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Sample records for alamos free-electron laser

  1. Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator has demonstrated high peak and average power (10 MW and 6 kW), broad-wavelength tunability (9 to 35 μm), and near-ideal optical quality (0.9 Strehl ratio). An electron energy-extraction efficiency of 1% was measured. The predicted production of synchrotron sidebands also was observed in the broadened optical spectrum. As shorter wavelengths and higher powers are pursued, higher currents with improved beam quality will be required. Advanced injectors and energy-recovery systems are being developed to meet these demands. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Los Alamos free electron laser: accelerator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos free electron (FEL) laser oscillator has successfully operated over a wavelength range from 9 to 11 μm with a peak output power of 5 MW and an average output power of 6 kW over a 70-μs pulse length. The FEL is driven by a conventional rf linear accelerator operating at 1.3 GHz with a nominal energy of 20 MeV. Particularly important parts of the beamline are the electron gun, the subharmonic and fundamental-bunching systems, the accelerator, the feedback controllers, the steering and focusing systems, the Cherenkov radiators used as beam-position monitors, and the slow and fast deflectors used with the diagnostic spectrometer at the exit of the beamline. We will discuss problems and present the performance of these components. 10 references, 12 figures, 2 tables

  3. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced Free-electron Laser (AFEL) at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the AFEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as the high-brightness rf linac, a brightness-preserving beamline with permanent magnet components, and a pulsed electromagnet microwiggler. With a compact optical resonator, the AFEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table, yet capable of providing high-power optical output scanning the near-IR and visible regions. (Author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  4. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 μm) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented

  5. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 μm with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 π·mm·mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 x 1012 A/m2rad2. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is ∼8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-μs macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability

  6. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30 degrees bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere

  7. Phase and amplitude feedback control system for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase and amplitude feedback control systems for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Beam-driven voltages are very high in the buncher cavity because the electron gun is pulsed at the fifth subharmonic of the buncher resonant frequency. The high beam loading necessitated a novel feedback and drive configuration for the buncher. A compensation cirucit has been added to the gun/driver system to reduce observed drift. Extremely small variations in the accelerator gradients had dramatic effects on the laser output power. These problems and how they were solved are described and plans for improvements in the feedback control system are discussed. 5 refs., 7 figs

  8. Subharmonic buncher for the Los Alamos free-electron laser oscillator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high efficiency free-electron laser oscillator experiment is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A buncher system has been designed to deliver 30-ps, 5-nC electron bunches to a 20-MeV standing-wave linac at the 60th subharmonic of the 1300-MHz accelerator frequency. The first 108.3-MHz buncher cavity accepts a 5-ns, 5-A peak current pulse from a triode gun. Following a 120-cm drift space, a second 108.3-MHz cavity is used, primarily to enhance the bunching of the trailing half of the bunch. A 1300-MHz cavity with 20-cm drift spaces at the each end completes the beamline components. The bunching process continues into the linac's first three accelerating cells. Two thin iron-shielded lenses and several large-diameter solenoids provide axial magnetic fields for radial focusing

  9. On-line electron beam measurements for the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the electron beam diagnostics used on the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) have extended our on-line, quantitative analysis capability to extraction efficiency and micropulse temporal duration. The FEL's 20-MeV electron beam is 100 μs in length and consists of ∼2000 micropulses of 20-ps duration and 46-ns separation. This extreme range of time scales is addressed by employing a combination of synchronized beam deflectors, an electron spectrometer, intensified video cameras, real-time video digitizers, and microcomputers. The tapered wiggler result for extraction efficiency (2%) and results for pulse duration measurements (10 to 15 ps) by two techniques are presented

  10. Development of a high-energy crowbar for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 135-kV, 2.5-μs crowbar has been developed to protect the TH2095A klystrons used on the Los Alamos free-electron laser. The klystron power supply consists of a 135-kV, 8.75-μF capacitor bank with a stored energy of approximately 80 kJ. The TH2095A specifications require that the dissipated energy in a klystron arc be limited to less than 10J. The crowbar design is based upon a series stack of pressurized spark gaps immersed in an oil tank. The spark gaps are triggered by an SCR-switched high-voltage trigger transformer. Input triggers are provided by current-monitoring transformers. The following currents are sensed for input triggers: total system current, integrated system current (long pulse sensing), cathode current, and modulator-anode current. Trigger levels are set to approximately 150% of nominal current levels. Unique features of this design are its modulator-anode trigger, noise immunity, and ability to print out the energy dissipated in the klystron arc. Typical operation of this system limits the energy dissipated in an arc to less than 2J. This paper describes the original design requirements, mechanical layout and fabrication, main trigger circuit design, modulator-anode trigger design, noise immunity circuit, integrated energy monitor, diagnostics, and recent developments. Performance data are also included. 1 ref., 6 figs

  11. Free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free Electron Lasers trigger, for many people, wild fantasies on large scale applications. However, Free Electron Lasers are not so much direct devices for various applications, but form an interesting subject within fundamental physics. Interplay between electric magnetic and photon field have intrinsic beauty and are deeply rooted in the fundamental understanding of nature. This volume gives a first, comprehensive account of Free Electron Lasers. Chapters include both complete classical and quantum mechanical descriptions. Various types of experiments with intrinsic strong points and weaknesses are described while attention is also given to state-of-the-art experiments

  12. Free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron lasers represent an altogether new and exciting class of coherent optical sources. Making use of a simple and elegant gain medium - an electron beam in a magnetic field - they have already demonstrated broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. For the future they offer the possibility of generating the greatest focused power ever achieved by a laser. But even before this is achieved, the unique advantages of free-electron lasers, especially their tunability, will make them useful for a variety of important applications in science, medicine, and industry. (author)

  13. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations

  14. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  15. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. These studies included both experimental measurements and computer simulations. The beamline starts with a 5 A micropulse from the thermionic cathode in the gun. After bunching by velocity modulation and acceleration to 20 MeV in a 1300 MHz standing wave accelerator, the beam current is roughly 250 A. Final bunching to 800 A is performed in the nonisochronous bend that rotates the electrons onto the axis of the wiggler and the optical cavity. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimensions through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. (orig.)

  16. Physics design of the high brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Browman, M. J.; Carlsten, B. E.; Young, L. M.

    1992-07-01

    Free-electron lasers and high energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high brightness electron-beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator that can produce beams of greater than 7×1011A/m2 (brightness equal to 21/ɛ2, with ɛ = 90% normalized emittance, equivalent to four times the rms emittance). The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by: producing a short electron bunch in a high gradient rf cavity, using a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth caused by space charge, and designing the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this design effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH output files for the accelerator cavity fields, MAFIA output files for the 3-D perturbation fields caused by the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON output files for the solenoid field in the gun region. The results from simulations are, at 2.3 nC, a peak current of 180 A and a 90% emittance of 6.4π mm mrad, and, at 4 nC a peak current of 300 A and a 90% emittance of 9.4π mrad. The exit energy from the linac is 20 MeV for both cases. A magnetic pulse compressor can be used to further increase the peak current.

  17. Free Electron Lasers in 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, W B; Voughs, T

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-eight years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  18. Free Electron Lasers in 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-seven years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs operating in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  19. Free Electron Lasers - Proceedings of the Beijing Fel Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaer; Xie, Jialin; Du, Xiangwan; Zhao, Kui

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface to the Series * Preface * Seminar Opening Speech * Seminar Closing Address * SECTION 1. RF LINAC BASED FEL * Richard H. Pantell * Free-Electron Lasers * Gas-Loading the FEL * High-Efficiency, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers * A Tunable Submillimeter-to-Far-Infrared Coherent Radiation Source * Kwok-Chi Dominic Chan * Recent Results from the Los Alamos Free Electron Laser * Short-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * Long-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * High-Brightness Injectors For RF-Driven Free-Electron Lasers * Computer Codes for Wakefield Analysis in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * George R. Neil * The TRW RF Accelerator FEL Program * Superconducting Linac FEL Technology * Design Considerations of RF Oscillators * Chun-Ching Shih * Development of Multicomponent Wiggler Free Electron Lasers * Free Electron Laser Resonator * SECTION 2. INDUCTION LINAC BASED FEL * Richard J. Briggs * Overview of FEL Development with Induction Linacs at LLNL * Overview of Linear Induction Accelerators * High Current Electron-Beam Transport in Induction Linacs * Thaddeus J. Orzechowski * An Introduction to the Physics of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers * Harmonics and Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers * The Electron Laser Facility: A millimeter Wave Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * The Electron Laser Facility: Measurement of Modes, Harmonics, Parametric Dependence, and Phase Shift * Paladin: A 10.6 μm Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * Aspects of Linear Induction Accelerator Technology * List of Participants

  20. Free-electron laser theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential features of the theory of the free electron laser (FEL) are given in some detail. Beginning with an explanation of the basic gain mechanism, the lectures continue with a discussion of the problems associated with single-passage and recirculated (storage-ring) operation. Pulse propagation effects and the so-called 'lethargic' behaviour are analysed more completely. Finally, elements of FEL quantum theory are reported, in order to clarify the laser process from the microscopic point of view. Appendices give a fuller treatment of optical cavities and undulator magnets. (orig.)

  1. The TESLA Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, Jörg

    1997-05-01

    The TESLA Free Electron Laser makes use of the high quality electron beam that can be provided by the superconducting TESLA linac to drive a single pass free electron laser (FEL) at wavelengths far below the visible. To reach a wavelength of 6 nanometers, the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY will be extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Because there are no mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, the principle of Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) will be employed. A first test of both the principle and technical components is foreseen at a photon wavelength larger than 42 nanometers. With respect to linac technology, the key prerequisite for such single-pass, high-gain FELs is a high intensity, diffraction limited, electron beam to be generated and accelerated without degradation. Key components are RF guns with photocathodes, bunch compressors, and related diagnostics. The status of design and construction as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. Once proven in the micrometer to nanometer regime, the SASE FEL scheme is considered applicable down to Angstrom wavelengths. It is pointed out that this latter option is particularly of interest in context with the construction of a linear collider, which requires very similar beam parameters. The status of conceptual design work on such a coherent X-ray user facility integrated into the TESLA linear collider design will be briefly sketched.

  2. Free-electron laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  3. Microwiggler free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In free electron laser (FEL) operation, wigglers with small periodicities reduce the electron beam energy required for producing high frequency radiation. Microwigglers with periodicities less than 1 cm combined with the high quality beams generated by photoelectric injectors may result in compact and efficient short-wavelength FELs. The authors present the design, construction, and test results of novel micor-wiggler structures with periodicities of 2.4 to 8 mm, in which the magnetic field in each half-period is independently adjustable. The experimentally demonstrated tunability of field amplitudes provides versatile means for enhancing the FEL performance. A microwiggler FEL experiment driven by a 300 kV Marx and a thermionic electron gun is described

  4. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  5. JAERI free electron laser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed, and constructed a prototype for a quasi-cw, and high-average power free electron laser driven by a 15 MeV superconducting rf linac at Tokai, JAERI. In designing a high power FEL, there are many available design options to generate the required power output. By applying the superconducting rf linac driver, some of the options relating to the FEL itself may be relaxed by transferring design difficulties to the driver. Because wall losses become minimal in the superconducting accelerator cavity, very long pulse or quasi-cw, and resultant high average power may be readily attained at the JAERI superconducting rf linac FEL. In 1992 Japanese fiscal year, we have successfully demonstrated expected cryogenic (stand-by loss 5 MV/m and Q > 2x10+9) of four JAERI superconducting accelerator modules, and installed them in the FEL accelerator vault. In 1993, Optical resonators and beam transport systems, which have been already assembled, are now under commissioning. A description and the latest results of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac FEL will be discussed in comparison with a normal-conducting one, and reported in the symposium. (author)

  6. Laser Heater and seeded Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Dattoli, G.; Petrillo, V.; E. Sabia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effect of laser heater on a seeded Free Electron Laser. We develop a model embedding the effect of the energy modulation induced by the heater with those due to the seeding. The present analysis is compatible with the experimental results obtained at FERMI displaying secondary maxima with increasing heater intensity. The treatment developed in the paper confirms and extends previous analyses and put in evidence further effects which can be tested in future experi...

  7. Simulation of DARMSTADT Free Electron Laser and a comparison of high gain Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Daniel S.

    2000-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser, with its wavelength tunability unlike any other laser, may be used in numerous future applications. These applications range from high energy laser weapons to surgical lasers for medical use. This thesis covers three separate topics concerning the FEL: the height of the separatrix for a tapered undulator, use of dimensionless parameters in a simple model and description for several high gain free electron lasers, and simulations of the Darmstadt free electron laser. T...

  8. The TESLA Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TESLA Free Electron Laser is an ultra-brilliant X-regime light source (XFEL). It adopts the lasing principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). To demonstrate the feasibility of the SASE principle at short wavelength, DESY is now pushing, in the frame of international collaboration, to constructing an FEL test facility (TTF FEL) in parallel with the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) for the high-energy physics. The TTF FEL is driven by a 390 MeV beam, lasing at 42 nm. An upgrading to a 1 GeV beam at 6 nm is foreseen. The low RF frequency of 1.3 GHz for TESLA is ideal to drive such kind of SASE beam, which requires a normalized transverse emittance of 1 π mm-mrad at 1 nC per bunch with an rms bunch length of only 25 μm. Moreover, the superconducting accelerating structure used by TESLA favors a multibunch operation. With the large cavity volume, the beam loading should be reduced to its minimum, which is again beneficial to the stringent requirement on the uncorrelated energy spread of 0.1 %. Simulation results of various components of the FEL show that the FEL design goal is quite challenging but feasible. The gun is optimized to produce a high quality beam of normalized transverse emittance εx,yn = 0.9 π mm-mrad, longitudinal emittance εs = 27 mm-keV, and rms bunch length δs = l mm. It is shown that the critical coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a chicane bunch compressor can be properly handled to maintain a growth in energy spread within 0.04%. TESLA cavity of nominal accelerating gradient of 15 MV/m will be used. This gradient is already more than three times higher than the highest currently routinely used. An even higher gradient of 25 MV/m is quite within reach. For the radiator, we will use a planar combined function undulator of permanent magnets (PM). Lateral beam wandering along the undulator should be kept within 10 μm. All the components necessary for the TTF FEL proof-of-principle operation are well under construction. First beam

  9. Hole coupling resonator for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of two mirror resonators with holes for output coupling is studied for free electron laser application using a Fox-Li type code. The mode profiles inside and outside the cavity, the diffraction losses at the mirror edges and apertures, the amount of useful power coupled through the hole, etc., are calculated for the dominant mode for different hole and mirror dimensions. It is found that resonators in near concentric geometry can develop a mode degeneracy in certain cases, which should be avoided for the stability of the free electron laser gain output. A resonator configuration for a free electron laser at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was found which can provide satisfactory performance over a wavelength range from 25 to 50 microns. The possibility of further increasing the tuning range by an adjustable intracavity aperture is discussed. 15 refs., 6 figs

  10. Free electron laser in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on the development of a free electron laser, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. The emission of synchrotron radiation is obtained from the interaction of relativistic charged particles with the magnetic field of the undulator. The synchrotron radiation is stored in a cavity, where interaction with electrons occurs. From the amplification of light waves, the laser radiation is then obtained. The changes in the electron wave packets induced by LEL experiment, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. A better understanding of the saturation mechanism, which dictates laser equilibrium, is obtained. Experiments in Super ACO were carried out and the following topics, on the construction of the laser, were investigated: the development of an optical klystron, gain optimization, the position of the mirrors (concerning the radiation from the undulator). This work allowed the construction of a 600 MeV free electron laser, at Super ACO. The development of a laser involving UV range radiation, is considered

  11. Physics of ultrarelativistic free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies on coherence characteristics of intensive electron beam induced radiation in ondulators are systematized and generalized. On the basis of obtained results the limits to applicability of classical hydrodynamic theory of free-electron lasers in the ultrarelativistic electron energy range are set. 30 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  12. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  13. Free-electron lasers shine on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global race is on to build a laser that can produce coherent, high-power X-rays, as John Galayda describes. Most people think of lasers as small devices that emit red light and are found in laser pointers or barcode scanners. Experimental physicists tend to be familiar with more powerful devices - some of which are big enough to fill a room - that produce light at shorter wavelengths. But one type of laser is in a league of its own when it comes to size and performance: the free-electron laser. The world's first free-electron laser (FEL) switched on at Stanford University in 1977, producing infrared light with a wavelength of 3400 nm. Today there are over 30 free-electron lasers in operation worldwide, with a further dozen at various stages of planning and construction. These new facilities, which were discussed at the 'FEL 2005' conference at Stanford in August, will produce extremely short pulses of very high-intensity radiation in the X-ray region of the spectrum. They will therefore act like a microscopic stroboscope, enabling researchers to investigate chemical and physical processes at the atomic level in real time. (U.K.)

  14. Free-electron laser triggered photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using free-electron laser (FEL) triggered photocathodes to produce high-quality e-beams for self-amplified spontaneous emission or oscillator FEL devices is explored. The use of the same e-beam, driving the photocathode and the FEL, makes the system naturally free of any synchronization problem, arising when an external laser is used. Examples of the interplay between the generation of electron and optical bursts are also investigated

  15. Attosecond X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D. E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For a real, meaningful pump-probe experiment with attosecond temporal resolution, an isolated attosecond pulse is in demand. In this vein we report the generation of an isolated ~ 148 attosecond pulse duration radiation pulse at 0.1 angstrom wavelength using current enhanced self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser. We consider the 10-GeV PAL-XFEL e-beam for enhanced self-amplified spontaneous emission (ESASE scheme. In ESASE, X-ray SASE FEL is combined with a femtosecond laser system. An 800 nm wavelength, 5 fs FWHM carrier envelope phase stabilized laser was employed in ESASE scheme.

  16. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  17. Progress Toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R and D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R and D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  18. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R and D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R and D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  19. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti ρ is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G(γ). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  20. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  1. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-08-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future.

  2. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  3. Linac based free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic treatment of the principle of the linac-driven free-electron laser (FEL) is given. The first part of the paper describes the FEL in low-gain approximation, and in the second part the high-gain FEL theory is given. The majority of the treatment describes FELs in one dimensional approximation, neglecting effects by diffraction of radiation and by electron beam emittance. Only in the final section a few remarks on these issues are given. The ambition of the paper is by no means any progress in FEL theory but a clear presentation of basic FEL theory concepts with explicit derivation of the formulae from first principles. (orig.)

  4. Optical guiding in a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coherent interaction between an optical wave and an electron beam in a free electron laser (FEL) is shown to be capable of optically guiding the light. The effect is analyzed using a two-dimensional approximation for the FEL equations, and using the properties of optical fibers. Results of two-dimensional (cylindrically symmetric) numerical simulations are presented, and found to agree reasonably well with the analytically derived criterion for guiding. Under proper conditions, the effect can be large and has important applications to short wavelength FEL's and to directing intense light

  5. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  6. CEFL-1: a compact free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the design and predicted performance of the CREOL-UCF Compact Free Electron Laser (CFEL-I). This device will consist of a 1.7 MV Pelletron electrostatic accelerator that will be able to provide electron beam energies between 800 keV and 1.7 MeV. A 200 milliamp electron beam will be used to achieve output laser power up to 1 kW. Highly efficient electron beam transport and collection will enable this device to have a large duty cycle, and eventually it may operate on a CW basis. Construction of a microundulator is underway. The 8 millimeter microundulator period will allow device operation between 250 microns and one millimeter

  7. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the Inverse Free-Electron Laser, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, has been pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a number of years. More recent studies focused on the development of a low energy (few GeV), high gradient, multistage linear accelerator. The authors are presently designing a short accelerator module which will make use of the 50 MeV linac beam and high power (2 x 1011 W) CO2 laser beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These elements will be used in conjunction with a fast excitation (300 μsec pulse duration) variable period wiggler, to carry out an accelerator demonstration stage experiment

  8. The Roads to LPA Based Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiongwei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we simply outline the present status of the free electron laser and the laser plasma based accelerator, and we simply discuss the potential possible roads appearing in the accelerator community to use the laser plasma based accelerator into the field of the free electron laser.

  9. Modelling elliptically polarised Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, J R; Freund, H P; McNeil, B W J

    2016-01-01

    A model of a Free Electron Laser operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a signficantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  10. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics

  11. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  12. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  13. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaclav, Vylet; /Duke U.; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  14. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of Raman free-electron laser using a circularly polarized electromagnetic pump is investigated. Cpupled wave equations that describe both linear and nonlinear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering are derived. The dispersion relation and the growth rate for the parametric instability are obtained. Nonlinear processes that may lead to saturation of the free-electron laser are discussed. (E.G.)

  15. Resonant Laser Incisions: Molecular Targets Using the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Lou; Bryant, Grady; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Laser ablation of tissue for medical incisions is normally concerned with the energy absorption and the subsequent vaporization of intracellular water. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have identified specific non-water resonances within tissues. Then, using the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (wavelength tunable from 2 to 10 microns) and our Computer Assisted Surgical Techniques program (to standardize the laser delivery), we have targeted specific molecular resonances for laser incisions and tissue removal. Using both acute and chronic studies, we can map out the resonant action spectrum to improve surgical outcomes. We have modeled these ablation mechanisms and working to establish the link between these ablation mechanisms and wound healing. This work has been supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense, Medical Free Electron Laser Program, ONR Grant #N000149411023.

  16. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  17. On Free-Electron Laser Growing Modes and their Bandwidth

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Stephen; Litvinenko, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Free-electron lasers play an increasing role in science, from generating unique femtosecond X- ray pulses for single short recording of the protein structures to amplifying feeble interactions in advanced cooling systems for high-energy hadron colliders. While modern Free-electron laser codes can describe their amplification mechanism, a deep analytical understanding of the mechanism is of extreme importance for a number of applications. Mode competition, their growth rates and amplification bandwidth are among the most important parameters of a free-electron laser. A dispersion relation, which defines these important characteristics, can be solved analytically only for a very few simple cases. In this letter we show that for a typical bell-shape energy distribution in electron beam there is no more that one growing mode. We also derive an analytical expression which determines the bandwidth of the free-electron laser.

  18. A high brightness electron beam for Free Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerle, van Bartholomeus Mathias

    1997-01-01

    In a free electron laser, coherent radiation is generated by letting an electron beam propagate through an alternating magnetic field. The magnetic field is created by a linear array of magnets, which is called an undulator or a wiggler. The wavelength of the laser radiation depends on the amplitude

  19. Electron motion in an elliptically polarized free electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equation of motion for an electron in a free electron laser amplifier are written in hamiltonian form, and exactly solved for the circular polarized case. Successively, an approximate solution for a general polarization (elliptical or linear) and weak laser field is obtained by a relativistic generalization of the two timing technique. Finally, the theoretical perturbative results are confirmed by comparison with numerical solutions

  20. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser [*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Experimental damage studies for a free electron laser weapon

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Laser material damage experiments for this thesis were the first ever conducted at the new DoE Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) free electron laser (FEL) user laboratory. In the past only large-scale laser experiments were thought to properly model weapons applications. Experimental procedures developed in this thesis allowed a scaled-down laser of a few hundred Watts to characterize the damage from a weapon-scale...

  2. Free Electron Laser Theory Using Two Times Green Function Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we present a quatum theory for free electron laser obtained by firstly using the Two time's Green Function method developed by Matsubara for solid physics theory. The dispersion relation for the laser photon obtained is limited to the case of low intensity of the laser due to the decoupling the correlation function in low order. For the analysis of the self-amplified emission (SASE), the high intensity laser radiation which strongly affect the trajectory of the free electron is involved, the use of the classical approximation for laser can formulate the laser radiation with multiple frequency. To get the quantum effects in the high intensity laser, use of the perturbation theory, and the expansion methods of state function using the coherent, squeeze and super-radiant states have discussed.

  3. Review of free-electron-laser (FEL) simulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we review the techniques employed in the numerical simulations of free-electron-laser, in the amplifier as well as the oscillator configuration. Special emphasis is given to the numerical problems associated with the particle initialization (particle loading), the treatment of the paraxial equation, the inclusion of oscillating space charge forces in the longitudinal particle motion and the multi-frequency modelling. This overview does not however include the particle-in-cell simulations commonly utilized in plasma physics: due to the large scale between the wiggler and the radiation wavelength, this type of technique is impractical for short wavelength free-electron-laser. (author) 2 figs., 37 refs

  4. Applications of free electron lasers in the UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first applications of the UV Free Electron Lasers (FEL) show the advance to a stage of maturity for such sources. Two-color experiments coupling storage ring FEL and synchrotron radiation offer the wide range of use. (TEC). 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Synchrotron radiation and free electron laser activities in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies realized in the Siberian synchrotron radiation centre within the frameworks of wide program of synchrotron radiation and free electron laser research are summarized. The technical information on the VEPP-2M, VEPP-3 and VEPP-4M storage rings used as synchrotron radiation sources is given. 10 refs.; 8 figs.; 12 tabs

  6. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; Slot, van der P.J.M.; Volokhine, I.V.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Boller, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for exam

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of free-electron laser physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code has been developed to simulate three-dimensional free-electron laser physics. A mathematical formulation of the FEL equations is presented, and the numerical solution of the problem is described. Sample results from the computer code are discussed. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Study of Short Bunches at the Free Electron Laser CLIO

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Khodnevych, Vitalii; Berthet, Jean-Paul; Glotin, Francois; Ortega, Jean-Michel; Prazeres, Rui

    2016-01-01

    CLIO is a Free Electron Laser based on a thermionic electron gun. In its normal operating mode it delivers electron 8 pulses but studies are ongoing to shorten the pulses to about 1 ps. We report on simulations showing how the pulse can be shortened and the expected signal yield from several bunch length diagnostics (Coherent Transition Radiation, Coherent Smith Purcell Radiation).

  9. Linac-driven XUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of an rf linear accelerator as the electron source for a free-electron laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range from 100 nm to at least as low as 50 nm appears feasible. Peak and average power outputs of greater than 100 kW and 50W, respectively, are predicted

  10. Applications of free electron lasers in the UV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couprie, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The first applications of the UV Free Electron Lasers (FEL) show the advance to a stage of maturity for such sources. Two-color experiments coupling storage ring FEL and synchrotron radiation offer the wide range of use. (TEC). 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Dynamic Desynchronization of a Free-Electron Laser Resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R. J.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    In a free-electron laser oscillator operating with short electron bunches, the desynchronism between electron bunches and optical pulses resulting in the shortest buildup time to saturation is different from that giving the largest saturated power. In this Rapid Communication we present an experimen

  12. The shipboard employment of a free electron laser weapon system

    OpenAIRE

    Allgaier, Gregory G.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited A megawatt (MW) class Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows promise as a new weapon for antiship cruise missile defense. An FEL weapon system delivers energy at the speed of light at controllable energy levels, giving the war fighter new engagement options. Considerations for this weapon system include employment, design, and stability. In order to reach a MW class laser, system parameters must be optimized and the high power optical beam mu...

  13. Accelerator dosimetry at free electron lasers in Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 27 April 2006 a vacuum ultra violet free electron laser (FEL) named free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) producing intense beams of 13.1 nm laser light became operational. A 260 m long, 1 GeV superconducting electron linear accelerator (linac) drives the FLASH. The electron linac is made of an array of superconducting niobium cavities developed at DESY on TESLA technology. During the FEL operation a parasitic radiation field of photoneutrons and bremsstrahlung gamma rays persists in the linac containment tunnel. Sophisticated measurement and control devices, based on radiation-sensitive commercial off the shelf (COTS) microelectronic components, have been installed near the FLASH linac. Therefore, it becomes necessary to characterise these stray radiations, in order to predict the radiation effects on electronics. This paper summarises the features of novel radiation dosimeters and accelerator dosimetry techniques developed by our group. The utilisation of valuable radiation dosimetry data gathered from the experiments at FLASH to predict the radiation field characteristics of the future European X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) driven by a 20 GeV superconducting electron linac is highlighted

  14. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  15. Progress in free electron laser activity at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the ongoing free electron laser (FEL) activity at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, a Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) is presently undergoing commissioning. Recently, the first signature of build-up of coherence has been observed on the setup, with the measured THz output power being more than 200 times higher than the spontaneous emission power expected for the beam parameters used in the experiment. Efforts are underway to further enhance the peak electron beam current in the setup with the installation of a sub-harmonic pre-buncher in the injector system. This paper discusses these development efforts and some recent results from the commissioning of the CUTE-FEL. (author)

  16. The theoretical study of the optical klystron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the theoretical study and numerical simulation of optical klystron free electron laser is supported by National 863 Research Development Program and National Science Foundation of China. The object of studying UV band free electron laser (FEL) is to understand the physical law of optical klystron FEL and to gain experience for design. A three-dimensional code OPFEL are made and it is approved that the code is correct completely. The magnetic field of the optical klystron, the energy modulation of the electron beam, the density modulation of the electron beam, spontaneous emission of the electron beam in optical klystron, the harmonic super-radiation of the electron beam, and the effects of the undulator magnetic field error on modulation of the electron beam energy are simulated. These results are useful for the future experiments

  17. The multi-cavity free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is made of a free-electron laser with many optical cavities where the cavities communicate with each other, not optically, but through the electron beam. Analysis is made in Ole one-dimensional approximation. A general expression is given for the growth rate in the exponential (high current) regime. In the regime where lethargy is important expressions are given in the two opposite limits of small and large numbers of cavities and bunches. Numerical simulation results, still in the one-dimensional approximation, but including non-linearities, are presented. The multi-cavity free-electron laser (MC/FEL) can be employed to avoid the slippage phenomena, and thus to make picosecond pulses of infra-red radiation. Three examples of this application are presented

  18. Mode Locking in a Free-Electron Laser Amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is proposed to generate attosecond pulse trains of radiation from a free-electron laser amplifier. The optics-free technique synthesizes a comb of longitudinal modes by applying a series of spatiotemporal shifts between the copropagating radiation and electron bunch in the free-electron laser. The modes may be phase locked by modulating the electron beam energy at the mode spacing frequency. Three-dimensional simulations demonstrate the generation of a train of 400 as pulses at gigawatt power levels evenly spaced by 2.5 fs at a wavelength of 124 A ring . In the x-ray at wavelength 1.5 A ring , trains of 23 as pulses evenly spaced by 150 as and of peak power up to 6 GW are predicted

  19. Physics of Superpulses in Storage Ring Free-Electron Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contradictory to the widespread perception, storage ring free-electron lasers with substantial net gain can generate peak lasing power reaching GW levels in the so-called superpulse mode. This power level is sufficient for studies of nonlinear processes and efficient intracavity harmonic generation. This letter describes the physics of the superpulses and a phase-space refreshment in the electron beam responsible for this phenomenon.

  20. Free electron laser pumped by a powerful traveling electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a three-wave free-electron laser (FEL) operated with a powerful 8.4-GHz electromagnetic pump wave replacing the usual magnetostatic wiggler. The presence of a uniform axial magnetic field B0 produced cyclotron-harmonic idler waves.Peaks in the emission spectrum corresponding to cyclotron harmonics were observed covering a frequency range from 16.5 to 130 GHz. The frequency spectrum of this FEL mechanism was tuned continuously by the variation of B0

  1. Status Of The Novosibirsk High Power Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, V P; Knyazev, B A; Kolobanov, E I; Kotenkov, V V; Kubarev, V V; Kulipanov, G N; Matveenko, A N; Medvedev, L E; Miginsky, S V; Mironenko, L A; Oreshkov, A D; Ovchar, V K; Popik, V M; Salikova, T V; Scheglov, M A; Serednyakov, S I; Shevchenko, O A; Skrinsky, A N; Vinokurov, N A; Zaigraeva, N S

    2004-01-01

    The first stage of Novosibirsk high power free electron laser (FEL) was commissioned in 2003. It is based on normal conducting CW energy recovery linac. Now the FEL provides electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range 120-180 micron. The average power is 200 W. The measured linewidth is 0.3%, which is close to the Fourier-transform limit. The assembly of user beamline is in progress. Plans of future developments are discussed.

  2. Status of the NPS Free-Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Lewellen, J.W.; Colson, W.B.; Niles, S.P.; T. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) is in the process of designing and constructing a free-electron laser (FEL) laboratory to pursue FEL-related research and introduce students to modern accelerator and FEL technology. The laboratory will pursue research on high-brightness injectors, fundamental and applied beam dynamics, energy recovery linear accelerators, as well as FEL experiments. The accelerator will be based around two, Stanford- Rossendorf type cryomodules, eac...

  3. Peking university superconducting accelerator facility for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peking University Superconducting Accelerator Facility (PKU-SCAF) is to generate high-quality electron beams with high average current. It is mainly composed of a DC-SC photocathode injector and a superconducting accelerator. It will operate in CW mode. The energy of the electrons is 20-35 MeV and the emittance is <15 π mm mrad. PKU-SCAF will be used for Free Electron Lasers

  4. Modulated desynchronism in a free-electron laser oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Calderón, O G; Smith, T I

    2001-01-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically, the effects of desynchronism modulation on short pulse free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators. We find that the output power and the micropulse length of the FEL beam oscillate periodically at the modulation frequency and the minimum micropulse length can be significantly shorter than that obtained without modulation. The FEL can operate during part of the modulation cycle in the normally inaccessible portion of the output power curve where the FEL gain is less than the cavity loss.

  5. Pulse Splitting in Short Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a fundamental limitation occurring in vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet seeded free electron lasers (FELs). For a given electron beam and undulator configuration, an increase of the FEL output energy at saturation can be obtained via an increase of the seed pulse duration. We put in evidence a complex spatiotemporal deformation of the amplified pulse, leading ultimately to a pulse splitting effect. Numerical studies of the Colson-Bonifacio FEL equations reveal that slippage length and seed laser pulse wings are core ingredients of the dynamics.

  6. Free electron laser for gamma-gamma collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper contains the results of optimization of the free electron laser for the gamma-gamma collider at TESLA. A superconducting linear accelerator, similar to the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator, produces a driving electron beam for the FEL. The MOPA FEL scheme is studied when the radiation from a master oscillator is amplified in the FEL amplifier with tapered undulator. The FEL produces the radiation of TW level with a wavelength of 1 μm. Optimization of the FEL amplifier is performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST

  7. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  8. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (''variable-parameter'') undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ''enhanced efficiency'' traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published

  9. Free-electron laser experiments in the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave pulses have been injected from a free electron-laser (FEL) into the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at up to 0.2 GW at 140 GHz in short pulses (10-ns duration) with O-mode polarization. The power transmitted through the plasma was measured in a first experimental study of high power pulse propagation in the plasma; no nonlinear effects were found at this power level. Calculations indicate that nonlinear effects may be found at the higher power densities expected in future experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  10. Infrared free electron laser magnet power supply control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared free-electron laser (IR-FEL) is under development at Materials and Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, RRCAT, Indore, for the investigation of materials using an electron beam. This system consists of a 90 keV electron gun as an electron source, a linear accelerator (LINAC) which accelerates the beam to energy in the range of 15-25 MeV, beam transport line and an undulator. Beam transport line consists of dipoles, quadrupoles and steering magnets for transporting beam from the LINAC exit to the entrance of the undulator. In this paper we are presenting the development of control system for these precision power supplies

  11. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  12. Electron Beam Diagnostic at the ELBE Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Evtushenko, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    The radiation source ELBE is a scientific user facility able to generate electromagnetic radiation as well as beams of secondary particles. The figure below shows the layout of the facility. ELBE is based on a superconducting electron linac. The linac consists of two accelerating modules and uses TESLA type nine-cell niobium cavities, two cavities in each module. The cavities were developed at DESY in the framework of the TESLA linear collider project and the X-ray free electron laser (FEL) p...

  13. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  14. Deep Saturated Free Electron Laser Oscillators and Frozen Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Ottaviani, P L; Dattoli, G; Sabia, E; Petrillo, V; Van Der Slot, P; Biedron, S; Milton, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillators operating in the deep saturated regime and point out the formation of sub-peaks of the optical pulse. They are very stable configurations, having a width corresponding to a coherence length. We speculate on the physical mechanisms underlying their growth and attempt an identification with FEL mode locked structures associated with Super Modes. Their impact on the intra-cavity nonlinear harmonic generation is also discussed along with the possibility of exploiting them as cavity out-coupler.

  15. Mode-Locking in a Free-Electron Laser Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, N. R.; McNeil, B.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    A technique is proposed to generate attosecond pulse trains of radiation from a Free-Electron Laser amplifier. The optics-free technique synthesises a comb of longitudinal modes by applying a series of spatio-temporal shifts between the co-propagating radiation and electron bunch in the FEL. The modes may be phase-locked by modulating the electron beam energy at the mode spacing frequency. Three-dimensional simulations demonstrate the generation of a train of 400as pulses at giga-watt power l...

  16. Numerical simulation of sidebands in free electron laser oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code named GOFEL-P for studying sidebands of free electron laser (FEL) oscillators was developed. Simulation results from this code are in agreement with experiments and the FELP code developed by others. The mechanism about the generation, development, hopping process, spiking mode and chaos of sidebands as well as the chirp of optical frequency has been investigated. The effect of sidebands on optical output is studied with a uniform wiggler or tapered wiggler. Methods to suppress sidebands with reducing optical cavity length or with optical filter are proposed

  17. An XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J. C.; Newnam, B. E.; Cooper, R. K.; Comly, J. C., Jr.

    Problems regarding the extension of free-electron laser technology from the visible and near infrared region, where such devices are currently operating, to the ultraviolet have recently been extensively discussed. It was found that significant technical problems must be overcome before free-electron lasers (FELs) can be operated in the VUV (100-200 nm) and the XUV (50-100). However, the present lack of other intense and tunable sources of coherent radiation at these wavelengths together with the intrinsic properties of FELs make the development of such devices potentially very rewarding. The properties of FELs include continuous tunability in wavelength and output in the form of a train of picosecond pulses. An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of an operation of a FEL in the XUV/VUV regions, taking into account a theoretical model. It is found that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will make the design of a FEL for operation in the 50-200-nm range of optical wavelength possible.

  18. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x109 at 2.5K, and 8x109 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  19. Touschek lifetime for the NSLS free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VUV-Ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source is designed to operate at an electron energy of 700 MeV with an average current of 1 A distributed in nine bunches. High brightness sources of synchrotron radiation are obtained by a lattice design yielding a small electron beam emittance, the uncoupled value of 700 MeV being 9 x 10-8 m-rad. Recently there has been interest in using the VUV-Ring for an experiment to study the operation of a free electron laser. For this purpose it is necessary to operate at an energy lower than 700 MeV, say 400 or 500 MeV. A consequence of the lower energy is that the emittance will be reduced by a factor of 1/3 or 1/2, respectively, relative to the value at 700 MeV. Since it is the peak current which determines the laser gain, it is hoped to achieve an average current of 1 A distributed in three bunches, the length of a bunch being kept as short as possible. The combination of high peak current, small transverse dimensions, and low energy lead one to be concerned about the Touschek lifetime. In this paper the Touschek lifetime for the free electron laser experiment is considered. The conclusion is reached that although minimizing the electron emittance is appropriate to optimize the performance of the ring as a cynchrotron light source, for the free electron laser it may be desirable to operate at a lower tune having a larger emittance. This increases the Touschek lifetime and does not result in a major change of the laser gain. For normal operation of the VUV-Ring, the nominal tune values are ν/sub x/ = 3.32 and ν/sub z/ = 1.32. Using the SYNCH program we have found a satisfactory solution with ν/sub x/ = 2.85 and ν/sub z/ = 0.85, having an emittance twice that of the original tune

  20. Vanderbilt University free-electron laser x-ray facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Perry A.; Andrews, Weiwei D.; Brau, Charles A.; Waters, James A.; Carroll, Frank E.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Roos, Carlton F.

    1993-02-01

    The Vanderbilt University Free-Electron Laser Program is developing the capability to create near-monochromatic x rays for medical imaging and other purposes. For this experiment we feed-back the normal infrared FEL light to collide with the electron beam. This causes Compton backscattering of the incident photons which creates x rays. These x rays cannot feed an x-ray laser, but they have a collimated intensity and tunability which make them highly suitable for medical imaging. This paper is particularly focused on the x-ray beam transport to be used with this experiment. This transport must collimate the x-ray beam and re-direct it to match a beam chase located in the vault ceiling at a 40 degree angle to the electron beam axis. A brief description of the creation mechanism and x-ray beam properties are included.

  1. Beam Conditioning and Harmonic Generation in Free Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation of large-scale free-electron lasers (FELs) such as Euro-XFEL and LCLS are to be devices which produce coherent X-rays using Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The performance of these devices is limited by the spread in longitudinal velocities of the beam. In the case where this spread arises primarily from large transverse oscillation amplitudes, beam conditioning can significantly enhance FEL performance. Future X-ray sources may also exploit harmonic generation starting from laser-seeded modulation. Preliminary analysis of such devices is discussed, based on a novel trial-function/variational-principle approach, which shows good agreement with more lengthy numerical simulations

  2. On harmonic operation of Shanghai deep UV free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By choosing parameters in the modulator,the dispersive section and the seed laser,the spatial bunching of the electron beam can be correlated to then-th harmonic of ther adiator radiation,instead of the fundamental radiation in conventional high-gain harmonic generation(HGHG).Thus,the radiator undulator is operated at high harmonic mode.In this paper,the possibility of harmonic operation of Shanghai deep ultraviolet(SDUV)free electron laser (FEL)is studied.Discussions on the principle of harmonic operation,the simulation code development,the simulation results.and the proposed experimental procedure for verification of harmonic operation at the SDUV FEL are also presented.

  3. Acoustic analog of a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As well known, at the present time there are many types of laser the operation of which is based on the stimulated emission of light by an active medium. Lasers are generators of coherent electromagnetic waves in the range from ultraviolet to submillimeters. But acoustic analogs of such devices have not been created up to now in spite of the progress in laser technology. Meanwhile, an acoustic laser could have a lot of interesting applications. Recently a theoretical scheme for an acoustic laser was proposed by the present author. A liquid dielectric with dispersed particles was considered as an active medium. The pumping was created by an oscillating electric field deforming dispersed particle volumes. Different types of oils or distilled water can serve as a liquid dielectric with gas bubbles as dispersed particles. Gas bubbles in water can be created by an electrolysis. The phase bunching of the initially incoherent emitters (gas bubbles) was realized by acoustic radiation forces. This scheme is an analog of the free-electron laser (FEL). It was shown that two types of losses must be overcome for the beginning of a generation. The first type results from the energy dissipation in the active medium and the second one is caused by radiation losses at the boundaries of the resonator. The purposes of this report are: (1) to discuss the analogies between the acoustic laser and FEL; (2) to propose an effective scheme of an acoustic laser with a mechanical pumping (by a piezoelectric emitter of the piston type); (3) to consider the schemes of acoustic lasers with the different types of the resonators (rectangular and cylindrical); (4) to discuss the possibility of the creation of an impact acoustic laser (5) to discuss the experimental works which are planned to be carried out in cooperation with prof. L.A. Crum

  4. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  5. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  6. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  7. Focusing mirror for x-ray free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a large total-reflection mirror for focusing x-ray free-electron laser beams to nanometer dimensions. We used an elliptical focusing mirror made of silicon that was 400 mm long and had a focal length of 550 mm. Electrolytic in-process dressing grinding was used for initial-step figuring and elastic emission machining was employed for final figuring and surface smoothing. A figure accuracy with a peak-to-valley height of 2 nm was achieved across the entire area. Characterization of the focused beam was performed at BL29XUL of SPring-8. The focused beam size was 75 nm at 15 keV, which is almost equal to the theoretical size

  8. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 μm to 0.05μm and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 μm). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs

  9. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations

  10. Recent Developments in Superconducting RF Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia Merminga

    2001-09-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) Free Electron Lasers (FELs) worldwide are reviewed. Two examples of high performance SRF FELs are discussed in detail: First, the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) FEL at DESY, which recently demonstrated Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) saturation at the wavelength of 98 nm, an important milestone towards X-ray FELs in the {angstrom} regime. Second, the Jefferson Lab IR FEL, which recently lased with 2.1 kW of average power while energy recovering 5 mA of average current, an important milestone towards high average power FELs and towards Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) in general. We discuss the scientific potential and accelerator physics challenges of both classes of SRF-driven FELs.

  11. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  12. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Recent Developments in Superconducting RF Free Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting RF (SRF) Free Electron Lasers (FELs) worldwide are reviewed. Two examples of high performance SRF FELs are discussed in detail: First, the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) FEL at DESY, which recently demonstrated Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) saturation at the wavelength of 98 nm, an important milestone towards X-ray FELs in the (angstrom) regime. Second, the Jefferson Lab IR FEL, which recently lased with 2.1 kW of average power while energy recovering 5 mA of average current, an important milestone towards high average power FELs and towards Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) in general. We discuss the scientific potential and accelerator physics challenges of both classes of SRF-driven FELs

  14. Fundamental physics at an X-ray free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ringwald, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (FELs) have been proposed to be constructed both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called XFEL laboratory is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA. In addition to the immediate applications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, material science, and structural biology, X-ray FELs may be employed also to study some physics issues of fundamental nature. In this context, one may mention the boiling of the vacuum (Schwinger pair creation in an external field), horizon physics (Unruh effect), and axion production. We review these X-ray FEL opportunities of fundamental physics and discuss the necessary technological improvements in order to achieve these goals.

  15. Recent developments in superconducting RF free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting RF (SRF) Free Electron Lasers (FELs) worldwide are reviewed. Two examples of high performance SRF FELs are discussed in detail: First, the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) FEL at DESY, which recently demonstrated Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) saturation at the wavelength of 98 nm, an important milestone towards X-ray FELs in the Angstroem regime. Second, the Jefferson Lab IR FEL, which recently lased with 2.1 kW of average power while energy recovering 5 mA of average current, an important milestone towards high average power FELs and towards Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) in general. We discuss the scientific potential and accelerator physics challenges of both classes of SRF-driven FELs. (author)

  16. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  17. Free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosley, D.L.; Kevorkian, J.

    1990-09-01

    A highly accurate, explicit asymptotic solution of the electron energy and phase is found for a class of free-electron lasers with very long wavelength beams, very low electron energies, and very slow taper of the wiggler field relative to the wiggler period. Dimensionless variables are defined and normalized, and three small parameters which characterize the operation of the FEL are identified. Because of the explicit nature of the solution, our results may be directly used to calculate features such as the escape distance of the electron from the potential well and the effects of the various physical parameters. One important advantage of the very slow wiggler taper is the increased efficiency of the energy transfer from the electron beam to the signal field due to increased bucket width. Numerical calculations are performed to verify all results. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Gyrotron electromagnetic wiggler for a compact free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated a novel, high power (≥1 MW), short wavelength (2 mm) gyrotron electromagnetic (GEM) wiggler for use in a compact free electron laser (FEL). The gyrotron consisted of an electron gun and resonator section followed by a special high Q cavity for storing the power created in the gyrotron resonator. The electromagnetic field stored in the high Q cavity would then be appropriate for use as a wiggler field in an infrared or visible FEL with a moderate energy (4 to 10 MeV) electron beam. The gyrotron experiment tested the practical limits due to ohmic loss, mode conversion, etc. on the strength of such a stored field. It also tested the effect of strong feedback from the high Q cavity back onto the gyrotron resonator. The proposed research utilized the technology of high power, high frequency gyrotrons developed at M.I.T. as part of the Department of Energy program on development of sources for plasma heating

  19. Free Electron Laser as Energy Driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength λ = 0.5 μm and providing flash energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 1022 W cm-2 sr-1 within steering pulse duration 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. Dimensions of such an ICF driver are comparable with those of heavy-ion ICF driver, while the problem of technical realization seems to be more realistic. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R and D. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper presents conceptual design of the free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths (λ=0.3...20 μm) and with the average output power 10-20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2x250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the FEL oscillators, up to 20%. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Mode-Locking in a Free-Electron Laser Amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, N R

    2008-01-01

    A technique is proposed to generate attosecond pulse trains of radiation from a Free-Electron Laser amplifier. The optics-free technique synthesises a comb of longitudinal modes by applying a series of spatio-temporal shifts between the co-propagating radiation and electron bunch in the FEL. The modes may be phase-locked by modulating the electron beam energy at the mode spacing frequency. Three-dimensional simulations demonstrate the generation of a train of 400 as pulses at giga-watt power levels evenly spaced by 2.5 fs at a wavelength of 124 angstrom. In the X-ray at wavelength 1.5 angstrom, trains of 23 as pulses evenly spaced by 150 as and of peak power up to 6 GW are predicted.

  2. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA)

  3. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  4. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  5. Attosecond Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, several schemes of soft X-ray and hard X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL and their progress are reviewed. Self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE schemes, the high gain harmonic generation (HGHG scheme and various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are discussed, especially in view of the generation of attosecond X-ray pulses. Our recent work on the generation of attosecond hard X-ray pulses is also discussed. In our study, the enhanced SASE scheme is utilized, using electron beam parameters of an XFEL under construction at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL. Laser, chicane and electron beam parameters are optimized to generate an isolated attosecond hard X-ray pulse at 0.1 nm (12.4 keV. The simulations show that the manipulation of electron energy beam profile may lead to the generation of an isolated attosecond hard X-ray of 150 attosecond pulse at 0.1 nm.

  6. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Gary P., Jr.; Copeland, Michael L.

    1998-09-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam® (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam® or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely support previous

  7. Nonlinear pulse evolution in seeded free-electron laser amplifiers and in free-electron laser cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances in laser technology have made available very short and intense laser pulses which can be used to seed a high-gain single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier. With these seed pulses, a regime of the FEL interaction where the radiation evolution is simultaneously dominated by nonlinear effects (saturation) and time-dependent effects (slippage) can be explored. This regime is characterized by the propagation of a solitary wavelike pulse where the power of the optical wave grows quadratically with time, its pulse length decreases and the spectral bandwidth increases. We analyze the interplay between the field and particle dynamics of this propagation regime which was studied before and termed super-radiance. Furthermore we analyze the properties of the strong higher-order harmonic emission from this wave and its behavior when propagating in a cascade FEL. The super-radiant pulse is indeed capable of passing through the stages of a cascade FEL and to regenerate itself at the wavelength of the higher-order harmonic. The optical pulse obtained is shorter than a cooperation length and is strongly chirped in frequency, thus allowing further longitudinal compression down to the attosecond time scale

  8. A 1-kW power demonstration from the advanced free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to engineer and procure an electron beamline compatible with the operation of a 1-kW free-electron laser (FEL). Another major task is the physics design of the electron beam line from the end of the wiggler to the electron beam dump. This task is especially difficult because electron beam is expected to have 20 kW of average power and to simultaneously have a 25% energy spread. The project goals were accomplished. The high-power electron design was completed. All of the hardware necessary for high-power operation was designed and procured

  9. Subharmonic triple buncher for a high-efficiency free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-efficiency free electron laser oscillator experiment is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A buncher system has been designed to deliver 30-ps, 5-nC electron bunches to a 20-MeV standing-wave linac at the 60th subharmonic of the 1300-MHz accelerator frequency. The first 108.3-MHz buncher cavity accepts a 5-ns, 5-A peak current pulse from a triode gun. Following a 120-cm drift space, a second 108.3-MHz cavity is used, primarily to enhance the bunching of the trailing half of the bunch. A 1300-MHz cavity with 20-cm drift spaces at each end completes the beamline components. The bunching process continues into the linac's first three accelerating cells. Two thin iron-shielded lenses and seven large-diameter solenoids provide axial magnetic fields for radial focusing

  10. Intense microwave generation using free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orzechowski, T.J.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper, I will describe a free-electron laser amplifier which operated in the microwave regime. This device, called the Electron Laser Facility (ELF), used an electron beam generated by a Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA). ELF operated as a single pass amplifier at 35 and 140 GHz. Because the device had no cavity, we could study the FEL physics independent of cavity considerations. With a sufficiently large input signal, growth of the signal from noise on the beam did not influence the performance. This device demonstrated significant gain and allowed us to investigate such FEL phenomenon as saturation and synchrotron oscillation of the electrons trapped in the ponderomotive well. We were also able to study the phase shift of the radiation due to the real part of complex gain of the FEL. Because the interaction takes place in a waveguide, the FEL can couple to several spatial modes at a given frequency. The bunched electrons can radiate at harmonics of the fundamental and in this experiment we studied the evolution of the third harmonic. In this paper, I will describe the Electron Laser Facility. I will discuss the FEL performance with regard to gain, saturation, phase evolution, mode coupling and harmonic generation, I will briefly discuss a switching technique which allows the LIA to run at high average power. When driven by such a device, and FEL can produce high average power radiation. We will present the design for such a device which can be used to heat a tokamak plasma. This device is designed to operate at 250 GHz and produce an average power of 2 MW.

  11. Quantum free-electron laser: A fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H.

    2012-02-01

    Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) are today a very important area of research. Such devices can generate short pulses of high-power coherent radiation in wavelengths that are unreachable to conventional molecular lasers, such as X-Rays, and are based on the radiation emitted by a relativistic electron beam that performs a waving movement induced by an alternating electromagnetic field. They can be described by classical or quantum models. Classical models are simpler than the last, but they are valid only if the one-photon momentum recoil is not greater than the beam momentum spread, where the FEL operates in a new Quantum regime, and quantum models should be used. It is the case for high-energy fotons and low-energy electron beams. In this work we present a hydrodynamical model which incorporates quantum effects. Starting from Poisson equation and a Schrödinger-like equation deduced from the total relativistic energy of the electron under the action of a ponderomotive potential V associated with the combined wiggle and radiation fields, we obtain, by performing a Madelung transformation to the electron wave function, a set of fluid equations (continuity and momentum) to the beam dynamics, where a Bohm potential accumulates the quantum information. By coupling the wave equation, under the SVEA hypothesis, we get a set of nonlinear PDE system which describes the quantum-FEL as a three-wave interaction phenomena, where the amplified radiation is seen as Compton or Raman backscattered radiation. Our model is simpler than previous quantum models, and can be used in laser amplification theory as well.

  12. Intense microwave generation using free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, I will describe a free-electron laser amplifier which operated in the microwave regime. This device, called the Electron Laser Facility (ELF), used an electron beam generated by a Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA). ELF operated as a single pass amplifier at 35 and 140 GHz. Because the device had no cavity, we could study the FEL physics independent of cavity considerations. With a sufficiently large input signal, growth of the signal from noise on the beam did not influence the performance. This device demonstrated significant gain and allowed us to investigate such FEL phenomenon as saturation and synchrotron oscillation of the electrons trapped in the ponderomotive well. We were also able to study the phase shift of the radiation due to the real part of complex gain of the FEL. Because the interaction takes place in a waveguide, the FEL can couple to several spatial modes at a given frequency. The bunched electrons can radiate at harmonics of the fundamental and in this experiment we studied the evolution of the third harmonic. In this paper, I will describe the Electron Laser Facility. I will discuss the FEL performance with regard to gain, saturation, phase evolution, mode coupling and harmonic generation, I will briefly discuss a switching technique which allows the LIA to run at high average power. When driven by such a device, and FEL can produce high average power radiation. We will present the design for such a device which can be used to heat a tokamak plasma. This device is designed to operate at 250 GHz and produce an average power of 2 MW

  13. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  14. The NIST/NRL free-electron laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A free-electron laser (FEL) user facility is discussed. The FEL, which will be operated as an oscillator, will be driven by the electron beam of the racetrack microtron (RTM) that is nearing completion. Variation of the electron kinetic energy from 17 MeV to 185 MeV will permit the FEL wavelength to be tuned from 200 nm to 10 μm. Performance will be enhanced by the high brightness, low energy spread, and continuous pulse nature of the RTM electron beam. The authors are designing a new injector to increase the peak current of the RTM. A 3.6-m undulator is under construction, and the 9-m optical cavity is under design. The FEL will emit a continuous train of 3-ps pulses at 66 MHz with an average power of 10--200 W, depending on the wavelength, and a peak power of up to several hundred kW. An experimental area is being prepared with up to five stations for research using the FEL beam

  15. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  16. Radiation focusing, guiding and steering in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a free electron laser (FEL), the radiation field, wiggler field and electron beam resonantly couple and modify the refractive index in the vicinity of the electron beam. The refractive index is modified such that the radiation beam will tend to focus upon the electron beam. A method for solving the 3-D wave equation for the FEL process is outlined. This approach, called the source dependent expansion method, provides an excellent analytical and numerical technique for studying optical focusing, guiding and steering in FELs. A radiation envelope equation is derived. Conditions and parameters necessary to achieve guided radiation beams (constant radius) in the exponential gain regime are obtained for FELs driven by either induction linacs or rf linacs. Immediately prior to saturation in the exponential gain region, the podermotive potential is large enough to trap the beam electrons. The wiggler field, at this point, could be tapered to further increase the operating efficiency. The possibility of bending or steering radiation beams in FELs is discussed and a condition necessary for radiation guiding along a curved electron beam orbit is obtained

  17. An assessment of the potential of the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the theoretical and experimental results which have been obtained to assess the potential of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) and to estimate the electron beam requirements with regard to energy, current and emittance. It is shown that with a FEL it is possible to obtain a radiation source which can be continuously tuned over a wide range from the far infra-red to the U-V, by varying the electron beam energy over a range approximately 1-250 MeV. The electron beam is required to be of high quality with very small energy spread and small transverse emittance. With presently developed electron beam sources of suitable quality, the conversion efficiency limits the output power to a mean of a few watts and a peak of the order of tens of kilo-watts. To obtain high output power requires the development of high current electron beam sources with high beam quality. The required beam quality is dependent on the magnet design and so further development is also required of high periodicity transverse field magnets with uniform transverse field across the magnet aperture. The spread in the electron distribution resulting from the dynamics in the FEL would appear to prevent any advantage being gained by recycling the electron beam. (U.K.)

  18. Low emittance injector design for free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, S.; Pedrozzi, M.; Reiche, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several parameters determine the performance of free electron lasers: the slice and the projected emittance, the slice energy spread, and the peak current are the most crucial ones. The peak current is essentially obtained by magnetic compression stages along the machine or occasionally assisted by velocity bunching at low energy. The minimum emittance and the alignment of the slices along the bunch are mainly determined in the low energy part of the accelerator (injector). Variations at the per-mille level of several parameters in this section of the machine strongly influence these quantities with highly nonlinear dynamic. We developed a numerical tool to perform the optimization of the injector. We applied this code to optimize the SwissFEL injector, assuming different gun designs, initial bunch lengths and intrinsic emittances. We obtained an emittance along the bunch of 0.14 mm mrad and around 0.08 mm mrad for the maximum and the minimum SwissFEL charges (200 and 10 pC, respectively). We applied the same tool to a running injector, where we automatized the optimization of the machine.

  19. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, Elham; Mirian, Najmeh Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulation for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can in...

  20. Design of an x-ray free electron laser undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An undulator designed to be used for an x-ray free electron laser has to meet a set of stringent requirements. With no optical cavity, an x-ray FEL operates in the single pass Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode; an electron macropulse is microbunched by an undulator and the radiation it creates. The microbunched pulse emits spontaneous radiation and coherent FEL radiation, whose power may reach saturation in a sufficiently long and perfect undulator. The pulse must have low emittance and high current, and its trajectory in the undulator must keep the radiation and the pulse together with a very high degree of overlap. We shall consider the case of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL project at SLAC, which is intended to create 1.5 A x-rays using an electron beam with 15 GeV energy, 1.5π mm-mrad normalized emittance, 3400 A peak current, and 280 fsec FWHM bunch duration. We find that this 65 μm rms diameter beam must overlap its radiation with a walkoff of no more than 5 μm for efficient gain. This places severe limitations on the magnetic field errors and other mechanical tolerances. The following is a discussion of the undulator design, specifications, alignment, engineering, and beam position monitoring we plan to implement for the LCLS X-ray FEL

  1. Design of an x-ray free electron laser undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An undulator designed to be used for an x-ray free electron laser has to meet a set of stringent requirements. With no optical cavity, an x-ray FeL operates in the single pass Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode; an electron macropulse is microbunched by an undulator and the radiation it creates. The microbunched pulse emits spontaneous radiation and coherent FEL radiation, whose power may reach saturation in a sufficiently long and perfect undulator. The pulse must have low emittance and high current, and its trajectory in the undulator must keep the radiation and the pulse together with a very high degree of overlap. The authors shall consider the case of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL project at SLAC, which is intended to create 1.5 angstrom x-rays using an electron beam with 15 GeV energy, 1.5π mm-mrad normalized emittance, 3,400 A peak current, and 280 fsec FWHM bunch duration. They find that this 65 microm rms diameter beam must overlap its radiation with a walkfoff of no more than 5 microm for efficient gain. This places severe limitations on the magnetic field errors and other mechanical tolerances. The following is a discussion of the undulator design, specifications, alignment, engineering, and beam position monitoring they plan to implement for the LCLS X-ray FEL

  2. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  3. Free-electron-laser-based biophysical and biomedical instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of biophysical and biomedical applications of free-electron lasers (FELs) is presented. FELs are pulsed light sources, collectively operating from the microwave through the x-ray range. This accelerator-based technology spans gaps in wavelength, pulse structure, and optical power left by conventional sources. FELs are continuously tunable and can produce high-average and high-peak power. Collectively, FEL pulses range from quasicontinuous to subpicosecond, in some cases with complex superpulse structures. Any given FEL, however, has a more restricted set of operational parameters. FELs with high-peak and high-average power are enabling biophysical and biomedical investigations of infrared tissue ablation. A midinfrared FEL has been upgraded to meet the standards of a medical laser and is serving as a surgical tool in ophthalmology and human neurosurgery. The ultrashort pulses produced by infrared or ultraviolet FELs are useful for biophysical investigations, both one-color time-resolved spectroscopy and when coupled with other light sources, for two-color time-resolved spectroscopy. FELs are being used to drive soft ionization processes in mass spectrometry. Certain FELs have high repetition rates that are beneficial for some biophysical and biomedical applications, but confound research for other applications. Infrared FELs have been used as sources for inverse Compton scattering to produce a pulsed, tunable, monochromatic x-ray source for medical imaging and structural biology. FEL research and FEL applications research have allowed the specification of spin-off technologies. On the horizon is the next generation of FELs, which is aimed at producing ultrashort, tunable x rays by self-amplified spontaneous emission with potential applications in biology

  4. Novosibirsk terahertz free electron laser: instrumentation development and experimental achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, the Novosibirsk free electron laser (NovoFEL) is the most intense radiation source in the terahertz spectral range. It operates in the continuous mode with a pulse repetition rate of up to 11.2 MHz (5.6 MHz in the standard mode) and an average power of up to 500 W. The radiation wavelength can be precisely tuned from 120 to 240 mm with a relative line width of 0.3–1%, which corresponds to the Fourier transform limit for a micropulse length of 40–100 ps. The laser radiation is plane-polarized and completely spatially coherent. The radiation is transmitted to six user stations through a nitrogen-filled beamline. Characteristics of the NovoFEL radiation differ drastically from those of conventional low-power (and often broadband) terahertz sources, which enables obtaining results impossible with other sources, but necessitates the development of special experimental equipment and techniques. In this paper, we give a review of the instrumentation developed for control and detection of high-power terahertz radiation and for the study of interaction of the radiation with matter. Quasi-optic elements and systems, one-channel detectors, power meters, real-time imagers, spectroscopy devices and other equipment are described. Selected experimental results (continuous optical discharge, material and biology substance ablation, real-time imaging attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, speckle metrology, polarization rotation by an artificial chiral structure, terahertz radioscopy and imaging) are also presented in the paper. In the near future, after commissioning another four electron racetracks and two optical resonators, intense radiation in the range from 5 to 240 µm will be available for user experiments

  5. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  6. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  7. Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksbaum, Philip; Möller, Thomas; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Your invitation to submit. Journal of Physics. B: Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (JPhysB) is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on 'Frontiers of free electron laser science', to appear in 2013, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will highlight recent advances in x-ray free electron laser (FEL) research enabled by the new generation of FELs in Europe, Japan and the USA. This is a particularly good moment to launch a special issue on this topic in JPhysB, to consolidate and place into a broader context some the recent novel research in the earliest years of x-ray FELs. We invite you to contribute original papers that describe some of these exciting results in several areas: AMO physics at x-ray FELs covering now a broad energy range from a few 10 eV to several tens keV is a central area of interest for this topical issue. We also especially welcome research papers on the topic of x-ray lasers that are pumped by FELs, as well as the physics of the x-ray FEL itself. Recent rapid developments in beam conditioning should also be covered, including seeding, echo and selective emittance spoiling. Such improved instrumentation has made possible the first femtosecond x-ray matter studies at FELs, and we invite papers in these areas as well. Pump-probe spectroscopy has now been extended to x-ray FELs, both with multiple x-ray pulses and with synchronized optical and x-ray pulses. The science related to timing x-ray pulses to laser-induced phenomena, including streaking, cross correlations and other time tools will be emphasized in this issue. Ultrafast x-ray FELs are also among the most intense laser sources available, and exceed the focusable intensity of other x-ray sources by many orders of magnitude. Therefore, intense x-ray atom and molecule interactions will be highlighted in this issue, as will the science of x-ray-induced damage. High intensities also give rise to the new field of nonlinear x-ray physics, and we would like

  8. FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITVINENKO,V.N.

    2007-08-31

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation of such beams is too feeble to provide significant cooling: even in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 7 TeV protons, the longitudinal damping time is about thirteen hours. Decrements of traditional electron cooling decrease rapidly as the high power of beam energy, and an effective electron cooling of protons or antiprotons at energies above 100 GeV seems unlikely. Traditional stochastic cooling still cannot catch up with the challenge of cooling high-intensity bunched proton beams--to be effective, its bandwidth must be increased by about two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high-energy hadron beams are optical stochastic cooling (OSC) and coherent electron cooling (CEC)--the latter is the focus of this paper. In the early 1980s, CEC was suggested as a possibility for using various instabilities in an electron beam to enhance its interaction with hadrons (i.e., cooling them). The capabilities of present-day accelerator technology, Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), and high-gain Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), finally caught up with the idea and provided the all necessary ingredients for realizing such a process. In this paper, we discuss the principles, and the main limitations of the CEC process based on a high-gain FEL driven by an ERL. We also present, and summarize in Table 1, some numerical examples of CEC for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC.

  9. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of "mode disorder" appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  10. Longitudinal Coherence Preservation and Chirp Evolution in a High Gain Laser Seeded Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; /BNL, NSLS; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; /BNL, NSLS

    2006-06-07

    In this letter we examine the start-up of a high gain free electron laser in which a frequency-chirped coherent seed laser pulse interacts with a relativistic electron beam. A Green function formalism is used to evaluate the initial value problem. We have fully characterized the startup and evolution through the exponential growth regime. We obtain explicit expressions for the pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp of the amplified light and show that the FEL light remains fully longitudinally coherent.

  11. Experiments on laser beam jitter control with applications to a shipboard free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, Brett E.

    2007-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows potential as an effective defensive weapon for a naval ship against today's modern weapons such as supersonic anti-ship missiles. A laser can destroy these fast and highly maneuverable missiles at the speed of light. Several obstacles must be overcome to employ this weapon on a naval ship. This thesis discusses several methods for passive and active jitter control of a guided optical beam which might be employed in a FEL weapon system. Vibration experime...

  12. The free electron laser: a system capable of determining the gold standard in laser vision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. In laser vision correction surgery, lasers are generally utilized based on their beam-tissue interactions and corneal absorption characteristics. Therefore, the free electron laser, with its ability to provide broad wavelength tunability, is a unique research tool for investigating wavelengths of possible corneal ablation. Methods. Mark III free electron laser wavelengths between 2.94 and 6.7 μm were delivered in serial 0.1 μm intervals to corneas of freshly enucleated porcine globes. Collateral damage, ablation depth, and ablation diameter were measured in histologic sections. Results. The least collateral damage (12-13 μm) was demonstrated at three wavelengths: 6.0, 6.1 (amide I), and 6.3 μm. Minimal collateral damage (15 μm) was noted at 2.94 μm (OH-stretch) and at 6.2 μm. Slightly greater collateral damage was noted at 6.45 μm (amide II), as well as at the 5.5-5.7 μm range, but this was still substantially less than the collateral damage noted at the other wavelengths tested. Conclusions. Our results suggest that select mid-infrared wavelengths have potential for keratorefractive surgery and warrant additional study. Further, the free electron laser's ability to allow parameter adjustment in the far-ultraviolet spectrum may provide unprecedented insights toward establishing the gold-standard parameters for laser vision correction surgery

  13. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  14. Can free-electron lasers answer critical questions in ultraviolet photobiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John C.

    2000-04-01

    This paper will evaluate the potential of ultraviolet free electron lasers, and particularly the soon to be available UV-FEL at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for such experiments.

  15. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed

  16. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups

  17. A simplified description of X-ray free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Margaritondo, G.; Ribic, Primoz Rebernik

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that an elementary semi-quantitative approach explains essential features of the X-ray free-electron laser mechanism, in particular those of the gain and saturation lengths. Using mathematical methods and derivations simpler than complete theories, this treatment reveals the basic physics that dominates the mechanism and makes it difficult to realise free-electron lasers for short wavelengths. This approach can be specifically useful for teachers at different levels and for collea...

  18. Free-electron laser-fusion drivers for inertial-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of tapered wiggler, free electron lasers as drivers for inertial confinement fusion requires an electron beam source which must meet specific and stringent requirements. The characteristics of ICF targets are combined with those of the free electron laser to obtain a general set of requirements and to define parameter tradeoffs. In particular, low beam emittance is essential to the system. A conceptual point design of an ICF-FEL driver is discussed

  19. Behavior of a free-electron laser oscillator with a hybrid coaxial wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the behaviors of a free-electron laser (FEL) with a hybrid coaxial wiggler and a normal wiggler for a free-electron laser oscillator. The radiation field is decomposed into fundamental and higher-order-Gauss Laguerre modes. A comparison of the behaviors of the radiation amplitudes of these modes and their efficiencies in the hybrid and the normal wigglers is made by using a 3D FEL code that we developed.

  20. Program to research laser-driven thermionic electron sources for free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This is the Final Report on the research and development of high brightness pulse laser driven thermionic electron sources. Enhanced coupling of electron beam energies to radiative fields in accelerator-driven free-electron lasers requires injector cathodes of higher brightness than is possible with conventional dispenser cathodes or plasma-forming field emitters. Cesiated refractory surfaces and dispenser cathodes which are pulse laser heated may offer such an increase in brightness, by the emission of monoenergetic beams of electrons at high current densities. The studies were designed to investigate the emission characteristics of both of these types of thermionic cathodes.

  1. X-ray free-electron lasers--present and future capabilities [Invited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fs to 500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  2. Free Electron Lasers Seeded by ir Laser Driven High-order Harmonic Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Juhao; Bolton, Paul R.; /SLAC; Murphy, James B.; /BNL, NSLS; Zhong, Xinming; /Beijing Normal U.

    2007-03-12

    Coherent x-ray production by a seeded free electron laser (FEL) is important for next generation synchrotron light sources. We examine the feasibility and features of FEL emission seeded by a high-order harmonic of an infrared laser (HHG). In addition to the intrinsic FEL chirp, the longitudinal profile and spectral bandwidth of the HHG seed are modified significantly by the FEL interaction well before saturation. This smears out the original attosecond pulselet structure. We introduce criteria for this smearing effect on the pulselet and the stretching effect on the entire pulse. We discuss the noise issue in such a seeded FEL.

  3. Focusing of Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (NovoFEL) radiation into paraxial segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonov, Andrey N.; Volodkin, Boris O.; Kachalov, Denis G.; Knyazev, Boris A.; Kropotov, Grigory I.; Tukmakov, Konstantin N.; Pavelyev, Vladimir S.; Tsypishka, Dmitry I.; Choporova, Yulia Yu.; Kaveev, Andrey K.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate results of studies of a silicon binary diffractive optical element (DOE) focusing a terahertz laser Gaussian beam into a paraxial segment. The characteristics of the DOE were examined on a Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser beam of 141-μm wavelength.

  4. IR-MALDI OF LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT COMPOUNDS USING A FREE ELECTRON LASER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Initial experiments on infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI) using a free electron laser in the analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds are reported. Mass spectra from samples of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacet...

  5. Pulse propagation in storage ring free electron laser devices and longitudinal instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, R; Giannessi, L; Mezi, L

    2002-01-01

    We develop a self-consistent general purpose code modelling the storage ring free electron laser devices. The code accounts for the beam longitudinal dynamics and the laser pulse propagation and is capable of reproducing the wealth of phenomenology associated with the laser-electron beam interplay and provides a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of the laser in the suppression of instabilities of longitudinal type.

  6. Pulse propagation in storage ring free electron laser devices and longitudinal instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a self-consistent general purpose code modelling the storage ring free electron laser devices. The code accounts for the beam longitudinal dynamics and the laser pulse propagation and is capable of reproducing the wealth of phenomenology associated with the laser-electron beam interplay and provides a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of the laser in the suppression of instabilities of longitudinal type

  7. Power beaming, orbital debris removal, and other space applications of a ground based free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    When compared to other laser types, the Free Electron Laser (FEL) provides optimal beam quality for successful atmospheric propagation. Assuming the development and deployment of a mega-watt (MW) class, ground or sea based FEL, this thesis investigates several proposed space applications including power beaming to satellites, the removal of orbital debris, laser illumination of objects within the solar system for scientific study, and interstellar laser illumination for communications. Po...

  8. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  9. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (∼10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  10. Hierarchic electrodynamics and free electron lasers concepts, calculations, and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kulish, Victor V

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchic Electrodynamics and Free Electron Lasers: Concepts, Calculations, and Practical Applications presents intriguing new fundamental concepts in the phenomenon of hierarchical electrodynamics as a new direction in physics. Concentrating on the key theory of hierarchic oscillations and waves, this book focuses on the numerous applications of nonlinear theory in different types of high-current Free Electron Lasers (FEL), including their primary function in the calculation methods used to analyze various multi-resonant, multi-frequency nonlinear FEL models. This is considered the first boo

  11. Deep Inner-Shell Multiphoton Ionization by Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzawa, H; Son, S.-K.; Kimura, M; Sakai, T; Matsunami, K; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Kukk, E.; Rudek, B.; Erk, B.; Motomura, K.; Foucar, L.; Robert, E.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics of argon and xenon atoms using a new x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) in Japan, and identified that highly charged Xe ions with the charge state up to +26 are produced predominantly via four-photon absorption as well as highly charged Ar ions with the charge state up to +10 are produced via two-photon absorption at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The absolute fluence of th...

  12. W.M. Keck-Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser Center facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, William E.; Feng, Bibo; Kozub, John A.; Piston, David W.

    2002-04-01

    The W.M. Keck-Vanderbilt Free-electron Laser Center operates a reliable free-electron laser (FEL) that is used in human surgical trials, as well as in basic and applied sciences. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable from 2.1 micrometers to 9.6 micrometers , delivering above 50 mJ per macropulse with a repetition rate of 30 Hz. For soft tissue surgery, especially neurosurgery and surgery on the optic nerve, a wavelength of 6.45 micrometers has been found to ablate with little collateral damage. The free-electron laser beam is delivered to experiments approximately 2000 hours each year. The Center also supports several other tools useful for biomedical experiments: an optical parametric generator laser system with tunable wavelength similar to the free- electron laser except it has much lower average power; a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to characterize samples; several devices for in vivo imaging including an optical coherence tomography setup, a two-photon fluorescent confocal microscope, and a cooled, integrating camera capable of imaging luciferin-luciferase reactions within the body of a mouse. The Center also houses a tunable, monochromatic x-ray source based on Compton backscattering of a laser off of a relativistic electron beam.

  13. Simulations of LANL Regenerative MW Free Electron Laser amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Richard T

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The development of a speed-of-light hard-kill weapon system for military applications represents a significant advancement in technology over present conventional kinetic weapon systems. Over the past two decades, the US Navy has successfully developed a megawatt-class chemical laser; however, under some maritime environments, the high power beam propagation was unable to delivery sufficient energy to kill a modern anti-ship missile (A...

  14. Conductors, semiconductors and insulators irradiated with short-wavelength free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Jurek, M.; Nietubyc, R.; Pelka, J. B.; Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Létal, V.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Andrejczuk, A.; Feldhaus, J.; Keitel, B.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Treusch, R.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 4 (2007), 043107/1-043107/4. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA235; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : free -electron laser * extreme ultraviolet * ablation * laser-matter interaction Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.171, year: 2007

  15. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange: Downsizing the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is proposed to generate electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance through laser assisted transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM10 mode is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the emittance exchange. It is shown that with the proposed technique one can significantly downsize an x-ray free electron laser (FEL), which may greatly extend the availability of these light sources. A hard x-ray FEL operating at 1.5 (angstrom) with a saturation length within 30 meters using a 3.8 GeV electron beam is shown to be practically feasible.

  16. New concept of waveguide for inverse free electron laser accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, W Z

    2000-01-01

    A segmented waveguide formed by a periodic system of pairs of wedge prisms with a gap between them is proposed. The prisms are made of single-crystal sapphire for which the refraction index nu<1 for CO sub 2 laser radiation (lambda=10.6 mu m). The attenuation of 0.1 db/m can be estimated for a 5 mm diameter radiation beam for which the Rayleigh distance is approximately 1 m. The gap between adjacent prisms can be useful in FEL-like applications.

  17. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  18. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 1012 photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  19. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  20. In-situ x-ray free-electron laser diffraction under femtosecond laser-driven shock compression of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have succeeded in quenching metastable high-pressure phases which are not quenchable using conventional compression methods or forming dense lattice defects in solids using femtosecond laser-driven shock wave. In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) under femtosecond laser-driven shock compression of solids using X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) is one of the powerful tools to directly image the lattice dynamics to make clear the mechanism. In this report we review the femtosecond laser-driven shock compression of solids and introduce some experiments performed at XFEL facility in Japan 'SACLA (SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser).' (author)

  1. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.; Fritz, David M.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Galler, Andreas; Gawelda, Wojciech; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Hartsock, Robert W.; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Stickrath, Andrew B.; Zhang, Wenkai; Zhu, Diling; Cammarata, Marco

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  2. Propagation properties of a relativistic prebunched electron beam in free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation properties of a prebunched electron beam in free electron lasers is investigated. Results show that: As the beam propagates downstream, the amplitude of the fundamental modulation current is enhanced and its phase keeps unchanged, while both the amplitude and phase of the high harmonic modulation current remain unchanged

  3. Imaging techniques for a high-power THz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two imaging techniques based on the thermal effect have been developed and implemented for recording images using radiation of a high-power terahertz free electron laser. The techniques were applied for the visualization of images in experiments on classical optics, as well as in a holographic experiment

  4. Tenth international free electron laser conference, kibbutz Ramat Rachel, Jerusalem, Israel, August 29 - September 2, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume contains over a hundred abstracts of lectures covering a wide variety of subjects in the field of free electron lasers. Many features of lasing were observed over a range of problems, and experiments which resulted in finding ideal or near-ideal techniques for gaining better and more efficient optical power have been carried out

  5. Second Harmonic Generation in CdTe Plate by Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Minehara, Eisuke; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Sawamura, Masaru; Hajima, Ryoichi; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2000-10-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) signal converted from the 22 μm input wavelength of free electron laser (FEL) is observed using a non-birefringent CdTe crystal. The conversion efficiency of SHG is experimentally obtained to be ˜3× 10-5%/(MWcm-2).

  6. Second harmonic generation in CdTe plate by free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Minehara, Eisuke; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Sawamura, Masaru; Hajima, Ryoichi; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito [Division of Advanced Photon Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) signal converted from the 22 {mu}m input wavelength of free electron laser (FEL) is observed using a non-birefringent CdTe crystal. The conversion efficiency of SHG is experimentally obtained to be {approx}3 x 10{sup -5}% (MWcm{sup -2}). (author)

  7. Structure modifications in silikon irradiated by ultra-short pulses of XUV free electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelka, J. B.; Andrejczuk, A.; Reniewicz, H.; Schell, N.; Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Wawro, A.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Klinger, D.; Juha, Libor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 382, - (2004), s. 264-270. ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA235; GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : XUV ablation * free electron laser Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2004

  8. RF system of the race-track microtron-recuperator for high power free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the RF system of 100 MeV race-track microtron-recuperator being built in Novosibirsk for the Free Electron Laser project at Siberian center of Photochemistry research is presented. The frequency of RF system is 180.4 MHz

  9. Storage ring lattice considerations of short wavelengths single pass free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To generate radiation at short wavelengths, λ < 500 A, using a free electron laser there are some stringent requirements on the electron beam. In this article the authors shall discuss these requirements and the consequences for the design of an electron storage ring to produce the required electron beam

  10. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  11. The “SF” System of Sextupoles for the JLAB 10 KW Free Electron Laser Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Biallas, Mark Augustine, Kenneth Baggett, David Douglas, Robin Wines

    2009-05-01

    The characteristics of the system of “SF” Sextupoles for the infrared Free Electron Laser Upgrade1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) are described. These eleven sextupoles possess a large field integral (2.15 T/m) with +/- 0.2%

  12. Radiation produced by the modulated electron beam of a free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Neighbours, John Robert; Maruyama, Xavier K.; Buskirk, Fred Ramon

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam in a free electron laser (FEL) becomes axially modulated at the optical wave length of the FEL radiation. This electron beam passed through a gas may produce intense Cerenkov radiation. The effects of the radial and axial dimension of the electron bunches on the radiation are explored

  13. Free electron laser irradiation at 200 microns affects DNA synthesis in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the effect of a 200-microns wavelength free electron laser beam on the ability of asynchronized and synchronized mammalian tissue culture cells to incorporate tritiated thymidine. Compared to controls (unexposed cells), a significant proportion of exposed cells exhibited a reduction in isotope incorporation. The results suggest that this wavelength may affect DNA synthesis

  14. X-ray free electron laser as a real-time probe of chemistry on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray free electron laser has opened up new possibilities for the study of surface chemical reactions on ultrafast time scale. This article reviews the recent work on the desorption of a molecule from a surface, which is one of the most fundamental surface chemical process. (author)

  15. Storage ring free electron laser. Operation with two undulators having opposite circular polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Storage Ring Free Electron Lasers two undulators, having opposite helical polarizations and arranged as an Optical-Klystron, may be exploited to obtain linearly polarized radiation, without additional problems associated with mirror degradation, due to the higher on axis harmonic emission. In this paper it was explored the dynamical behavior of this device and discuss possible configurations allowing such as possibility

  16. Optical free-electron lasers with Traveling-Wave Thomson-Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a fully analytic model of an all-optical free electron laser (OFEL) undulator based on the Traveling-Wave Thomson-Scattering (TWTS) scheme. The TWTS undulator provides for sub-mm undulator wavelengths, does not require any material or plasma to generate or contain the undulator field and allows for sub-meter saturation lengths. Starting from a fully analytic description of the three-dimensional TWTS field we derive the OFEL pendulum equation for electrons in the TWTS field and discuss the constraints on laser and electron pulse parameters that have to be fulfilled for OFEL operation. We conclude in applying the TWTS OFEL to the realization of compact free electron laser sources at 13.5 nm and 0.2 nm using laser and electron sources in reach of present day technologies. (paper)

  17. 3-D numerical analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel approach to the 3-dimensional high-gain free- electron laser amplifier problem. The method allows us to write the laser field as an integral equation which can be efficiently and accurately evaluated on a small computer. The model is general enough to allow the inclusion of various initial electron beam distributions to study the gain reduction mechanism and its dependence on the physical parameters. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. The chirped-pulse free-electron laser: Final technical report, September 1987--October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a theoretical and numerical investigation into the operation of pulsed free-electron lasers in which the electron energy depends on the time of injection into the wiggler. Such energy ''chirping'' over each of a train of electron micropulses injected into an FEL oscillator is expected to give rise to a laser pulse inside the optical resonator with a chirped carrier frequency ω/sub s/(/tau/)

  19. Optical modeling of induction-linac driven free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser (FEL) simulation code FRED, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) primarily to model single-pass FEL amplifiers driven by induction linear accelerators, is described. The main emphasis is on the modeling of optical propagation in the laser and on the differences between the requirements for modeling rf-linac-driven vs. induction-linac-driven FELs. Examples of optical guiding and mode cleanup are presented for a 50 μm FEL

  20. The storage-ring FOKKER-PLANCK equation: inclusion of the free electron laser amplifier contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the longitudinal phase-space dynamics of e-beam circulating in storage-rings, by exploiting analytical and semianalytical solutions of the relevant FOKKER-PLANCK equation. Particular attention is devoted to the modification induced by the inclusion of the free electron laser amplifier contributions. We study time-dependent solutions and discuss the evolution towards the equilibrium configuration, we also analyze the effect of the laser parameter on the equilibrium conditions and on the longitudinal damping time

  1. Conceptual design of a high-power infrared free electron laser for the applications in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free electron lasers are tuneable over a wide-range of spectrum, and can generate high aver power of laser beam. The free electron lasers can be used in many fields of nuclear industry such as production of heavy water, extraction of tritium from heavy water, production of isotopes for medical and industrial applications, partioning and extraction of valuable elements from nuclear waste, and so on. In this paper, the conceptual design of a high average power infrared free electron laser for the application in nuclear industry is described. The tunable range of output wavelength of the free electron laser is 1-30 μm, and the average power is 10-100 kW. A 100-MeV recirculating RF accelerator with energy recovery will be used as a driver of the free electron laser. Details of the electron accelerator, optical cavity, undulator, etc. are described in this paper

  2. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  3. Storage ring free electron laser, pulse propagation effects and microwave type instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been developed a dynamical model accounting for the storage Ring Free Electron Laser evolution including pulse propagation effects and e-beam instabilities of microwave type. It has been analyzed the general conditions under which the on set of the laser may switch off the instability and focus everybody attention on the interplay between cavity mismatch, laser pulsed behavior and e-beam instability dynamics. Particular attention is also devoted to the laser operation in near threshold conditions, namely at an intracavity level just enough to counteract the instability, that show in this region new and interesting effects arises

  4. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, J.; Özkan, C.; Coppola, N.; Farahani, S.D.; Schulz, J.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Gaudin, J.; Bajt, S.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.N.; Loch, R.A.; Jurek, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Harmand, M.; Galasso, G.; Nagasono, M.; Saskl, K.; Sovák, P.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2015), 254-264. ISSN 2159-3930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant ostatní: OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fluorescent and luminescent materials * laser damage * free-electron laser s * soft x-rays * laser materials processing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 2.844, year: 2014

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of gas-phase clusters using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most clusters produced in the gas phase, especially those containing metals, remain largely uncharaterized, among these are transition metal - carbide, -oxide and -nitride clusters. A method for recording IR spectra of strongly bound gas-phase clusters is presented. It is based on a free-electron laser called Felix, characterized by wide wavelength tuning range, covering almost the full 'molecular finger print' region, high power and fluence which make it suited to excite gas-phase species i.e. gas -phase clusters. Neutral clusters were generated by laser vaporization technique, ions that were created after the interaction with the free-electron laser were analyzed in a flight mass spectrometer. Experiments were run with titanium carbide clusters and their IR spectra given. It was shown that this method is suited to strongly bound clusters with low ionization energies, a condition met for many pure metal clusters and metal compound clusters. (nevyjel)

  6. Dominant Secondary Nuclear Photoexcitation with the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The new regime of resonant nuclear photoexcitation rendered possible by x-ray free electron laser beams interacting with solid state targets is investigated theoretically. Our results unexpectedly show that secondary processes coupling nuclei to the atomic shell in the created cold high-density plasma can dominate direct photoexcitation. As an example we discuss the case of $^{93m}$Mo isomer depletion for which nuclear excitation by electron capture as secondary process is shown to be orders of magnitude more efficient than the direct laser-nucleus interaction. General arguments revisiting the role of the x-ray free electron laser in nuclear experiments involving solid-state targets are further deduced.

  7. Pickup design for high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased demands for low bunch charge operation mode in the free-electron lasers (FELs) require an upgrade of the existing synchronization equipment. As a part of the laser-based synchronization system, the bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs) should have a sub-10 femtosecond precision for high and low bunch charge operation. In order to fulfill the resolution demands for both modes of operation, the bandwidth of such a BAM should be increased up to a cutoff frequency of 40 GHz. In this talk, we present the design and the realization of high bandwidth cone-shaped pickup electrodes as a part of the BAM for the FEL in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). The proposed pickup was simulated with CST STUDIO SUITE, and a non-hermetic model was built up for radio frequency (rf) measurements.

  8. Free-electron laser operation with a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector at ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, J., E-mail: j.teichert@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, A.; Büttig, H.; Justus, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kamps, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Lu, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Michel, P.; Murcek, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Rudolph, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schurig, R.; Seidel, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Vennekate, H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Will, I. [Max-Born-Institut, Berlin, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Xiang, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-04-11

    At the radiation source ELBE a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) was developed and put into operation. Since 2010 the gun has delivered beam into the ELBE linac. A new driver laser with 13 MHz pulse repetition rate allows now to operate the free-electron lasers (FELs) with the SRF gun. This paper reports on the first lasing experiment with the far-infrared FEL at ELBE, describes the hardware, the electron beam parameters and the measurement of the FEL infrared radiation output. - Highlights: • The superconducting RF gun produces beam with Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes. • The SRF gun operates as an injector for the ELBE linear accelerator. • First lasing of an infrared free-electron laser with an SRF gun.

  9. A high harmonic source for seeding the free electron laser FLASH in the XUV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are powerful sources for efficient XUV generation. They deliver very intense femtosecond pulses in the XUV and X-ray regime, which can be used for a wide range of experiments from material science to time resolved atomic physics. Presently, XUV and X-ray FELs start lasing from an electron bunch in an undulator by means of spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation (SASE). At the FEL facility FLASH (Free electron LASer at Hamburg) it is planned to seed an FEL for the first time in a wavelength range below 40 nm with a laser driven higher harmonics generation (HHG) source. We present the seeding concept and characterization measurements for the newly developed HHG source. Further we motivate, how future time resolved ultrashort experiments will benefit from seeded FELs.

  10. A high harmonic source for seeding the free electron laser FLASH in the XUV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin; Boedewadt, Joern; Curbis, Francesca; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Drescher, Markus; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Miltchev, Velizar; Mittenzwey, Manuel; Schulz, Michael; Rosbach, Joerg; Tarkeshian, Roxana; Wieland, Marek [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Bajt, S.; Duesterer, Stefan; Feldhaus, Joseph; Honkavaara, Katja; Laarmann, Tim; Schlarb, Holger [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Meseck, Atoosa [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Ischebeck, Rasmus [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Khan, Shaukat [DELTA, Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are powerful sources for efficient XUV generation. They deliver very intense femtosecond pulses in the XUV and X-ray regime, which can be used for a wide range of experiments from material science to time resolved atomic physics. Presently, XUV and X-ray FELs start lasing from an electron bunch in an undulator by means of spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation (SASE). At the FEL facility FLASH (Free electron LASer at Hamburg) it is planned to seed an FEL for the first time in a wavelength range below 40 nm with a laser driven higher harmonics generation (HHG) source. We present the seeding concept and characterization measurements for the newly developed HHG source. Further we motivate, how future time resolved ultrashort experiments will benefit from seeded FELs.

  11. Seed laser transmission and injection system for the Shanghai deep-ultraviolet free-electron laser test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Free electron laser (FEL) has developed several high gain work modes, including high gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), cascade HGHG, etc. Such modes have special advantages but all need external seed laser to modulate the electron beam. Purpose: To carry out such experiments at Shanghai Deep-Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser test facility (SDUV-FEL), a new seed laser system has been established. Methods: The system is consisting of Ti: sapphire laser, optic parameter amplifier (OPA), laser transport line and synchronize measurement system. Results: By such system, wide variation rang of seed laser wavelength (1140-2600 nm) and sub-picosecond level synchronization between seed laser and electron beam have been achieved. Conclusions: We have succeeded carry out HGHG and EEHG experiments at SDUV-FEL and the results show that the seed laser could effectively modulate electron beam. (authors)

  12. Red laser initiative at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several solid state lasers systems tunable between 0.70 and 0.95 μm have been the subject of studies to identify new lasers for various programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These solid state lasers include Cr:GSGG, Cr:GSAG and Ti:Sapphire. Both laser pumped flashlamp pumped results are described in the following sections

  13. X-ray laser spectroscopy with an electron beam ion trap at the free electron laser LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a first laser spectroscopy experiment in the keV energy regime, performed at the Free-Electron Laser LCLS at Stanford. An electron beam ion trap was used to provide a target of highly charged O, F and Fe ions. The resonant fluorescence spectra obtained for various transitions were calibrated to simultaneously measured Lyman lines of hydrogenic ions.

  14. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs

  15. Feasibility study on optical vortex generation at Shanghai deep ultraviolet free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) is of great interest. Recently, OAM light generation by coupling a relativistic electron beam with a Gaussian mode laser pulse at the high harmonics of a helical undulator has been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, the possibility of delivering coherent OAM light at the 3rd harmonic of the Gaussian mode seed laser is discussed for the Shanghai deep ultraviolet free-electron laser (SDUV-FEL). Considerations are given on the experiment setup, the expected performance and the possible measurement method. (author)

  16. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources

  17. Deep inner-shell multiphoton ionization by intense x-ray free-electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuzawa, H; Motomura, K; Mondal, S; Nagaya, K; Wada, S; Liu, X -J; Feifel, R; Tachibana, T; Ito, Y; Kimura, M; Sakai, T; Matsunami, K; Hayashita, H; Kajikawa, J; Johnsson, P; Siano, M; Kukk, E; Rudek, B; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Robert, E; Miron, C; Tono, K; Inubushi, Y; Hatsui, T; Yabashi, M; Yao, M; Santra, R; Ueda, K

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics of argon and xenon atoms using a new x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) in Japan, and identified that highly charged Xe ions with the charge state up to +26 are produced predominantly via four-photon absorption as well as highly charged Ar ions with the charge state up to +10 are produced via two-photon absorption at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The absolute fluence of the XFEL pulse, needed for comparison between theory and experiment, has been determined using two-photon processes in the argon atom with the help of benchmark ab initio calculations. Our experimental results, in combination with a newly developed theoretical model for heavy atoms, demonstrate the occurrence of multiphoton absorption involving deep inner shells.

  18. CAS CERN Accelerator School. Synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the tenth specialised course organised by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the topic this time being 'Synchrotron Radiation and Free-electron Lasers'. A similar course was already given at Chester, UK in 1989 and whose proceedings were published as CERN 90-03. However, recent progress in this field has been so rapid that it became urgent to present a revised version of the course. Starting with a review of the characteristics of synchrotron radiation there follows introductory lectures on electron dynamics in storage rings, beam insertion devices, and beam current and radiation brightness limits. These themes are then developed with more detailed lectures on lattices and emittance, wigglers and undulators, current limitations, beam lifetime and quality, diagnostics and beam stability. Finally lectures are presented on linac and storage ring free-electron lasers. (orig.)

  19. Discrete cavity model of a standing-wave free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) has been proposed for use in a two-beam accelerator (TBA). Unlike a conventional microwave free-electron laser, the SWFEL has a wiggler that is divided by irises into a series of standing-wave cavities, and the beam is reaccelerated by induction cells between cavities. We introduce a one-dimensional discrete-cavity model of the SWFEL. In contrast to the continuum model that has been extensively used to study the device, the new model takes into account time-of-flight effects within the cavity and applies the reacceleration field only between cavities, where the pondermotive force is absent. As in previous SWFEL models, only a single frequency is considered. Using this model, effects of finite cavity length are investigated. For moderately long cavities, it is shown that there are no adverse effects on the phase stability of the device. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed

  1. Optimization of a seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2000-01-01

    In order to get fully coherent radiation from the Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier starting from the shot noise, it is foreseen to implement a seeding option into the VUV FEL being under construction at DESY (DESY print TESLA-FEL 95-03, Hamburg, DESY, 1995, Seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY: joint DESY and GKSS proposal; Available at DESY upon request only). It consists of an additional undulator, a bypass for electrons and an X-ray monochromator. This paper presents the results of optimization of the seeding option for the VUV FEL providing maximal spectral brightness at minimal shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations. Calculations are performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 429 (1999) 233).

  2. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  3. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-07-08

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  4. Cavity dumping of an injection-locked free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Susumu; Ramian, Gerald; Sherwin, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    This letter reports cavity dumping of an electrostatic-accelerator-driven free-electron laser (FEL) while it is injection-locked to a frequency-stabilized 240 GHz solid-state source. Cavity dumping enhances the FEL output power by a factor of $\\sim$8, and abruptly cuts off the end of the FEL pulse. The cavity-dumped, injection-locked FEL output is used in a 240 GHz pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) experiment.

  5. Brightness and coherence of radiation from undulators and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to review the radiation characteristics of undulators and high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). The topics covered are: a phase-space method in wave optics and synchrotron radiation, coherence from the phase-space point of view, discussions of undulator performances in next-generation synchrotron radiation facility and the characteristics of the high-gain FELs and their performances

  6. Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limit...

  7. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically...

  8. Electron trajectories in free electron laser with realizable helical wiggler and ion channel guiding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebrahimi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   A detailed analysis of electron trajectories in a realizable helical wiggler free electron laser with ion channel guiding using electron (single particle dynamics is presented. Conditions for stability of electron orbit have been investigated, calculations are made to illustrate. Conclusion shows that there are differences stable (unstable condition(s electron trajectories between ideal helical wiggler(2D and realizable helical wiggler (3D.

  9. Optical Transition Radiation Measurement of Electron Beam for Beijing Free Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qiang; XIE Jia-Lin; LI Yong-Gui; ZHUANG Jie-Jia

    2001-01-01

    We used transition radiation techniques instead of the original phosphor targets to improve the electronic beam diagnostic system at Beijing Free Electron Laser. The beam profile, size (3.3 × 2.4 mm), position and divergence angle (σrms = 2.5 mrad) in transverse have been obtained from optical transition radiation. We also present the experimental set-up and some preliminary results.

  10. CAS to set up a free-electron laser facility in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ CAS has decided to establish a soft X-ray free-electron laser (SXFEL) experiment facility and an RF superconducting accelerator unit in Shanghai,according to a presentation made by Prof. ZHAO Zhentang, vice director-general of the CAS Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), at the 122nd session of the Eastern Forum of Science and Technology held on 11 and 12 December, 2008, in Shanghai.

  11. Diagnosis of the Wavelength Stability of a Mid-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Wavelength stability of free-electron lasers (FELs) is one of the important parameters for various applications. In this paper we describe two different methods to diagnose the wavelength stability of a mid-infrared (MIR) FEL. The first one is based on autocorrelation which is usually used to measure the pulse duration, and the second one is based on frequency upconversion through sum-frequency mixing (SFM).

  12. Short Rayleigh length free electron laser simulations in expanding coordinates / Proceedings of the 2004 FEL Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Armstead, R.L.; Colson, W.B.; Blau, J.

    2004-01-01

    For compact short-Rayleigh length free electron lasers (FELs), the area of the optical beam can be thousands of times greater at the mirrors than at the beam waist. A fixed numerical grid of sufficient resolution to represent the narrow mode at the waist and the broad mode at the mirrors would be prohibitively large. To accommodate this extreme change of scale with no loss of information, we employ a coordinate system that expands with the diffracting optical mode. The...

  13. Modeling and simulation of the free electron laser and railgun on an electric Naval surface platform

    OpenAIRE

    Bowlin, Oscar E.

    2006-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Rail Gun are electric weapons which will require a significant amount of stored energy for operation. These types of weapons are ideal for use onboard an all-electric ship. An investigation is made of the effects these weapons will have on a proposed electrical system architecture using simulation modeling. Specifically, this thesis identifies possible design weaknesses and shows where further research and modeling is needed in order to ensure the proper inte...

  14. High power optical cavity design and concept of operations for a shipboard free electron laser weapon

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited A megawatt (MW)class Free Electron Laser (FEL) as a point defense weapon system may lead to a revolution in anti-ship missile defense. Deep magazine, low cost per shot, proportional engagement capability, and speed of light energy delivery provide the FEL with unmatched advantages over kinetic energy weapon systems. Before an FEL is made fleet deployable, stability, system parameter optimization, and operational utility all must be taken ...

  15. High harmonic attosecond pulse train amplification in a free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, B.W.; Sheehy, B.; Thompson, N.R.; Dunning, D.J.

    2011-03-04

    It is shown using three-dimensional simulations that the temporal structure of an attosecond pulse train, such as that generated via high harmonic generation in noble gases, may be retained in a free electron laser amplifier through to saturation using a mode-locked optical klystron configuration. At wavelengths of {approx}12 nm, a train of attosecond pulses of widths {approx}300 as with peak powers in excess of 1 GW are predicted.

  16. Investigation of betatron instability in a wiggler pumped ion-channel free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavi, A [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, 19395-4697 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H, E-mail: Raghavi@tmu.ac.ir, E-mail: Mehdian@tmu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Betatron emission from an ion-channel free electron laser in the presence of a helical wiggler pump and in the high gain regime is studied. The dispersion relation and the frequency of betatron emission are derived. Growth rate is illustrated and maximum growth rate as a function of ion-channel density is considered. Finally, the relation between beam energy, the density of ion channel and the region of betatron emission is discussed.

  17. High harmonic attosecond pulse train amplification in a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown using three-dimensional simulations that the temporal structure of an attosecond pulse train, such as that generated via high harmonic generation in noble gases, may be retained in a free electron laser amplifier through to saturation using a mode-locked optical klystron configuration. At wavelengths of ∼12 nm, a train of attosecond pulses of widths ∼300 as with peak powers in excess of 1 GW are predicted.

  18. Properties of the transfer matrices of deflecting magnet systems for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oscillation of the free electron laser (FEL) requires the high current and low emittance electron beam. The beam transport system should be achromatic and isochronous to preserve the brightness and the emittance of the electron beam. In this paper we clarify the algebraic properties of the transfer matrices of the magnetic deflection system, which is a key component in the beam transport line. (author)

  19. Radiation safety aspects of new X-ray free electron laser facility, SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the safety point of view, X-ray free electron laser facilities have some characteristics in comparison with 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facilities. One is that the high energy electrons are always injected into the beam dump and the beamlines must be constructed in the direction of the movements of electrons, and another is that the total number of accelerated electrons of X-ray free electron laser facilities is much larger than that of synchrotron radiation facilities. In addition to the importance of safety interlock systems, therefore, it is important that high energy electrons never invade into X-ray free electron laser beamlines and the amount of accelerated electron beam losses must be reduced as much as possible. At SACLA, a safety permanent magnet was installed into the X-ray light beam axis, and a beam halo monitor and beam loss monitors were installed within and around the electron transport pipes, respectively. In comparison with the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, shielding design of SACLA, outline of the radiation safety systems including the monitors will be presented

  20. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of 93Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in 57Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities

  1. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin, E-mail: yuanbin.wu@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana, E-mail: Palffy@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  2. Identification of the Amplification Mechanism in the First Free-Electron Laser as Net Stimulated Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H.Kim

    2009-01-01

    We find that the electron phase with respect to the incident laser radiation must be random in the first freeelectron laser (FEL) and, hence, the incident laser radiation works as a relaxation force to keep a Maxwellian distribution. We formulate the threshold laser intensity for amplification which agrees with the measured value in the order of magnitude in the first FEL. The magnetic wiggler must produce an electric wiggler whose period is the same as that of the magnetic wiggler. We find that net stimulated free-electron two-quantum Stark (FETQS)emission driven by this electric wiggler is the mechanism responsible t'or the measured ga/n and the measured laser intensity at the plateau in the first FEL.

  3. Investigating the interaction of x-ray free electron laser radiation with grating structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaudin, J.; Ozkan, C.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Bajt, S.; Burian, Tomáš; Vyšín, Luděk; Coppola, N.; Dastjani-Farahani, S.; Chapman, H.N.; Galasso, G.; Hájková, Věra; Harmand, M.; Juha, Libor; Jurek, M.; Loch, R.A.; Möller, S.; Nagasono, M.; Störmer, M.; Sinn, H.; Saksl, K.; Sobierajski, R.; Schulz, J.; Sovak, P.; Toleikis, S.; Tiedtke, K.; Tschentscher, T.; Krzywinski, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 15 (2012), s. 3033-3035. ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : radiation damage * diffraction grating * amorphous carbon * soft x- rays * free-electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.385, year: 2012

  4. Imaging the He$_2$ quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, S; Voigtsberger, J; Kalinin, A; Schottelius, A; Schober, C; Waitz, M; Sann, H; Hartung, A; Bauer, T; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Goihl, C; Janke, C; Richter, M; Kastirke, G; Weller, M; Czasch, A; Kitzler, M; Braune, M; Grisenti, R E; Schöllkopf, W; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schöffer, M; Williams, J B; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on coulomb explosion imaging of the wavefunction of the quantum halo system He$_2$. Each atom of this system is ionized by tunnelionization in a femto second laser pulse and in a second experiment by single photon ionization employing a free electron laser. We visualize the exponential decay of the probability density of the tunneling particle over distance for over two orders of magnitude up to an internuclear distance of 250 \\r{A}. By fitting the slope of the density in the tunneling regime we obtain a binding energy of 151.9 $\\pm$ 13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  5. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L; Gutt, C; Streit-Nierobisch, S; Walther, M; Schaffert, S; Pfau, B; Geilhufe, J; Büttner, F; Flewett, S; Günther, C M; Eisebitt, S; Kobs, A; Hille, M; Stickler, D; Frömter, R; Oepen, H P; Lüning, J; Grübel, G

    2013-01-01

    An endstation for pump-probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump-probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si(3)N(4) membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples. PMID:23387667

  6. Applications of the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser for photobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylla, H. Frederick; Benson, Stephen V.; Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Austin, Robert H.; Sutherland, John C.

    2000-04-01

    A versatile free electron laser (FEL) user facility has recently come on line at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) providing high average (kilowatt-level) power laser light in the infrared. A planned upgrade of the FEL in this facility will extend the wavelength range through the visible to the deep UV and provide the photobiology community with a unique light source for a variety of studies. Planned and potential applications of this FEL include: IR studies of energy flow in biomolecules, IR and visible imaging of biomedical systems, IR and visible studies of photodynamic effects and UV and near visible studies of DNA photodamage.

  7. Boiling the Vacuum with an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Ringwald, A.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the la...

  8. Conductors, semiconductors, and insulators irradiated with short-wavelength free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Jurek, M.; Nietubyc, R.; Pelka, J. B.; Juha, L.; Bittner, M.; Létal, V.; Vorlíček, V.; Andrejczuk, A.; Feldhaus, J.; Keitel, B.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Treusch, R.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2007-02-01

    The results of a study of irreversible changes induced at surfaces of metals, semiconductors, and insulators by extreme ultraviolet (λTESLA Test Facility Free-Electron Laser, Phase 1 (TTF1 FEL) are reported and discussed. The laser was tuned at 86, 89, and 98nm during the experiments reported here. Energy spectra of ions ejected from the irradiated surfaces are also reported. Special attention is paid to the difference in the ablation behavior of (semi)conductors and insulators that we have observed. The difference is dramatic, while the absorption coefficients are similar for all materials at the TTF1 FEL wavelength.

  9. Pair Production from Vacuum at the Focus of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Ringwald, A.

    2001-01-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spo...

  10. Conductors, semiconductors, and insulators irradiated with short-wavelength free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of irreversible changes induced at surfaces of metals, semiconductors, and insulators by extreme ultraviolet (λ<100 nm) ultrashort pulses provided by TESLA Test Facility Free-Electron Laser, Phase 1 (TTF1 FEL) are reported and discussed. The laser was tuned at 86, 89, and 98 nm during the experiments reported here. Energy spectra of ions ejected from the irradiated surfaces are also reported. Special attention is paid to the difference in the ablation behavior of (semi)conductors and insulators that we have observed. The difference is dramatic, while the absorption coefficients are similar for all materials at the TTF1 FEL wavelength

  11. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent...... Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers....

  12. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  13. High gain free electron laser for heating and current drive in the ALCATOR-C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free electron laser (FEL) particle simulation code, FRED, has been used to examine the design of an FEL for amplifying radiation in the one to two millimeter wavelength range for use in electron heating and current drive in a tokamak device such as ALCATOR-C. As a desired design goal a peak output power of 8 GW, with a minimum input power in the 1 to 100 watt range has been used. The effects of electron beam current, energy and brightness, laser frequency and input power as well as wiggler wavelength and overall wiggler length on the performance of the FEL have been examined

  14. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An endstation for pump–probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump–probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-platinum multilayer samples grown on freestanding Si3N4 membranes and pump-laser-induced grid structures in multilayer samples.

  15. Single-shot characterization of independent femtosecond extreme ultraviolet free electron and infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-color above threshold ionization of helium and xenon has been used to analyze the synchronization between individual pulses of the femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free electron laser in Hamburg and an independent intense 120 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. Characteristic sidebands appear in the photoelectron spectra when the two pulses overlap spatially and temporally. The cross-correlation curve points to a 250 fs rms jitter between the two sources at the experiment. A more precise determination of the temporal fluctuation between the XUV and infrared pulses is obtained through the analysis of the single-shot sideband intensities

  16. PROCEEDING OF THE SEEDED X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER WORKSHOP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,X.J.; MURPHY,J.B.; YU,L.H.; FAATZ,B.; HUANG,Z.; REICHE,S.; ZOLOTOREV,M.

    2002-12-13

    The underlying theory of a high gain free electron laser (FEL) has existed for two decades [1-2], but it is only in the last few years that these novel radiation sources have been realized experimentally. Several high gain FELs have successfully reached saturation in the infrared, visible and the VUV portion of the spectrum: the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) free electron lasers [3] at BNL and the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FELs at LEUTL, VISA and TTF [4-6]. The outstanding challenges for future FELs are to extend high gain FELs to the X-ray regime, improve the longitudinal coherence of the radiation using seeded FEL schemes and generate ultrashort pulses (<100 fs). The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) sponsored a Seeded X-ray Free Electron Laser Workshop on December 13-14, 2002 to explore these challenging issues. Representatives from BNL, DESY, LBNL, SLAC and UCLA made presentations on the novel schemes under consideration at their laboratories. Workshop participants had a lively discussion on the feasibility, performance and R&D issues associated with the seeded XFEL schemes. An improvement of the electron beam quality will certainly be necessary to drive the XFEL. Self-seeding SASE, cascaded HGHG, and SASE pulse compression FELs show the most promise for producing short pulse X-rays. Of these, only the self-seeded and HGHG schemes generate longitudinally coherent radiation. While the pulse length in the self-seeded scheme is determined by the electron bunch length ({approx}100 fs), the pulse length in the HGHG scheme is determined by the short pulse seed laser, and so can be much shorter ({approx} 20 fs).

  17. Boiling the vacuum with an X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory. (orig.)

  18. Boiling the Vacuum with an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ringwald, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  19. Boiling the Vacuum with AN X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, A.

    2004-10-01

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  20. Sequential multiphoton multiple ionization of Ar and Xe by X-ray free electron laser pulses at SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated multiphoton multiple ionization of Ar and Xe atoms irradiated by intense X-ray pulses using the new X-ray free electron laser facility SACLA. The experimental results are compared with theoretical results.

  1. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  2. Electron Acceleration By The Use Of Segmented Cylindrical Electrodes In An Inverse Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikrah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- In this paper we expend a theory of high gradient laser excited electron accelerator by the use of an inverse free-electron laser IFEL but with using new structure and design. The wiggler used in our scheme that is to say Paul wiggler is obtainedby segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltagesVosc tover 90-degrees segments. The inverse free-electron laser interaction can be demonstrated by the equations that govern the electron motion in the composed fields of both laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical research of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the electron gains the maximum energy at a short distance for high wiggler amplitude intensities a0w. In addition it is discovered that the electron energy gains various peaks for different initial axial velocities. It is seen that aappropriate small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces remarkably high energy gain. According to the transverse limitation of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this devise.

  3. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  4. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  5. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Duesterer, Stefan; Rehders, Marie; Fruehling, Ulrike; Gerasimova, Natalia; Gerken, Nils; Gerth, Christopher; Golz, Torsten; Grebentsov, Alexander; Hass, Eugen; Honkavaara, Katja; Kocharian, V.; Kurka, Moritz; Al-Shemmary, Alaa; Limberg, Th.; Mitzner, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Rad...

  6. Works on the start-up of an infrared free-electron laser in FIAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description and results of the study on the free-electron laser (FEL) on 100 μm, representing the first line of the FIAN multipurpose radiation complex, are presented. The electron beam with the energy of 6-8 MeV, once accelerated in a racetrack microtron and extracted into the FEL injection tract, is used for exciting this FEL. The system of the electron beam transport, injection and diagnostics are described. Additional works on increasing the beam emittance up to 0.4 A for one energy spread percent are carried out. The obtained electron beam parameters assure generation of the far infrared radiation in the FEL

  7. The first stage of the free electron laser for the Siberian center of photochemical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project on the free electron laser (FEL) of continuous action of the IR-range with the average power of 100 kW for conducting photochemical studies is described. The electron energy recovery by means of a linear accelerator-recuperator (AR) is applied in the FEL. The FEL and AR basic parameters are presented. It is supposed that the above project will be accomplished in two stages: the first order FEL-AR stage and the full-scale FEL-AR one. The possibilities of applying these facilities are indicated

  8. Improved resonator stability and performance of oscillator free-electron lasers using a hollow electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) in the oscillator configuration, using a hollow or annular electron beam, instead of the usual Gaussian. Using the three-dimensional, time- dependent FEL code GENESIS, we show that for FEL oscillators use of an annular beam extends the region of resonator stability over that of a Gaussian beam, arising out of reduced mode competition. We also find a three-fold increase in the saturated out-coupled power, with the optical mode still remaining the fundamental TEM00 mode. Thus, it may be preferable to operate an FEL oscillator with a hollow electron beam. (author)

  9. Hollow-glass waveguide delivery of an infrared free-electron laser for microsurgical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research is to deliver free-electron-laser (FEL) pulses for intraocular microsurgery. The FEL at Vanderbilt University is tunable from 1.8 to 10.8 μm. To deliver the FEl beam we used a metallic-coated hollow-glass waveguide of 530-μm inner diameter. A 20-gauge cannula with a miniature CaF2 window shielded the waveguide from water. Open-sky retinotomy was performed on cadaver eyes. The system delivered as much as 6x105 W of FEL peak power to the intraocular tissues without damage to the waveguide or to the surgical probe

  10. Intense ultrashort pulse generation using the JAERI far-infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense ultrashort optical pulse has been quasi-continuously generated using a superconducting RF linac-based free-electron laser at a wavelength of 22.5 μm. The pulse shape and width are measured by second-order optical autocorrelation with a birefringent Te crystal. At synchronism of the optical resonator, the pulse shape is a smooth single pulse with an FWHM width of 255 fs and energy of 74 μJ. A train of subpulses is developed by increasing the desynchronism of the optical resonator. The measured results are in good agreement with numerical simulation

  11. Megawatt-class free electron laser concept for shipboard self-defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient MW-class free electron laser (FEL) directed energy weapon (DEW) system holds promise for satisfying shipboard self-defense (SSD) requirements on future generations of Navy vessels because of the potential for high-power operation and the accessibility to all IR wavelengths. In order to meet shipboard packaging and prime power constraints, the power efficiency and high real-estate gradient achievable in an FEL driven by a superconducting RF accelerator is attractive. Configuration options and the key development issues for such a system are described

  12. Endstation for ultrafast magnetic scattering experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg

    OpenAIRE

    MÜller, L.; Gutt, C.; Eisebitt, S.; Kobs, A.; Hille, M.; Stickler, D.; Frömter, R.; Oepen, H.P.; Lüning, J.; Gruebel, Gerhard; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Walther, M.; Schaffert, S.; Pfau, B.; Geilhufe, J.

    2013-01-01

    An endstation for pump–probe small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is presented. The endstation houses a solid-state absorber, optical incoupling for pump–probe experiments, time zero measurement, sample chamber, and detection unit. It can be used at all FLASH beamlines in the whole photon energy range offered by FLASH. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by showing the results of resonant magnetic SAXS measurements on cobalt-...

  13. Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leth, Henriette Astrup

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dissociative multiple ionization processes of diatomic molecules exposed to extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses is studied theoretically using the Monte Carlo wave packet approach. By simulated detection of the emitted electrons, the model reduces a full propagation...... of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O2 is studied as an...

  14. Planning design and construction of infra-red free electron laser (IR-FEL) building complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared free-electron laser (IR-FEL) that will be tunable at around 50μm wavelength is currently being developed at the RRCAT, Indore. The Accelerator Technology development in the field of IRFEL requires specific infrastructure facilities for component development, testing and commissioning. The IRFEL complex has been designed with integrated approach to enable the technology development ensuring fulfillment of specific requirements of Radiation shielding, precision alignment, environmental conditions, man and material transport arrangement, provision for supporting arrangement for heavy undulator, electron beam transport system, optical cavity system and electrical power etc. The paper highlights salient features of planning design and construction of IRFEL complex

  15. Weak-Field Gain in Short-Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Blau, J; Niles, S P; Vigil, R

    2005-01-01

    A compact, high-power free electron laser may require a short-Rayleigh length resonator to reduce the power intensity on the mirrors. Conventional FEL theory predicts that as the Rayleigh length is reduced below an optimum value of approximately one-third of the undulator length, the filling factor and hence the gain will be reduced. However, this theory is only valid for extremely low gains (~1%); for modest gains (~20%), the optical mode is distorted and the amplification is enhanced. Simulations show that the weak-field gain remains fairly constant as the Rayleigh length is reduced.

  16. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    OpenAIRE

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; S. Rutishauser; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V.A.; Bunk, O.; E. Färm; Ritala, M; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nano...

  17. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY

  18. A free-electron laser for cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    A G-band free-electron laser designed for plasma heating is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler formed by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers positioned so that the central ferrite (nonferrite) spacers are opposite the outer nonferrite (ferrite) spacers. The CHI wiggler provides for enhanced beam focusing and the ability to handle intense beams and high-power continuous wave radiation. Simulations indicate that a power/efficiency of 3.5 MW/13% are possible using a 690 kV/40 A beam. No beam loss was found in simulation.

  19. Control system for magnet power supplies for Novosibirsk free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-power free electron laser (FEL) based on the accelerator-recuperator principle is being built in Budker Institute (Russia). The magnetic system of the FEL is an important part of the installation. It consists of many magnetic elements of different types: bending magnets, quadrupole lenses and correctors. The windings of all these elements are fed from DC current power supplies. The power supply control system based on embedded intelligent controllers with the CAN-BUS interface is considered in detail. The control software structure and capabilities are described. Besides, the software tools for power supply diagnostics are described

  20. Real-time speckle metrology using terahertz free electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time speckle photography in the terahertz spectral region was experimentally demonstrated using a 160x120 microbolometer focal plane array (FPA). Novosibirsk free electron laser was employed as a source of 2.3 THz monochromatic coherent radiation. A speckled image of an object which was illuminated by radiation diffusely reflected from a rotating scatterer was projected on the FPA. Two hundred fifty frames of the terahertz 'video' recorded by the FPA with a repetition rate of 41 frames/s were used for reconstruction of the amplitude, period, and logarithmic decrement of damped rotational oscillations of the scatterer.

  1. Real-time speckle metrology using terahertz free electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaschina, O.I. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Knyazev, B.A. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Knyazev@inp.nsk.su; Kulipanov, G.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vinokurov, N.A. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-11

    Real-time speckle photography in the terahertz spectral region was experimentally demonstrated using a 160x120 microbolometer focal plane array (FPA). Novosibirsk free electron laser was employed as a source of 2.3 THz monochromatic coherent radiation. A speckled image of an object which was illuminated by radiation diffusely reflected from a rotating scatterer was projected on the FPA. Two hundred fifty frames of the terahertz 'video' recorded by the FPA with a repetition rate of 41 frames/s were used for reconstruction of the amplitude, period, and logarithmic decrement of damped rotational oscillations of the scatterer.

  2. The quantum operation regime of the x-ray Compton free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum operation regime in the x-ray Compton free-electron laser (FEL) is analyzed. This regime emerges when the quantum emitted exceeds the electron beam energy spread and FEL homogeneous linewidth, determined by the optical undulator length. Such a FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. In the nonlinear interaction regime, inversion can be completely removed in one pass, in analogy with π-pulse formation in coherently amplifying medium. Estimates show the quantum FEL is a promising compact high-power high-brightness source of coherent x-ray radiation. (author)

  3. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Adams, Paul D.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically significant high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements. PMID:24633409

  4. Spatial and temporal coherence properties of single free-electron laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, A; Sorgenfrei, F.; Mancuso, Adrian Paul; Gerasimova, N.; Yefanov, O. M.; Gulden, J.; Gorniak, T.; Senkbeil, T.; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Attwood, D; Dziarzhytski, S.; Mai, D. D.; Treusch, R.; Weckert, E.

    2012-01-01

    The experimental characterization of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at a wavelength of 8.0 nm is presented. Double pinhole diffraction patterns of single femtosecond pulses focused to a size of about 10 microns by 10 microns were measured. A transverse coherence length of 6.2 microns in the horizontal and 8.7 microns in the vertical direction was determined from the most coherent pulses. Using a split and delay unit the coherence ti...

  5. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. Free electron laser with linearly polarized wiggler and ion channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A free electron laser (FEL) configuration utilizing a linearly polarized wiggler and ion-channel guiding has been studied for axial injection of the electron beam. The interaction results in an imperfect electron trajectory which is a superposition of two simple harmonic oscillations, one at the wiggler frequency and the other at the ion-channel frequency. The possibility of obtaining gain at the upshifted wiggler or the upshifted ion-channel betatron frequency and their odd harmonics has been shown. As a result the FEL can be tuned either by changing the electron energy or the ion-channel density

  7. Electron Beam Spectrum Diagnostics with Optical Transition Radiation on the Beijing Free-Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泉凤; 吴频; 高建江; 吴刚

    2004-01-01

    A measurement system was developed to measure the electron beam spectrum of the Beijing free-electron laser based on the optical transition radiation (OTR). This paper describes the system, which consists of a 32-channel high resolution of 0.02% OTR detector, especially the spectrometer. The OTR angular-distribution pattern at the focal plane has two apexes, but the two apexes are smoothed out due to the electron beam energy distribution. The energy spectrum can be measured if the magnet energy resolution is higher than 0.7% to distinguish the electron beam energy distribution.

  8. Free electron laser induced two-photon photoconductivity in Hg1-xCdxTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Beijing free electron laser (BFEL) has been employed for the first time to study the nonlinear photoconductivity characteristics of the typical infrared photoelectronic material Hg1-xCdxTe. Taking advantage of the high photon flux density of BFEL, we have investigated the photoconductivity characteristics in Hg1-xCdxTe induced by two-photon absorption by means of the photoconductivity technique, observed the photoconductivity signals saturation, and studied the two-photon photoconductivity characteristics on different bias voltages across the sample.

  9. Proposals for gain cascading in single-pass of a free-electron laser oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao

    2016-01-01

    The low-gain free electron laser (FEL) oscillators are cutting-edge tools to produce fully coherent radiation in the spectral region from terahertz to vacuum ultraviolet, and potentially in hard X-ray. In this paper, it is proposed to utilize an oscillator with multi-stage undulators to enable gain cascading in a single pass of FEL oscillator, making it possible to achieve shorter pulses and higher power than classical FEL oscillators. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations in the infrared and hard X-ray regions show that our proposal is effective and practically simple to implement.

  10. Growth rate enhancement of free-electron laser by two consecutive wigglers with axial magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hasanbeigi; A Farhadian; E Khademi Bidhendi

    2014-06-01

    The operative mechanism for a free-electron laser (FEL) with two consecutive helical wigglers having opposite circular polarization in the presence of an axial magnetic field is proposed and analysed. With the help of fluid theory, a tenth-degree polynomial dispersion equation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived. The results are used to illustrate and discuss the dependence of growth rate on different system parameters. Finally, it is shown that for the same system parameters the growth rate of the proposed structure is more than the growth rate of instability in a conventional FEL.

  11. Matter under extreme conditions probed by a seeded free-electron-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FERMI is the first user dedicated seeded free-electron-laser (FEL) working in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray range. The EIS-TIMEX experimental end-station was availabe to external users since from the beginning of the user operation of the facility, in Dicember 2012. EIS-TIMEX has been conceived to exploit the unique properties of the FERMI source to study matter under extreme and metastable thermodynamic conditions. We hereby report on its basic parameters and applications, which includes very low jitter (i.e., high time resolution) pump-probe measurements

  12. Transverse-coherence properties of the free-electron-laser FLASH at DESY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, A; Vartanyants, I A; Kuhlmann, M; Duesterer, S; Treusch, R; Feldhaus, J

    2008-12-19

    A general theoretical approach based on the decomposition of statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes was used for the analysis of the coherence properties of the new free-electron laser source FLASH operated at 13.7 nm wavelength. The analysis shows that several transverse modes are contributing to the total radiation field of FLASH. The results of theoretical calculations are compared with measurements using Young's double-slit experiment. The coherence lengths in the horizontal and in the vertical directions 20 m downstream from the source are estimated at 300 and 250 microm, respectively. PMID:19113716

  13. Simulation of an rf gun injector for the Beijing free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxiu

    1990-09-01

    An rf gun injector is being developed in the Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica. It will be used for a 30 MeV, 2856 MHz disk-loaded travelling-wave linac to drive the Beijing free electron laser (BFEL). It consists of an rf thermionic gun with a LaB 6 cathode and an achromatic but nonisochronic alpha magnet serving as the momentum filter. The transverse and longitudinal dynamics of a single electron bunch were simulated using SUPERFISH and PARMELA. The injector performance was examined in the light of the simulation results.

  14. The analysis of Raman scattering in a free-electron laser with a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordbacheh, A., E-mail: akordbacheh@iust.ac.ir; Shahsavand, M. [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, 1684613114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A one dimensional theory of the stimulated Raman backscattering process in a free electron laser with rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is analyzed. The dispersion relation in the rest frame of the electron beam and also a formula for the lab-frame spatial growth rate are derived. A numerical computation of the growth rate for RHW is conducted and a comparison with that for coaxial hybrid wiggler is made away from the resonance. The growth rate is found larger for the rectangular wiggler than for the coaxial wiggler. A much narrower magnetoresonance associated with the third spatial harmonic is also obtained compared to the first one.

  15. The analysis of Raman scattering in a free-electron laser with a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one dimensional theory of the stimulated Raman backscattering process in a free electron laser with rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is analyzed. The dispersion relation in the rest frame of the electron beam and also a formula for the lab-frame spatial growth rate are derived. A numerical computation of the growth rate for RHW is conducted and a comparison with that for coaxial hybrid wiggler is made away from the resonance. The growth rate is found larger for the rectangular wiggler than for the coaxial wiggler. A much narrower magnetoresonance associated with the third spatial harmonic is also obtained compared to the first one

  16. Multiphoton Ionization of Xenon at the LCLS Free-Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Rudek, B.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.; Epp, S.; Foucar, L.; Erk, B.; R. Hartmann; Kimmel, N; Holl, P.; Reich, C.; Strüder, L.; Hirsemann, H.; Ueda, K.; Simon, M.; Berrah, N.

    2012-01-01

    With the first X-ray free-electron laser (FEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), multiphoton ionization has been pushed to a new regime, where atoms and molecules are not just ionized by a series of valence ionizations but "from the inside out". At unprecedented high intensities and short pulse durations in the soft X-ray regime, a series of inner-shell photoionizations followed by cascades of Auger decays was observed to lead to highly charged final states in rare gases such as Ne, Ar...

  17. Matter under extreme conditions probed by a seeded free-electron-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Battistoni, A.; Cucini, R.; Danailov, M. B.; Demidovich, A.; Di Cicco, A.; D'Amico, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Filipponi, A.; Gessini, A.; Gunnella, R.; Hatada, K.; Kurdi, N.; Mahne, N.; Mincigrucci, R.; Raimondi, L.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-08-01

    FERMI is the first user dedicated seeded free-electron-laser (FEL) working in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray range. The EIS-TIMEX experimental end-station was availabe to external users since from the beginning of the user operation of the facility, in Dicember 2012. EIS-TIMEX has been conceived to exploit the unique properties of the FERMI source to study matter under extreme and metastable thermodynamic conditions. We hereby report on its basic parameters and applications, which includes very low jitter (i.e., high time resolution) pump-probe measurements.

  18. Design of an infra-red free-electron laser at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared free-electron laser (IR-FEL) that will be tunable at around 30 μm wavelength is currently being developed at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore. The FEL will use a 15- 25 MeV normal conducting linear accelerator and a 50 mm period, 2.5 m long undulator housed in a 4.1 m long optical cavity. In this paper, we discuss the physics design of the IR-FEL and the design/development of various sub-systems. (author)

  19. A high-power rf linear accelerator for FELS [free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of a high average current rf linear accelerator suitable for driving short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL). It is concluded that the design of a room-temperature rf linear acelerator that can meet the stringent requirements of a high-power short-wavelength FEL appears possible. The accelerator requires the use of an advanced photoelectric injector that is under development; the accelerator components, however, do not require appreciable development. At these large beam currents, low-frequency, large-bore room-temperature cavities can be highly efficient and give all specified performance with minimal risk. 20 refs

  20. First operation of a free-electron laser generating GW power radiation at 32 nm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many scientific disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry and biology to material sciences, geophysics and medical diagnostics need a powerful X-ray source with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such radiation of extreme intensity, and tunable over a wide range of wavelengths, can be accomplished using high-gain free-electron lasers (FEL). Here we present results of the first successful operation of an FEL at a wavelength of 32 nm, with ultra-short pulses (25 fs FWHM), a peak power at the Gigawatt level, and a high degree of transverse and longitudinal coherence. We have demonstrated during the first operation of the VUV-FEL (vacuum-ultra-violet free-electron laser) at DESY that powerful, laser-like VUV radiation pulses in the 10 fs range can be produced with a simple and reliable single-pass SASE FEL (self-amplified spontaneous emission) scheme. The experimental data are in full agreement with theory. This is the shortest wavelength achieved with an FEL to date and an important milestone towards a user facility designed for wavelengths down to 6 nm. With a peak brilliance exceeding the state-of-the-art of synchrotron radiation sources by seven orders of magnitude, this device opens a new field of experiments, and it paves the way towards sources with even shorter wavelengths

  1. Scientific and technological applications of free-electron lasers in ultraviolet photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions of photon-surface interactions have traditionally been cast in terms of the collective properties (e.g., the heat capacity or the optical susceptibility) of the irradiated material. However, the development of lasers and synchrotron light sources, coupled with innovative applications of both mass and optical spectroscopy, is making it possible to study photon-surface interactions at an atomic scale by determining the quantum states of atoms and molecules at and near material surfaces. Short-wavelength free-electron lasers operating in the XUV and VUV regions of the spectrum offer some exciting prospects for novel photon-matter interaction experiments which take advantage of the FEL's intrinsic properties of narrow bandwidth, high intensity, short temporal pulse length and coherence. The authors examine some of the ways in which free electron lasers in the VUV and XUV can lead both to new tools for studying photon-surface interactions through uv-photon-stimulated-desorption (PSD) spectroscopy, and to new developments in optical technology which might help solve certain pressing technological needs of XUV FELs

  2. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the γ-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  3. Space-charge effects and gain in Cherenkov free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a quantum mechanical treatment to study the growth rate characteristics of Cherenkov free-electron laser. For this purpose, we basically use the single-particle model in which the dynamics of a single electron in the presence of the laser field is analyzed. The inclusions of the space-charge (collective) effects are considered by taking into account the static electric field of neighboring electrons in the dynamics formulations. An analytical expression for the gain per pass in the Cherenkov laser is derived. It is shown that the space-charge effects depend mainly on the operating wavelength, the electron density, and the electron beam neutralization due to the possible presence of positive ions. We discuss the validity boundaries of the interaction mode evolved from the single-particle regime to the collective regime. Using quantum mechanical concepts, we finally present a formula for calculating the inclusion of the spontaneous emission power

  4. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  5. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at a x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experim...

  6. Storage ring free electron laser, pulse propagation effects and microwave type instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Migliorati, M. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

    2000-07-01

    It has been developed a dynamical model accounting for the storage Ring Free Electron Laser evolution including pulse propagation effects and e-beam instabilities of microwave type. It has been analyzed the general conditions under which the on set of the laser may switch off the instability and focus everybody attention on the interplay between cavity mismatch, laser pulsed behavior and e-beam instability dynamics. Particular attention is also devoted to the laser operation in near threshold conditions, namely at an intracavity level just enough to counteract the instability, that show in this region new and interesting effects arises. [Italian] Si sviluppa un modello dinamico per la descrizione dell'evoluzione di un laser ad elettroni liberi in anello di accumulazione con l'inclusione di effetti di propagazione d'impulso e di instabilita' a microonda. Si analizzano le condizioni per le quali l'instaurarsi dell'operazione laser puo' spegnere l'instabilita' e si focalizza l'attenzione sulla connessione fra desincronismo della cavita', comportamento pulsato del laser e comportamento instabile del fascio di elettroni: si analizza in particolare l'operazione laser quando il guadagno e' prossimo alle perdite della cavita' e si osservano effetti particolarmente interessanti.

  7. Equivalence between free-electron-laser oscillators and actively-mode-locked lasers: Detailed studies of temporal, spatiotemporal, and spectrotemporal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, C.; Legrand, T.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Couprie, M. E. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Unite Mixte de Recherche No. 8607 associee au Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Batiment 200, Boite Postale 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Unite Mixte de Recherche No. 8523, associee au Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches Lasers et Applications, Federation de Recherche No. 2416, associee au Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Bat. P5, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex,France (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, Boite Postale 34, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-12-15

    We show experimentally and numerically that free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators behave in a very similar way to conventional actively-mode-locked lasers. This stems from the similar structures of their underlying Haus equations. A comparative study of the temporal evolutions of the pulse train shapes and spatiotemporal regimes is performed on a Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser and a storage-ring free-electron laser. Furthermore, since direct observations of time-resolved pulse shapes and spectra are more accessible on free-electron lasers, the analogy also potentially enables one to investigate mode-locked laser dynamics using existing FEL facilities.

  8. A continuous wave millimeter free electron laser experiment with a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator and electron beam recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems relevant to a continuous wave free electron laser (FEL) in the centimeter-millimeter region are investigated. The ideas are applied to the FEL experiment in progress at the Legnaro (Padova) INFN laboratory. The accelerator characteristics and laser parameters are discussed. The laser could sweep the centimeter-millimeter region until 2.5 mm with a power around 15 kW

  9. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  10. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Gunst, Jonas; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of $^{93}$Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV M\\"ossbauer trans...

  11. Microbunching-instability-induced sidebands in a seeded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lindberg, Ryan; Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of the multishot-averaged, soft x-ray, self-seeding spectrum at the LCLS free-electron laser often have a pedestal-like distribution around the seeded wavelength, which limits the spectral purity and can negatively affect some user applications not employing a post-undulator monochromator. In this paper, we study the origins of such pedestals, focusing on longitudinal phase space modulations produced by the microbunching instability upstream of the free-electron laser (FEL) undulator. We show from theory and numerical simulation that both energy and density modulations can induce sidebands in a high-gain, seeded FEL whose fractional strength typically grows as the square of the undulator length. The results place a tight constraint on the longitudinal phase space uniformity of the electron beam for a seeded FEL, possibly requiring the amplitude of long-wavelength modulations to be much smaller than the typical incoherent energy spread if the output sideband power is to remain only a couple percent or less of the amplified seed power.

  12. A novel scheme for the generation of X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    In this paper are developed design considerations on the possibility of generating Free Electron Laser radiation in the X-ray region of the spectrum (50-60 AA), by exploiting a frequency multiplier scheme. It is proposed a Free Electron device consisting of a relatively low energy linac (750 MeV) and three sections: an oscillator at 150 nm, an amplifier tuned at the 5. harmonic of the first an a second amplifier operating at a sub-harmonic of the second amplifier. The seedless amplification is ensured by the e-beam bunching, induced in the oscillator and in the second section, which plays the role of amplifier and modulator. It is also explored the possibility of overcoming the problems associated with the bunching efficiency dilution, due to intracavity saturation of the first section, by discussing the regeneration of the bunching by the use of a cavity dumping, realized with a suitable e-beam energy or cavity detuning modulation. [Italian] In questo lavoro vengono sviluppate alcune considerazioni progettuali per estendere l'operazione dei laser ad elettroni liberi alla regione dei (50-60 AA), con l'utilizzo di schemi a moltiplicazione di frequenza. Si propone un sistema che consiste di un Linac ad energia relativamente basa (750 MeV) e tre sezioni: un oscillatore a 150 nm, un amplificatore alla quinta aromonica del primo e un secondo amplificatore operante ad una sub armonica del secondo amplificatore.

  13. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup

  14. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs

  15. Theory of free-electron-laser heating and current drive in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of a powerful new microwave source, the free-electron laser, provides new opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes to be used in toroidal fusion devices. This high-power, pulsed source has a number of technical advantages for these applications, and its use is predicted to lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and opacities in reactor-grade fusion plasmas in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. Although the motivation for much of this research has derived from the application of a free-electron laser to the heating of a tokamak plasma at a frequency near the electron cyclotron frequency, the underlying physics, i.e., the highly nonlinear interaction of an intense, pulsed, coherent electromagnetic wave with an electron in a magnetized plasma including relativistic effects, is of general interest. Other relevant applications include ionospheric modification by radio-frequency waves, high-energy electron accelerators, and the propagation of intense, pulsed electromagnetic waves in space and astrophysical plasmas. This review reports recent theoretical progress in the analysis and computer simulation of the absorption and current drive produced by intense pulses, and of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities, nonlinear self-focusing, trapped-particle sideband instability, and instabilities of the heated plasma

  16. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  17. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  18. Single-particle structure determination by X-ray free-electron lasers: Possibilities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hosseinizadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Single-particle structure recovery without crystals or radiation damage is a revolutionary possibility offered by X-ray free-electron lasers, but it involves formidable experimental and data-analytical challenges. Many of these difficulties were encountered during the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological systems. Electron microscopy of biological entities has now reached a spatial resolution of about 0.3 nm, with a rapidly emerging capability to map discrete and continuous conformational changes and the energy landscapes of biomolecular machines. Nonetheless, single-particle imaging by X-ray free-electron lasers remains important for a range of applications, including the study of large “electron-opaque” objects and time-resolved examination of key biological processes at physiological temperatures. After summarizing the state of the art in the study of structure and conformations by cryogenic electron microscopy, we identify the primary opportunities and challenges facing X-ray-based single-particle approaches, and possible means for circumventing them.

  19. X-ray free electron laser and its application to 3-dimensional imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laser in the X-ray region has been anticipated to be realized as a light source to probe the nano-world. Free electron lasers using high energy electron accelerators have been promising the candidates. The finding of the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) resolved the technological difficulties accompanying the X-ray free electron laser, and the construction of large scale SASE facilities started in western countries. In Japan the construction of an SASE facility started in 2006 to be completed in 2010 at the site of the large synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8 positioned as a 'critical technology of national importance' by the Japanese government. The principle of the X-ray free electron laser is explained and the outline of the Japanese facility construction plan is presented. Also the application of the X-ray laser to the imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure is introduced. (K.Yoshida)

  20. Quantized form factor shift in the presence of free electron laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fratini, F; Hayrapetyan, A G; Jänkälä, K; Amaro, P; Santos, J P

    2015-01-01

    In electron scattering, the target form factors contribute significantly to the diffraction pattern and carry information on the target electromagnetic charge distribution. Here we show that the presence of electromagnetic radiation, as intense as currently available in Free Electron Lasers, shifts the dependence of the target form factors by a quantity that depends on the number of photons absorbed or emitted by the electron as well as on the parameters of the electromagnetic radiation. As example, we show the impact of intense ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation on elastic electron scattering by Ne-like Argon ion and by Xenon atom. We find that the shift brought by the radiation to the form factor is in the order of some percent. Our results may open up a new avenue to explore matter with the assistance of laser.

  1. Time-resolved protein nano-crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photo-activated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nano-crystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 μs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. (authors)

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of various materials irradiated by soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cihelka, Jaroslav; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Rosmej, F.B.; Renner, Oldřich; Saksl, K.; Hájková, Věra; Vyšín, Luděk; Galtier, E.; Schott, R.; Khorsand, A.R.; Riley, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Nelson, A.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S.; Wark, J.; Whitcher, T.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Fäustlin, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Bajt, S.; Chapman, H.; Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Hau-Riege, S.; London, R.A.; Kuba, J.; Stojanovic, N.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Gleeson, A.J.; Störmer, M.; Andreasson, J.; Hajdu, J.; Timneanu, N.

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2009 - (Juha, L.; Bajt, S.; Sobierajski, R.), 73610P/1-73610P/10 ISBN 9780819476357. ISSN 0277-786x. - (Proceedings of SPIE. 7361). [Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-Ray Optics II. Prague (CZ), 21.04.2009-23.04.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * free-electron laser * atomic lines * plasma plume * warm dense matter Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.822766

  3. Spectro-temporal shaping of seeded free-electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Gauthier, David; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectro-temporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectro-temporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows retrieving the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility to tailor the spectro-temporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to X-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  4. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  5. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  6. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  7. Free-electron laser multiplex driven by a superconducting linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Tim; Amstutz, Philipp; Bödewadt, Jörn; Brenner, Günter; Ekanayake, Nagitha; Faatz, Bart; Hacker, Kirsten; Honkavaara, Katja; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Lechner, Christoph; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Scholz, Matthias; Schreiber, Siegfried; Vogt, Mathias; Zemella, Johann; Laarmann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate femtosecond XUV and X-ray pulses at peak powers in the gigawatt range. The FEL user facility FLASH at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) is driven by a superconducting linear accelerator with up to 8000 pulses per second. Since 2014, two parallel undulator beamlines, FLASH1 and FLASH2, have been in operation. In addition to the main undulator, the FLASH1 beamline is equipped with an undulator section, sFLASH, dedicated to research and development of fully coherent extreme ultraviolet photon pulses using external seed lasers. In this contribution, the first simultaneous lasing of the three FELs at 13.4 nm, 20 nm and 38.8 nm is presented. PMID:27577757

  8. A VUV free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, J.; Tesla Fel Study Group

    1996-02-01

    We present the layout of a single pass free electron laser (FEL) to be driven by the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY. The TTF is a test-bed for high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting acceleration sections for a future linear collider. Due to its unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a FEL. We aim at a photon wavelength of λ = 6 nm utilizing the TTF after it has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties are discussed.

  9. RF Stability in Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenomena that result from the interaction of the beam with the rf fields in superconducting cavities, and can potentially limit the performance of high average power Energy Recovery Free Electron Lasers (FELs), are reviewed. These phenomena include transverse and longitudinal multipass, multibunch Beam Breakup, longitudinal beam-loading types of instabilities and their interaction with the FEL, Higher Order Mode power dissipation, emittance growth and energy spread due to short range wakefields, and rf control issues. We present experimental data obtained at the Jefferson Lab IR FEL with average current up to 5 mA, compare with analytic calculations and simulations and extrapolate the performance of Energy Recovery FELs to much higher average currents, up to approximately 100 mA. This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150, the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Laser Processing Consortium

  10. Design and fabrication of PPM and hybrid undulator for free electron laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two undulators for free electron laser applications are under fabrication at Insertion Device Development and Measurement Laboratory, DAVV, Indore. The first one is of PPM type with twenty periods, 50 mm each period. The second one is a hybrid undulator with twenty five periods, 20 mm each period. NdFeB magnets of rectangular cross section 12.5 mm, 12.5 mm and 6.25 mm, 6.25 mm will be used for the undulators respectively. Each magnet length is of 50 mm. Each magnet is scanned by a laser micrometer to ensure gap uniformity along the length of the undulator. In this paper we describe the technical design details of both the undulators.

  11. Achieving few-femtosecond time-sorting at hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, few-femtosecond pulses have become available at hard X-ray free-electron lasers. Coupled with the available sub-10 fs optical pulses, investigations into few-femtosecond dynamics are not far off. However, achieving sufficient synchronization between optical lasers and X-ray pulses continues to be challenging. We report a 'measure-and-sort' approach, which achieves sub-10 fs root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) error measurement at hard X-ray FELs, far beyond the 100-200 fs r.m.s. jitter limitations. This timing diagnostic, now routinely available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is based on ultrafast free-carrier generation in optically transparent materials. Correlation between two independent measurements enables unambiguous demonstration of ∼6 fs r.m.s. error in reporting the optical/X-ray delay, with single shot error suggesting the possibility of reaching few-femtosecond resolution. (authors)

  12. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P.; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J.; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  13. Feasibility analysis for attosecond X-ray pulses at FERMI and ELETTRA free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present preliminary analysis for the feasibility of the attosecond x-ray pulses at a proposed FERMI and ELETTRA free electron laser (FEL) [1]. In part 1 we restrict ourselves to minimal modifications to the proposed FEL and consider a scheme for attosecond x-ray production which can be qualified as a small add-on to a primary facility. We demonstrate that at 5-nm wavelength our scheme is capable for production of pulses with an approximate duration of 100 attoseconds at approximately 2 MW peak power and with an absolute temporal synchronization to a pump laser pulse. In part 2 we propose to use an FEL amplifier seeded by a VUV signal and to follow it by the scheme for attosecond x-ray production described in part 1

  14. Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond X-ray pulse in a free electron laser (FEL), via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, sub-femtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator,this current spike emits a ∼250 attosecond X-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the X-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch

  15. Start-to-end modelling of a mode-locked optical klystron free electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A free electron laser (FEL) in a mode-locked optical klystron (MLOK) configuration is modelled using start-to-end simulations that simulate realistic electron beam acceleration and transport before input into a full three-dimensional FEL simulation code. These simulations demonstrate that the MLOK scheme is compatible with the present generation of radiofrequency accelerator designs. A train of few-optical cycle pulses is predicted with peak powers similar to those of the equivalent conventional FEL amplifier. The role of electron beam energy modulation in these results is explained and the limitations of some simulation codes discussed. It is shown how seeding the FEL interaction using a High Harmonic seed laser can improve the coherence properties of the output.

  16. Transverse beam diagnostics for seeding the free-electron laser FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedewadt, Joern; Azima, Armin; Curbis, Francesca; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Drescher, Markus; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Miltchev, Velizar; Mittenzwey, Manuel; Rossbach, Joerg; Schulz, Sebastian; Schulz, Michael; Tarkeshian, Roxana; Wieland, Marek [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Meseck, Atoosa [Helmholz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Khan, Shaukat [Technische Universitaet, Dortmund (Germany). DELTA; Duesterer, Stefan; Feldhaus, Josef; Laarmann, Tim; Schlarb, Holger; Bajt, S. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Ischebeck, Rasmus [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    The free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) delivers intense femtosecond pulses in the extreme ultra violet (XUV) and soft X-ray spectral range for experiments in material science or time resolved atomic physics. These XUV pulses are generated by the interaction of ultra relativistic electron bunches and the spontaneously emitted synchrotron radiation within an undulator. Due to the statistic behavior of the spontaneous emission of light the spectral distribution of the FEL pulses changes from shot to shot. By seeding the FEL process with an external laser field these fluctuation can be decreased. At FLASH a direct seeding scheme for wavelengths below 40 nm is presently realized. This talk presents the concepts and the diagnostics to control the transverse overlap of the seed and the electron beam.

  17. Transverse beam diagnostics for seeding the free-electron laser FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) delivers intense femtosecond pulses in the extreme ultra violet (XUV) and soft X-ray spectral range for experiments in material science or time resolved atomic physics. These XUV pulses are generated by the interaction of ultra relativistic electron bunches and the spontaneously emitted synchrotron radiation within an undulator. Due to the statistic behavior of the spontaneous emission of light the spectral distribution of the FEL pulses changes from shot to shot. By seeding the FEL process with an external laser field these fluctuation can be decreased. At FLASH a direct seeding scheme for wavelengths below 40 nm is presently realized. This talk presents the concepts and the diagnostics to control the transverse overlap of the seed and the electron beam.

  18. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne /SLAC

    2012-01-06

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  19. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  20. X-ray optics research for free electron lasers: study of material damage under extreme fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuba, Jaroslav E-mail: kuba@llnl.gov; Wootton, Alan; Bionta, R.M.; Shepherd, Ronnie; Fill, E.E.; Ditmire, Todd; Dyer, Gilliss; London, R.A.; Shlyaptsev, V.N.; Dunn, James; Booth, Rex; Bajt, Sasa; Smith, R.F.; Feit, M.D.; Levesque, Rick; McKernan, Mark

    2003-07-11

    Free electron lasers operating in the 0.1-1.5 nm wavelength range have been proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (USA) and DESY (Germany). The unprecedented brightness and associated fluence (up to 30 J cm{sup -2}) predicted for pulses <300 fs pose new challenges for optical components. A criterion for optical component design is required, implying an understanding of X-ray--material interactions at these extreme conditions. In our experimental effort, the extreme conditions are simulated by the currently available sources ranging from optical lasers, through X-ray lasers (XRLs) at 14.7 nm down to K-alpha sources ({approx}0.15 nm). In this paper, we present an overview of our research project on X-ray--matter interaction, including both computer modeling and preliminary results from optical laser experiments, the COMET tabletop high brightness ps XRL and a K-alpha experimental campaign carried out at the JanUSP laser facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Status report of the study on the free electron laser for the 3GHz HF linear accelerator: CLIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main steps of project CLIO (Collaboration for an Infrared Laser at Orsay, France) are reported. The aim of the project is the construction of a free electron laser system, in the infrared range, for use in linear accelerators. The design and concepts of a free electron laser system are described. The linear accelerator characteristics, and those of each of the system's main components are presented. The laboratory's infrastructure, the first experiments feasibility and the research programs, which will probably make use of CLIO, are discussed

  2. Characterization of amorphous carbon films as total-reflection mirrors for XUV free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Sandra; Steeg, Barbara; Wiesmann, Jorg; Stormer, Michael; Feldhaus, Josef; Bormann, R.'diger; Michaelsen, Carsten

    2002-12-01

    As part of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) project a free electron laser (FEL) in the XUV (Extreme Ultra-Violet, (6-200 eV)) and X-ray (0.5-15 keV) range is being developed at DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) a prototype FEL has recently demonstrated maximum light amplification in the range of 80 nm to 120 nm. It is expected that the FEL will provide intense, sub-picosecond radiation pulses with photon energies up to 200 eV in the next development stage. In a joint project between DESY and GKSS, thin film optical elements with very high radiation stability, as required for FEL applications, are currently being developed. Sputter-deposited amorphous carbon coatings have been prepared for use as total reflection X-ray mirrors. The optical characterization of the mirrors has been carried out using the soft X-ray reflectometer at HASYLAB (Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor) beamline G1. The reflectivity of the carbon films at 2 deg incidence angle is close to the theoretical reflectivity of 95.6 %, demonstrating the high quality of the coatings. For comparison, layers produced by different methods (e.g. Chemical vapor deposition, Pulsed laser deposition) have been characterized as well. Annealing experiments have been performed to evaluate the thermal stability of the amorphous carbon films. Further investigations concerning the radiation stability of the X-ray mirrors have also been conducted. The mirrors were irradiated in the FELIS (Free Electron Laser-Interaction with Solids) experiment at the TTF-FEL. Microscopic investigations demonstrate that the carbon mirrors are fairly stable.

  3. A novel scheme for the generation of X-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper are developed design considerations on the possibility of generating Free Electron Laser radiation in the X-ray region of the spectrum (50-60 AA), by exploiting a frequency multiplier scheme. It is proposed a Free Electron device consisting of a relatively low energy linac (750 MeV) and three sections: an oscillator at 150 nm, an amplifier tuned at the 5th harmonic of the first an a second amplifier operating at a sub-harmonic of the second amplifier. The seedless amplification is ensured by the e-beam bunching, induced in the oscillator and in the second section, which plays the role of amplifier and modulator. It is also explored the possibility of overcoming the problems associated with the bunching efficiency dilution, due to intracavity saturation of the first section, by discussing the regeneration of the bunching by the use of a cavity dumping, realized with a suitable e-beam energy or cavity detuning modulation

  4. The surface modification of tooth dentine with a Free Electron Laser (FEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) with the wide wavelength tunability has been developed and used for various applications. The FEL gives high efficiency for the photo-induced ablation when the laser is tuned to an absorption maximum of the target. The FEL was tuned to 9.4 μm, which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid ion, a known major component of dentine. The FEL pulse length was several ps. The average output power was varied from 5 to 20 mW by filters. The change of irradiated dentine surface was analyzed by mass spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Positive ions which correspond to Na+, CO3+ and many phosphoric acid ions were measured. It was found that atomic ratio of P/Ca had reduced from 0.65-0.60. The atomic ratio of P/Ca, however had not changed with irradiation by Er:YAG laser (2.9 μm), or CO2 laser (10.6 μm). These results indicate the selective ablation of phosphoric acid ion by the 9.4 mm FEL irradiation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Medical Application of Free Electron Laser Trasmittance using Hollow Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsonuri

    2004-01-01

    Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) is expected as new application for biomedical surgery. However, delivery of MIR-FEL into the body is difficult because the common glass optical fibers have strong absorption at MIR region. A good operational and flexible line for FEL is required at medical field. A Hollow optical fiber is developed for IR laser and high-power laser delivery. We evaluated the fiber for FEL transmission line. This fiber is coated with cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and silver thin film on the inside of glass capillary tube. It is 700 μm-bore and 1m in lengths. The fiber transmission loss of the measured wavelength region of 5.5 μm to 12 μm is less than 1dB/m when the fiber is straight and 1.2 dB/m when bent to radius of 20 cm. Additionally, the output beam profile and the pulse structure is not so different form incidence beam. In conclusion, the fiber is suitable for delivery of the FEL energy for applications in medical and laser surgery.

  6. IR-MALDI of low molecular weight compounds using a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Park, Hee K.; Yavas, Oguz; Haglund, R. F.

    1998-05-01

    Initial experiments on infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI) using a free electron laser in the analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds are reported. Mass spectra from samples of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and a phosphate salt were obtained. Low molecular weight (LMW) compounds are of similar mass as the molecular weight of the matrix compound and interference between matrix and analyte ions can degrade MALDI sensitivity. Under optimal conditions, however, we find little interference and that often the analyte signal exceeds the matrix signal, a result also observed in UV-MALDI of these compounds. In the IR-MALDI of EDTA near 3.0 μm the FEL results are similar to those obtained using a fixed frequency 2.94 μm Er:YAG laser of 200 ns pulse duration. However, the tunable FEL laser can selectively excite particular vibrational modes of the matrix (e.g., an OH or CO stretch) or of residual water contained within the crystalline MALDI sample. This capability was used to explore possible vaporization and ionization mechanisms of IR-MALDI for EDTA.

  7. Pair Production from Vacuum at the Focus of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ringwald, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be incre...

  8. Pair production from vacuum at the focus of an X-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, A.

    2001-06-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: one could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this Letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism.

  9. Generation of subterawatt-attosecond pulses in a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Senlin; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marcus, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate attosecond soft x rays in a self-seeded free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for enabling attosecond spectroscopic investigations. A time-energy chirped electron bunch with additional sinusoidal energy modulation is adopted to produce a short seed pulse through a self-seeding monochromator. This short seed pulse, together with high electron current spikes and a cascaded delay setup, enables a high-efficiency FEL with a fresh bunch scheme. Simulations show that using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) parameters, soft x-ray pulses with a FWHM of 260 attoseconds and a peak power of 0.5 TW can be obtained. This scheme also has the feature of providing a stable central wavelength determined by the self-seeding monochromator.

  10. Sustained Kilowatt Lasing in a Free-Electron Laser with Same-Cell Energy Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, G. R.; Bohn, C. L.; Benson, S. V.; Biallas, G.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Evans, R.; Fugitt, J.; Grippo, A.; Gubeli, J.; Hill, R.; Jordan, K.; Li, R.; Merminga, L.; Piot, P.; Preble, J.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Walker, R.; Yunn, B.

    2000-01-01

    Jefferson Laboratory's kW-level infrared free-electron laser utilizes a superconducting accelerator that recovers about 75% of the electron-beam power. In achieving first lasing, the accelerator operated ``straight ahead'' to deliver 38-MeV, 1.1-mA cw current for lasing near 5 μm. The waste beam was sent directly to a dump while producing stable operation at up to 311 W. Utilizing the recirculation loop to send the electron beam back to the linac for energy recovery, the machine has now recovered cw average currents up to 5 mA, and has lased cw with up to 1720 W output at 3.1 μm.

  11. First lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). The experiment was conducted at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This is a BNL experiment in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A preliminary measurement gives a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) pulse energy that is 2 x 107 times larger than the spontaneous radiation, In a purely self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation, the signal was measured as 10 times larger than the spontaneous radiation in the same distance (approximately2 m) through the same wiggler. This means the HGHG signal is 2 x 106 times larger than the SASE signal. To obtain the same saturated output power by the SASE process, the radiator would have to be 3 times longer (6 m)

  12. First lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation free- electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). The experiment was conducted at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This is a BNL experiment in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A preliminary measurement gives a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) pulse energy that is 2x107 times larger than the spontaneous radiation. In a purely self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation, the signal was measured as 10 times larger than the spontaneous radiation in the same distance (∼2 m) through the same wiggler. This means the HGHG signal is 2x106 times larger than the SASE signal. To obtain the same saturated output power by the SASE process, the radiator would have to be 3 times longer (6 m)

  13. Design, construction and characterization of the compact ultrafast terahertz free-electron laser undulator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Biswas; V Kumar; S Chouksey; S Krishnagopal

    2008-12-01

    A compact ultrafast terahertz (CUTE) free-electron laser (FEL) is being developed at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore. The undulator required for the CUTE-FEL has recently been developed. We have designed, built and characterized a variable gap, 5 cm period, 2.5 m long pure permanent magnet undulator in two identical segments. The tolerable error in the magnetic field was 1% in rms, and we have measured it to be 0.7%. The obtained rms phase shake is around 2°. To ensure that the trajectories do not have an exit error in position or angle, corrector coils have been designed. Shimming coils have been applied for both the undulator segments to reduce the amplitude of the betatron oscillations in the vertical trajectory. Details of novel corrector coils and soft iron shims are given and their performance is discussed.

  14. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam Radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Yi; Wu, J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.W.; Fawley, W.M.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UCLA; Reiche, S.; /PSI, Villigen

    2012-02-15

    Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL) can be increased when the undulator is tapered after the FEL saturation. By use of ray equation approximation to combine the one-dimensional FEL theory and optical guiding approach, an explicit physical model is built to provide insight to the mechanism of the electron-radiation coherent interaction with variable undulator parameters as well as electron beam radius. The contribution of variation in electron beam radius and related transverse effects are studied based on the presented model and numerical simulation. Taking a recent studied terawatt, 120 m long tapered FEL as an example, we demonstrate that a reasonably varied, instead of a constant, electron beam radius along the undulator helps to improve the optical guiding and thus the radiation output.

  15. Statistical and coherence properties of radiation from X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2009-12-15

    We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). It is shown that the X-ray FEL radiation before saturation is described with gaussian statistics. Particularly important is the case of the optimized X-ray FEL, studied in detail. Applying similarity techniques to the results of numerical simulations allowed us to find universal scaling relations for the main characteristics of an X-ray FEL operating in the saturation regime: efficiency, coherence time and degree of transverse coherence. We find that with an appropriate normalization of these quantities, they are functions of only the ratio of the geometrical emittance of the electron beam to the radiation wavelength. Statistical and coherence properties of the higher harmonics of the radiation are highlighted as well. (orig.)

  16. Coherence properties of the radiation from X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2006-08-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of coherence properties of the radiation from X-ray free electron laser (XFEL). We consider practically important case when XFEL is optimized for maximum gain. Such an optimization allows to reduce significantly parameter space. Application of similarity techniques to the results of numerical simulations allows to present all output characteristics of the optimized XFEL as functions of the only parameter, ratio of the emittance to the radiation wavelength, {epsilon}=2{pi} {epsilon}/{lambda}. Our studies show that optimum performance of the XFEL in terms of transverse coherence is achieved at the value of the parameter {epsilon} of about unity. At smaller values of {epsilon} the degree of transverse coherence is reduced due to strong influence of poor longitudinal coherence on a transverse one. At large values of the emittance the degree of transverse coherence degrades due to poor mode selection. Comparative analysis of existing XFEL projects, European XFEL, LCLS, and SCSS is presented as well. (orig.)

  17. On the release of cppxfel for processing X-ray free-electron laser images1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    As serial femtosecond crystallography expands towards a variety of delivery methods, including chip-based methods, and smaller collected data sets, the requirement to optimize the data analysis to produce maximum structure quality is becoming increasingly pressing. Here cppxfel, a software package primarily written in C++, which showcases several data analysis techniques, is released. This software package presently indexes images using DIALS (diffraction integration for advanced light sources) and performs an initial orientation matrix refinement, followed by post-refinement of individual images against a reference data set. Cppxfel is released with the hope that the unique and useful elements of this package can be repurposed for existing software packages. However, as released, it produces high-quality crystal structures and is therefore likely to be also useful to experienced users of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) software who wish to maximize the information extracted from a limited number of XFEL images.

  18. Analysis of Cherenkov free-electron laser driven by a flat electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin dielectric slab at the top of an ideal conductor supports surface electromagnetic waves, which can be amplified by an electron beam co-propagating in the close vicinity of the dielectric surface. Under suitable conditions, powerful coherent tera hertz radiation can be produced using this device, which is called as Cherenkov Free-Electron Laser (CFEL). In this paper, we present an analysis of CFEL driven by a two dimensional flat electron beam travelling close and parallel to the dielectric surface. The existence of the surface mode is explained and derived in terms of the singularity of the reflectivity of this system. A formula for small signal gain is derived by analysing the residue at the singularity. Analysis is also extended to understand the behaviour of the system at saturation. (author)

  19. Spatial and temporal coherence properties of single free-electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, A; Mancuso, A P; Gerasimova, N; Yefanov, O M; Gulden, J; Gorniak, T; Senkbeil, T; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Attwood, D; Dziarzhytski, S; Mai, D D; Treusch, R; Weckert, E; Salditt, T; Rosenhahn, A; Wurth, W; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-01-01

    The experimental characterization of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at a wavelength of 8.0 nm is presented. Double pinhole diffraction patterns of single femtosecond pulses focused to a size of about 10 microns by 10 microns were measured. A transverse coherence length of 6.2 microns in the horizontal and 8.7 microns in the vertical direction was determined from the most coherent pulses. Using a split and delay unit the coherence time of the pulses produced in the same operation conditions of FLASH was measured to be 1.75 fs. From our experiment we estimated the degeneracy parameter of the FLASH beam to be on the order of $10^{10}$ to $10^{11}$, which exceeds the values of this parameter at any other source in the same energy range by many orders of magnitude.

  20. Nonlinear evolutionary processes in a free-electron laser generator of diffracted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear evolutionary processes with two control parameters, one of which is related to the electrodynamic structure (positive feedback) and the other is related to the constant electric field applied to the electron flux, are studied in a free-electron laser, which is a diffracted- radiation oscillator. To this end, first, the linear spectral problem for an open-cavity resonator is investigated and the dispersion relation near the Morse critical point is established. Then the nonlinear evolutionary equation with two control parameters is constructed. Analysis of the latter makes it possible to determine the properties of the parametric dependence of the bifurcation and structural stability, which are determined by small variations of the control parameter (tuning of the cavity). This explains the operating efficiency of a diffracted-radiation oscillator in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges

  1. LINAC DESIGN FOR AN ARRAY OF SOFT X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the linac delivering electron bunches into ten independent soft x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) producing light at 1 nm and longer wavelengths is presented. The bunch repetition rate in the linac is 1 MHz and 100 kHz in each of ten FEL beam lines. Various issues regarding machine layout and lattice, bunch compression, collimation, and the beam switch yard are discussed. Particular attention is given to collective effects. A demanding goal is to preserve both a low beam slice emittance and low slice energy spread during acceleration, bunch compression and distribution of the electron bunches into the array of FEL beamlines. Detailed studies of the effect of the electron beam microbunching caused by longitudinal space-charge forces and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) have been carried out and their results are presented

  2. Relativistic aspects of the free-electron laser in the quantum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser (FEL) devices are radiation sources with a wide tunability ranging from far-infrared up to X-rays. All existing FELs can be described by classical electrodynamics. However, due to experimental progress in the last years a new regime, the so-called quantum regime seems to be in reach. Here recoil effects become important and a Jaynes-Cummings-like behavior between the radiation and the center-of-mass motion arises. Within our approach we investigate its emergence as well as its properties. In contrast to earlier approaches based on quantum mechanics in a co-moving reference frame we stay in the laboratory frame and use quantum electrodynamics.

  3. Spectral modeling of Fe XVII pumped by a free-electron x-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementson, Joel

    2011-09-01

    The atomic structure and x-ray pumping of neonlike Fe xvii have been calculated and modeled under free-electron laser excitation conditions using the Flexible Atomic Code. Specifically, pumping of the (2p3/23s1/2)2,1, (2p1/23s1/2)1, (2p3/23d5/2)1, and (2p1/23d3/2)1 levels that connect with the ground state (2s22p6)0 by the so-called M2, 3G, 3F, 3D, and 3C transitions have been studied. In addition, the spectrum of sodiumlike Fe xvi has been modeled to account for possible line coincidences with the neonlike spectrum. The calculations include oscillator strengths, radiative transition probability rates, autoionization rates, non-resonant photoionization cross sections, and line emissivities.

  4. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A. [Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology & Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  5. TDA - a three-dimensional axisymmetric code for free-electron-laser (FEL) simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particle simulation code, TDA, which models the single-pass amplification process in a free-electron-laser (FEL) is developed and tested. The code allows for the treatment of the fully three-dimensional electron dynamics, thus taking into account the transverse betatron motion as well as the longitudinal bunching of the electrons. The paraxial wave equation that governs the growth and the diffraction of the selfconsistent radiation field (assumed to be axisymmetrtic), is discretized in the radial direction by the finite difference method. The benchmark study indicates that the single-pass gain, as well as the optical guiding phenomena can be well described by the code with a reasonable number of simulation particles (N ∼ 1000) and a radial mesh number not exceeding 64. A detailed discussion of the numerical method is presented. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  6. Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, R. R.; Shyd' ko, Y.; Kim, K.-J; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limited with peak powers in excess of 1 MW. Wealso include preliminary results for a four-mirror cavity that can be tuned in wavelength over a few percent, with future plans to incorporate the full transverse response of the Bragg crystals into GINGER to more accurately model this tunable source.

  7. A free-electron laser for cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A G-band free-electron laser designed for plasma heating is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler formed by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers positioned so that the central ferrite (nonferrite) spacers are opposite the outer nonferrite (ferrite) spacers. The CHI wiggler provides for enhanced beam focusing and the ability to handle intense beams and high-power continuous wave radiation. Simulations indicate that a power/efficiency of 3.5 MW/13% are possible using a 690 kV/40 A beam. No beam loss was found in simulation. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Free-electron laser as a power source for a high-gradient accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two beam colliding linac accelerator is proposed in which one beam is intense (approx. = 1KA), of low energy (approx. = MeV), and long (approx. = 100 ns) and provides power at 1 cm wavelength through a free-electron-laser-mechanism to the second beam of a few electrons (approx. = 1011), which gain energy at the rate of 250 MeV/m in a high-gradient accelerating structure and hence reach 375 GeV in 1.5 km. The intense beam is given energy by induction units and gains, and losses by radiation, 250 keV/m thus supplying 25 J/m to the accelerating structure. The luminosity, L, of two such linacs would be, at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, L = 4. x 1032 cm-2 s-1

  9. Structure modifications in silicon irradiated by ultra-short pulses of XUV free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural modifications of solid Si (0 0 1) targets exposed to the XUV TESLA free electron laser radiation were studied. The samples were irradiated with the photon energy centered at 14 eV, in short pulses of only 80 fs and of peak power up to 1 GW. The FEL beam was focused on sample surfaces to microspots of size 10-100 μm. The energy density in the spots varied from below the ablation threshold up to far above this threshold. The structural modifications induced with the irradiation were studied by AFM, Nomarski contrast microscopy and by X-ray diffraction methods. A variety of morphological structures created in the damaged areas was found. The maps of the X-ray diffracted intensity distribution recorded around chosen spots on the Si surface made it possible to probe the damage distribution range around the spots. The observed features are related to the FEL irradiation fluencies applied

  10. High Power Amplifiers Chain nonlinearity influence on the accelerating beam stability in free electron laser (FLASH)

    CERN Document Server

    Cichalewski, w

    2010-01-01

    The high power amplifiers transfer characteristics nonlinearities can have a negative influence on the overall system performance. This is also true for the TESLA superconducting cavities accelerating field parameters control systems. This Low Level Radio Frequency control systems uses microwave high power amplifiers (like 10 MW klystrons) as actuators in the mentioned feedback loops. The amplitude compression and phase deviations phenomena introduced to the control signals can reduce the feedback performance and cause electron beam energy instabilities. The transfer characteristics deviations in the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg experiment have been investigated. The outcome of this study together with the description of the developed linearization method based on the digital predistortion approach have been described in this paper. Additionally, the results from the linearization tool performance tests in the FLASH's RF systems have been placed.

  11. Development of autocorrelator for hard X-ray free electron laser. Study on alignment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources, which produce unprecedented brilliant, transversely coherent, and ultra-short x-ray pulses, are the powerful tools for exploring new possibilities in ultrafast science with hard x rays. A split-delay optics called autocorrelator provides two replica pulses with time delay precisely controlled, which is essential to realize XFEL pump and XFEL probe experiments. In order to overlap two XFEL pulses sufficiently, precise tuning of crystal angles is required. We investigated influences of each angular error to pointing displacement of XFEL beams and the tolerated error calculated by ray trace method was ±0.07 μrad at Japan's XFEL facility, SACLA. We also present some alignment methods to parallelize the two beams after autocorrelator precisely. (author)

  12. Asymmetric two-bunch operation of free-electron laser and generation of inverse Compton photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yield enhancement of high-energy photon pulses, which were generated via inverse Compton scattering of free-electron laser (FEL) pulses with electron pulses in relativistic motion, was achieved by an asymmetric two-bunch method. This method involves the use of two electron bunches recirculating in an electron storage ring for FEL oscillation with asymmetric bunch filling, and the generation of inverse Compton photon pulses at two collision points. The effects of the magnetic field of an undulator for FEL oscillation on the photon energy spectrum and photon yield were analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. -- Highlights: ► Yield enhancement of inverse Compton γ rays is achieved. ► Effects of magnetic field on the γ rays are analyzed by theory and experiments. ► The energy spread of the γ ray increases and the intensity decreases.

  13. A Bragg beam splitter for hard x-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Taito; Yabashi, Makina; Sano, Yasuhisa; Tono, Kensuke; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2013-02-11

    We report a Bragg beam splitter developed for utilization of hard x-ray free-electron lasers. The splitter is based on an ultrathin silicon crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide high reflectivity and transmissivity simultaneously. We fabricated frame-shaped Si(511) and (110) crystals with thicknesses below 10 μm by a reactive dry etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma. The thickness variation over an illuminated area is less than 300 nm peak-to-valley. High crystalline perfection was verified by topographic and diffractometric measurements. The crystal thickness was evaluated from the period of the Pendellösung beats measured with a highly monochromatic and collimated x-ray probe. The crystals provide two replica pulses with uniform wavefront [(<1/50)λ] and low spatial intensity variation (<5%). These Bragg beam splitters will play an important role in innovating XFEL applications. PMID:23481739

  14. CAS on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs in Hamburg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and DESY held a jointly-organised specialised course on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs (FELs and ERLs) in Hamburg, Germany, from 31 May to 10 June 2016.      The course was held in the Hotel Scandic Emporio in Hamburg and was attended by 68 participants of 13 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as China, Iran and Japan. The intensive programme comprised 44 lectures and one seminar. Following introductory lectures on electromagnetism, relativity and synchrotron radiation issues, the basic requirements of linacs and ERLs were discussed. Detailed lectures on the theory of FEL science followed. Undulators and the process of lasing and seeding were covered in some detail along with lectures on various beam dynamics and beam control issues. Case studies, for which seven hours were allocated, completed the academic programme. For these, the students were divided into small groups and tasked with completing the basic desig...

  15. The Segmented Beamformer for Electromagnetic Waves of the Terahertz Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomolov, G D; Letunov, A A; Zavyalov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-optical segmented mirror for a formation of the target irradiation field was manufactured and investigated. It was designed for the high power THz beam of the free electron laser (FEL) using as a target a dust particle cloud, simulating cosmic dust. Numerical calculation of the beam shape and its low power laboratory measurements was made in the spectral region 1 - 3 THz of the first phase of the Novosibirsk FEL construction. The theoretical calculations of the diffraction effects reveal a speckle structure of a target spot, which was confirmed by the laboratory experiment. The beamformer technology was adapted for manufacturing and such device could be widely used for a concentration of powerful terahertz radiation.

  16. Uses of very high-power free-electron lasers based on electrostatic accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been demonstrated in the last decade in a wide range of operating frequencies ranging from microwaves to visible light. As the technology of FELs has matured, the possibility of high power levels with high efficiency while maintaining both coherence and wavelength tunability has become evident. This property of FELs leads to near-term and futuristic applications, which are compatible with the expected size and weight characteristics of such high-power devices. In reviewing the state of the art of FELs, the authors conclude that FELs based on electrostatic accelerators with energy recovery can fundamentally change the economics of producing coherent radiation over a very broad part of the spectrum. This is particularly true of applications requiring high average power and high efficiency. With a depressed collector energy retrieval scheme, overall wall plug energy conversion efficiencies in excess of 50% are expected to be realizable as is routinely achieved in microwave devices

  17. Simple Method to Generate Terawatt-Attosecond X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Eduard; Reiche, Sven

    2015-06-19

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are cutting-edge research tools that produce almost fully coherent radiation with high power and short-pulse length with applications in multiple science fields. There is a strong demand to achieve even shorter pulses and higher radiation powers than the ones obtained at state-of-the-art XFEL facilities. In this context we propose a novel method to generate terawatt-attosecond XFEL pulses, where an XFEL pulse is pushed through several short good-beam regions of the electron bunch. In addition to the elements of conventional XFEL facilities, the method uses only a multiple-slotted foil and small electron delays between undulator sections. Our scheme is thus simple, compact, and easy to implement both in already operating as well as future XFEL projects. We present numerical simulations that confirm the feasibility and validity of our proposal. PMID:26196979

  18. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  19. Towards Zeptosecond-Scale Pulses from X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, D J; Thompson, N R

    2013-01-01

    The short wavelength and high peak power of the present generation of free-electron lasers (FELs) opens the possibility of ultra-short pulses even surpassing the present (tens to hundreds of attoseconds) capabilities of other light sources - but only if x-ray FELs can be made to generate pulses consisting of just a few optical cycles. For hard x-ray operation (~0.1nm), this corresponds to durations of approximately a single attosecond, and below into the zeptosecond scale. This talk will describe a novel method to generate trains of few-cycle pulses, at GW peak powers, from existing x-ray FEL facilities by using a relatively short 'afterburner'. Such pulses would enhance research opportunity in atomic dynamics and push capability towards the investigation of electronic-nuclear and nuclear dynamics. The corresponding multi-colour spectral output, with a bandwidth envelope increased by up to two orders of magnitudes over SASE, also has potential applications.

  20. High Efficiency, Multi-Terawatt X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Claudio; Wu, Juhao; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We study high efficiency, multi-terawatt peak power, few angstrom wavelength, X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). To obtain these characteristics we consider an optimized undulator design: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. The peak power and efficiency depend on the transverse electron beam distribution and on time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. The last effect is identified as the main cause for reduction of electron beam microbunching and FEL peak power. We show that the optimal functional form for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile, yielding the maximum output power, depends significantly on these effects. The output power achieved when neglecting time dependent effects for an LCLS-like X-ray FEL with a 100 m lo...

  1. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  2. Warm dense aluminum plasma generated by the free-electron-laser FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrau, U.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, R. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Dzelzainis, T. W. J.; Riley, D.; Nagler, B.; Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F. B.; Foerster, E. [IOQ, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Max-Wien Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); School of Mathematics and Physics, QueenSs University, Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); SLAC, National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, California 94025 (United States); Universites, Pierre et Marie Curie, LULI, UMR 7605, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Helmholtz Institut Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2012-05-25

    We report on experiments aimed at the generation and characterization of solid density plasmas at the free-electron laser FLASH in Hamburg. Aluminum samples were irradiated with XUV pulses at 13.5 nm wavelength (92 eV photon energy). The pulses with duration of a few tens of femtoseconds and pulse energy up to 100 {mu}J are focused to intensities ranging from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We investigate the absorption and temporal evolution of the sample under irradiation by use of XUV spectroscopy. We discuss the origin of saturable absorption, radiative decay, bremsstrahlung and ionic line emission. Our experimental results are in good agreement with hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  4. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucchi, A; Di Mitri, S; Penco, G; Allaria, E; Lupi, S

    2013-02-01

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation. PMID:23464184

  5. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  6. Design of the miniaturized free electron laser module as an efficient source of the THz waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul [Department of Optometry, Eulji University, 212 Yangji-dong, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Joon [Department of I and C Engineering, Sun Moon University, Tangjeong-myeon, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Seob; Kim, Dae-Wook [Department of Information Display, Sun Moon University, 100 Kalsan-ri, Tangjeong-myun, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seungjoon, E-mail: sjan@sunmoon.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Sun Moon University, 100 Kalsan-ri, Tangjeong-myun, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-21

    Since the tremendous potential of the THz wave for the bio-technological applications has been found, there has been a lot of interest paid to development of the THz-wave sources. The miniaturized free electron laser (FEL) module based on the microcolumn can be a very convenient THz wave emitter because of its compactness. In this work, we tried to design the miniaturized FEL module to achieve the optimized electron beam (e-beam) trajectory in the module by using 3D simulation tool. We found that the accelerator bias, the length and radius of the limiting aperture were important parameters to obtain the strong and parallel e-beam. We have also proposed the ring-type grids to get more symmetrical behavior of the e-beam in the wiggler.

  7. Design of the miniaturized free electron laser module as an efficient source of the THz waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the tremendous potential of the THz wave for the bio-technological applications has been found, there has been a lot of interest paid to development of the THz-wave sources. The miniaturized free electron laser (FEL) module based on the microcolumn can be a very convenient THz wave emitter because of its compactness. In this work, we tried to design the miniaturized FEL module to achieve the optimized electron beam (e-beam) trajectory in the module by using 3D simulation tool. We found that the accelerator bias, the length and radius of the limiting aperture were important parameters to obtain the strong and parallel e-beam. We have also proposed the ring-type grids to get more symmetrical behavior of the e-beam in the wiggler.

  8. Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limited with peak powers in excess of 1 MW. Wealso include preliminary results for a four-mirror cavity that can be tuned in wavelength over a few percent, with future plans to incorporate the full transverse response of the Bragg crystals into GINGER to more accurately model this tunable source.

  9. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented

  10. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Vartanyants, I A; Mancuso, A P; Yefanov, O; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Bang, E; Williams, G J; Cadenazzi, G; Abbey, B; Sinn, H; Attwood, D; Nugent, K A; Weckert, E; Wang, T; Zhu, D; Wu, B; Graves, C; Scherz, A; Turner, J J; Schlotter, W F; Messerschmidt, M; Luning, J; Acremann, Y; Heimann, P; Mancini, D C; Joshi, V; Krzywinski, J; Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Hau-Riege, S; Peele, A G; Feng, Y; Krupin, O; Moeller, S; Wurth, W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), are presented. Single shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in "diffract and destroy" mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 micrometers in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused LCLS beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.6 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  11. Analysis of optical klystron wave guide free electron laser with betatron oscillation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the betatron oscillation on spontaneous emission and gain spectrum of an optical klystron wave guide free electron laser. The analysis also includes the effects of length mismatch of the two undulator sections of the klystron configuration. We observe that intensity and gain can be change with length mismatch parameter without changing the central emission frequency. - Highlights: • We analyse effect of length mismatch of two undulator section of optical klystron. • With length mismatch betatron effect is analyse on optical klystron. • The length mismatch does not affect central emission frequency. • With increase in length mismatch gain decreases. • With increase of betatron oscillation gain decreases

  12. A far-infrared free-electron laser facility for applications in basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been conducted to assess the potential of the IMPELA technology as a basis for a far-infrared Free-electron laser (FEL), and to survey potential opportunities in basic and applied research. It is concluded that with relatively modest modifications to the IMPELA prototype accelerator, it would be possible to build an internationally competitive far-infrared FEL user facility. Such a facility could enhance a whole range of CANDU-business-related R and D activities within AECL and create new scientific opportunities for university-based researchers in Canada. In this report the basic principles of FELs are identified, potential applications are discussed, a proposal for a far-infrared FEL facility is outlined, and recommendations are offered for future action. (author). 28 refs., 7 tabs., 14 figs

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of free-electron laser performance using brightness scaled variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional analysis of radiation generation in a free-electron laser (FEL) is performed in the small signal regime. The analysis includes beam conditioning, harmonic generation, flat beams, and a new scaling of the FEL equations using the six-dimensional beam brightness. The six-dimensional beam brightness is an invariant under Liouvillian flow; therefore, any nondissipative manipulation of the phase-space, performed, for example, in order to optimize FEL performance, must conserve this brightness. This scaling is more natural than the commonly-used scaling with the one-dimensional growth rate. The brightness-scaled equations allow for the succinct characterization of the optimal FEL performance under various additional constraints. The analysis allows for the simple evaluation of gain enhancement schemes based on beam phase space manipulations such as emittance exchange and conditioning. An example comparing the gain in the first and third harmonics of round or flat and conditioned or unconditioned beams is presented

  14. Generation of ultrashort radiation pulses by injection locking a regenerative free-electron-laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate how a steady-state train of ultrashort radiation pulses can be produced utilizing a new free-electron laser (FEL) configuration, the injection-locked regenerative klystron amplifier (IRKA). This configuration consists of two elements: (1) a prebuncher, which microbunches the electron beams at the desired output wavelength, and (2) a multipass FEL operated at a very small cavity desynchronism and below the lasing threshold, in the regime of regenerative amplification. The regenerative amplifier is driven by the microbunched electron beam, so that the pulse-to-pulse stability is provided by the pre-buncher. The broad amplification bandwidth of this regenerative amplifier enables generation of ultrashort pulses, much shorter than a slippage length, with high efficiency. The IRKA configuration can produce such ultra-short radiation pulses while avoiding the chaotic dynamics that limits conventional FEL performance. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Fully Coherent X-ray Pulses from a Regenerative Amplifier Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and analyze a novel regenerative amplifier free electron laser (FEL) to produce fully coherent x-ray pulses. The method makes use of narrow-bandwidth Bragg crystals to form an x-ray feedback loop around a relatively short undulator. Self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) from the leading electron bunch in a bunch train is spectrally filtered by the Bragg reflectors and is brought back to the beginning of the undulator to interact repeatedly with subsequent bunches in the bunch train. The FEL interaction with these short bunches not only amplifies the radiation intensity but also broadens its spectrum, allowing for effective transmission of the x-rays outside the crystal bandwidth. The spectral brightness of these x-ray pulses is about two to three orders of magnitude higher than that from a single-pass SASE FEL

  16. Fully Coherent X-Ray Pulses from a Regenerative-Amplifier Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and analyze a regenerative-amplifier free-electron laser (FEL) to produce fully coherent, hard x-ray pulses. The method makes use of narrow-bandwidth Bragg crystals to form an x-ray feedback loop around a relatively short undulator. Self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) from the leading electron bunch in a bunch train is spectrally filtered by the Bragg reflectors and is brought back to the beginning of the undulator to interact repeatedly with subsequent bunches in the bunch train. The FEL interaction with these short bunches regeneratively amplifies the radiation intensity and broadens its spectrum, allowing for effective transmission of the x rays outside the crystal bandwidth. The spectral brightness of these x-ray pulses is about 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that from a single-pass SASE FEL

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  18. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.;

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  19. Analysis of coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wave elds are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source. (orig.)

  20. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at ∼1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL

  1. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear formulation of a free-electron laser based upon a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler is described. The CHI wiggler is created by insertion of a central rod and an outer ring [composed of alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers in which the ferrite (dielectric) spacer on the central rod is opposite to the dielectric (ferrite) spacer on the outer ring] along the axis of a solenoidal. An analytic model of the CHI wiggler is developed which is in good agreement with the Poisson/Superfish group of codes. The free-electron laser (FEL) formulation is a slow-time-scale analysis of the interaction of an annular electron beam with the CHI wiggler in a coaxial waveguide. The electromagnetic field is represented as the superposition of the vacuum transverse electric (TE), transverse magnetic (TM), and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) modes of the waveguide, and a set of nonlinear second-order differential equations is derived for the amplitudes and phases of these modes. These equations are solved simultaneously with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for the combined magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. An adiabatic taper is used to model the injection of the beam, and an amplitude taper is included for efficiency enhancement. Simulations are presented for Ka-, Ku- and W-band operation. Multimode operation is also studied. The results indicate that operation over a wide bandwidth is practical with the CHI wiggler, and that the bandwidth in the tapered-wiggler cases is comparable to that for a uniform wiggler. Therefore, relatively high field strengths can be achieved with the CHI wiggler at shorter wiggler periods than is possible in many other conventional wiggler designs.

  2. Spectrometer Based on a VLS Grating for Diagnostics of a Vacuum-Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon beam diagnostics for vacuum-ultraviolet free electron lasers (VUV FEL) are critical to monitoring and understanding their performance characteristics. Due to the shot-to-shot fluctuations inherent in FELs based on the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process, it is mandatory to use pulse-resolved diagnostics. We have designed a spectrograph based on a variable-line-spacing (VLS) plane grating and a phosphor/CCD to monitor single shot spectra of the free electron laser at DESY. The basic concept is to allow most of the beam to be reflected towards an experimental station while the first order light is dispersed and focused by the VLS grating onto the CCD. The spectrograph will cover the wavelength range 6.4-60 nm with the CCD accepting a bandwidth of ∼10%. The grazing angle of incidence on the grating is 2 deg., the central line density is 1200 l/mm, and the distance grating-CCD is approximately 2 m. The linear variation of the grating line spacing combined with positioning the detector at the focal curve, allows zeroing the defocus in the full spectrograph wavelength range. The correction of higher order grating aberrations yields a theoretical resolving power greater than 20000 over the full length of the 20 mm CCD when the CCD is positioned tangent to the focal plane. Based on power considerations, a shallow blazed grating is the preferred profile. Efficiency calculations over the spectrograph range show that with a carbon coating the absolute efficiency for zeroth order is higher than 0.85 and the first order efficiency varies between 0.5% and 8%

  3. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Migliorati, M. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica; Couprie, M.E.; Garzella, D.; Nutarelli, D.; Thomas, C.; De Ninno, G. [Service de Photons, Atomes et Molecules DSM/DRECAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Walker, R. [Sincrotrone, Basorizza, TS (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources. [Italian] La qualita' di fascio di un anello di accumulazione e la sua stabilita' sono le caratteristiche cruciali di un anello di accumulazione dedicato a sorgenti di Luce di Sincrotrone o al Laser ad Elettroni Liberi. La gran parte di tali caratteristiche dipende dall'accoppiamento del fascio di elettroni con la macchina stessa, tale accoppiamento puo' essere descritto in termini di una impedenza caratteristica, il cui valore assoluto e struttura possono essere utilizzati per specificarne sia la stabilita' del fascio (longitudinale e trasversale) e le sue qualita' (dispersione di energia, lunghezza del pacchetto, corrente di picco ...). In questo articolo si considerano due esempi specifici di anelli di accumulazione utilizzati per l'operazione Laser ed Elettroni Liberi e si analizzano le loro caratteristiche per mezzo di metodi semianalitici e numerici. L'analisi e' essenzialmente dedicata a chiarire la dipendenza della dispersione di energia e della lunghezza del pacchetto dalla corrente media e a fornire un insieme di

  4. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  5. Design of cascading two stages of high gain harmonic generation scheme based on Shanghai deep ultraviolet free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hai-Xiao; DAI Zhi-Min

    2008-01-01

    Cascading stages of high gain harmonic generation free electron laser (FEL) seem to be a feasible way to generate short wavelength radiation. With help of the analytical estimates, we design a two-stage cascading scheme to achieve 131 nm DUV radiation on the basis of the Shanghai deep ultraviolet free electron laser test facility. Detailed studies on the FEL performance, the stability and the sensitivity of the output power to parameter variation have been achieved by GENESIS1.3, and design of the lattice structure is presented.

  6. UV x-ray free electron lasers through high-gain single pass amplifier: Basic principles and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the basic principles of high gain free electron laser amplifier in single pass configuration for generation of intense, tunable radiation for wavelength shorter than 1,000 angstrom. Two schemes are discussed: for wavelength region between 1,000--100 angstrom, the high gain harmonic generation of a coherent input radiation can be used. For x-ray wavelength as short as a few angstrom, the self-amplified spontaneous emission is currently the only known free electron laser scheme. The author also presents a brief introduction of various key issues in realizing these schemes, which will be discussed in detail in other papers in these proceedings

  7. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature. PMID:27036761

  8. High Precision Temperature Control of Normal-Conducting RF GUN for a High Duty Cycle Free-Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kruppa, K.; Pfeiffer, Sven; Lichtenberg, G.; Brinker, Frank; Decking, Winfried; Floettmann, Klaus; Krebs, Olaf; Schlarb, Holger; Schreiber, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    High precision temperature control of the RF GUN is necessary to optimally accelerate thousands of electrons within the injection part of the European X-ray free-electron laser XFEL and the Free Electron Laser FLASH. A difference of the RF GUN temperature from the reference value of only 0.01 K leads to detuning of the cavity and thus limits the performance of the whole facility. Especially in steady-state operation there are some undesired temperature oscillations when using classical standa...

  9. Damage-resistant single-pulse optics for x-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-pulse ultraviolet and x-ray free electron lasers of unprecedented peak brightness are in the process of revolutionizing physics, chemistry, and biology. Optical components for these new light sources have to be able to withstand exposure to the extremely high-fluence photon pulses. Whereas most optics have been designed to stay intact for many pulses, it has also been suggested that single-pulse optics that function during the pulse but disintegrate on a longer timescale, may be useful at higher fluences than multiple-pulse optics. In this paper we will review damage-resistant single-pulse optics that recently have been demonstrated at the FLASH soft-x-ray laser facility at DESY, including mirrors, apertures, and nanolenses. It was found that these objects stay intact for the duration of the 25-fs FLASH pulse, even when exposed to fluences that exceed the melt damage threshold by fifty times or more. We present a computational model for the FLASH laser-material interaction to analyze the extent to which the optics still function during the pulse. Comparison to experimental results obtained at FLASH shows good quantitative agreement

  10. Isotope selective multiphoton dissociation of formic acid and nitromethane by a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful experiments on the isotope selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MPD) of formic acid and nitromethane molecules have been first performed under IR radiation of a free electron laser (FEL). Upon irradiating the H12COOH + H13COOH (50% +50%) mixture in the spectral region of the C=O stretch vibrational band either 13C or 12C isotope predominates in the dissociation product CO depending on the laser radiation frequency. In the sample with natural isotopic content (1.1%) the enrichment of CO by the 13C isotope has been attained up to 19.5%. Also the about fivefold enrichment of CO by the 18O isotope has been observed. Nitrogen isotope selective IR MPD has been performed by irradiation of naturally abundant (0.4% of 15N) nitromethane molecules in the spectral region of the N=O stretch vibrational band. The 15N content in the decomposition product, NO, was varied from 0.1 to 1.6% as a function of the laser radiation frequency. (author)

  11. TerraHertz Free Electron Laser Applications for Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a Free Electron Laser (EL) operating in the terahertz frequency regime by the group at the University of Hawaii (Elias et al.) represents a significant new opportunity in the area of atmospheric remote sensing. The FEL has 2 salient features that create a unique opportunity. First of all it represents the only source in this frequency range with sufficient power to enable lidar instrumentation. Secondly its very high electrical efficiency (several times more efficient than any currently employed spaceborne laser) renders it a strong candidate for use in satellite remote sensing. On the negative side the atmosphere is rather strongly absorbing throughout this frequency range due primarily to the water vapor continuum absorption. This means that the instruments using this laser will not be able to access the lower troposphere because of its very high water concentration.. However the instrument will be very capable of measurements in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. A passive instrument, the Microwave Limb Sounder on the UARS satellite operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has already demonstrated that this wavelength region can be used for chemical species with strong emission lines. A lidar would complement the capabilities of this instrument by providing the capability to measure absorbing species in the upper atmosphere. I will discuss the design of such an instrument in greater detail and estimate its performance in measuring a number of chemical species of interest to the Earth Science community.

  12. A free-electron laser fourth-generation X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of synchrotrons radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research those beams make possible. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the.optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission in free electron lasers. The use of a superconducting linac could produce a major, cost-effective facility that spans wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotron facilities, immense new scientific opportunities from fourth-generation sources

  13. New method for attosecond-terawatt pulse generation in X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel scheme for generating a terawatt-attosecond pulse from X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), which is perfectly synchronized to the few cycle IR pulse. Our approach utilizes baseline configuration similar to PAL-XFEL, but adds a current enhanced self-amplified emission (ESASE) module inserted between the linac and the undulater that introduces only a few cycle energy and current modulation in the electron beam. Our scheme is compact and easy to implement and does not require a slotted foil, thereby leading to improved longitudinal coherence of the beam. We demonstrate the viability of our scheme with simulations using PAL-XFEL beam parameters. Attosecond science has emerged as an important research area of ultrafast phenomena during the past decade as it provides a direct access to capturing, measuring and controlling the electronic dynamics in atoms, molecules and condensed matters. However, high-energy isolated attosecond pulses required for the most intriguing nonlinear attosecond experiments spectroscopy are still lacking. Therefore, techniques are to be further developed to make a powerful isolated attosecond pulse in the x-ray range (1 keV and higher). Several techniques have been proposed to achieve attosecond pulses in a free electron laser (FEL). In this vein, we demonstrate in simulation a TW-attosecond pulse in FEL. In our scheme, it utilizes a laser-induced energy modulation to generate a few-cycle current modulation and small optical-delays between undulator modules for radiation alignment. In this work, we are able to show that an isolated 280 attosecond FWHM, 1 TW pulse at 1 keV (1.25 nm) photon energy and an 100 attosecond FWHM, 1 TW pulse at 12.4 keV (0.1 mn) can be generated. This scheme is simple and easy to implement and can be adapted to the existing FEL facilities. It is worthwhile to mention that in this scheme there is still a room for higher power even for shorter undulator lengths via tapering of the undulator or high

  14. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 μm wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design

  15. High-order harmonic generation enhanced by x rays from free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buth, Christian; Kohler, Markus C.; He, Feng; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Ullrich, Joachim; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2012-06-01

    We theoretically examine high-order harmonic generation (HHG), by an intense near-infrared (nir) laser, in the light of the emerging, intense x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) which have started to revolutionize x-ray science. We present two theories based on modified three-step models of HHG. Once, we combine HHG with resonant x-ray excitation of a core electron into the transient valence vacancy that is created in the course of the HHG process via tunnel ionization (first step of HHG) by the nir light. When the continuum electron is driven back to the parent ion, a recombination with the valence and the core hole may occur. Modified HHG spectra are determined and analyzed for krypton on the 3d ->4p resonance and for neon on the 1s ->2p resonance. Another time, we examine HHG where tunnel ionization by the nir light is replaced by direct x-ray ionization of a core electron. We use the boosted HHG radiation from 1s electrons of neon to predict single attosecond pulses in the kiloelectronvolt regime. For both presented schemes, we find substantial HHG yield from the recombination of the continuum electron with the core hole. Our research brings the capabilities of HHG-based sources to FELs.

  16. All-metal resonator designs for visible/near-infrared free-electron laser oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiple radiation environment of future high-current free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators poses severe requirements on the resonator mirrors. In addition to withstanding the high-average power, high-repetition-rate pulses of the fundamental laser radiation, the optical properties of the mirrors must not be degraded by the attendant optical harmonics, gamma rays, neutrons, electrons, and vacuum. Furthermore, the initial mirror absorption must be low enough so that the reflected wavefront distortion is tolerable when various types of mirror cooling are employed. Multilayer dielectric reflectors for visible- and near-infrared wavelengths are known to be susceptible to damage or degradation by several radiation hazards, and experimental data to support their use in the presence of some of the other radiations is now available. To assure that future operation of high-power oscillators is not limited by optical damage considerations, the author proposes the use of ring-resonators consisting of all-metal mirrors. One such resonator design includes multiple-facet, end mirrors and intracavity beam-expanding mirrors each used at grazing incidence. The metal of choice for wavelengths longer than 500 nm is vacuum-deposited silver although gold and copper films are possible alternatives. At such large angles with S-polarization, the metal mirrors are much less susceptible to degradation from exposure to the high-energy radiations than are dielectrics. Further, scaling to large sizes should be within the potential capabilities of the optical industry

  17. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossbach, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  18. Present status of the NIJI-IV storage-ring free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Sei, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The tunable region of the free-electron-laser (FEL) wavelength with the NIJI-IV system is now 348{approximately}595 nm. After the lasing at 352 nm in 1994, the quality of the electron beam stored in the ring has been improved further, and the highest peak intensity of the laser obtained so far is more than 300 times as high as that of the resonated spontaneous emission. The macro-temporal structure of the lasing has been greatly improved. Recently, a single-bunch injection system was completed, and the system has been installed in the injector linac, which is expected to increase the peak stored-beam current. The commissioning and the test of the new system is under way. The beam transporting system from the linac to the ring is also being modified by increasing the number of quadrupole magnets. The experiments related to the FEL in the ultraviolet wavelength region will be begun in this coming May. The results and the status of the FEL experiments will be presented at the Conference.

  19. Coherent control with a short-wavelength free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, K. C.; Allaria, E.; Callegari, C.; Cucini, R.; de Ninno, G.; di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Ferrari, E.; Finetti, P.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Mahne, N.; Penco, G.; Plekan, O.; Raimondi, L.; Rebernik, P.; Roussel, E.; Svetina, C.; Trovò, M.; Zangrando, M.; Negro, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Reduzzi, M.; Sansone, G.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Gryzlova, E. V.; Strakhova, S. I.; Bartschat, K.; Douguet, N.; Venzke, J.; Iablonskyi, D.; Kumagai, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ueda, K.; Fischer, A.; Coreno, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short-wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilized for many experiments previously possible only at long wavelengths: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here, we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and we controlled the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution by adjusting the phase, with a temporal resolution of 3 as. This opens the door to new short-wavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.

  20. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of λ = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-1022photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%. Each 800 μs long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz

  1. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ogi, Yoshihiro [Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshinori [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  2. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10−3), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10−3, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution

  3. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  4. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  5. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  6. Detuning Curve Analysis on the UVSOR2 Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Labat, M

    2005-01-01

    Storage Ring Free-Electron Laser dynamics and behaviour can be explored versus the detuning, i.e. a small difference between the frequencies of revolution of the electron bunches, and of the optical pulse circulating into the optical cavity. In fact, it provides situations ranging from the maximum initial gain over losses conditions to threshold ones. Systematic measurements of the UVSOR2 detuning curves have been performed. A complete detuning curve gives the intensity of the FEL versus the detuning. On such a plot, one can distinguish five distinct zones: three corresponding to continuous modes of emission for the FEL, and two pulsed modes. Each zone can then be described with its width and period for the pulsed modes. Streak camera also provides a full characterisation of the FEL versus detuning: position of the centre of mass of the laser, bunch lengthening. The energy spread is deduced from the electron beam transverse sizes. The analysis of the FEL behaviour versus detuning is compared with simulations ...

  7. Tunability experiments at the FERMI-Elettra free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FERMI-Elettra is a free electron-laser (FEL)-based user facility that, after two years of commissioning, started preliminary users' dedicated runs in 2011. At variance with other FEL user facilities, FERMI-Elettra has been designed to deliver improved spectral stability and longitudinal coherence. The adopted scheme, which uses an external laser to initiate the FEL process, has been demonstrated to be capable of generating FEL pulses close to the Fourier transform limit. We report on the first instance of FEL wavelength tuning, both in a narrow and in a large spectral range (fine- and coarse-tuning). We also report on two different experiments that have been performed exploiting such FEL tuning. We used fine-tuning to scan across the 1s–4p resonance in He atoms, at ≈23.74 eV (52.2 nm), detecting both UV–visible fluorescence (4p–2s, 400 nm) and EUV fluorescence (4p–1s, 52.2 nm). We used coarse-tuning to scan the M4,5 absorption edge of Ge (∼29.5 eV) in the wavelength region 30–60 nm, measured in transmission geometry with a thermopile positioned on the rear side of a Ge thin foil. (paper)

  8. EDITORIAL: Attosecond and x-ray free-electron laser physics Attosecond and x-ray free-electron laser physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2009-07-01

    Currently, we are witnessing a revolution in photon science, driven by the vision to time-resolve ultra-fast electronic motion in atoms, molecules, and solids as well as by the quest for the characterization of time-dependent structural changes in large molecules and solids. Quantum jumps in the development of light sources are the key technologies for this emerging field of research. Thus, high harmonic radiation bursts now penetrate the attosecond (10-18 s) regime and free-electron lasers (FELs) deliver ultra-brilliant femtosecond, coherent VUV and x-ray pulses. This special issue presents a snapshot of this ongoing revolution and brings together, for the first time, pioneering results in both of these fields that are expected to evolve synergetically in the future. The volume is based on the spirit of the International Conference on Multi-Photon Processes, ICOMP08, which was held at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg in summer 2008. The first contributions include articles that envision tracing electronic motion on an attosecond time scale and its relation to nuclear motion. After more technical papers on the generation of attosecond pulses via high harmonic generation (HHG), molecular and two-electron atomic dynamics in strong optical fields at a typical wavelength of 800 nm are presented pointing to sub-cycle, attosecond features. Making the transition to shorter wavelengths, nonlinear dynamics in atoms and molecules is explored via experimental and theoretical methods, where the present measurements are nearly exclusively performed at FEL sources. A substantial number of articles focus on the investigation of the most simple many- (few-) photon two-electron processes in double ionization of helium at optical and VUV wavelengths, with the goal of characterizing this fundamental reaction, not yet consistently solved theoretically, in spite of huge efforts. Finally, the behaviour of more complex nanoscaled systems, i.e. clusters, is

  9. Anomalously Strong Scattering of Spontaneously Produced Laser Radiation in the First Free-Electron Laser and Study of Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Lasing in an Electric Wiggler with Quantum-Wiggler Electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. H. Kim

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the scattering cross section of an electron with respect to the spontaneously produced laser radiation in the first free-electron laser (FEL) with quantum-wiggler electrodynamics (QWD). The cross section is 1016 times the Thomson cross section, confirming the result obtained by a previous analysis of the experimental data. A QWD calculation show that spontaneous emission in an FEL using only an electric wiggler can be very strong while amplification through net stimulated emission is practically negligible.

  10. The HIγS facility. A free-electron laser generated gamma-ray beam for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIγS), a collaborative project between TUNL and the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory at Duke University, is described. The results of some initial experiments and plans for the future research program are discussed. (author)

  11. VUV and X-ray coherent light with tunable polarization from single-pass free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Spezzani, C; Diviacco, B; Ferrari, E; Geloni, G; Karantzoulis, E; Mahieu, B; Vento, M; De Ninno, G

    2011-01-01

    Tunable polarization over a wide spectral range is a required feature of light sources employed to investigate the properties of local symmetry in both condensed and low-density matter. Among new-generation sources, free-electron lasers possess a unique combination of very attractive features, as they allow to generate powerful and coherent ultra-short optical pulses in the VUV and X-ray spectral range. However, the question remains open about the possibility to freely vary the light polarization of a free-electron laser, when the latter is operated in the so-called nonlinear harmonic-generation regime. In such configuration, one collects the harmonics of the free-electron laser fundamental emission, gaining access to the shortest possible wavelengths the device can generate. In this letter we provide the first experimental characterization of the polarization of the harmonic light produced by a free-electron laser and we demonstrate a method to obtain tunable polarization in the VUV and X-ray spectral range....

  12. German and U.S. laboratories to collaborate on the development of X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Multimedia

    Calder, N

    2002-01-01

    Germany's leading particle physics and synchrotron radiation laboratory (DESY), and the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to establish a unique international collaboration for the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (1 page).

  13. The Effects of Slippage and Diffraction in Long-Wavelength Operation of a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhulin, V. I.; Haselhoff, E. H.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 mu m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably longer wavelengths. This would result in the production of extre

  14. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Barty, Anton; Williams, Garth J.; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Milathianaki, Despina; DePonte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Katona, Gergely; Westenhoff, Sebastian; White, Thomas A.; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Berntsen, Peter; Bogan, Mike; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Doak, R. Bruce; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Henning, Robert; Hunter, Mark S.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kosheleva, Irina; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sjohamn, Jennie; Stellato, Francesco; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sebastien; Groenhof, Gerrit; Chapman, Henry N.; Neutze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast glob...

  15. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  16. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  17. Detecting vacuum birefringence with x-ray free electron lasers and high-power optical lasers: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Heinzl, Tom; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Thomas E.; Sauerbrey, Roland

    2016-02-01

    We study the feasibility of measuring vacuum birefringence by probing the focus of a high-intensity optical laser with an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). This amounts to performing a new type of QED precision experiment, employing only laser pulses, hence space- and time-dependent fields. To set the stage, we briefly review the status of QED precision tests and then focus on the example of vacuum birefringence. Adopting a realistic laser beam model in terms of pulsed Gaussian beams we calculate the induced phase shift and translate it into an experimental signal, counting the number of photons with flipped polarization. We carefully design a detailed experiment at the European XFEL operating in self-seeded mode, supplemented by a petawatt class optical laser via the HIBEF project. Assuming all components to represent the current state of the art, in particular the x-ray polarizers, realistic estimates of signal-to-noise ratios plus ensuing acquisition times are provided. This is accompanied by a statistical analysis of the impact of poor laser focus overlap either due to timing and pointing jitter as well as limited alignment accuracy. A number of parasitic effects are analyzed together with appropriate countermeasures. We conclude that vacuum birefringence can indeed be measured upon combining an XFEL with a high-power optical laser if depolarization effects in the x-ray lenses can be controlled.

  18. First Demonstration of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Technique for Short-Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Pernet, P.-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2010-08-25

    We report the first experimental demonstration of the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique which holds great promise for generation of high power, fully coherent short-wavelength radiation. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the 3rd and 4th harmonic of the second seed laser is generated from the so-called beam echo effect. The experiment confirms the physics behind this technique and paves the way for applying the EEHG technique for seeded x-ray free electron lasers.

  19. Image reconstruction in serial femtosecond nanocrystallography using x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joe P. J.; Kirian, Richard A.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Bean, Richard J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Arnal, Romain D.; Wojtas, David H.; Bones, Phil J.; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Millane, Rick P.

    2015-09-01

    Serial femtosecond nanocrystallography (SFX) is a form of x-ray coherent diffraction imaging that utilises a stream of tiny nanocrystals of the biological assembly under study, in contrast to the larger crystals used in conventional x-ray crystallography using conventional x-ray synchrotron x-ray sources. Nanocrystallography utilises the extremely brief and intense x-ray pulses that are obtained from an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL). A key advantage is that some biological macromolecules, such as membrane proteins for example, do not easily form large crystals, but spontaneously form nanocrystals. There is therefore an opportunity for structure determination for biological molecules that are inaccessible using conventional x-ray crystallography. Nanocrystallography introduces a number of interesting image reconstruction problems. Weak diffraction patterns are recorded from hundreds of thousands of nancocrystals in unknown orientations, and these data have to be assembled and merged into a 3D intensity dataset. The diffracted intensities can also be affected by the surface structure of the crystals that can contain incomplete unit cells. Furthermore, the small crystal size means that there is potentially access to diffraction information between the crystalline Bragg peaks. With this information, phase retrieval is possible without resorting to the collection of additional experimental data as is necessary in conventional protein crystallography. We report recent work on the diffraction characteristics of nanocrystals and the resulting reconstruction algorithms.

  20. 13nm EUV free electron lasers for next generation photolithography: the critical importance of RF stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keens, Simon; Fritsche, Bodo; Hiltbrunner, Carmen; Frei, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) is a highly coherent, highly collimated light source capable of creating extremely high power beams of precisely controlled wavelengths. The semiconductor industry is currently examining these as sources extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light for photolithography applications. An important factor to achieve high quality FEL emission is the careful development of the amplifying RF system as a complete integrated unit, considering each component as part of the amplification chain to maximise RF stability and FEL beam quality. In this paper we review methods to optimise RF amplifier systems without compromising on output stability, compare solid-state with tube based technologies, and discuss the state-of-the-art in RF amplifier technology, highlighting recent case studies. We conclude by examining the benefits of integrated systems and highlight the solutions offered by available technologies to a range of technological challenges, in order to design and build the best possible systems with maximum possible efficiency for the demanding requirements of the semiconductor industry.

  1. Collimation system for the VUV free-electron laser at the TESLA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To perform a proof-of-principle experiment for a Free Electron Laser operating at VUV wavelengths an undulator has been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac phase I. To meet the requirements on the magnetic field quality in the undulator, a hybrid type structure with NdFeB permanent magnets has been chosen. The permanent magnets are sensitive to radiation by high energy particles. In order to perform the various experiments planned at the TESLA Test Facility linac, a collimator section has been installed to protect the undulator from radiation. In this thesis the design, performance and required steps for commissioning the collimator system are presented. To identify potential difficulties for the linac operation, the beam halo and the dark current transport through the entire linac is discussed. Losses of primary electrons caused by technical failures, component misalignments, and operation errors are investigated by tracking simulations, in order to derive a complete understanding of the absorbed dose in the permanent magnets of the undulator. Various topics related to a collimator system such as the removal of secondary particles produced at the collimators, generation and shielding of neutrons, excitation of wake fields, and beam based alignment concepts are important subjects of this thesis. (orig.)

  2. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic characterization of the undulator for infrared free-electron laser at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared (IR) free electron laser (FEL) is currently under development at the RRCAT, Indore. One of the crucial components of an FEL is the undulator, which produces static, sinusoidal vertical magnetic field along the axis through which an electron beam is propagated to generate coherent radiation. A 2.5 m long, pure permanent magnet based undulator with a period of 50 mm has been recently procured and installed at its designated location inside the radiation shielded area built to house the IRFEL. For the successful operation of an FEL, the magnetic field profile of the undulator has to satisfy stringent criterion on parameters such as rms error in the peak field, optical phase error, trajectory errors etc. Detailed magnetic characterization of the undulator installed inside the shielded area has been performed using in-house developed measurement benches to measure the magnetic field profile as well as magnetic field integrals. This paper describes the details of magnetic characterization performed to ensure that all the required criteria on the field quality are satisfied by the undulator. (author)

  4. Design and development of the free electron laser based Delhi light source at IUAC, Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for the photon beams with high brightness and short pulse length is growing in. To address the requirements, a project to develop a compact Light Source based on the principle of Free Electron Laser at IUAC has been taken up. In the first phase of the project, prebunched electron beam of energy ∼ 8 MeV will be produced by a normal conducting photocathode RF gun and coherent THz radiation will be produced by a short undulator magnet. In the second phase, a superconducting RF gun will be developed to increase the average power of the THz radiation. In the last phase, the energy of the electron beam will be increased up to 40 MeV by two sets of superconducting niobium resonators and the coherent IR radiation will be produced by long undulator magnets.The same beam will be used to produce X-rays by Inverse Compton Scattering. Presently, efforts are on to develop the Phase-I of the project. This paper will present the details and the status of the facility

  5. Control scheme for remote operation of magnet power supplies for infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) is under development at MAASD, RRCAT Indore. The IRFEL machine consists of 90 KeV thermionic gun as electron source, beam transport line, 25 MeV Linear Accelerator (LINAC) and an undulator magnet. There are fifty magnets on beam transport line. These magnets are energized by precision power supplies. These power supplies have local as well as remote control and will be located at equipment hall. The control room and equipment hall are at approximate distance of 300 m. We have planned a three layer structure for centralized operation of Beam Transport line Magnet Power Supplies (BTMPS). These layers are device interface layer, the equipment control layer and the presentation layer. Presentation layer is linked with equipment control layer on Ethernet. Whereas equipment control layer will be linked to device interface layer by RS-485. Device interface layer consist Magnet Power Supply Controllers (MPSC). Each MPSC has one master and five slave controllers linked on isolated SPI bus, which will control five BTMPS. We have developed slave controllers and a master as prototype of MPSC. This paper describes MPSC prototype and proposed control scheme. (author)

  6. Free electron laser experiment in resonant helical and axial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on an intermediate energy, long pulse free electron laser (FEL). The experiment is designed to investigate cyclotron resonance effects in FELs. The power source is a Marx generator which produces a repeatable, flat accelerating voltage pulse. The thermionic electron gun operates immersed in a shaped magnetic field. The perpendicular energy of the emitted electrons is estimated to be less than one percent of their total energy. The beam propagates in a two meter long drift tube, guided by a uniform axial magnetic field that can be varied between 0.7 and 7.0 kG. The wiggler fields are generated by a bifilar helical winding. An adjustable, adiabatic entrance profile is produced by staggering the wiggler termination windings. The system has been designed to that under normal operating conditions, the emitted radiation propagates in the lowest mode of the cylindrical drift tube. The authors have observed microwave power levels of over 10 KW at approximately 10 GHz. Spectra observed with an X-band waveguide dispersive line show that most of the power is concentrated in a narrow peak (Δf/f<0.1). Preliminary results indicate that the output frequency increases with beam energy

  7. 5 (Upgradable to 25 keV) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility

    CERN Document Server

    York, R C

    2013-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility utilizing a recirculated Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) provides the opportunity to achieve about five times greater photon energy than an unrecirculated linac of similar cost. > A 4 GeV SRF, cw, electron linac can be used to drive an FEL producing 5 keV photons. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) laboratory, proposes to utilize a 4 GeV unrecirculated, SRF, linac in a segment of existing linac tunnel. > For an initial investment similar to that of the proposed SLAC strategy, a recirculated SRF linac system could deliver the 4 GeV electrons for photon energies of 5 keV and provide an upgrade path to photon energies of 25 keV. > Further support amounting to about a third of the initial investment would provide upgrade funds for additional SRF linac and cryogenic capacity sufficient to provide electron energies appropriate for 25 keV photons matching the European XFEL.

  8. Software and capabilities of the beam position measurement system for Novosibirsk free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system that measures the electron beam position in the Novosibirsk high power free electron laser has been operating for 8 years and is described in this article. the main part of the system is a number of pick-up electrodes (BPM stations) installed in different parts of the vacuum chamber of the microtron-recuperator. Each BPM (Beam Position Monitoring) station has four buttons with a clear aperture diameter of about 80 mm. Signals from the plates of all BPMs are transmitted by cables outside the shielded hall to the site of location of the measurement electronics. The beam position is determined via simultaneous measurement of the amplitudes of signals induced on the buttons by the beam field. The control software for this system is a single application running on the IBM-PC computer. Communication with the CAMAC crates is realized with the help of the ISP controller, developed at Budker INP. The application can operate in several different regimes. The first regime is a serial poll of all the BPM stations for the purpose of determination of the transverse coordinates of the beam (the main operating regime). The second operation regime is a scanning throughout the delay time range of one of the BPM stations. The third and very useful regime is a poll of the waveform of the BPM button pulses with the frequency of the beam movement and a constant time delay value

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  10. Statistical properties of radiation from VUV and X-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1998-03-01

    The paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the statistical properties of the radiation from a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser operating in linear and nonlinear mode. The investigation has been performed in a one-dimensional approximation assuming the electron pulse length to be much larger than a coherence length of the radiation. The following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation have been studied in detail: time and spectral field correlations, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after the monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and radiation spectrum. The linear high gain limit is studied analytically. It is shown that the radiation from a SASE FEL operating in the linear regime possesses all the features corresponding to completely chaotic polarized radiation. A detailed study of statistical properties of the radiation from a SASE FEL operating in linear and nonlinear regime has been performed by means of time-dependent simulation codes. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility being under construction at DESY.

  11. Use of the Lorentz-Boosted Frame Transformation to Simulate Free-Electron Laser Amplifier Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently it has been pointed out that numerical simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz boosted frame. A particularly good example is that of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) in which a high energy (E0 (ge) 250 MeV) electron beam interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame with Lorentz factor gamma F, the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue shifted undulator have identical wavelengths and the number of required time-steps (presuming the Courant condition applies) decreases by a factor of g2 F for fully electromagnetic simulation. We have adapted the WARP code to apply this method to several FEL problems including coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) from pre-bunched e-beams, and strong exponential gain in a single pass amplifier configuration. We discuss our results and compare with those from the 'standard' FEL simulation approach which adopts the eikonal approximation for propagation of the radiation field

  12. Power spectrum and coherence length measurements of a compact terahertz free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the possibility of developing advanced imaging technology, such as 3-D holographic THz (terahertz) tomography, by using a compact high-power FEL (free-electron laser) operating as user facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The wavelength range of the FEL output pulses is 100 ∼ 1200 μm, which corresponds to 0.3 ∼ 3 THz in frequency. In particular, we measured the dependence of the power spectrum of the compact FEL beam on the length of the FEL resonator. The coherence lengths of the FEL pulses were measured by using a Michelson interferometer, and the interference intensity was recorded as a function of the optical path difference. We also confirmed that the spectral width of the FEL had an influence on its coherence length by changing the detuning length of the resonator. The measured coherence lengths of the THz FEL are around 1 cm. We anticipate that our measured results will be useful for coherent imaging of biomedical specimens.

  13. $\\boldmath{\\check{\\text{C}}}$erenkov free-electron laser in side-wall configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Kalkal, Yashvir

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a $\\check{\\text{C}}$erenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls. In this system, metallic side walls are used to confine the surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed at the top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in the coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, the performance of CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with the undulator based conventional FELs; and obtain formulas for small signal gain and growth rate. It has been shown that the small signal gain and the growth rate in the sidewall configuration of CFEL are larger compared to the configuration without side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the $\\check{\\text{C}}$erenkov FEL with side walls attains saturation quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz (TH...

  14. Intrinsic corrections to optical guiding in a free-electron laser: Beam Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Scharlemann, E. T.; Sessler, A. M.

    The effect on optical guiding of the undulations of an electron beam in a free electron laser (FEL) is investigated. A model for a fully saturated FEL amplifier with no remaining gain is developed. The density of the electron beam includes the effects of both transverse and longitudinal undulation. The longitudinal density modulation is expressed in terms of the Bessel functions of zeta, where zeta = a(sub w)/2(1 + a(sub w)) is the shift of the electron phase in the electron bucket caused by its longitudinal undulation. The transverse density modulation is evaluated to second order in the ratio of undulation amplitude delta r to beam radial scale length r(sub b). The radiation field is calculated in terms of spatial modes proportional to exp(i(k + delta k + lk(sub w)z - iwt)), where l is an arbitrary integer. Here, delta k is the change of the wavenumber of the radiation caused by the electron bunches. Radially radiating modes with intensity on the order of (delta k/k(sub w))zeta sup 2 are found. Optical guiding is modified by the transverse undulations of the beam at second order in delta r(sub b), and by the longitudinal undulations to first order in delta k/k (sub w). For the usual FEL parameters, the correction is quite small.

  15. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  16. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  17. Present status of mid-infrared free electron laser in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility, named Kyoto University FEL (KU-FEL), has been developed for energy related sciences in Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. In fiscal year 2012, the FEL operated for 570 hours. About 70% of operation time is dedicated for users. There were two shutdown periods in FY2012; one was for the electric power saving in August and September 2012, and the other was for the building refinement in February and March 2013. During the winter shutdown, the vacuum chamber for the undulator was replaced with a narrower one. After the replacement, the tunable range of KU-FEL has been extended from 5-14 μm to 5-20 μm. Now there are two major problems in KU-FEL linac. One is SF6 gas leakage through an RF window to the vacuum side. The other is a timing drift of a klystron pulse. Those are not critical for the linac operation, but they should be fixed in near future. In this paper, undergoing R and D work for the MIR-FEL is also reported. (author)

  18. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  19. Transverse pulse shaping and optimization of a tapered hard X-ray free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Claudio; Wu, Juhao

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional optimization schemes for TW hard X-Ray free electron lasers are applied to the cases of transversely uniform and parabolic electron beam distributions and compared to examples of transversely Gaussian beams. The optimizations are performed for a $200$m undulator and a resonant wavelength of $\\lambda_r=1.5\\AA $ using the fully 3-dimensional FEL particle code GENESIS. Time dependent simulations showed that the maximum radiation power is larger for flatter transverse distributions due to enhanced optical guiding in the tapered section of the undulator. For a transversely Gaussian beam the maximum output power was found to be $\\text{P}_{max}$=$1.56$ TW compared to $2.26$ TW for the parabolic case and $2.63$ TW for the uniform case. Spectral data also showed a 30-70$\\%$ reduction in energy deposited in the sidebands for the uniform and parabolic beams compared with a Gaussian. An analysis of the maximum power as a function of detuning from resonance shows that redshifting the central wavelength by...

  20. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  1. A tapered undulator experiment at the ELBE far infrared hybrid-resonator oscillator free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tapered undulator experiment was carried out at the ELBE far-infrared free electron laser (FEL). The oscillator FEL makes use of a hybrid optical resonator. The main motivation was to see whether the presence of a dispersive medium in the form of a waveguide in the resonator has any effect on the outcome. The FEL saturated power and the wavelength shifts have been measured as a function of both positive as well as negative undulator field amplitude tapering. In contrast to the typical high-gain FELs where positive tapering proves beneficial for the output power we observed an improvement of performance at negative taper. During the same experiments we studied the characteristics of the detuning curves. The width of the curves indicates a maximum small signal gain for zero taper while the output peak power increases with negative taper. The saturated power output, the detuning curve characteristics, and the wavelength shifts agrees with the theoretical predictions. Details of the experiment are presented.

  2. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T.

    2000-06-14

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  3. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  4. Coherent electron beam density modulator for driving X-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new compact scheme for a Free Electron Laser with more coherent properties for the X-ray beam. Higher FEL performance would be achieved using a train of electron bunches initially accelerated in a linear accelerator. Similar to the RF klystron concept, we propose developing an X-ray FEL which consists of two parts: an X-ray self-seeding electron beam density modulator and an output set of undulators. A density modulator consists of a low-Q X-ray cavity and an undulator, which is placed between the cavity mirrors. We use this undulator as a very high gain amplifier, which compensates the amplitude loss due to monochromatic X-ray reflections from the mirrors. Following the X-ray cavity, the density modulated electron beam is separated from the X-ray beam and then enters the output set of undulators. The frequency spectrum of the final X-ray beam is determined mainly by the bandwidth of the reflected elements in the X-ray cavity

  5. Inelastic X-ray scattering in single molecule imaging with free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the structure of bio-macromolecules with atomic resolution is essential to comprehend their function. Because many proteins do not form crystals, it would be enormously beneficial to be able to image single molecules. Free-electron lasers (FEL) offer an ideal tool to image nanocrystals and single-molecules with atomic resolution. The structural information is contained in the elastic X-ray scattering signal. However, in contrast to crystallography, in single molecule imaging there are no Bragg reflections, which means the elastic scattering is not enhanced. Because the usual scattering detectors cannot distinguish between elastically or inelastically scattered photons, the quality of the signal is attenuated by inelastic scattering. Here, we present a study of inelastic x-ray scattering under typical single molecule imaging conditions. We show the scattering spectrum as well as elastic and inelastic scattering probabilities, using the example of a carbon atom. Furthermore, we include the radiation damage caused by the highly intense FEL X-ray pulse by solving a rate equation model. In this way we obtain the elastic and inelastic scattering patterns of a carbon atom for different pulse durations and fluences.

  6. Resonance fluorescence in ultrafast and intense x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Cavaletto, S M; Harman, Z; Kanter, E P; Southworth, S H; Young, L; Keitel, C H

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of resonance fluorescence is calculated for a two-level system excited by an intense, ultrashort x-ray pulse made available for instance by free-electron lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). We allow for inner-shell hole decay widths and destruction of the system by further photoionization. This two-level description is employed to model neon cations strongly driven by x rays tuned to the $1s 2p^{-1}\\rightarrow 1s^{-1} 2p$ transition at 848 eV; the x rays induce Rabi oscillations which are so fast that they compete with Ne $1s$-hole decay. We predict resonance fluorescence spectra for two different scenarios: first, chaotic pulses based on the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission principle, like those presently generated at XFEL facilities and, second, Gaussian pulses which will become available in the foreseeable future with self-seeding techniques. As an example of the exciting opportunities deriving from the use of seeding methods, we predict, in spite of above obstacles, the ...

  7. Measurement and Instrumentation Challenges at X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yiping

    2015-03-01

    X-ray Free Electron Laser sources based on the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission process are intrinsically chaotic, giving rise to pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in all physical properties, including intensity, position and pointing, spatial and temporal profiles, spectral content, timing, and coherence. These fluctuations represents special challenges to users whose experiments are designed to reveal small changes in the underlying physical quantities, which would otherwise be completely washed out without using the proper diagnostics tools. Due to the X-ray FEL's unique characteristics such as the unprecedented peak power and nearly full spatial coherence, there are many technical challenges in conceiving and implementing these devices that are highly transmissive, provide sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, and most importantly work in the single-shot mode. Portions of this research were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by Stanford Univ.

  8. Coherent electron beam density modulator for driving X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A., E-mail: novo@slac.stanford.edu; Decker, F.-J.; Hettel, B.; Nosochkov, Yu.; Sullivan, M.

    2015-02-21

    We propose a new compact scheme for a Free Electron Laser with more coherent properties for the X-ray beam. Higher FEL performance would be achieved using a train of electron bunches initially accelerated in a linear accelerator. Similar to the RF klystron concept, we propose developing an X-ray FEL which consists of two parts: an X-ray self-seeding electron beam density modulator and an output set of undulators. A density modulator consists of a low-Q X-ray cavity and an undulator, which is placed between the cavity mirrors. We use this undulator as a very high gain amplifier, which compensates the amplitude loss due to monochromatic X-ray reflections from the mirrors. Following the X-ray cavity, the density modulated electron beam is separated from the X-ray beam and then enters the output set of undulators. The frequency spectrum of the final X-ray beam is determined mainly by the bandwidth of the reflected elements in the X-ray cavity.

  9. New linac based free electron laser projects using bright electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the progress of accelerator technology in recent years it is now possible to consider the construction of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) that provides coherent radiation at wavelengths very far below the visible. In this paper, various projects are mentioned which are under way to establish the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) principle at very short photon wavelengths as well as multiple harmonic generation. The basic principles are briefly explained and the expected performance is discussed. With respect to linac technology, the key prerequisite for such single-pass, high-gain FELs is a high intensity, diffraction limited, electron beam to be generated and accelerated without degradation. Key components are RF guns with photocathodes, bunch compressors, and related diagnostics. Once proven in the micrometer to nanometer regime, the SASE FEL scheme is considered applicable down to Angstrom wavelengths. It is pointed out that this latter option is particularly of interest in context with the construction of a linear collider, which requires very similar beam parameters. (author)

  10. ELIXER, a simulation code for the spatial structure of light pulses in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the simulation code ELIXER, which was developed to study the spatial evolution of radiation in pulsed-beam Free-Electron Lasers. ELIXER includes the full spatial structure of the radiation by means of a set of orthogonal axisymmetric Gauss-Laguerre functions. Reflection and transmission on realistic cavity mirrors is included by means of a matrix formulation. The code differs from other spatially three dimensional models by calculating the longitudinal electron dynamics for each electron separately, whereas the transverse motions are approximated by the variation of the radial beam envelope. This approximation leads to a significant reduction of the numerical effort. An overview of the physical model is presented, and the numerical implementation of the FEL equations in the code is discussed. Particular emphasis is put on the input file, which describes the FEL device that is to be simulated, and on the output files that contain the spatial and spectral properties of the radiation, as well as the energy spectrum of the beam electrons. (orig.)

  11. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser using a nonlinearly tapered wiggler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Zahedian; B.Maraghechi; M.H.Rouhani

    2012-01-01

    A nonlinear and non-averaged model of a two-beam free-electron laser (FEL) wiggler that is tapered nonlinearly in the absence of slippage is presented.The two beams are assumed to have different energies,and the fundamental resonance of the higher energy beam is at the third harmonic of the lower energy beam.By using Maxwell's equations and the full Lorentz force equation of motion for the electron beams,coupled differential equations are derived and solved numerically by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.The amplitude of the wiggler field is assumed to decrease nonlinearly when the saturation of the third harmonic occurs.By simulation,the optimum starting point of the tapering and the slopes for reducing the wiggler amplitude are found.This technique can be applied to substantially improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the XUV and X-ray regions.The effect of tapering on the dynamical stability of the fast electron beam is also studied.

  12. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  13. Application of Strong Field Physics Techniques to X-Ray Free Electron Laser Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, Christoph Antony

    With the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) was realized at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This novel device brings an unprecedented parameter set to a diverse community of scientists. The short wavelengths and short pulse durations enable an entire new class of time resolved structural analysis. The imaging capabilities enabled by the machine will lead to many breakthroughs in the fields of biophysics and nano technology. With the new capabilities of the LCLS come many challenges. The understanding required to effectively utilize the XFEL on complex molecular or biological systems goes back to the basic atomic physics of the interaction of light and matter. The parameter set of this machine is as unprecedented as it will be untested. To make informed measurements with the LCLS beam, a set of novel diagnostic techniques will be required. This report outlines major contributions made to the early experimental atomic physics and diagnostic efforts at LCLS. Building on a rich history of techniques used for ultra short optical lasers and atomic physics experimentation, a diagnostic instrument and experimental techniques are developed to make spectral, energy and temporal measurements of the LCLS pulses possible. Expanding on earlier studies of ionization performed on optical lasers and synchrotron sources, new ionization mechanisms such as multiphoton ionization in the x-ray regime are observed. Leveraging the unique combination of hard x-ray photon energy, extremely short pulse duration and high pulse energy, a technique for the time resolved study of ultrafast inner shell electronic relaxation processes is developed and studied for feasibility. The common theme to the efforts described here is the advancement of proven techniques and interesting atomic physics phenomena to the next generation of ultra short pulsed x-ray laser systems. The atomic physics explored here lay the groundwork for the

  14. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  15. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  16. Operating synchrotron light sources with a high gain free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s synchrotron light sources have been considered as drivers of a high repetition rate (RR), high gain free electron laser (FEL) inserted in a by-pass line or in the ring itself. As of today, the high peak current required by the laser is not deemed to be compatible with the standard multi-bunch filling pattern of synchrotrons, and in particular with the operation of insertion device (ID) beamlines. We show that this problem can be overcome by virtue of magnetic bunch length compression in a ring section, and that, after lasing, the beam returns to equilibrium conditions without beam quality disruption. Bunch length compression brings a double advantage: the high peak current stimulates a high gain FEL emission, while the large energy spread makes the beam less sensitive to the FEL heating and to the microwave instability in the ring. The beam’s large energy spread at the undulator is matched to the FEL energy bandwidth through a transverse gradient undulator. Feasibility of lasing at 25 nm is shown for the Elettra synchrotron light source at 1 GeV, and scaling to shorter wavelengths as a function of momentum compaction, beam energy and transverse emittance in higher energy, larger rings is discussed. For the Elettra case study, a low (100 Hz) and a high (463 kHz) FEL RR are considered, corresponding to an average FEL output power at the level of ∼1 W (∼1013 photons per pulse) and ∼300 W (∼1011 photons per pulse), respectively. We also find that, as a by-product of compression, the ∼5 W Renieri’s limit on the average FEL power can be overcome. Our conclusion is that existing and planned synchrotron light sources may be made compatible with this new hybrid IDs-plus-FEL operational mode, with little impact on the standard beamlines functionality.

  17. Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an x-ray free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the feasibility of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser (DFL) pumped by an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL). The DFL under consideration is a Mg/SiC bi-layered Bragg reflector pumped by a single X-FEL bunch at 57.4 eV, stimulating the Mg L2,3 emission at 49 eV corresponding to the 3s-3d →2p1/2,3/2 transition. Based on a model developed by Yariv and Yeh and an extended coupled-wave theory, we show that it would be possible to obtain a threshold gain compatible with the pumping provided by available X-FEL facilities.

  18. Two-color facility based on a broadly tunable infrared free-electron laser and a subpicosecond-synchronized 10-fs-Ti : Sapphire laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van de Pol, M.J.; Pellemans, H. P. M.; Planken, P. C. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1998-01-01

    Subpicosecond synchronization between a mirror-dispersion-controlled 10-fs Ti:sapphire laser and the Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments has been achieved. The measured intensity cross correlation between the two lasers is consistent with a jitter of only 400 fs rms. The wide and continuous

  19. External magnetic field effect on the growth rate of a plasma-loaded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeildoost, N.; Jafari, S.; Abbasi, E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to extend the production of intense coherent radiation to angstrom wavelengths, a laser wave is employed as a laser wiggler which propagates through a magnetized plasma channel. The plasma-loaded laser wigglers increase the ability of laser guidance and electron bunching process compared to the counterpropagating laser wigglers in vacuum. The presence of the plasma medium can make it possible to propagate the laser wiggler and the electron beam parallel to each other so that the focusing of the pulse will be saved. In addition, employing an external guide magnetic field can confine both the ambient plasma and the transverse motions of the electron beam, therefore, improving the free-electron lasers' efficiency, properly. Electron trajectories have been obtained by solving the steady state equations of motion for a single particle and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method has been used to simulate the electron orbits. To study the growth rate of a laser-pumped free-electron laser in the presence of a plasma medium, perturbation analysis has been performed to combine the momentum transfer, continuity, and wave equations, respectively. Numerical calculations indicate that by increasing the guide magnetic field frequency, the growth rate for group I orbits increases, while for group II and III orbits decreases.

  20. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating

  1. R and D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R and D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R and D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R and D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R and D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R and D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance (le) 1 mm · mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the

  2. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hromalik, Marianne [Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY 13126 (United States); Tate, Mark; Koerner, Lucas [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) promise to revolutionize X-ray science with extremely high peak brilliances and femtosecond X-ray pulses. This will require novel detectors to fully realize the potential of these new sources. There are many current detector development projects aimed at the many challenges of meeting the XFEL requirements . This paper describes a pixel array detector (PAD) that has been developed for the Coherent X-ray Imaging experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory . The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization; a 2-level in-pixel gain setting that can be used to make an arbitrary 2-D gain pattern that is adaptable to a particular experiment; the ability to handle instantaneous X-ray flux rates of 10{sup 17} photons per second; and continuous frames rates in excess of 120 Hz. The detector uses direct detection of X-rays in a silicon diode. The charge produced by the diode is integrated in a pixilated application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which digitizes collected holes with single X-ray photon capability. Each ASIC is 194x185 pixels, each pixel is 110{mu}mx110{mu}m on a side. Each pixel can detect up to 2500 X-rays per frame in low-gain mode, yet easily detects single photons at high-gain. Cooled, single-chip detectors have been built and meet all the required specifications. SLAC National Laboratory is engaged in constructing a tiled, multi-chip 1516x1516 pixel detector.

  3. Development of magnets for infra-red-free electron laser project at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and development of the magnets for the beam transport line of Infra- red- Free Electron Laser (IR-FEL) project at RRCAT. All the magnets have been developed and fiducialized after magnetic characterization for installation in the tunnel. These magnets include three dipole magnets, twelve quadrupole magnets and twenty two steering magnets for bending, focussing and steering of 15 to 35 MeV electron beam through a dog-leg type beam line. The dipole magnet is designed as H type for a maximum magnetic field of 0.25 tesla with pole gap and bending angle of 42 mm and 22.5° respectively. The dipole magnet is quite thin (effective length ∼200 mm) therefore entry-exit ends were chamfered to achieve the integrated field uniformity of < 1 x 10-3 within the good field zone. The quadrupole magnet is designed for maximum integrated strength of 2.5 T/m. The poles are wider than the coil to enhance the good field region and made detachable type. The pole profile is chosen as pure hyperbola with extension. Quadrupole magnets with two different sizes of apertures (aperture diameters of 60 mm and 40 mm) were developed. The steering magnet is designed for kick strength of 12 mrad at 25 MeV. Out of 22 steering magnets, 8 are vertical steering, 6 are horizontal steering and 8 combined function steering magnets. Magnetic measurements of dipole magnets were carried out in 3 axes Hall probe bench. Quadrupole and steering magnets were characterized in a rotating coil based harmonic measurement bench. The details of the design and magnetic measurements of these magnets with results will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Initial electron distributions for free-electron lasers generated by injector and accelerator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early free-electron laser (FEL) development was guided by simple performance criteria based on the number of undulator periods, electron beam quality, and current. The beam quality (emittance and energy spread) was used to characterize the initial distribution of axial electron velocities along the undulator axis. While the emittance and energy spread determine the overall width of the distribution, its detailed shape is also important. As new accelerators are designed specifically for FEL applications, it becomes important to obtain distribution shape information from simulations that include the electron gun, accelerator, and beam transport in addition to the usual electron/optical interaction in the undulator. The distribution at the entrance to the undulator can be calculated from numerical simulations of the cathode emission, acceleration, and transport of an electron beam. We have modeled the beam generation, from cathode emission up to the energy of the accelerator injector, using an axisymmetric, cylindrical geometry particle simulation (DPC). This code solves the relativistic force equation with fields obtained from Maxwell's equations in the Darwin model. The DPC calculation is run repeatedly varying parameters such as accelerating stress, electrode configuration, and axial magnetic field profile until a good match is obtained for the accelerator. The beam exiting from the injector can be accelerated and transported using the transfer matrix technique with a simple model for accelerating gaps and magnets. Alternatively, acceleration and transport can be simulated with a particle code that solves for the axisymmetric evolution of a slice of an electron beam including possible emittance growth. The phase space obtained from the accelerator can be evaluated for performance using either the simple FEL integral equation method or the more complete FRED simulation code. 9 refs., 5 figs

  5. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  6. Injection Methods and Instrumentation for Serial X-ray Free Electron Laser Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daniel

    Scientists have used X-rays to study biological molecules for nearly a century. Now with the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL), new methods have been developed to advance structural biology. These new methods include serial femtosecond crystallography, single particle imaging, solution scattering, and time resolved techniques. The XFEL is characterized by high intensity pulses, which are only about 50 femtoseconds in duration. The intensity allows for scattering from microscopic particles, while the short pulses offer a way to outrun radiation damage. XFELs are powerful enough to obliterate most samples in a single pulse. While this allows for a "diffract and destroy" methodology, it also requires instrumentation that can position microscopic particles into the X-ray beam (which may also be microscopic), continuously renew the sample after each pulse, and maintain sample viability during data collection. Typically these experiments have used liquid microjets to continuously renew sample. The high flow rate associated with liquid microjets requires large amounts of sample, most of which runs to waste between pulses. An injector designed to stream a viscous gel-like material called lipidic cubic phase (LCP) was developed to address this problem. LCP, commonly used as a growth medium for membrane protein crystals, lends itself to low flow rate jetting and so reduces the amount of sample wasted significantly. This work discusses sample delivery and injection for XFEL experiments. It reviews the liquid microjet method extensively, and presents the LCP injector as a novel device for serial crystallography, including detailed protocols for the LCP injector and anti-settler operation.

  7. Nonlinear resonances in a multi-stage free-electron laser amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, S. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Takayama, K. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    A two-beam accelerator (TBA) is a possible candidate of future linear colliders, in which the demanded rf power is provided by a multi-stage free-electron laser (MFEL). After if amplification in each stage, a driving beam is re-accelerated by an induction unit and propagates into the next stage. Recently it has been recognized that the multi-stage character of the MFEL causes resonances between its periodicity and the synchrotron motion in an rf bucket. Since the synchrotron oscillation is strongly modulated by the resonance and at the worst a large fraction of particles is trapped in the resonance islands, the nonlinear resonances in the FEL longitudinal beam dynamics can lead to notable degradation of the MFEL performance, such as output fluctuation and phase modulation which have been big concerns in the accelerator society. The overall efficiency of the MFEL and the quality of the amplified microwave power are key issues for realizing the TBA/FEL Particularly the rf phase and amplitude errors must be maintained within tolerance. One of significant obstacles is an amplification of undesired modes. If a small-size waveguide is employed, the FEL resonance energies for undesired higher order modes shift very far from that for a fundamental mode; so it is possible to prevent higher order modes from evolving. Such a small-size waveguide, however, gives a high power density in the FEL. Simulation results have demonstrated that the nonlinear resonances occur in die FEL longitudinal motion when the power density exceeds some threshold. An analytical method for studying the nonlinear resonance in the TBA/FEL is developed based on the macroparticle model which can describe analytically the drastic behaviors in the evolutions of the phase and amplitude. In the theory the basic 1D-FEL equations are reduced to a nonlinear pendulum equation with respect to the ponderomotive phase.

  8. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft X-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility responsive to them is being studied at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The facility is based on a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on the experimental requirements, the individualFELs may be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded highgain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds. This new light source would serve a broad community of scientists in many areas of research, similar to existing utilization of storage ring based light sources. To reduce technical risks and constructioncosts, accelerator research, development, and design studies at LBNL target the most critical components and systems of the facility. We are developing a high-repetition-rate low-emittance electron gun, high quantum efficiency photocathodes, and have embarked on design and optimization of the electron beam accelerator, FEL switchyard, and array of FELs. We continue our work on precision timing and synchronization systems critical for time-resolved experiments using pump-probe techniques.

  9. Non-wiggler-averaged theory of short wavelength free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional nonlinear analysis of the interaction in short wavelength free-electron lasers is presented using a non-wiggler-averaged formulation for the electron trajectories. The analysis and simulation code is based upon a slow-time-scale amplifier model in which it is assumed that the interaction is with a single frequency wave, and Maxwell's equations are averaged over a wave period. This eliminates the fast time scale from the analysis. Note that although Maxwell's equations are averaged over the wave period, no average is imposed on the Lorentz force equations. The electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of Gaussian optical modes. The wiggler model used is that of a three-dimensional planar wiggler which dictates the choice of a Gauss-Hermite mode decomposition. These fields are substituted into Maxwell's equations and, after averaging over the wave period and integration over the transverse coordinates, yields nonlinear differential equations for the evolution of the amplitude and phase of each mode. These equations are integrated simultaneously with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons. Advantages which are derived from the non-wiggler-averaged orbit treatment are: the adiabatic injection of the beam into the wiggler can be modeled; effects due to the transverse wiggler inhomogeniety such as betatron oscillations and synchrotron-betatron coupling are implicitly included in the treatment; wiggler imperfections can be included in the analysis by the relatively simple expedient of allowing the wiggler amplitude to vary with axial position; and harmonic interactions are implicitly included. The first two advantages relate to the self-consistent treatment of emittance growth due to the injection process and the transverse wiggler inhomogenieties. It should be noted that MEDUSA is also capable of analyzing the effect of the measured imperfections of a specific wiggler magnet to be used in an experiment

  10. Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Development of the soft X-ray spectroscopy setup to probe surfaces using free electron laser. •Probing surface chemical reactions using free electron laser. •Optical laser pump and soft X-ray probe study on a sub-picosecond timescale. -- Abstract: We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface

  11. Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, T.; Anniyev, T. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Beye, M. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Coffee, R. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dell’Angela, M. [University of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Föhlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gladh, J. [Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Kaya, S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Krupin, O. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: •Development of the soft X-ray spectroscopy setup to probe surfaces using free electron laser. •Probing surface chemical reactions using free electron laser. •Optical laser pump and soft X-ray probe study on a sub-picosecond timescale. -- Abstract: We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface.

  12. Creation and diagnosis of a solid-density plasma with an X-ray free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinko, S.M.; Ciricosta, O.; Cho, B.I.; Engelhorn, K.; Chung, H.-K.; Brown, C.R.D.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Falcone, R.W.; Graves, C.; Hájková, Věra; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H.J.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, C. D.; Ping, Y.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J.J.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P.A.; Nagler, B.; Wark, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 482, č. 7383 (2012), s. 59-63. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : x-ray laser * free-electron laser * hot dense plasmas * astrophysics * inertial fusion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 38.597, year: 2012

  13. Single-shot spectra of temporally selected micropulses from a mid-infrared free-electron laser by upconversion

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaolong; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of single-shot spectra of temporally selected micropulses from a mid-infrared (MIR) free-electron laser (FEL) by upconversion. We achieve the upconversion of FEL pulses at 11 \\mu m using externally synchronized Nd:YAG or microchip laser pulses at 1064 nm to produce sum-frequency mixing (SFM) signals at 970 nm, which are detected by a compact CCD spectrometer without an intensifier. Our experimental system is very cost-effective, and allows us to obtain the laser spectra of selected micropulses at any temporal position within a single macropulse from an oscillator-type FEL.

  14. Chirped-beam two-stage free-electron laser for high-power femtosecond x-ray pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for generating femtosecond-duration x-ray pulses with a free-electron laser is presented. This method uses an energy-chirped electron beam propagating through an undulator to produce a frequency-chirped x-ray pulse by self-amplified spontaneous emission. A short temporal pulse is created by use of a monochromator to select a narrow radiation bandwidth. A second undulator is used to amplify the short-duration radiation. The radiation characteristics produced by a chirped-beam two-stage free-electron laser are calculated, and the performance of the chirped-beam two-stage option for the Linac Coherent Light Source is considered

  15. X-ray free-electron lasers: Scientific goals and machine implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, John

    2001-07-01

    Free electron lasers are now being designed which will operate at wavelengths down to about 1. [1] The physics of the high-gain, single pass FEL process requires extremely bright electron pulses in the 10-20 GeV range. This electron brightness should be achievable using an RF-photocathode source and a linear accelerator, such as the initial acceleration stage of a TeV-range linear electron-positron collider. The x-ray FEL radiation produced will have unique properties. In particular: • The FEL peak intensity and peak brightness will be many orders of magnitude higher than can be produced by any other source. • The pulse length will be less than 1 picosecond, orders of magnitude shorter than can be achieved with any other bright source such as a synchrotron. • The FEL radiation will have full transverse coherence and a degeneracy parameter (photons/coherence volume) equal to 109 or more. No other source can produce hard x-radiation with a degeneracy parameter significantly greater than 1. These properties offer the chance to study chemical, biological, and condensed matter dynamical processes with sub-picosecond time resolution and angstrom spatial resolution. [2] The high peak power of the FEL radiation (greater than 1014W/cm2) could be used to create precisely-controlled chemical and structural modifications inside samples. There is also the possibility that nonlinear x-ray interactions could be used to give increased resolution for spectroscopic studies, to greatly expand the parameter space for atomic physics studies, and to permit new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. The exploration of these new x-ray techniques will require considerable development, not only in technical areas such as optics and detectors, but also in understanding the basic physics of the interaction of very intense x-radiation with matter. A large collaboration of US institutions is now conducting preliminary research and development in these areas, with the intention of

  16. X-ray free-electron lasers: Scientific goals and machine implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free electron lasers are now being designed which will operate at wavelengths down to about 1. [1] The physics of the high-gain, single pass FEL process requires extremely bright electron pulses in the 10-20 GeV range. This electron brightness should be achievable using an RF-photocathode source and a linear accelerator, such as the initial acceleration stage of a TeV-range linear electron-positron collider. The x-ray FEL radiation produced will have unique properties. In particular: The FEL peak intensity and peak brightness will be many orders of magnitude higher than can be produced by any other source. The pulse length will be less than 1 picosecond, orders of magnitude shorter than can be achieved with any other bright source such as a synchrotron. The FEL radiation will have full transverse coherence and a degeneracy parameter (photons/coherence volume) equal to 109 or more. No other source can produce hard x-radiation with a degeneracy parameter significantly greater than 1. These properties offer the chance to study chemical, biological, and condensed matter dynamical processes with sub-picosecond time resolution and angstrom spatial resolution. [2] The high peak power of the FEL radiation (greater than 1014 W/cm2) could be used to create precisely-controlled chemical and structural modifications inside samples. There is also the possibility that nonlinear x-ray interactions could be used to give increased resolution for spectroscopic studies, to greatly expand the parameter space for atomic physics studies, and to permit new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. The exploration of these new x-ray techniques will require considerable development, not only in technical areas such as optics and detectors, but also in understanding the basic physics of the interaction of very intense x-radiation with matter. A large collaboration of US institutions is now conducting preliminary research and development in these areas, with the intention of creating an FEL

  17. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Meng; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; WANG Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Bin LI; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng

    2014-01-01

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utiliza...

  18. Doubly resonant three-photon double ionization of Ar atoms induced by an EUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanism for three-photon double ionization of atoms by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses is revealed, where in a sequential process the second ionization step, proceeding via resonant two-photon ionization of ions, is strongly enhanced by the excitation of ionic autoionizing states. In contrast to the conventional model, the mechanism explains the observed relative intensities of photoelectron peaks and their angular dependence in three-photon double ionization of argon.

  19. Saturable absorption of an X-ray free-electron-laser heated solid-density aluminum plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rackstraw, D.S.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S.M.; Barbrel, B.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Cho, B.I.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G.L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, Věra; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J.J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 1 (2015), "015003-1"-"015003-5". ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100101221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : free electron laser * x-ray * ionization of plasmas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 7.512, year: 2014

  20. Energy absorption of free rare gas clusters irradiated by intense VUV pulses of a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the first experiments at the free electron laser of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) the Coulomb explosion of Xenon clusters irradiated with high intensity pulses at a wavelength of 98 nm has been observed. Classical trajectory calculations have been performed in order to illuminate the energy absorption process. Comparison with typical parameters in the infrared regime shows that above barrier ionization is suppressed due to the fast oscillating field and thermionic ionization prevails