically engineered transposon-transposase mice induced cancers whose type (hematopoietic versus solid) and latency were dependent on the regulatory elements introduced into transposons. Analysis of 63 hematopoietic tumors revealed that PiggyBac is capable of genome-wide mutagenesis. The PiggyBac screen uncovered many cancer genes not identified in previous retroviral or Sleeping Beauty transposon screens, including Spic, which encodes a PU.1-related transcription factor, and Hdac7, a histone deacetylase gene. PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty have different integration preferences. To maximize the utility of the tool, we engineered 21 mouse lines to be compatible with both transposon systems in constitutive, tissue- or temporal-specific mutagenesis. Mice with different transposon types, copy numbers, and chromosomal locations support wide applicability. PMID:20947725

  18. Induction of Pectinase Hyper Production by Multistep Mutagenesis Using a Fungal Isolate--Aspergillus flavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Sabika; Prasuna, R Gyana; Khanam, Rasheeda

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus flavipes, a slow growing pectinase producing ascomycete, was isolated from soil identified and characterised in the previously done preliminary studies. Optimisation studies revealed that Citrus peel--groundnut oil cake [CG] production media is the best media for production of high levels of pectinase up to 39 U/ml using wild strain of A. flavipes. Strain improvement of this isolated strain for enhancement of pectinase production using multistep mutagenesis procedure is the endeavour of this project. For this, the wild strain of A. flavipes was treated with both physical (UV irradiation) and chemical [Colchicine, Ethidium bromide, H2O2] mutagens to obtain Ist generation mutants. The obtained mutants were assayed and differentiated basing on pectinase productivity. The better pectinase producing strains were further subjected to multistep mutagenesis to attain stability in mutants. The goal of this project was achieved by obtaining the best pectinase secreting mutant, UV80 of 45 U/ml compared to wild strain and sister mutants. This fact was confirmed by quantitatively analysing 3rd generation mutants obtained after multistep mutagenesis. PMID:26563068

  19. Yeasts acquire resistance secondary to antifungal drug treatment by adaptive mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quinto-Alemany

    Full Text Available Acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment both by microorganisms and by tumor cells is a major public health concern. Several species of bacteria acquire resistance to various antibiotics through stress-induced responses that have an adaptive mutagenesis effect. So far, adaptive mutagenesis in yeast has only been described when the stress is nutrient deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that adaptive mutagenesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans as model organisms would also take place in response to antifungal agents (5-fluorocytosine or flucytosine, 5-FC, and caspofungin, CSP, giving rise to resistance secondary to treatment with these agents. We have developed a clinically relevant model where both yeasts acquire resistance when exposed to these agents. Stressful lifestyle associated mutation (SLAM experiments show that the adaptive mutation frequencies are 20 (S. cerevisiae -5-FC, 600 (C. albicans -5-FC or 1000 (S. cerevisiae--CSP fold higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency, the experimental data for C. albicans -5-FC being in agreement with the clinical data of acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment. The spectrum of mutations in the S. cerevisiae -5-FC model differs between spontaneous and acquired, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that generate them are different. Remarkably, in the acquired mutations, an ectopic intrachromosomal recombination with an 87% homologous gene takes place with a high frequency. In conclusion, we present here a clinically relevant adaptive mutation model that fulfils the conditions reported previously.

  20. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  1. Lack of mutational hot spots during decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2015-11-01

    Decitabine has previously been shown to induce lethal mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, the factors that determine the susceptibilities of individual sequence positions in HIV-1 to decitabine have not yet been defined. To investigate this, we performed Illumina high-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons prepared from proviral DNA that was recovered from decitabine-treated cells infected with HIV-1. We found that decitabine induced an ≈4.1-fold increase in the total mutation frequency of HIV-1, primarily due to a striking ≈155-fold increase in the G-to-C transversion frequency. Intriguingly, decitabine also led to an ≈29-fold increase in the C-to-G transversion frequency. G-to-C frequencies varied substantially (up to ≈80-fold) depending upon sequence position, but surprisingly, mutational hot spots (defined as upper outliers within the mutation frequency distribution) were not observed. We further found that every single guanine position examined was significantly susceptible to the mutagenic effects of decitabine. Taken together, these observations demonstrate for the first time that decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis is promiscuous and occurs in the absence of a clear bias for mutational hot spots. These data imply that decitabine-mediated G-to-C mutagenesis is a highly effective antiviral mechanism for extinguishing HIV-1 infectivity.

  2. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. PMID:25802337

  3. Densities and solubilities of Glycylglycine and Glycyl-L-Alanine in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breil, Martin Peter; Mollerup, Jørgen; Rudolph, E. Susanne J.;

    2004-01-01

    is 1.74 and 4.78 mol/kg of water, respectively. The solubility of glycylglycine in salt solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, and (NH4)(2)SO4 show a moderate salting-in effect. The solubility of glycyl-L-alanine show a minor or no salting-in effect at low salt concentrations and a moderate salting-out effect...... at higher salt concentrations in NaCl and Na2SO4, and in (NH4)(2)SO4 the solubility is almost constant. The densities of the solutions have been determined experimentally, and the volume expansions by dissolving salt and dipeptide in water have been calculated. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jinjin; Li, Zhenzhen; He, Guangzheng; Xu, Shujing; Zhao, Baohua; Zhu, Xianming; Dong, Hui; Ju, Jiansong

    2013-01-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (OF4Ald) from the alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 was expressed and purified with a His6 tag in a form suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 289 K using a solution consisting of 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0, 0.2 M LiSO4, 22%(w/v) PEG 3350. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.04, b = 105.59, c = 120.53 Å, α = 88.37, β = 78.77, γ = 82.65°. PMID:24192355

  5. Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase: A novel regulator of intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutao Yan; Didier Merlin

    2008-01-01

    Recently, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been the subject of considerable research, with increasing attention being paid to the loss of intestinal epithelial cell barrier function as a mechanism of pathogenesis. Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) is involved in regulating barrier function. SPAK is known to interact with inflammation-related kinases (such as p38, JNK, NKCC1, PKCθ, WNK and MLCK), and with transcription factor AP-1, resulting in diverse biological phenomena, including cell differentiation, cell transformation and proliferation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and regulation of chloride transport. This review examines the involvement of Ste20-like kinases and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways in the pathogenesis and control of intestinal inflammation. The primary focus will be on the molecular features of intestinal inflammation, with an emphasis on the interaction between SPAK and other molecules, and the effect of these interactions on homeostatic maintenance, cell volume regulation and increased cell permeability in intestinal inflammation.

  6. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  7. Formation Equilibria of Ternary Metal Complexes with Citric Acid and Glutamine (Alanine) in Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进平; 牛春吉; 杨魁跃; 倪嘉缵

    2004-01-01

    The species and their formation constants in the ternary systems were obtained by the Scogs2 software from potentiometric titration data. The Comics software was used to calculate the distribution of species in the ternary systems. MLXH, MLXH2 and MLXH3 are the common species in these systems. The coordination behaviors of the rare earths are very similar and their stability is closely matched. The ternary rare earth complexes are more stable than the corresponding ternary complexes of calcium. The ternary zinc complex with glutamine as the secondary ligand is more stable than the corresponding complexes of rare earths, but the ternary complex with alanine as the secondary ligand shows an inverse trend. The distributions of species in the ternary systems vary with pH changing. A prediction can be made that exogenous rare earths can affect the species of Ca and Zn in human body.

  8. A Thermochemical Study of the Reaction of Lanthanum Nitrate with Alanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The standard molar reaction enthalpy of the solid-solid coordination reaction La(NO3)3 ·6H2O (s) +4Ala(s) (Ala is Alanine)=La(NO3)3 · (Ala)4 · H2O(s) + 5H2O(1) was studied byusing classical solution calorimetry. The molar dissolution enthalpies of the reactants and theproduct of the solid-solid coordination reaction in 2 mol/L HCl were measured by using anisoperibol calorimeter. From the results and other auxiliary quantities, the standard molar formation enthalpy of [La (NO3)3 · (Ala)4 · H2O, s, 298. 15 K] has been determined to be△fHm [La(NO3)3 · (Ala)4 · H2O, s, 298. 15 K]=-3 864. 248 kJ/mol.

  9. Multiple adaptive losses of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase mitochondrial targeting in fruit-eating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Huihui; Yuan, Xinpu; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-06-01

    The enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT) functions to detoxify glyoxylate before it is converted into harmful oxalate. In mammals, mitochondrial targeting of AGT in carnivorous species versus peroxisomal targeting in herbivores is controlled by two signal peptides that correspond to these respective organelles. Differential expression of the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is considered an adaptation to diet-specific subcellular localization of glyoxylate precursors. Bats are an excellent group in which to study adaptive changes in dietary enzymes; they show unparalleled mammalian dietary diversification as well as independent origins of carnivory, frugivory, and nectarivory. We studied the AGT gene in bats and other mammals with diverse diets and found that the MTS has been lost in unrelated lineages of frugivorous bats. Conversely, species exhibiting piscivory, carnivory, insectivory, and sanguinivory possessed intact MTSs. Detected positive selection in the AGT of ancestral fruit bats further supports adaptations related to evolutionary changes in diet.

  10. Multiple adaptive losses of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase mitochondrial targeting in fruit-eating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Huihui; Yuan, Xinpu; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-06-01

    The enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT) functions to detoxify glyoxylate before it is converted into harmful oxalate. In mammals, mitochondrial targeting of AGT in carnivorous species versus peroxisomal targeting in herbivores is controlled by two signal peptides that correspond to these respective organelles. Differential expression of the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is considered an adaptation to diet-specific subcellular localization of glyoxylate precursors. Bats are an excellent group in which to study adaptive changes in dietary enzymes; they show unparalleled mammalian dietary diversification as well as independent origins of carnivory, frugivory, and nectarivory. We studied the AGT gene in bats and other mammals with diverse diets and found that the MTS has been lost in unrelated lineages of frugivorous bats. Conversely, species exhibiting piscivory, carnivory, insectivory, and sanguinivory possessed intact MTSs. Detected positive selection in the AGT of ancestral fruit bats further supports adaptations related to evolutionary changes in diet. PMID:22319153

  11. Excitatory amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine is a putative environmental neurotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR NEDELJKOV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid b-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA has been associated with the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in three distinct western Pacific populations. The putative neurotoxin is produced by cyanobacteria, which live symbiotically in the roots of cycad trees. L-BMAA was thought to be a threat only to those few populations whose diet and medicines rely heavily on cycad seeds. However, the recent discovery that cyanobacteria from diverse terrestrial, freshwater, and saltwater ecosystems around the world produce the toxin requires a reassessment of whether it poses a larger health threat. Therefore, it is proposed that monitoring L-BMAA levels in cyanobacteria-contaminated water supplies might be prudent.

  12. Growth and characterization of organometallic L-alanine cadmium chloride single crystal by slow evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bright, K.C., E-mail: brightmcc@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, Malankara Catholic College, Mariyagiri 629153, Tamil Nadu (India); Freeda, T.H. [Physics Research Center, S.T. Hindu College, Nagercoil 629002, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-09-15

    Single crystals of L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC), an organometallic nonlinear optical material, have been grown by the slow evaporation technique. The grown crystals were subjected to various characterization techniques, such as single crystal and powder XRD, FTIR, UV-vis and TGA-DTA. The mechanical properties of the crystals show that this material belongs to the category of hard materials. Second harmonic generation was confirmed by the Kurtz and Perry powder technique. Electrical parameters, such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss, ac and dc conductivity and their corresponding activation energies have been studied. The low dielectric constant and dielectric loss suggest that this material is a good candidate for micro-electronic applications.

  13. Optical properties of europium compounds with L- and DL-{alpha}-alanine-hydroxamic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendziewicz, J.; Gawryszewska, P. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Galdecka, E. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland); Galdecki, Z. [Institute of General and Ecological Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    Two europium complexes with L- and DL-{alpha}-alanine-hydroxamic acids were synthesized. To our knowledge they are the first examples of X-ray and spectral data lanthanide single crystals with hydroxamic acid derivatives. Both compounds consists of dimers in their structures, formed by two OH bridging groups of amino-hydroxamic acid molecules. Besides, two metal ions are chelated by CO and OH groups, forming five-membered groups. In the complex with L-ligand, different than DL-one, two additional perchloric acid molecules are included in crystal cavities and form hydrogen bondings with nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the ligand. Absorption, emission and excitation spectra were measured and analysed at room and low temperatures. Structural effect of ligand chirality was found and its spectroscopic consequences are reported. The effect of the dimeric structure on spectroscopic properties is discussed. (author) 30 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Optical properties of the radical anion derived from {alpha}-alanine by deamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z.P.; Przybytniak, G.K. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The free radical anion CH{sub 3}CHCOO derived during high energy irradiation from {alpha}-alanine by deamination has been investigated until now by EPR, in irradiated single crystals, for basic research or in completely randomized polycrystalline material for {gamma}-dosimetric purposes. It has been found by spectrophotometry of irradiated single crystals that the free radical absorbs light at {lambda}{sub max}=350 nm. The same radical anion is observed by pulse radiolysis of {alpha}-chloropropionic or propionic anion in aqueous solutions by Cl resp. {alpha}-H abstraction.Basic and applied aspects of the identity of the radical anion obtained in different ways are discussed, as well as consequences for dosimetric techniques. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  15. Alanine in high-dose dosimetry: spectrophotometric and electrochemical readout procedures compared with ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Laere, K.; Buysse, J.; Berkvens, P. (Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Lab. voor Kernfysica)

    1989-01-01

    The ESR readout of radical concentrations produced upon irradiation of {alpha}-alanine is compared and related to other physico-chemical detection methods. Dissolution of the free radicals in an acid ferrous sulphate solution leads to an indirect oxidation of ferrous ions. After complex formation with the dye xylenol orange optical absorption measurements can be made within a dose range from 0.03 to 12 kGy. The yield of ammonia, produced upon dissolution in a basic aqueous solution, provides spectrophotometric evaluations after complex formation with a mercury iodide containing reagent for the dose range 5 kGy to 1 MGy. A practical new routine dosimeter for applications in the range 300 Gy to at least 1 MGy, by means of an ion-selective ammonia electrode, is proposed. (author).

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the putative deprotonation site of squalene-hopene cyclase from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Tsutomu; Kouda, Masanori; HOSHINO, Tsutomu; 佐藤, 努

    2004-01-01

    To provide insight into the catalytic mechanism for the final deprotonation reaction of squalene-hopene cyclase (SHC) from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, mutagenesis experiments were conducted for the following ten residues: Thr41, Glu45, Glu93, Arg127, Trp133, Gln262, Pro263, Tyr267, Phe434 and Phe437. An X-ray analysis of SHC has revealed that two types of water molecules ("front water" and "back waters") were involved around the deprotonation site. The results of these mutagenesis experi...

  17. Scan mirrors relay for high resolution laser scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David

    2014-09-01

    Two dimensional beam deflection is often required in medical laser scanning systems such as OCT or confocal microscopy. Commonly two linear galvo mirrors are used for performance in terms of their large apertures and scan angles. The galvo mirrors are placed at the vicinity of entrance pupil of the scan lens with a "displacement distance" separating them. This distance limits the scan fields and/or reduces the effective aperture of the scan lens. Another option is to use a beam or pupil relay, and image one galvo mirror onto the other. However, beam (or pupil) relays are notoriously complicated, expensive and can add significant aberrations. This paper discusses a simple, all reflective, diffraction limited, color corrected, beam relay, capable of large scan angles and large deflecting mirrors. The design is based on a unique combination of an Offner configuration with a Schmidt aspheric corrector. The design is highly corrected up to large scan mirrors and large scan angles down to milliwaves of aberrations. It allows significantly larger scan field and or scan lenses with higher numerical aperture as compared with scanners using galvos separated by the displacement distance. While this relay is of exceptionally high performance, it has one element located where the beam is focused which may present a problem for high power lasers. Thus modifications of the above design are introduced where the beam is focused in mid air thus making it usable for high power systems such including laser marking and fabrication systems.

  18. Chiral selectivity of amino acid adsorption on chiral surfaces—The case of alanine on Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S. [Department of Physics, Campus Plaine - CP 231, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-07

    We study the binding pattern of the amino acid alanine on the naturally chiral Pt surfaces Pt(531), Pt(321), and Pt(643). These surfaces are all vicinal to the (111) direction but have different local environments of their kink sites and are thus a model for realistic roughened Pt surfaces. Alanine has only a single methyl group attached to its chiral center, which makes the number of possible binding conformations computationally tractable. Additionally, only the amine and carboxyl group are expected to interact strongly with the Pt substrate. On Pt(531), we study the molecule in its pristine as well as its deprotonated form and find that the deprotonated one is more stable by 0.47 eV. Therefore, we study the molecule in its deprotonated form on Pt(321) and Pt(643). As expected, the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the deprotonated molecule provide a local binding “tripod” and the most stable adsorption configurations optimize the interaction of this “tripod” with undercoordinated surface atoms. However, the interaction of the methyl group plays an important role: it induces significant chiral selectivity of about 60 meV on all surfaces. Hereby, the L-enantiomer adsorbs preferentially to the Pt(321){sup S} and Pt(643){sup S} surfaces, while the D-enantiomer is more stable on Pt(531){sup S}. The binding energies increase with increasing surface density of kink sites, i.e., they are largest for Pt(531){sup S} and smallest for Pt(643){sup S}.

  19. Radionuclide brain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At one stage of medical imaging development, radionuclide brain scanning was the only technique available for imaging of the brain. Advent of CT and MRI pushed it to the background. It regained some of the grounds lost to ''allied advances'' with the introduction of brain perfusion radiopharmaceuticals. Positron emission tomography is a promising functional imaging modality that at present will remain as a research tool in special centres in developed countries. However, clinically useful developments will gradually percolate from PET to SPECT. The non-nuclear imaging methods are totally instrument dependent; they are somewhat like escalators, which can go that far and no further. Nuclear imaging has an unlimited scope for advance because of the new developments in radiopharmaceuticals. As the introduction of a radiopharmaceutical is less costly than buying new instruments, the recent advances in nuclear imaging are gradually perfusing through the developing countries also. Therefore, it is essential to follow very closely PET developments because what is research today might become routine tomorrow

  20. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.