WorldWideScience

Sample records for al4o2cl102 oxide species

  1. Anaerobic benzene oxidation by Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Bain, Timothy S; Nevin, Kelly P; Barlett, Melissa A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 10(9) and 8.4 × 10(9) cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 10(9) cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated.

  2. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts satisfact......A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  3. Reactive species and diabetes: counteracting oxidative stress to improve health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Zulet, M Angeles; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2009-12-01

    Oxidative stress is at the very core of metabolism. Reactive species behave as true second messengers that control important cellular functions. However, under pathological conditions, abnormally large concentrations of these species may lead to permanent changes in signal transduction and gene expression. Attenuation of oxidative stress as a way to improve several diseases such as diabetes has flourished as one of the main challenges of research. The lack of evidence to prove the benefits from antioxidant compounds has led to boost these strategies. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through the development of inhibitors against NADPH oxidase and mitochondria offers an alternative approach to conventional antioxidant therapies. There is a need to understand oxidative stress process to implement health-disorder approaches.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fátima Horta; Bárbara Pinheiro Mendes; Eric Henrique Roma; Fátima Soares Motta Noronha; Juan Pereira Macêdo; Luciana Souza Oliveira; Myrian Morato Duarte; Leda Quercia Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects millions of people around the world. Several species of Leishmania infect mouse strains, and murine models closely reproduce the cutaneous lesions caused by the parasite in humans. Mouse models have enabled studies on the pathogenesis and effector mechanisms of host resistance to infection. Here, we review the role of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) in the control of parasites by macrophages, which are both the host c...

  5. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  6. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Horta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects millions of people around the world. Several species of Leishmania infect mouse strains, and murine models closely reproduce the cutaneous lesions caused by the parasite in humans. Mouse models have enabled studies on the pathogenesis and effector mechanisms of host resistance to infection. Here, we review the role of nitric oxide (NO, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and peroxynitrite (ONOO− in the control of parasites by macrophages, which are both the host cells and the effector cells. We also discuss the role of neutrophil-derived oxygen and nitrogen reactive species during infection with Leishmania. We emphasize the role of these cells in the outcome of leishmaniasis early after infection, before the adaptive Th-cell immune response.

  8. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in limb vascular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be one of the most important regulatory compounds within the cardiovascular system where it is central for functions such as regulation of blood pressure, blood flow and vascular growth. The bioavailability of NO is determined by a balance between, on one hand......, the extent of enzymatic and non-enzymatic formation of NO and on the other hand, removal of NO, which in part is dependent on the reaction of NO with reactive oxygen species (ROS). The presence of ROS is dependent on the extent of ROS formation via mitochondria and/or enzymes such as NAD(P)H oxidase...

  9. Oxidation of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and reactive oxidative species: A review of investigative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B J

    2015-05-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, in particular hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a key role in the regulation of cellular behaviour and alterations to it can modulate both the development of human diseases as well as controlling normal biochemical processes such as cell signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. For these reasons, in vitro fragmentation studies of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and oxidative species are seen to be relevant to the understanding of in vivo studies of damage to the ECM. A wide range of investigative techniques have therefore been applied to gain insights into the relative fragmentation effects of several reactive oxidative species with the ultimate goal of determining mechanisms of fragmentation at the molecular level. These methods are reviewed here.

  10. Evaluation of discrepancy between measured and modelled oxidized mercury species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available L. Zhang et al. (2012, in a recent report, compared model estimates with new observations of oxidized and particulate mercury species (Hg2+ and Hgp in the Great Lakes region and found that the sum of Hg2+ and Hgp varied between a factor of 2 to 10 between measurements and model. They suggested too high emission inputs as Hg2+ and too fast oxidative conversion of Hg0 to Hg2+ and Hgp as possible causes. This study quantitatively explores measurement uncertainties in detail. These include sampling efficiency, composition of sample, interfering species and calibration errors. Model (Global/Regional Atmospheric Heavy Metals Model – GRAHM sensitivity experiments are used to examine the consistency between various Hg measurements and speciation of Hg near emission sources to better understand the discrepancies between modelled and measured concentrations of Hg2+ and Hgp. We find that the ratio of Hg0, Hg2+ and Hgp in the emission inventories, measurements of surface air concentrations of oxidized Hg and measurements of wet deposition are currently inconsistent with each other in the vicinity of emission sources. Current speciation of Hg emissions suggests higher concentrations of Hg2+ in air and in precipitation near emission sources; however, measured air concentrations of Hg2+ and measured concentrations of Hg in precipitation are not found to be significantly elevated near emission sources compared to the remote regions. The averaged unbiased root mean square error (RMSE between simulated and observed concentrations of Hg2+ is found to be reduced by 42% and for Hgp reduced by 40% for 21 North American sites investigated, when a ratio for Hg0 : Hg2+ : Hgp in the emissions is changed from 50 : 40 : 10 (as specified in the original inventories to 90 : 8 : 2. Unbiased RMSE reductions near emissions sources in the eastern United States and Canada are found to be reduced by up to 58% for Hg2+. Significant improvement in the model simulated spatial

  11. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  12. Interplay Among Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integrated cellular process occurring in plant growth, development, and defense responses to facilitate normal growth and development and better survival against various stresses as a whole. As universal toxic chemicals in plant and animal cells, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS or RNS), mainly superoxide anion (O2−•), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nitric oxide (•NO), have been studied extensively for their roles in PCD induction. Physiological and genetic studies have convincingly shown their essential roles. However, the details and mechanisms by which ROS and •NO interplay and induce PCD are not well understood. Our recent study on Cupressus lusitanica culture cell death revealed the elicitor-induced co-accumulation of ROS and •NO and interactions between •NO and H2O2 or O2-• in different ways to regulate cell death. •NO and H2O2 reciprocally enhanced the production of each other whereas •NO and O2−• showed reciprocal suppression on each other's production. It was the interaction between •NO and O2-• but not between •NO and H2O2 that induced PCD, probably through peroxynitrite (ONOO−). In this addendum, some unsolved issues in the study were discussed based on recent studies on the complex network of ROS and •NO leading to PCD in animals and plants. PMID:19704554

  13. Biogenesis of reactive sulfur species for signaling by hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Libiad, Marouane; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-07-01

    The chemical species involved in H2S signaling remain elusive despite the profound and pleiotropic physiological effects elicited by this molecule. The dominant candidate mechanism for sulfide signaling is persulfidation of target proteins. However, the relatively poor reactivity of H2S toward oxidized thiols, such as disulfides, the low concentration of disulfides in the reducing milieu of the cell and the low steady-state concentration of H2S raise questions about the plausibility of persulfide formation via reaction between an oxidized thiol and a sulfide anion or a reduced thiol and oxidized hydrogen disulfide. In contrast, sulfide oxidation pathways, considered to be primarily mechanisms for disposing of excess sulfide, generate a series of reactive sulfur species, including persulfides, polysulfides and thiosulfate, that could modify target proteins. We posit that sulfide oxidation pathways mediate sulfide signaling and that sulfurtransferases ensure target specificity.

  14. Reactive species and oxidative stress in optic nerve vulnerable to secondary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Bartlett, Carole A; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Lam, Magdalena; Archer, Michael; Stocker, Roland; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2014-11-01

    Secondary degeneration contributes substantially to structural and functional deficits following traumatic injury to the CNS. While it has been proposed that oxidative stress is a feature of secondary degeneration, contributing reactive species and resultant oxidized products have not been clearly identified in vivo. The study is designed to identify contributors to, and consequences of, oxidative stress in a white matter tract vulnerable to secondary degeneration. Partial dorsal transection of the optic nerve (ON) was used to model secondary degeneration in ventral nerve unaffected by the primary injury. Reactive species were assessed using fluorescent labelling and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS). Antioxidant enzymes and oxidized products were semi-quantified immunohistochemically. Mitophagy was assessed by electron microscopy. Fluorescent indicators of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species increased at 1, 3 and 7days after injury, in ventral ON. LC/MS/MS confirmed increases in reactive species linked to infiltrating microglia/macrophages in dorsal ON. Similarly, immunoreactivity for glutathione peroxidase and haem oxygenase-1 increased in ventral ON at 3 and 7days after injury, respectively. Despite increased antioxidant immunoreactivity, DNA oxidation was evident from 1day, lipid oxidation at 3days, and protein nitration at 7days after injury. Nitrosative and oxidative damage was particularly evident in CC1-positive oligodendrocytes, at times after injury at which structural abnormalities of the Node of Ranvier/paranode complex have been reported. The incidence of mitochondrial autophagic profiles was also significantly increased from 3days. Despite modest increases in antioxidant enzymes, increased reactive species are accompanied by oxidative and nitrosative damage to DNA, lipid and protein, associated with increasing abnormal mitochondria, which together may contribute to the deficits of secondary degeneration.

  15. Lidocaine Oxidation by Electrogenerated Reactive Oxygen Species in the Light of Oxidative Drug Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Bruins, Andries P.

    2010-01-01

    The study of oxidative drug metabolism by Cytochrome P450s (P450) is important in the earlier stages of drug development. For this purpose, automated analytical techniques are needed for fast and accurate estimation of oxidative drug metabolism. Previous studies have shown that electrochemistry in c

  16. Time-dependent reactive species formation and oxidative stress damage in the skin after UVB irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Pereira, R C; Silva, T N X; Costa, A C C; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-04-02

    This study provides evidence that skin oxidative stress injury caused by UVB irradiation is mediated predominantly by reactive oxygen species immediately after irradiation and by reactive nitrogen species at later time points. Animals were pre-treated with free radical scavengers (deferrioxamine, histidine), α-tocopherol, or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (L-NAME or aminoguanidine) or left untreated and subjected to UVB irradiation. α-Tocopherol inhibited the increase in lipid peroxidation, as evaluated by chemiluminescence at 0 h and 24 h after UVB irradiation. Immediately after UVB irradiation, lipid peroxidation increased moderately and was abolished by free radical scavengers but not by NOS inhibitors. Likewise, the reduction of antioxidant capacity was not reversed by NOS inhibitors. Nitric oxide augmentation was not observed at this time point. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, increased lipid peroxidation levels and nitric oxide elevation were observed and were prevented by NOS inhibitors. Low concentrations of GSH and reduced catalase activity were also observed. Altogether, these data indicate that reactive oxygen species (singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals) are the principal mediators of immediate damage and that reactive nitrogen species (*NO and possibly ONOO(-)) seem to be involved later in skin oxidative injury induced by UVB radiation. The reduced catalase activity and low level of GSH suggest that *NO and H(2)O(2) may react to generate ONOO(-), a very strong lipid peroxidant species.

  17. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Couto Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise.

  18. Oxidants, antioxidants, and the beneficial roles of exercise-induced production of reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Elisa Couto; Silva, Albená Nunes; de Oliveira, Marta Rubino

    2012-01-01

    This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise.

  19. Bioavailability of cadmium adsorbed on various oxides minerals to wetland plant species Phragmites australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang He, E-mail: he.wangworld@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jia Yongfeng, E-mail: yongfeng.jia@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang Shaofeng [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhu Huijie; Wu Xing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-08-15

    The bioavailability of heavy metals strongly depends on their speciation in the environment. The effect of different chemical speciations of cadmium ions (i.e. adsorbed on different oxide minerals) on its bioavailability to wetland plant Phragmites australis was studied. Goethite, magnetite, gibbsite, alumina, and manganese oxide were chosen as representatives of metal (hydr)oxides commonly present in sediment. The cultivar system with Hoagland solution as nutrition supply, and single metal oxide with adsorbed Cd as contaminant was applied to study Cd accumulation by P. australis. The bioaccumulation degree in root after the 45-day treatment followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > MnO{sub 2} > FeOOH. The concentration of Cd in stem and leaf followed a similar order although it was considerably lower than that in root. Low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs), acetic acid, malic acid and citric acid were used to evaluate the desorbability of Cd from different oxides, which can be indicative of Cd-oxide bonding strength and Cd bioavailability. Desorption of Cd by acetic acid and malic acid followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}, while by citric acid: Al(OH){sub 3} {>=} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}. This was consistent with the Cd accumulation degree in the plant. Cd adsorbed on Al(OH){sub 3} was the most easily desorbable species and most bioavailable to P. australis among the oxide minerals, whereas MnO{sub 2} adsorbed Cd was least desorbable by LMWOAs hence constituted the least bioavailable Cd species adsorbed on the oxide minerals.

  20. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extract suppresses both reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and prevents lipid oxidation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Kitts, D D

    2005-08-01

    Flavonoids and coumaric acid derivatives were identified from dandelion flower (Taraxacum officinale). Characteristics of chain-breaking antioxidants, such as extended lag phase and reduced propagation rate, were observed in oxidation of linoleic acid emulsion with the addition of dandelion flower extract (DFE). DFE suppressed both superoxide and hydroxyl radical, while the latter was further distinguished by both site-specific and non-specific hydroxyl radical inhibition. DPPH-radical-scavenging activity and a synergistic effect with alpha-tocopherol were attributed to the reducing activity derived from phenolic content of DFE. A significant (p < 0.05) and concentration-dependent, reduced nitric oxide production from acterial-lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells was observed with the addition of DFE. Moreover, peroxyl-radical-induced intracellular oxidation of RAW264.7 cells was inhibited significantly (p < 0.05) by the addition of DFE over a range of concentrations. These results showed that the DFE possessed marked antioxidant activity in both biological and chemical models. Furthermore, the efficacy of DFE in inhibiting both reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were attributed to its phenolic content.

  1. Dynamic Structure of Mo-O Species in Ag-Mo-P-O Catalyst for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic structure of Mo-O species in Ag-Mo-P-O catalyst was studied by in situ confocal microprobe laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and catalytic test. The results indicate Mo-O species of MoO3 transformed to Mo-O species of AgMoO2PO4 in C3H8/O2/N2 (3/1/4) flow at 773 K. This behavior is closely relative to oxidative dehydrogenation of propane and intrinsic properties of Mo-O species. The Mo-O species of AgMoO2PO4 may be active species for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

  2. Phenol by direct hydroxylation of benzene with nitrous oxide - role of surface oxygen species in the reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitzmann, A.; Klemm, E.; Emig, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie 1; Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Technical Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Transient experiments in a Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) Reactor were performed to elucidate the role of surface oyxgen species in the oxidation of benzene to phenol on ZSM-5 type zeolites with nitrous oxide as a selective oxidant. It was shown by puls experiments with nitrous oxide that the mean lifetime of the generated surface oxygen species is between 0.2s at 500 C and about 4.2 s at 400 C. Afterwards the surface oxygen species desorb as molecular oxygen into the gas phase where total oxidation will take place if hydrocarbons are present. Dual puls experiments consisting of a nitrous oxide puls followed by a benzene puls allowed studying the reactivity of the surface oxygen species formed during the first puls. The observation of the phenol formation was impeded due to the strong sorption of phenol. Multipulse experiments were necessary to reach a pseudo steady state phenol yield. (orig.)

  3. Oxidation, characterization, and separation of non-pertechnetate species in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, N.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Under DOE`s privatization initiative, Lockheed Martin and British Nuclear Fuels Limited are preparing to stabilize the caustic tank waste generated from plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Pretreatment of Hanford tank waste will separate it into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The scope of the technetium problem is indicated by its inventory in the waste: {approximately}2000 kg. Technetium would normally exist as the pertechnetate anion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, in aqueous solution. However, evidence obtained at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) indicates that the combination of radiolysis, heat, organic complexants, and time may have reduced and complexed a significant fraction of the technetium in the tank waste. These species are in a form that is not amenable to current separation techniques based on pertechnetate removal. Thus, it is crucial that methods be developed to set technetium to pertechnetate so these technologies can meet the required technetium decontamination factor. If this is not possible, then alternative separation processes will need to be developed to remove these non-pertechnetate species from the waste. The simplest, most cost-effective approach to this problem is to convert the non-pertechnetate species to pertechnetate. Chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical oxidation methods, as well as hydrothermal treatment, are being applied to Hanford waste samples to ensure that the method works on the unknown technetium species in the waste. The degree of oxidation will be measured by determining the technetium distribution coefficient, {sup Tc}K{sub d}, between the waste and Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin, and comparing it to the true pertechnetate K{sub d} value for the waste matrix. Other species in the waste, including all the organic material, could be oxidized by these methods, thus selective oxidation is desirable to minimize the cost, time, and secondary waste generation.

  4. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  5. Measurements of reactive halogen species as oxidants of mercury over the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Terschure, A. F.; Edgerton, E. S.; Wu, Y.; Nair, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction of bromine and chlorine radicals with gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is a source for gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM). It has been established that oxidation by bromine is relevant at high latitudes, and can also occur in mid-latitude regions (Peleg et al. 2007), or in the free troposphere. A subject of ongoing debate concerns the role of free tropospheric bromine vs boundary layer bromine in oxidizing mercury. Here we present measurements of reactive halogen species bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) along with gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), and particulate mercury (Hgp) at a coastal location in Gulf Breeze, Fl. The University of Colorado has deployed a research grade Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure BrO, IO, as well as formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen dimers (O4). Here we present the compilation of the data collected by this instrument over the time period from May 2009 to January 2011, which include the first measurements of BrO, IO, and CHOCHO over the Gulf of Mexico. We also present several case studies for days where significant amounts of reactive halogens were measured, explore the sources and back trajectories of the air masses carrying these compounds, and relate our observations to mercury data collected at a nearby SEARCH network site.

  6. Reducing Systematic Errors in Oxide Species with Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Hansen, Heine Anton

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations can be used to gain valuable insight into the fundamental reaction processes in metal−oxygen systems, e.g., metal−oxygen batteries. Here, the ability of a range of different exchange-correlation functionals to reproduce experimental enthalpies of formation...... for different types of alkali and alkaline earth metal oxide species has been examined. Most examined functionals result in significant overestimation of the stability of superoxide species compared to peroxides and monoxides, which can result in erroneous prediction of reaction pathways. We show that if metal...

  7. Low-Cost Synthesis of Smart Biocompatible Graphene Oxide Reduced Species by Means of GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Tiziana; Armata, Nerina; Pendolino, Flavio; Colombo, Paolo; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is focused on the engineering of biocompatible complex systems composed of an inorganic and bio part. Graphene oxide (GO) and/or graphite oxide (GtO) were taken into account as potential substrates to the linkage of the protein such as Anemonia sulcata recombinant green fluorescent protein (rAsGFP). The complex system is obtained through a reduction process between GO/GtO and rAsGFP archiving an environmentally friendly biosynthesis. Spectroscopic measurements support the formation of reduced species. In particular, photoluminescence shows a change in the activity of the protein when a bond is formed, highlighted by a loss of the maximum emission signal of rAsGFP and a redshift of the maximum absorption peak of the GO/GtO species. Moreover, the hemolysis assay reveals a lower value in the presence of less oxidized graphene species providing evidence for a biocompatible material. This singular aspect can be approached as a promising method for circulating pharmaceutical preparations via intravenous administration in the field of drug delivery.

  8. TRLFS Studies on luminescence enhancement of U(VI) using oxidants for quencher species in samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wansik; Jung, Euo Chang; Cho, Hye Ryun [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The pulse laser-based method detects photo luminescent emission of U(VI) so that it is highly sensitive for non-isotopic al determination of total uranium concentration. Thus, this method has been used for detection of trace quantity of uranium in the environmental, geological, and bioassay samples. One of widely-used pulse laser-based methods is kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), of which instrument is commercially available. The intensity and lifetime of characteristic phosphorescence at 515-520 nm of hexavalent uranium are measured with an excitation wavelength of 425 nm. Particularly in KPA the use of phosphate-based luminescence enhancing agent (LEA) leading to the formation of uranyl-phosphate complexes extends the luminescence (LM) lifetime of uranium (> {approx} 200 {mu}s) and subsequently the overall luminescence intensity. In KPA, however, an extensive sample pretreatment procedure is required to reduce the luminescence quenching effects of ions and molecules present in samples. During such procedures the uranium species in low oxidation states are also oxidized to hexavalent uranium so that the measurement of the total uranium concentration can be achieved. In general, a series of high temperature dry and wet ashing procedures is implemented prior to the addition of LEA to decompose the interfering substances. The aim of this study is to examine the characteristics of the interfering species exhibiting significant quenching effects and to develop a way of minimizing the time required for the sample pretreatment step particularly for certain oxidizable quencher species. In fact, in a previous study we reported that significant LM quenching effects are observed from those possessing chemical reduction capability such as Fe(II) and cysteine. Under such sample conditions it is shown that the conventional KPA is not applicable due to the short lifetime (< {approx} 1 {mu}s), therefore a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) capable

  9. Aminoguanidine inhibits reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and oxidant-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, I; Fard, A K; Hatchell, D L; Brownlee, M

    1998-07-01

    Aminoguanidine (AG) treatment, like nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment, prevents diabetes-induced apoptosis of retinal Müller cells in the rat eye, but the mechanism involved is unknown. In this study, the effects of preincubation with AG on oxidant-induced apoptosis, oxidant-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation were determined in rat retinal Müller cells and compared with the effects of NGF, a protein that protects neuronal cells from oxidative stress. The effect of AG on rabbit vitreous lipid peroxide levels was also determined. After exposure to increasing concentrations of H2O2, there was a corresponding increase in the percentage of apoptotic Müller cells. Preincubation with AG for 48 h completely inhibited oxidant-induced apoptosis in response to 10 micromol/l H2O2 (+AG 0 vs. 10 micromol/l, NS), and reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in response to 50 micromol/l H2O2 by 50% (+AG vs. -AG, P NGF. Both AG and NGF preincubation prevented the twofold increase in oxidant-induced lipid peroxides. The fivefold increase in oxidant-induced ROS production was decreased 100% by NGF, but only 61% by AG preincubation. The twofold increase in vitreous lipid peroxide level in diabetic rabbits was completely prevented by AG treatment. AG reduced H2O2-induced benzoate hydroxylation in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular glutathione content was unchanged. These data demonstrate that AG can act as an antioxidant in vivo, quenching hydroxyl radicals and lipid peroxidation in cells and tissues and preventing oxidant-induced apoptosis.

  10. Temperature and wetland plant species effects on wastewater treatment and root zone oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Winthrop C; Hook, Paul B; Biederman, Joel A; Stein, Otto R

    2002-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are widely used for wastewater treatment, but there is little information on processes affecting their performance in cold climates, effects of plants on seasonal performance, or plant selection for cold regions. We evaluated the effects of three plant species on seasonal removal of dissolved organic matter (OM) (measured by chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon) and root zone oxidation status (measured by redox potential [Eh] and sulfate [SO4(2-)]) in subsurface-flow wetland (SSW) microcosms. A series of 20-d incubations of simulated wastewater was conducted during a 28-mo greenhouse study at temperatures from 4 to 24 degrees C. Presence and species of plants strongly affected seasonal differences in OM removal and root zone oxidation. All plants enhanced OM removal compared with unplanted controls, but plant effects and differences among species were much greater at 4 degrees C, during dormancy, than at 24 degrees C, during the growing season. Low temperatures were associated with decreased OM removal in unplanted controls and broadleaf cattail (Typha latifolia L.) microcosms and with increased removal in beaked sedge (Carex rostrata Stokes) and hardstem bulrush [Schoenoplectus acutus (Muhl. ex Bigelow) A. & D. Löve var. acutus] microcosms. Differences in OM removal corresponded to species' apparent abilities to increase root zone oxygen supply. Sedge and bulrush significantly raised Eh values and SO4(2-) concentrations, particularly at 4 degrees C. These results add to evidence that SSWs can be effective in cold climates and suggest that plant species selection may be especially important to optimizing SSW performance in cold climates.

  11. Identification of Subnanometric Ag Species, Their Interaction with Supports and Role in Catalytic CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Kotolevich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nature and size of the real active species of nanoparticulated metal supported catalysts is still an unresolved question. The technique of choice to measure particle sizes at the nanoscale, HRTEM, has a practical limit of 1 nm. This work is aimed to identify the catalytic role of subnanometer species and methods to detect and characterize them. In this frame, we investigated the sensitivity to redox pretreatments of Ag/Fe/TiO2, Ag/Mg/TiO2 and Ag/Ce/TiO2 catalysts in CO oxidation. The joint application of HRTEM, SR-XRD, DRS, XPS, EXAFS and XANES methods indicated that most of the silver in all samples is in the form of Ag species with size <1 nm. The differences in catalytic properties and sensitivity to pretreatments, observed for the studied Ag catalysts, could not be explained taking into account only the Ag particles whose size distribution is measured by HRTEM, but may be explained by the presence of the subnanometer Ag species, undetectable by HRTEM, and their interaction with supports. This result highlights their role as active species and the need to take them into account to understand integrally the catalysis by supported nanometals.

  12. Adsorption and photocatalyzed oxidation of methylated arsenic species in TiO2 suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tielian; Cai, Yong; O'Shea, Kevin E

    2007-08-01

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are used as herbicides in the agriculture industry. We have demonstrated that MMA and DMA are readily degraded upon TiO2 photocatalysis. DMA is oxidized to MMA as the primary oxidation product, which is subsequently oxidized to inorganic arsenate, As(V). The adsorption of MMA and DMA on Ti02 surface was measured as a function of initial arsenic concentration and solution pH. The pH of the solution influences the adsorption and photocatalytic degradation to a similar degree, due to the speciation of the arsenic substrates and surface charge of TiO2 as a function of pH. The mineralization of MMA and DMA by TiO2 photocatalysis follows the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. Addition of tert-butyl alcohol, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, during TiO2 photocatalysis dramatically reduces the rate of degradation, indicating that *OH is the primary oxidant. For dilute solutions, TiO2 may also be applicable as an absorbent for direct removal of a variety of arsenic species, namely As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA, all of which are strongly adsorbed, thus eliminating the need for a multistep treatment process.

  13. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Forkink, M.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Swarts, H.G.P.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic ca

  14. A pulsed electron beam synthesis of PEDOT conducting polymers by using sulfate radicals as oxidizing species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Cecilia; Cui, Zhenpeng; Dazzi, Alexandre; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Néron, Stéphane; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Remita, Samy

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an original radiolytic method, based on pulsed electron beam irradiation, is used for the synthesis of conducting PEDOT in an aqueous solution containing EDOT monomers in the presence of potassium persulfate, K2S2O8, at 0 °C. At this low temperature, EDOT monomers are not chemically oxidized by S2O82- anions, initiating PEDOT polymerization, but are rather oxidized by sulfate radicals, SO4•-, which are radiolytically generated by the reaction of solvated electrons, produced by water radiolysis, with persulfate anions. Successfully, as demonstrated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, irradiating the aqueous solution, by using a series of accumulated electron pulses, enables complete EDOT oxidation and quantitative in situ PEDOT polymerization through a step-by-step oxidation mechanism. The morphology of PEDOT polymers, mixed with unreacted K2S2O8 salt, is characterized by Cryo-TEM microscopy in aqueous solution and by SEM after deposition. Successfully, in the absence of any washing step, high resolution AFM microscopy, coupled with infrared nanospectroscopy, is used to discriminate between the organic polymers and the inorganic salt and to probe the local chemical composition of PEDOT nanostructures. The results demonstrate that PEDOT polymers form globular self-assembled nanostructures which preferentially adsorb onto unreacted K2S2O8 solid nanoplates. The present results first demonstrate the efficiency of sulfate radicals as oxidizing species for the preparation of nanostructured PEDOT polymers and second highlight the promising potentiality of electron accelerators in the field of conducting polymers synthesis.

  15. On the Role of Vanadia Species for VOx/SiO2 in the Selective Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaojun Miao; Ding Ma; Qingjun Zhu; Heng Zheng; Guoqing Jia; Shutian Zhou; Xinhe Bao

    2005-01-01

    Various VOx/SiO2 catalysts were prepared by the methods of physical mixing, conventional wetness impregnation and ultrasonication-assistant impregnation. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, UV-Vis DRS, Raman, TPR, ESR and TPSR techniques and the nature of the vanadium species were correlated to their catalytic performance in the reaction of direct conversion of methane to formaldehyde. It is concluded that highly dispersed monomeric and low oligomeric vanadia species are formed on the sample prepared with both traditional wetness impregnation method and ultrasonication-assistant impregnation, whereas in the latter case, the amount of oligomeric vanadia species is much smaller. The V2O5 microcrystallines are the dominant species on the material prepared by physical mixing method.During the selective oxidation of methane, Vv species are reduced to VⅣ paramagnetic species and both microcrystalline V2O5 species and oligomeric vanadia species are found to further disperse and transform into tetrahedral vanadia species. Based on the results of UV Raman spectroscopy and TPSR, CO2 is suggested to be formed via two different routes, in which one is from the sequence reaction of CH4 → HCHO → CO → CO2 over monomeric vanadia species, and the other is from the direct oxidation of methane to CO2 over oligomeric vanadia species. Oligomeric vanadia species is more active than monomeric vanadia species for methane activation.

  16. A literature review of interaction of oxidized uranium species and uranium complexes with soluble organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Joan K.; Leventhal, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Organic material is commonly found associated with uranium ores in sandstone-type deposits. This review of the literature summarizes the classes and separations of naturally occurring organic material but the emphasis is on soluble organic species. The main class of materials of interest is humic substances which are high-molecular-weight complex molecules that are soluble in alkaline solution. These humic substances are able to solubilize (make soluble) minerals and also to complex [by ion exchange and (or) chelation] many cations. The natural process of soil formation results in both mineral decomposition and element complexing by organic species. Uranium in solution, such as ground water, can form many species with other elements or complexes present depending on Eh and pH. In natural systems (oxidizing Eh, pH 5-9) the uranium is usually present as a complex with hydroxide or carbonate. Thermodynamic data for these species are presented. Interacting metals and organic materials have been observed in nature and studied in the laboratory by many workers in diverse scientific disciplines. The results are not easily compared. Measurements of the degree of complexation are reported as equilibrium stability constant determinations. This type of research has been done for Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Mg, Ca, Al, and to a limited degree for U. The use of Conditional Stability Constants has given quantitative results in some cases. The methods utilized in experiments and calculations are reviewed.

  17. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  18. Dental resin curing blue light induced oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Okada, Eizo; Okada, Yasue; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Kishimoto, Sachi; Otsuka, Takero; Nishimura, Tomoko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin curing blue light has been used in the treatment of tooth bleaching and to restore teeth with resin-based composite fillings. However, there has been little consideration of its effect on oral tissues such as dental pulp and oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dental resin curing blue light irradiation affects the dental pulp, especially the blood vessels that are known as the first target of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in vascular reactivity. We found that blue light irradiation increased the level of lipid peroxidation in isolated rat aorta blood vessels by measuring malondialdehyde. Furthermore, cell proliferative activity was decreased in a time-dependent manner and apoptosis of human aorta vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced. These results indicated that (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals were generated in VSMCs by irradiation with blue light, and they induced cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, which increased lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. In addition, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, which is a typical intracellular antioxidant, protected VSMCs against cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress. These findings suggested that antioxidants may be used to prevent oxidative stress in dental pulp by repeated and/or multiple treatments with blue light irradiation in future dental treatments.

  19. The role of reactive species in epileptogenesis and influence of antiepileptic drug therapy on oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinc, Boštjan; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaž

    2012-12-01

    Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders. The focus of this review is the acquired form of epilepsy, with the development process consisting of three major phases, the acute injury phase, the latency epileptogenesis phase, and the phase of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Nowadays, an increasing attention is paid to the possible interrelationship between oxidative stress resulting in disturbance of physiological signalling roles of calcium and free radicals in neuronal cells and mitochondrial dysfunction, cell damage, and epilepsy. The positive stimulation of mitochondrial calcium signals by reactive oxygen species and increased reactive oxygen species generation resulting from increased mitochondrial calcium can lead to a positive feedback loop. We propose that calcium can pose both, physiological and pathological effects of mitochondrial function, which can lead in neuronal cell death and consequent epileptic seizures. Various antiepileptic drugs may impair the endogenous antioxidative ability to prevent oxidative stress. Therefore, some antiepileptic drugs, especially from the older generation, may trigger oxygen-dependent tissue injury. The prooxidative effects of these antiepileptic drugs might lead to enhancement of seizure activity, resulting in loss of their efficacy or apparent functional tolerance and undesired adverse effects. Additionally, various reactive metabolites of antiepileptic drugs are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules which may lead to deterioration of the epileptic seizures and systemic toxicity. Since neuronal loss seems to be one of the major neurobiological abnormalities in the epileptic brain, the ability of antioxidants to attenuate seizure generation and the accompanying changes in oxidative burden, further support an important role of antioxidants as having a putative antiepileptic potential.

  20. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  1. Scavenging of photogenerated oxidative species by antimuscarinic drugs: atropine and derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Susana; Guardianelli, Carina; Tuninetti, Jimena; Molina, Patricia; García, Norman A

    2002-01-01

    The quenching ability of photogenerated oxidative species by some antimuscarinic drugs generically named atropines (e.g. atropine [I] eucatropine [II], homatropine [III] and scopolamine [IV]) have been investigated employing stationary photolysis, polarographic detection of dissolved oxygen, stationary and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser flash photolysis. Using Rose Bengal as a dye sensitiser for singlet molecular oxygen, O(2)((1)Delta(g)), generation, compounds I-IV behave as moderate chemical plus physical quenchers of the oxidative species. Correlation between kinetic and electrochemical data indicates that the process is possibly driven by a charge-transfer interaction. The situation is somewhat more complicated employing the natural pigment riboflavin (Rf) as a sensitiser. Compounds I and II complex Rf ground state, diminishing the quenching ability towards singlet and triplet excited state of the pigment. On the other hand, compounds III and IV effectively quench Rf excited states, protecting the pigment against photodegradation. Under anaerobic conditions, semireduced Rf (Rf(.-)) is formed through quenching of excited triplet Rf. Nevertheless, although Rf(.-) is a well-known generator of the reactive species superoxide radical anion by reductive quenching in the presence of oxygen, the process of O(2)((1)Delta(g)) production prevails over superoxide radical generation, due to the relatively low rate constants for the quenching of triplet Rf by the atropines (in the order of 10(7) M(-1)s(-1) for compounds III and IV) in comparison to the rate constant for the quenching by ground state oxygen, approximately two orders of magnitude higher, yielding O(2)((1)Delta(g)). Compound I is the most promising O(2)((1)Delta(g)) physical scavenger, provided that it exhibits the higher value for the overall quenching rate constant and only 11% of the quenching process leads to its own chemical damage.

  2. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Quinlan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ, with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo. However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo, and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo.

  3. Ectomycorrhizal Cortinarius species participate in enzymatic oxidation of humus in northern forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Inga T M; Clemmensen, Karina E; de Boer, Wietse; Martin, Francis; Olson, Åke; Lindahl, Björn D

    2014-07-01

    In northern forests, belowground sequestration of nitrogen (N) in complex organic pools restricts nutrient availability to plants. Oxidative extracellular enzymes produced by ectomycorrhizal fungi may aid plant N acquisition by providing access to N in macromolecular complexes. We test the hypotheses that ectomycorrhizal Cortinarius species produce Mn-dependent peroxidases, and that the activity of these enzymes declines at elevated concentrations of inorganic N. In a boreal pine forest and a sub-arctic birch forest, Cortinarius DNA was assessed by 454-sequencing of ITS amplicons and related to Mn-peroxidase activity in humus samples with- and without previous N amendment. Transcription of Cortinarius Mn-peroxidase genes was investigated in field samples. Phylogenetic analyses of Cortinarius peroxidase amplicons and genome sequences were performed. We found a significant co-localization of high peroxidase activity and DNA from Cortinarius species. Peroxidase activity was reduced by high ammonium concentrations. Amplification of mRNA sequences indicated transcription of Cortinarius Mn-peroxidase genes under field conditions. The Cortinarius glaucopus genome encodes 11 peroxidases - a number comparable to many white-rot wood decomposers. These results support the hypothesis that some ectomycorrhizal fungi--Cortinarius species in particular--may play an important role in decomposition of complex organic matter, linked to their mobilization of organically bound N.

  4. Enzymatic and chemical oxidation of polygalactomannans from the seeds of a few species of leguminous plants and characterization of the oxidized products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Luca; Boccia, Antonella Caterina; Mendichi, Raniero; Galante, Yves M

    2015-03-20

    Plant polysaccharides are used in a growing number of applications, in their native or in chemically and/or biochemically modified forms. In the present work, we compare TEMPO-mediated oxidation with laccase of polygalactomannans (PGM) from different species of plant leguminous to chemical oxidation with NaClO/NaBr/TEMPO. We have investigated the gums from: locust bean (Ceratonia siliqua), tara (Caesalpinia spinosa), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonolobus), sesbania (Sesbania bispinosa) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum). Upon laccase/TEMPO oxidation, PGM viscosity and concentration of reducing groups increased up to five-fold and structured, elastic, stable gels were formed, which could be degraded by hydrolysis with β-mannanase. Conversely, chemical oxidation with NaClO/NaBr/TEMPO caused a rapid, intermediate transition of the gum solutions to compact gels, that immediately reverted to liquid, with a lower viscosity than at the start and an increased concentration of reducing groups, similar to the reaction with laccase. We interpret the above as due to, in the case of laccase, oxidation of primary hydroxyl groups to aldehydes, able to form stable hemiacetalic bonds with free hydroxyl groups. While upon chemical oxidation, primary OH's are only transiently oxidized to aldehydes, followed by rapid oxidation of all carbonyl groups to carboxylates. In either cases, TEMPO appeared to cause a limited splitting of glycosidic bonds of PGM. Native and oxidized PGM were further characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and by rheology.

  5. Roles of antioxidant enzymes in corpus luteum rescue from reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Garrel, Catherine; Faure, Patrice; Sugino, Norihiro

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone produced by the corpus luteum (CL) regulates the synthesis of various endometrial proteins required for embryonic implantation and development. Compromised CL progesterone production is a potential risk factor for prenatal development. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play diverse roles in mammalian reproductive biology. ROS-induced oxidative damage and subsequent adverse developmental outcomes constitute important issues in reproductive medicine. The CL is considered to be highly exposed to locally produced ROS due to its high blood vasculature and steroidogenic activity. ROS-induced apoptotic cell death is involved in the mechanisms of CL regression that occurs at the end of the non-fertile cycle. Luteal ROS production and propagation depend upon several regulating factors, including luteal antioxidants, steroid hormones and cytokines, and their crosstalk. However, it is unknown which of these factors have the greatest contribution to the maintenance of CL integrity and function during the oestrous/menstrual cycle. There is evidence to suggest that antioxidants play important roles in CL rescue from luteolysis when pregnancy ensues. As luteal phase defect impacts fertility by preventing implantation and early conceptus development in livestock and humans, this review attempts to address the importance of ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzymes in the control of mammalian CL function and integrity. The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine organ that develops after ovulation from the ovulated follicle during each reproductive cycle. The main function of the CL is the production and secretion of progesterone which is necessary for embryonic implantation and development. Compromised CL progesterone production is a potential risk factor for prenatal development and pregnancy outcomes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are natural by-products of cellular respiration and metabolism, play diverse roles in mammalian reproductive biology. ROS

  6. Comparative Genome Analysis of Three Thiocyanate Oxidizing Thioalkalivibrio Species Isolated from Soda Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Tom; Overmars, Lex; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Thiocyanate is a C1 compound containing carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. It is a (by)product in a number of natural and industrial processes. Because thiocyanate is toxic to many organisms, including humans, its removal from industrial waste streams is an important problem. Although a number of bacteria can use thiocyanate as a nitrogen source, only a few can use it as an electron donor. There are two distinct pathways to use thiocyanate: (i) the “carbonyl sulfide pathway,” which has been extensively studied, and (ii) the “cyanate pathway,” whose key enzyme, thiocyanate dehydrogenase, was recently purified and studied. Three species of Thioalkalivibrio, a group of haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from soda lakes, have been described as thiocyanate oxidizers: (i) Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus (“cyanate pathway”), (ii) Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans (“cyanate pathway”) and (iii) Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans (“carbonyl sulfide pathway”). In this study we provide a comparative genome analysis of these described thiocyanate oxidizers, with genomes ranging in size from 2.5 to 3.8 million base pairs. While focusing on thiocyanate degradation, we also analyzed the differences in sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen metabolism. We found that the thiocyanate dehydrogenase gene is present in 10 different Thioalkalivibrio strains, in two distinct genomic contexts/genotypes. The first genotype is defined by having genes for flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenase upstream from the thiocyanate dehydrogenase operon (present in two strains including the type strain of Tv. paradoxus), whereas in the second genotype these genes are located downstream, together with two additional genes of unknown function (present in eight strains, including the type strains of Tv. thiocyanoxidans). Additionally, we found differences in the presence/absence of genes for various sulfur oxidation pathways, such as sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, dissimilatory

  7. Manipulation of pyrite colonization and leaching by iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellenberg, Sören; Barthen, Robert; Boretska, Mariia; Zhang, Ruiyong; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the process of pyrite colonization and leaching by three iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was investigated by fluorescence microscopy, bacterial attachment, and leaching assays. Within the first 4-5 days, only the biofilm subpopulation was responsible for pyrite dissolution. Pyrite-grown cells, in contrast to iron-grown cells, were able to oxidize iron(II) ions or pyrite after 24 h iron starvation and incubation with 1 mM H₂O₂, indicating that these cells were adapted to the presence of enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are generated on metal sulfide surfaces. Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans SS3 and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans R1 showed enhanced pyrite colonization and biofilm formation compared to A. ferrooxidans (T). A broad range of factors influencing the biofilm formation on pyrite were also identified, some of them were strain-specific. Cultivation at non-optimum growth temperatures or increased ionic strength led to a decreased colonization of pyrite. The presence of iron(III) ions increased pyrite colonization, especially when pyrite-grown cells were used, while the addition of 20 mM copper(II) ions resulted in reduced biofilm formation on pyrite. This observation correlated with a different extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition of copper-exposed cells. Interestingly, the addition of 1 mM sodium glucuronate in combination with iron(III) ions led to a 5-fold and 7-fold increased cell attachment after 1 and 8 days of incubation, respectively, in A. ferrooxidans (T). In addition, sodium glucuronate addition enhanced pyrite dissolution by 25%.

  8. Reusable Oxidation Catalysis Using Metal-Monocatecholato Species in a Robust Metal–Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei, Honghan; Shin, JaeWook; Meng, Ying Shirley; Adelhardt, Mario; Sutter, Jörg; Meyer, Karsten; Cohen, Seth M.

    2014-04-02

    An isolated metal-monocatecholato moiety has been achieved in a highly robust metal–organic framework (MOF) by two fundamentally different postsynthetic strategies: postsynthetic deprotection (PSD) and postsynthetic exchange (PSE). Compared with PSD, PSE proved to be a more facile and efficient functionalization approach to access MOFs that could not be directly synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Metalation of the catechol functionality residing in the MOFs resulted in unprecedented Fe-monocatecholato and Cr-monocatecholato species, which were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ⁵⁷Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The resulting materials are among the first examples of Zr(IV)-based UiO MOFs (UiO = University of Oslo) with coordinatively unsaturated active metal centers. Importantly, the Cr-metalated MOFs are active and efficient catalysts for the oxidation of alcohols to ketones using a wide range of substrates. Catalysis could be achieved with very low metal loadings (0.5–1 mol %). Unlike zeolite-supported, Cr-exchange oxidation catalysts, the MOF-based catalysts reported here are completely recyclable and reusable, which may make them attractive catalysts for ‘green’ chemistry processes.

  9. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  10. Reactive Oxygene Species and Thioredoxin Activity in Plants at Development of Hypergravity and Oxidative Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    Early increasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, including H2O2, occurs in plant cells under various impacts and than these ROS can function as signaling molecules in starting of cell stress responses. At the same time thioredoxins (TR) are significant ROS and H2O2 sensors and transmitters to activation of various redox sensitive proteins, transcription factors and MAP kinases. This study was aimed to investigate early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents and TR activity in the pea roots and in tissue culture under hypergravity and oxidative stresses. Pea roots of 3-5 days old seedlings and 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pea seedlings were grown on wet filter paper and the tissue culture was grown on MS medium in dark conditions under 24oC. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 15 g. Chemiluminescence (ChL) intensity for ROS concentration, H2O2 content and TR activity were determined. All experiments were repeated by 3-5 times. Early and reliable increasing of ChL intensity and H2O2 contents in the pea roots and in the tissue culture took place under hypergravity and oxidative stresses to 30, 60 and 90 min. At the same time TR activity increased on 11 and 19 percents only to 60 and 90 min. Thus under hypergravity and oxidative stresses in both investigated plants take place early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents which as second messengers lead to increasing of TR activity with creating of ROS-TR stress signaling pathway.

  11. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar Hefny, Mohamed; Pattyn, Cedric; Lukes, Petr; Benedikt, Jan

    2016-10-01

    A remote microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (µAPPJ) with He, He/H2O, He/O2, and He/O2/H2O gas mixtures was used to study the transport of reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid and the following aqueous phase chemistry. The effects induced by the µAPPJ in water were quantitatively studied using phenol as a chemical probe and by measuring H2O2 concentration and pH values. These results were combined with the analysis of the absolute densities of the reactive species and the modeling of convective/diffusion transport and recombination reactions in the effluent of the plasma jet. Additionally, modified plasma jets were used to show that the role of emitted photons in aqueous chemistry is negligible for these plasma sources. The fastest phenol degradation was measured for the He/O2 plasma, followed by He/H2O, He/O2/H2O, and He plasmas. The modeled quantitative flux of O atoms into the liquid in the He/O2 plasma case was highly comparable with the phenol degradation rate and showed a very high transfer efficiency of reactive species from the plasma into the liquid, where more than half of the O atoms leaving the jet nozzle entered the liquid. The results indicate that the high oxidative effect of He/O2 plasma was primarily due to solvated O atoms, whereas OH radicals dominated the oxidative effects induced in water by plasmas with other gas mixtures. These findings help to understand, in a quantitative way, the complex interaction of cold atmospheric plasmas with aqueous solutions and will allow a better understanding of the interaction of these plasmas with water or buffered solutions containing biological macromolecules, microorganisms, or even eukaryotic cells. Additionally, the µAPPJ He/O2 plasma source seems to be an ideal tool for the generation of O atoms in aqueous solutions for any future studies of their reactivity.

  12. Characterization of a trinuclear ruthenium species in catalytic water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 in neutral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biaobiao; Li, Fei; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Chengbing; Chen, Lin; Sun, Licheng

    2016-06-30

    A Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV)-O-Ru(III) type trinuclear species was crystallographically characterized in water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 (H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; pic = 4-picoline) under neutral conditions. The formation of a ruthenium trimer due to the reaction of Ru(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O with Ru(II)-OH2 was fully confirmed by chemical, electrochemical and photochemical methods. Since the oxidation of the trimer was proposed to lead to catalyst decomposition, the photocatalytic water oxidation activity was rationally improved by the suppression of the formation of the trimer.

  13. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species mediate metabolic changes in barley seed embryo during germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The levels of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS, ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0-48 h postimbibition the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy.

  14. An N-bridged high-valent diiron-oxo species on a porphyrin platform that can oxidize methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrik, Evgeny V.; Afanasiev, Pavel; Alvarez, Leonardo X.; Dubourdeaux, Patrick; Clémancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Blondin, Geneviève; Bouchu, Denis; Albrieux, Florian; Nefedov, Sergey E.; Sorokin, Alexander B.

    2012-12-01

    High-valent oxo-metal complexes are involved in key biochemical processes of selective oxidation and removal of xenobiotics. The catalytic properties of cytochrome P-450 and soluble methane monooxygenase enzymes are associated with oxo species on mononuclear iron haem and diiron non-haem platforms, respectively. Bio-inspired chemical systems that can reproduce the fascinating ability of these enzymes to oxidize the strongest C-H bonds are the focus of intense scrutiny. In this context, the development of highly oxidizing diiron macrocyclic catalysts requires a structural determination of the elusive active species and elucidation of the reaction mechanism. Here we report the preparation of an Fe(IV)(µ-nitrido)Fe(IV) = O tetraphenylporphyrin cation radical species at -90 °C, characterized by ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance and Mössbauer spectroscopies and by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. This species exhibits a very high activity for oxygen-atom transfer towards alkanes, including methane. These findings provide a foundation on which to develop efficient and clean oxidation processes, in particular transformations of the strongest C-H bonds.

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide radicals in activation and proliferation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Saccomanno, S; van Goor, H; Jansen, P; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce HSCs activation, proliferation and collagen gene expression in vitro. Nitric oxide (NO) represents a reactive molecule that reacts with ROS, yielding peroxynitrite. We thus verified the effect of NO on ROS-induced HSCs proliferation in vitro and

  16. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol develop...

  17. Emulsification of crude oil by an alkane-oxidizing Rhodococcus species isolated from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Scince and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Josefsen, K.; Vatland, A. [SINTEF SI, Oslo (Norway). Industrial Chemistry Div.

    1998-04-01

    A Rhodococcus species, which has proven to be the best of 99 oil-emulsifying bacteria isolated from seawater, was characterized. This bacterium produced very stable oil-in-water emulsions from different crude oils with various content of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, by utilizing C{sub 1}1 and C{sub 3}3 n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. Bacteria that produce stable emulsions are often able to adhere strongly to hydrocarbons or hydrophobic surfaces. It was at these surfaces that extensive emulsification of the residual oil and accumulation of acidic oxidation products occurred. The acidic products were consumed in a second step. This step was characterized by linear growth and an increasing number of cells growing in the water phase. The most extensive emulsification occurred at the end of the exponential phase. There was no evidence of surfactants at the end of the exponential phase, however, a polymeric compound with emulsifying activity, tightly bound to the oil droplets, was isolated, suggesting that the emulsification resulted from the release of the hydrophobic cell surface discarded during growth limitations. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Interplay among nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species: a complex network determining cell survival or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integrated cellular process occurring in plant growth, development, and defense responses to facilitate normal growth and development and better survival against various stresses as a whole. As universal toxic chemicals in plant and animal cells, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS or RNS), mainly superoxide anion (O(2) (-*)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or nitric oxide ((*)NO), have been studied extensively for their roles in PCD induction. Physiological and genetic studies have convincingly shown their essential roles. However, the details and mechanisms by which ROS and (*)NO interplay and induce PCD are not well understood. Our recent study on Cupressus lusitanica culture cell death revealed the elicitor-induced co-accumulation of ROS and (*)NO and interactions between (*)NO and H(2)O(2) or O(2)-(*) in different ways to regulate cell death. (*)NO and H(2)O(2) reciprocally enhanced the production of each other whereas (*)NO and O(2) (-*) showed reciprocal suppression on each other's production. It was the interaction between (*)NO and O(2)-(*) but not between (*)NO and H(2)O(2) that induced PCD, probably through peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). In this addendum, some unsolved issues in the study were discussed based on recent studies on the complex network of ROS and (*)NO leading to PCD in animals and plants.

  19. Comparative Study of Different Methods to Determine the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar A. Najim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS followed by an increase in oxidative stress is associated with cellular responses to nanoparticle induced cell damages. Finding the best method for assessing intracellular ROS production is the key step in the detection of oxidative stress induced injury. This study evaluates and compares four different methods for the measurement of intracellular ROS generation using fluorogenic probe, 2´,7´-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was utilised as a positive control to assess the reactivity of the probe. Spherically shaped zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles with an average particle size of 85.7 nm were used to determine the diverse roles of ROS in nanotoxicity in Hs888Lu and U937 cell lines. The results showed that different methods exhibit different patterns of ROS measurement. In conclusion this study found that the time point at which the DCFH-DA is added to the reaction, the incubation time and the oxidative species that is responsible for the oxidation of DCFH, have impact on the intracellular ROS measurement.

  20. The oxidative cost of reproduction depends on early development oxidative stress and sex in a bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Haro, A A; Sorci, G; Alonso-Alvarez, C

    2016-06-29

    In the early 2000s, a new component of the cost of reproduction was proposed: oxidative stress. Since then the oxidative cost of reproduction hypothesis has, however, received mixed support. Different arguments have been provided to explain this. Among them, the lack of a life-history perspective on most experimental tests was suggested. We manipulated the levels of a key intracellular antioxidant (glutathione) in captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) during a short period of early life and subsequently tested the oxidative cost of reproduction. Birds were allowed to mate freely in an outdoor aviary for several months. We repeatedly enlarged or reduced their broods to increase or reduce, respectively, breeding effort. Birds whose glutathione levels were reduced during growth showed higher erythrocyte resistance to free radical-induced haemolysis when forced to rear enlarged broods. This supports the hypothesis predicting the occurrence of developing programmes matching early and adult environmental conditions to improve fitness. Moreover, adult males rearing enlarged broods endured higher plasma levels of lipid oxidative damage than control males, whereas adult females showed the opposite trend. As most previous studies reporting non-significant or opposite results used females only, we also discuss some sex-related particularities that may contribute to explain unexpected results.

  1. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  2. Effects of Plant Species on Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Constructed Wetlands Treating Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanda Chuersuwan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to quantify emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs, methane (CH4 and Nitrous Oxide (N2, from free water surface constructed wetlands used for domestic wastewater treatment. All constructed wetlands were monoculture and each plot was planted with Phragmites sp., Cyperus sp., or Canna sp. The average CH4 and N2 O emissions were in the range of 5.9-11.2 and 0.9-1.8 g/m2/h, respectively. Seasonal fluctuations of CH4 and N2 O emissions were observed. The highest fluxes of both GHGs occurred during hot rainy season (July-October followed by summer and the lowest found in cool season. The mean of CH4 and N2O emissions from different plants species were significantly different (p<0.05. Average CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands planted with Phragmites sp., Cyperus sp. and Cannasp. were 11.2, 6.0 and 5.9 mg/m2/h, respectively, while mean N2O emissions were 0.9, 1.0 and 1.8 mg/m2/h, respectively. Calculated of Global Warming Potential (GWP found that GWP of CH4 and N2O flux from constructed wetlands planted with Cyperus sp., was the highest (669 mg CO2 equivalent/m2/h, followed by Phragmite sp., (524 mg CO2 equivalent/m2/h and Cannasp., (434 mg CO2 equivalent/mm2/h, respectively. These results suggested that municipal wastewater treatment by constructed wetlands planted with Canna sp. and Phragmite sp., had potential of lower GHGs emissions into the atmosphere and Phragmite sp., provided the highest removal rate of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD.

  3. Insights into synergistic effect of chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC for NO oxidation and their surface species study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lei [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Cai, Wei; Yu, Yang [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Zhong, Qin, E-mail: zq304@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synergistic effect between CrO{sub x} and ceria supported on TP were studied for NO oxidation. • TPD results indicated NO and O{sub 2} were activated by CrO{sub x} and ceria, respectively. • H{sub 2}-TPR analysis suggested that CrO{sub x} undertook the main function in catalysis. • The nature and stability of surface-bound species were investigated by in situ DRIFTS. - Abstract: The insights of synergistic effect between chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC were studied for NO oxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chromium oxides and ceria and their synergistic effect in textural properties, redox performance and surface species over the Cr{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}/TP catalysts. These catalysts were investigated in detail by means of Brunauer–Emmertt–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction of H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD, O{sub 2}-TPD), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS). It has been found that CrO{sub x} were beneficial to adsorb and activate NO to form NO{sup +} and then generate nitrates while ceria were inclined to activate O{sub 2} via oxygen vacancies to produce nitrates. Besides, the results of in situ DRIFTS further demonstrated that surface species were associated with not only reaction atmosphere but also reaction temperature. Hence, a possible reaction model was tentatively proposed.

  4. Formation of copper oxychloride and reactive oxygen species as causes of uterine injury during copper oxidation of Cu-IUD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Garcia, M J; Espinosa, A; Herrera, N; Perez-Zapata, A J; Beltran-Garcia, C; Ogura, T

    2000-02-01

    The lining of the uterus and cervix might be injured by a variety of oxidation products of Cu in a Cu-IUD, including cuprous ions, dissolved and precipitated cupric ions, and reactive oxygen species such as superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, the human amnious WISH cell line was employed as a model of uterine cells in the presence of copper. The cell viability was decreased by elemental copper, which was alleviated up to 70% by the addition of catalase. The addition of copper oxychloride caused cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Hydroxyl radicals in the presence of copper were determined by the formation of malondialdehyde. Soluble cuprous chloride complexes are formed in the uterus by slowly entering oxygen. The complexes are partly oxidized to insoluble copper oxychloride. which damages the endometrium. Unoxidized cuprous ions migrate to the oxygen-rich cervix and are oxidized to copper oxychloride, causing cervix damage.

  5. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohao Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase, and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  6. Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Intermediate Species Mediate Asbestos-Induced Genotoxicity and Oxidative Stress–Responsive Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sarah X.L.; Partridge, Michael A.; Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Davidson, Mercy M.; Sally A Amundson; Hei, Tom K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of asbestos-induced human cancers is increasing worldwide, and considerable evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of these diseases. Our previous studies suggested that mitochondria might be involved in the initiation of oxidative stress in asbestos-exposed mammalian cells. Objective: We investigated whether mitochondria are a potential cytoplasmic target of asbestos using a mitochondrial DNA–depleted (ρ0) human small airway epi...

  7. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  8. Insights into synergistic effect of chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC for NO oxidation and their surface species study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei; Cai, Wei; Yu, Yang; Zhong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The insights of synergistic effect between chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC were studied for NO oxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chromium oxides and ceria and their synergistic effect in textural properties, redox performance and surface species over the Cr1-xCex/TP catalysts. These catalysts were investigated in detail by means of Brunauer-Emmertt-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD, O2-TPD), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS). It has been found that CrOx were beneficial to adsorb and activate NO to form NO+ and then generate nitrates while ceria were inclined to activate O2 via oxygen vacancies to produce nitrates. Besides, the results of in situ DRIFTS further demonstrated that surface species were associated with not only reaction atmosphere but also reaction temperature. Hence, a possible reaction model was tentatively proposed.

  9. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of Taxus chinensis suspension cells through the reactive oxygen species-dependent and-independent signal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are two important signal molecules that play key roles in plant defense responses. Nitric oxide generation and oxidative burst and accumulation of reactive oxygen species are the early reactions of Taxus chinensis suspension cells to fungal elicitor prepared from the cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. In order to investigate the relationship and/or interactions of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells, we treated the cells with nitric oxide specific scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetra- methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor S,S(-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-eth- anediyl)-bis-isothiourea (PBITU), membrane NAD(P) H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase. The results show that pretreatment of T. chinensis cells with cPITO and DPI inhibited not only the elicitor-induced nitric oxide biosynthesis and oxidative burst, but also the elicitor-induced Taxol production, suggesting that both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are involved in elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with cPITO and PBITU suppressed the elicitor-induced oxidative burst, indicating that the oxidative burst might be dependent on NO. Application of nitric oxide via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis cells. The nitric oxide-induced Taxol production was suppressed by DPI, showing that the oxidative burst is involved in NO-triggered Taxol biosynthesis. However, nitric oxide and the fungal elicitor induced Taxol biosynthesis even though the accumulation of reactive oxygen species wass completely abolished in T. chinensis cells. Our data show that nitric oxide may mediate the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells through both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent signal

  11. Antioxidants, reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage associated to the presence of organochlorine pesticides in breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Carolina Castillo-Castañeda

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the effects of which can be countered by the antioxidant system, also present in breast milk. Objective: To evaluate the indicators of oxidative stress in breast milk associated to the presence of OCPs, and their relationship with seafood intake. Methods: Breast milk was collected from 108 lactating women. Indicators of oxidative stress (antioxidant enzyme activity, glutathione concentration, superoxide radical [O2•-] production, lipid peroxidation and carbonylated protein concentration were analyzed by spectrophotometry. OCPs concentrations were measured by gas chromatography. Results and discussion: O2•- production had no significant relationship with OCPs concentrations. Significant correlations between OCPs concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities (glutathione reductase [GR] activity and aldrin concentration [r = - 0.5], superoxide dismutase [SOD] activity and α-HCH concentration [r = 0.45] were found. Oxidative damage had a low correlation with OCPs content (r < 0.30, p < 0.05. It is possible that OCP's levels are not sufficient to increase O2•- production, that production of ROS other than O2•- is increased, or that the antioxidant capacity is sufficient to avoid oxidative damage in breast milk. Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that marine diet is not a determinant factor in the level of contamination by OCP's or in the oxidative damage in breast milk.

  12. Nitric oxide increases tolerance responses to moderate water deficit in leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata bean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer-Prados, Lucas Martins; Moreira, Ana Sílvia Franco Pinheiro; Magalhaes, Jose Ronaldo; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa

    2014-07-01

    Drought stress is one of the most intensively studied and widespread constraints, and nitric oxide (NO) is a key signaling molecule involved in the mediation of abiotic stresses in plants. We demonstrated that a sprayed solution of NO from donor sodium nitroprusside increased drought stress tolerance responses in both sensitive (Phaseolus vulgaris) and tolerant (Vigna unguiculata) beans. In intact plants subjected to halting irrigation, NO increased the leaf relative water content and stomatal conductance in both species. After cutting leaf discs and washing them, NO induced increased electrolyte leakage, which was more evident in the tolerant species. These leaf discs were then subjected to different water deficits, simulating moderate and severe drought stress conditions through polyethylene glycol solutions. NO supplied at moderate drought stress revealed a reduced membrane injury index in sensitive species. In hydrated discs and at this level of water deficit, NO increased the electron transport rate in both species, and a reduction of these rates was observed at severe stress levels. Taken together, it can be shown that NO has an effective role in ameliorating drought stress effects, activating tolerance responses at moderate water deficit levels and in both bean species which present differential drought tolerance.

  13. Graphene/graphene oxide and their derivatives in the separation/isolation and preconcentration of protein species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuwei; Hai, Xin; Wang, Jianhua, E-mail: jianhuajrz@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2016-05-30

    The distinctive/unique electrical, chemical and optical properties make graphene/graphene oxide-based materials popular in the field of analytical chemistry. Its large surface offers excellent capacity to anchor target analyte, making it an powerful sorbent in the adsorption and preconcentration of trace level analyte of interest in the field of sample preparation. The large delocalized π-electron system of graphene framework provides strong affinity to species containing aromatic rings, such as proteins, and the abundant active sites on its surface offers the chance to modulate adsorption tendency towards specific protein via functional modification/decoration. This review provides an overview of the current research on graphene/graphene oxide-based materials as attractive and powerful adsorption media in the separation/isolation and preconcentration of protein species from biological sample matrixes. These practices are aiming at providing protein sample of high purity for further investigations and applications, or to achieve certain extent of enrichment prior to quantitative assay. In addition, the challenges and future perspectives in the related research fields have been discussed. - Highlights: • This review provides an updated overview of G/GO-materials in the separation, isolation/preconcentration of protein species. • The strategies to improve protein extraction performance by G/GO-materials are summarized. • The challenges and future perspectives in the related research fields are discussed.

  14. Nitric oxide-assisted atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization for the analysis of automobile hydrocarbon emission species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearth, M A; Komiski, T J

    1994-12-01

    Nitric oxide reagent gas has been found to improve the sensitivity and robustness of the atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) process. Sensitivity has been increased by a factor of 20-100, depending on the compound, over APCDI without nitric oxide. The robustness (defined as the sensitivity to matrix interferences) of APCDI in the presence of water has been improved by a factor of 3 over normal APCDI. These improvements are due in part to a modification of the commercial inlet system and ionization chamber that allows the chamber and sample gases to be heated to 100 and 350°C, respectively. Nitric oxide was chosen as the reagent gas because of the variety and selectivity of its interaction with hydrocarbons with differing functional groups. Product ions of nitric oxide ionization and their subsequent tandem mass spectra are presented and discussed for selected alkanes; alkenes, alkylbenzenes, alcohols; aldehydes, and an ether. A tandem mass spectrometry (unique parent ion-daughter ion transition) method was developed to quantify compounds of specific interest in vehicle emissions. The absolute sensitivity for these compounds, under ideal conditions, was determined and ranges from 0.006 ppb for xylene (most sensitive) to 80 ppb for C8 (or larger) normal alkanes. Routine sensitivity for real-world samples was in the single parts per billion range for aromatic and olefinic species. Potential applications include the real-time, on-line monitoring of selected hydrocarbons in automobile exhaust.

  15. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Kenta; Uematsu, Takumi; Korenaga, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Ryuya; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Murata, Kyohei; Zhang, Jian; Gai, Xiaoqing; Sakamoto, Kazuichi; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Takumi

    2017-03-16

    Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs) are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs-used at 1 mM-protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate-another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM), they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Oxygen Reactivity of PutA from Helicobacter Species and Proline-Linked Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F.

    2006-01-01

    Proline is converted to glutamate in two successive steps by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme in gram-negative bacteria. PutA contains a proline dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and a P5C dehydrogenase domain that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of P5C to glutamate. Here, we characterize PutA from Helicobacter hepaticus (PutAHh) and Helicobacter pylori (PutAHp) to pro...

  18. Catalytically active Au-O(OH)x-species stabilized by alkali ions on zeolites and mesoporous oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Li, Sha; Wang, Yuan; Herron, Jeffrey A; Xu, Ye; Allard, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Huang, Jun; Mavrikakis, Manos; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2014-12-19

    We report that the addition of alkali ions (sodium or potassium) to gold on KLTL-zeolite and mesoporous MCM-41 silica stabilizes mononuclear gold in Au-O(OH)x-(Na or K) ensembles. This single-site gold species is active for the low-temperature (alkali ions and establishing an active site on various supports. The intrinsic activity of the single-site gold species is the same on irreducible supports as on reducible ceria, iron oxide, and titania supports, apparently all sharing a common, similarly structured gold active site. This finding paves the way for using earth-abundant supports to disperse and stabilize precious metal atoms with alkali additives for the WGS and potentially other fuel-processing reactions.

  19. The Effect of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae: The Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra A. Gallina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS production was investigated in the marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi (SM, exposed to 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DECA, 2E,4E/Z-octadienal (OCTA, 2E,4E/Z-heptadienal (HEPTA and a mix of these last two (MIX. When exposed to polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA, a decrease of NO was observed, proportional to the PUA concentration (85% of the initial level after 180 min with 66 µM DECA. Only OCTA, HEPTA and MIX induced a parallel increase of ROS, the highest (2.9-times the control with OCTA concentrations twice the EC50 for growth at 24 h (20 μM. The synthesis of carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll cycle (XC was enhanced during exposure, suggesting their antioxidant activity. Our data provide evidence that specific pathways exist as a reaction to PUA and that they depend upon the PUA used and/or the diatom species. In fact, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT produces NO in response to DECA, but not to OCTA. We advance the hypothesis that SM perceives OCTA and HEPTA as intra-population infochemicals (as it produces PUA, while PT (non-PUA producing species perceives them as allelochemicals. The ability to produce and to use PUA as infochemicals may underlie ecological traits of different diatom species and modulate ecological success in natural communities.

  20. The effect of polyunsaturated aldehydes on Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae): the involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Alessandra A; Brunet, Christophe; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella

    2014-07-14

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated in the marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi (SM), exposed to 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DECA), 2E,4E/Z-octadienal (OCTA), 2E,4E/Z-heptadienal (HEPTA) and a mix of these last two (MIX). When exposed to polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA), a decrease of NO was observed, proportional to the PUA concentration (85% of the initial level after 180 min with 66 µM DECA). Only OCTA, HEPTA and MIX induced a parallel increase of ROS, the highest (2.9-times the control) with OCTA concentrations twice the EC50 for growth at 24 h (20 μM). The synthesis of carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll cycle (XC) was enhanced during exposure, suggesting their antioxidant activity. Our data provide evidence that specific pathways exist as a reaction to PUA and that they depend upon the PUA used and/or the diatom species. In fact, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT) produces NO in response to DECA, but not to OCTA. We advance the hypothesis that SM perceives OCTA and HEPTA as intra-population infochemicals (as it produces PUA), while PT (non-PUA producing species) perceives them as allelochemicals. The ability to produce and to use PUA as infochemicals may underlie ecological traits of different diatom species and modulate ecological success in natural communities.

  1. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Bihari Nityananda Chainy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  2. Zinc oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis in human cancer cells through reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Mohd Javed Akhtar1,2, Maqusood Ahamed3, Sudhir Kumar1, MA Majeed Khan3, Javed Ahmad4, Salman A Alrokayan31Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India; 2Fibre Toxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, India; 3King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have received muc...

  3. Mechanism of Anesthetic Toxicity: Metabolism, Reactive Oxygen Species, Oxidative Stress, and Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    There is much literature on the toxic effects of anesthetics. This paper deals with both the volatiles and locals. Adverse effects appear to be multifaceted, with the focus on radicals, oxidative stress (OS), and electron transfer (ET). ET functionalities involved are quinone, iminoquinone, conjugated iminium, and nitrone. The non-ET routes involving radicals and OS apparently pertain to haloalkanes and ethers. Beneficial effects of antioxidants, evidently countering OS, are reported. Knowled...

  4. Resveratrol induced inhibition of Escherichia coli proceeds via membrane oxidation and independent of diffusible reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Mahesh; Goswami, Manish; Chakraborty, Saikat; Jawali, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (5-[(E)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethenyl]benzene-1,3-diol), a redox active phytoalexin with a large number of beneficial activities is also known for antibacterial property. However the mechanism of action of resveratrol against bacteria remains unknown. Due to its extensive redox property it was envisaged if reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by resveratrol could be a reason behind its antibacterial activity. Employing Escherichia coli as a model organism we have evaluated the role of diffusible reactive oxygen species in the events leading to inhibition of this organism by resveratrol. Evidence for the role of ROS in E. coli treated with resveratrol was investigated by direct quantification of ROS by flow cytometry, supplementation with ROS scavengers, depletion of intracellular glutathione, employing mutants devoid of enzymatic antioxidant defences, induction of adaptive response prior to resveratrol challenge and monitoring oxidative stress response elements oxyR, soxS and soxR upon resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol treatment did not result in scavengable ROS generation in E. coli cells. However, evidence towards membrane damage was obtained by potassium leakage (atomic absorption spectrometry) and propidium iodide uptake (flow cytometry and microscopy) as an early event. Based on the comprehensive evidences this study concludes for the first time the antibacterial property of resveratrol against E. coli does not progress via the diffusible ROS but is mediated by site-specific oxidative damage to the cell membrane as the primary event.

  5. Resveratrol induced inhibition of Escherichia coli proceeds via membrane oxidation and independent of diffusible reactive oxygen species generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (5-[(E-2-(4-hydroxyphenylethenyl]benzene-1,3-diol, a redox active phytoalexin with a large number of beneficial activities is also known for antibacterial property. However the mechanism of action of resveratrol against bacteria remains unknown. Due to its extensive redox property it was envisaged if reactive oxygen species (ROS generation by resveratrol could be a reason behind its antibacterial activity. Employing Escherichia coli as a model organism we have evaluated the role of diffusible reactive oxygen species in the events leading to inhibition of this organism by resveratrol. Evidence for the role of ROS in E. coli treated with resveratrol was investigated by direct quantification of ROS by flow cytometry, supplementation with ROS scavengers, depletion of intracellular glutathione, employing mutants devoid of enzymatic antioxidant defences, induction of adaptive response prior to resveratrol challenge and monitoring oxidative stress response elements oxyR, soxS and soxR upon resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol treatment did not result in scavengable ROS generation in E. coli cells. However, evidence towards membrane damage was obtained by potassium leakage (atomic absorption spectrometry and propidium iodide uptake (flow cytometry and microscopy as an early event. Based on the comprehensive evidences this study concludes for the first time the antibacterial property of resveratrol against E. coli does not progress via the diffusible ROS but is mediated by site-specific oxidative damage to the cell membrane as the primary event.

  6. Are matrix isolated species really “isolated”? Infrared spectroscopic and theoretical studies of noble gas-transition metal oxide complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize our recent results on matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic studies and theoretical investigations of noble gas-transition metal oxide complexes. The results show that some transition metal oxide species trapped in solid noble gas matrices are chemically coordinated by one or multiple noble gas atoms forming noble gas complexes and, hence, cannot be regarded as isolated species. Noble gas coordination alters the vibrational frequencies as well as the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal oxide species trapped in solid noble gas matrixes. The interactions between noble gas atoms and transition metal oxides involve ion-induced dipole interactions as well as chemical bonding interactions. Periodic trends in the bonding in these noble gas-transition metal complexes are discussed.

  7. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, C. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Physics; Treffry, A. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Physics; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dep. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits ferroxidase activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial {sup b}urst{sup ,} the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported.

  8. Schisandrin B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection are mediated by reactive oxidant species production in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Ko, Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of reactive oxidant species (ROS), presumably arising from cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-catalyzed metabolism of schisandrin B (Sch B), in triggering glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B induced reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent and CYP-catalyzed reaction and associated ROS production were examined in rat heart microsomes. Sch B analogs were also studied for comparison. Using rat heart microsomes as a source of CYP, Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate (an intermediate compound derived from the synthesis of Sch C), were found to serve as co-substrate for the CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction, with concomitant production of ROS. The stimulation of CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction and/or ROS production by Sch B or Sch C correlated with the increase in mitochondrial reduced glutathione level and protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. The involvement of ROS in Sch B-induced cardioprotection was further confirmed by the suppressive effect produced by N-acetylcysteine or alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Taken together, these results suggest that Sch B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection may be mediated by ROS arising from CYP-catalyzed reaction.

  9. The Anopheles gambiae oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1 gene regulates expression of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Jaramillo-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: OXR1 is an ancient gene, present in all eukaryotes examined so far that confers protection from oxidative stress by an unknown mechanism. The most highly conserved region of the gene is the carboxyl-terminal TLDc domain, which has been shown to be sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: OXR1 has a complex genomic structure in the mosquito A. gambiae, and we confirm that multiple splice forms are expressed in adult females. Our studies revealed that OXR1 regulates the basal levels of catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx expression, two enzymes involved in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, giving new insight into the mechanism of action of OXR1. Gene silencing experiments indicate that the Jun Kinase (JNK gene acts upstream of OXR1 and also regulates expression of CAT and GPx. Both OXR1 and JNK genes are required for adult female mosquitoes to survive chronic oxidative stress. OXR1 silencing decreases P. berghei oocyst formation. Unexpectedly, JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, suggesting that JNK may also mediate some, yet to be defined, antiparasitic response. CONCLUSION: The JNK pathway regulates OXR1 expression and OXR1, in turn, regulates expression of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS in Anopheles gambiae. OXR1 silencing decreases Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, while JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances infection.

  10. Role of active oxidative species on TiO2 photocatalysis of tetracycline and optimization of photocatalytic degradation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhaohui; Li, Lu; Wei, Chuanlin; Li, Huixin; Chen, Dan

    2015-07-01

    The optimum operating conditions for TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of tetracycline antibiotic (TC) in aqueous solution and the role of active oxidative species (AOS) from UV/TiO2 in its degradation were investigated. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were adopted to optimize three parameters: TiO2 concentration, initial pH and UV irradiation time. Radical scavengers were added to reaction solution to assess the photocatalytic reaction mechanism of TC. The results showed that 93.1% degradation efficiency was obtained under optimum conditions established during experimentation (TiO2 concentration = 2.09 g l(-1), pH = 5.56 and t = 20.95 min). These results agree with the prediction made by the proposed model. Photocatalytic degradation of TC followed a pseudo first-order reaction rate. Photogenerated holes (h+(VB)) with minor participation from superoxide anions (O2*), were responsible for TC oxidation on TiO2, while hydroxyl radicals (*OH) played a negligible role in titania-TC oxidation.

  11. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and their interactions play different roles in Cupressus lusitanica cell death and phytoalexin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2007-01-01

    Beta-thujaplicin Is a natural troponoid with strong antifungal, antiviral, and anticancer activities. Beta-thujaplicin production in yeast elicitor-treated Cupressus lusitanica cell culture and its relationships with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production and hypersensitive cell death were investigated. Superoxide anion radical (O2*-) induced cell death and inhibited beta-thujaplicin accumulation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation but did not significantly affect cell death. Both elicitor and O2*- induced programmed cell death, which can be blocked by protease inhibitors, protein kinase inhibitors, and Ca2+ chelators. Elicitor-induced NO generation was nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent. Inhibition of NO generation by NOS inhibitors and NO scavenger partly blocked the elicitor-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation and cell death, and NO donors strongly induced cell death. Interaction among NO, H2O2, and O2*- shows that NO production and H2O2 production are interdependent, but NO and O2*- accumulation were negatively related because of coconsumption of NO and O2*-. NO- and O2*- -induced cell death required each other, and both were required for elicitor-induced cell death. A direct interaction between NO and O2*- was implicated in the production of a potent oxidant peroxynitrite, which might mediate the elicitor-induced cell death.

  12. The Effects of Bis(tri-n-butyltin) Oxide on Three Species of Marine Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    fluorescence with time indicates an actively photosynthesizing culture that is healthy and growing. The photosynthetic capability of phytoplankton was...vivo fluorescence data with the FRs suggests that the control replicates were actively photosynthesizing and growing. For each species, the mean in vivo

  13. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be the fuel of the next century. Hydrogen can be produced by either water splitting using the solar or nuclear energy or by catalytic cracking and reforming of the fossil fuels. The water splitting process using solar energy and photovoltaics is a clean way to produce hydrogen, but it suffers from very low efficiency. A promising scheme to produce H 2 from natural gas involves following steps: (i) partial oxidation and reforming of natural gas to syngas, (ii) water-gas shift reaction to convert CO in the syngas to additional H2, (iii) separation of the H2 from CO2, and (iv) CO2 sequestration. The requirements for the above scheme are (i) a highly active coke resistant catalyst for generation of syngas by direct partial oxidation, (ii) a highly active sulfur tolerant catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction, and (iii) a low cost sorbent with high CO2 adsorption capacity for CO2 sequestration. This dissertation will address the mechanisms of partial oxidation, CO2 adsorption, and water-gas shift catalysis using in situ IR spectroscopy coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The results from these studies will lead to a better understanding of the reaction mechanism and design of both the catalyst and sorbent for production of hydrogen with zero emissions. Partial oxidation of methane is studied over Rh/Al2O 3 catalyst to elucidate the reaction mechanism for synthesis gas formation. The product lead-lag relationship observed with in situ IR and MS results revealed that syngas is produced via a two-step reforming mechanism: the first step involving total oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H 2O and the second step involving the reforming of unconverted methane with CO2 and H2O to form syngas. Furthermore, the Rh on the catalyst surface remains predominantly in the partially oxidized state (Rhdelta+ and Rh0). For the water-gas shift reaction, addition of Re to the Ni/CeO2 catalyst enhanced the water gas shift activity by a factor of three. The activity

  14. Enhancement of Muscle Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity and Alterations in Insulin Action Are Lipid Species Dependent

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Nigel; Hariharan, Krit; TidAng, Jennifer; Frangioudakis, Georgia; Beale, Susan M.; Wright, Lauren E.; Zeng, Xiao Yi; Leslie, Simon J; LI Jing-ya; Kraegen, Edward W.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have been reported to be less obesogenic than long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs); however, relatively little is known regarding their effect on insulin action. Here, we examined the tissue-specific effects of MCFAs on lipid metabolism and insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS C57BL6/J mice and Wistar rats were fed either a low-fat control diet or high-fat diets rich in MCFAs or LCFAs for 4–5 weeks, and markers of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, l...

  15. Aquatic toxicity structure-activity relationships for the zwitterionic surfactant alkyl dimethyl amine oxide to several aquatic species and a resulting species sensitivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Rawlings, Jane M; McDonough, Kathleen M; Zoller, Ann C; Wehmeyer, Kenneth R

    2016-12-01

    Amine oxide (AO) is a cationically charged surfactant at environmental pH and has previously been assessed in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) High Production Volume (HPV) chemicals program. Typical of cationic chemicals, AO is highly aquatically toxic. In this study we vastly improve the knowledge of AO toxicity by developing acute Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) for an alga (Desmodesmus subspicatus), an invertebrate (Daphnia magna) and a fish (Danio rerio) using the appropriate array of OECD Test Guidelines. A chronic toxicity QSAR was also determined for the most sensitive taxon, Desmodesmus. Pure AO spanning the chain lengths of C8 to C16 were tested individually with trace analytical confirmation of exposures in all tests. The QSARs were all of high quality (R(2) 0.92-0.98) with slopes ranging from -0.338 to -0.484. QSARs were then used to normalize toxicity outcomes for a larger, previously published data set used in HPV, European REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals), and peer reviewed publications. Two additional species, Lemna gibba (macrophyte) and Ankistrodesmus falcatus (alga) were studied in exposures to dodecyl (C12) AO to provide sufficient taxonomic diversity to conduct a Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD) analysis. The SSD 5th percentile hazardous concentration (HC5) to C12 AO was found to be 0.052mg/L which is similar to an existing AO 28-d, 3-community periphyton community bioassay normalized to C12 AO (No-observed-effect-concentration or NOEC=0.152mg/L). The statistical properties of the SSD was probed suggesting that new studies of additional taxa would be required that were at least 10-fold more sensitive than the most sensitive taxon to move the HC5 lower by a factor of 3. The overall AO hazard assessment suggests a large margin of safety relative to published environmental exposure data.

  16. Effects of surface oxide species and contents on SiC slurry viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Shufan; LI Hongyan; CHEN Wei; LIU Bin; CHEN Shoutian

    2005-01-01

    The disadvantageous effects of colloidal SiO2 layer and micro-content of metal oxide adsorbed on SiC powder surface on SiC slurry stable dispersion were studied, and the novel method to avoid this disadvantage was proposed. By acidwashing, on the one hand, because the maximum Zeta potential of SiC powder increases to 72.49 mV with the decreasing content of metal oxide adsorbed on the SiC powder surface, the repulsion force between SiC powders that dispersed in slurry is enhanced, thus the SiC powder can be fully dispersed in slurry. On the other hand, after HF acidwashing, with the OH- group adsorbed on SiC powder surface destroyed and replaced by the F- ion, the hydrogen bond adsorbed on the OH-group is also destroyed. Therefore, the surface property of the SiC powder is changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic;H2O that adsorbed on SiC powder surface is released and can flow freely, and it actually increases the content of the effective flow phase in the slurry. These changes of SiC powder surface property can be proved by XPS and FTIR analysis. Fivolume fraction of SiC powder in the slurry is maximized to 61.5 vol.%.

  17. Nitrous oxide emission from polyculture constructed wetlands: Effect of plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yanhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Min Hang, Shanghai 200240 (China); Inamori, Ryuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Kong Hainan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Min Hang, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: remanda@126.com; Xu Kaiqin [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science, Wuhan Unviversity, Wuhan 430072 (China); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Zhang Jixiang [School of Economics and Management, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210096 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Loss of nitrogen from the soil-plant system has raised environmental concern. This study assessed the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in the subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CWs). To better understand the mechanism of N{sub 2}O emission, spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in four kinds of wetlands soil were compared. N{sub 2}O emission data showed large temporal and spatial variation ranging from -5.5 to 32.7 mg N{sub 2}O m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. The highest N{sub 2}O emission occurred in the cell planted with Phragmites australis and Zizania latifolia. Whereas, the lower emission rate were obtained in the cell planted with P. australis and Typha latifolia. These revealed that Z. latifolia stimulated the N{sub 2}O emission. Transportation of more organic matter and oxygen for AOB growth may be the reason. The study of AOB also supported this result, indicating that the root structure of Z. latifolia was favored by AOB for N{sub 2}O formation. - Zizania latifolia has a large contribution to global warming.

  18. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles toxic potency on different microalgae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Dailianis, Stefanos; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles are widely used in many products such as cosmetics, material coatings, and pigments and they are released into enviroment. Recently, nanoparticles have been found in municipal wastewater and wastewater treatment plants, which are consequently discharged to receiving bodies. Since their versatile use and application is increasing, their environmental impact is of great concern and needs to be clarified. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on aquatic species, such as unicellular microalgae. This is considered as a necessary step in order to assess their impact on coastal food chain and the ecosystems that they support as well as on natural wastewater treatment systems. More specifically, the potential toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on three aquatic organisms, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Tetraselmis suesica, and Chlorococcum sp. were investigated. The microalgae species exposed to different periods of time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) and different concentrations of ZnO NPs (1 to 100 μM, 1 to10 mM), and showed significant differences on their growth rates. Algae exposed to ZnO NPs concentrations from 1 to 100 μΜ exhibited increased levels of the half maximum inhibitory concentration values (IC50) in all cases, while at higher concentrations (from 1 to 10 mM) algae showed excessive lysis, probably due to disturbances occurred in cellular structure and function. According to the results of the present study, ZnO nanoparticles appeared to have toxic effects on all species tested, showing type- and time-dependent alterations.

  19. The optical constants of several atmospheric aerosol species - Ammonium sulfate, aluminum oxide, and sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.; Khare, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of problems which are related to a use of measured optical constants in the simulation of the optical constants of real atmospheric aerosols. The techniques of measuring optical constants are discussed, taking into account transmission measurements through homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials, the immersion of a material in a liquid of a known refractive index, the consideration of the minimum deviation angle of prism measurement, the interference of multiply reflected light, reflectivity measurements, and aspects of mathematical analysis. Graphs show the real and the imaginary part of the refractive index as a function of wavelength for aluminum oxide, NaCl, and ammonium sulfate. Tables are provided for the dispersion parameters and the optical constants.

  20. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinlan, Casey L; Perevoshchikova, IrinaV; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF) and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo). However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase...... a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First....... With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF) was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo), and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions...

  1. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  2. A line confusion-limited millimeter survey of Orion KL. III. Sulfur oxide species

    CERN Document Server

    Esplugues, G B; Cernicharo, J; Goicoechea, J R; Palau, Aina; Marcelino, N; Bell, T A

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the sulfur-bearing species detected in a line confusion-limited survey towards Orion KL performed with the IRAM 30m telescope in the range 80-281 GHz. The study is part of an analysis of the line survey divided into families of molecules. Our aim is to derive accurate physical conditions and molecular abundances in the different components of Orion KL from observed SO and SO2 lines. First we assumed LTE conditions obtain rotational temperatures. We then used a radiative transfer model, assuming either LVG or LTE excitation to derive column densities of these molecules in the different components of Orion KL. We have detected 68 lines of SO, 34SO, 33SO, and S18O and 653 lines of SO2, 34SO2, 33SO2, SO18O and SO2 v2=1. We provide column densities for all of them and also upper limits for the column densities of S17O, 36SO, 34S18O, SO17O and 34SO2 v2=1 and for several undetected sulfur-bearing species. In addition, we present 2'x2' maps around Orion IRc2 of SO2 transitions with energies from...

  3. Harnessing Evolutionary Toxins for Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species, Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in Plant Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, John T.

    2017-01-01

    During the early periods of evolution, as well as in niche environments today, organisms have had to learn to tolerate the presence of many reactive compounds, such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide. It is now known that such compounds are instrumental in the signaling processes in plant cells. There are enzymes which can make them, while downstream of their signaling pathways are coming to light. These include the production of cGMP, the activation of MAP kinases and transcription factors, and the modification of thiol groups on many proteins. However, organisms have also had to tolerate other reactive compounds such as ammonia, methane, and hydrogen gas, and these too are being found to have profound effects on signaling in cells. Before a holistic view of how such signaling works, the full effects and interactions of all such reactive compounds needs to be embraced. A full understanding will be beneficial to both agriculture and future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28239389

  4. Graphene oxide induces plasma membrane damage, reactive oxygen species accumulation and fatty acid profiles change in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liang, Chen; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    During the past couple of years, graphene nanomaterials were extremely popular among the scientists due to the promising properties in many aspects. Before the materials being well applied, we should first focus on their biosafety and toxicity. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of synthesized graphene oxide (GO) against the model industrial organism Pichia pastoris. We found that the synthesized GO showed dose-dependent toxicity to P. pastoris, through cell membrane damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In response to these cell stresses, cells had normal unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) levels but increased contents of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) with up-regulation of UFA synthesis-related genes on the transcriptional level, which made it overcome the stress under GO attack. Two UFA defective strains (spt23Δ and fad12Δ) were used to demonstrate the results above. Hence, this study suggested a close connection between PUFAs and cell survival against GO.

  5. Mechanisms of nitric oxide crosstalk with reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes during abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dhara; Jain, Prachi; Singh, Neha; Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts in a concentration and redox-dependent manner to counteract oxidative stress either by directly acting as an antioxidant through scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions (O(2)(-)*), to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) or by acting as a signaling molecule, thereby altering gene expression. NO can interact with different metal centres in proteins, such as heme-iron, zinc-sulfur clusters, iron-sulfur clusters, and copper, resulting in the formation of a stable metal-nitrosyl complex or production of varied biochemical signals, which ultimately leads to modification of protein structure/function. The thiols (ferrous iron-thiol complex and nitrosothiols) are also involved in the metabolism and mobilization of NO. Thiols bind to NO and transport it to the site of action whereas nitrosothiols release NO after intercellular diffusion and uptake into the target cells. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) also has the ability to transnitrosylate proteins. It is an NO˙ reservoir and a long-distance signaling molecule. Tyrosine nitration of proteins has been suggested as a biomarker of nitrosative stress as it can lead to either activation or inhibition of target proteins. The exact molecular mechanism(s) by which exogenous and endogenously generated NO (or reactive nitrogen species) modulate the induction of various genes affecting redox homeostasis, are being extensively investigated currently by various research groups. Present review provides an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms by which NO interacts with and modulates the activity of various ROS scavenging enzymes, particularly accompanying ROS generation in plants in response to varied abiotic stress.

  6. Therapeutic Strategies for Oxidative Stress-Related Cardiovascular Diseases: Removal of Excess Reactive Oxygen Species in Adult Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunyun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that acute and chronic uncontrolled overproduction of oxidative stress-related factors including reactive oxygen species (ROS causes cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Moreover ROS mediate various signaling pathways underlying vascular inflammation in ischemic tissues. With respect to stem cell-based therapy, several studies clearly indicate that modulating antioxidant production at cellular levels enhances stem/progenitor cell functionalities, including proliferation, long-term survival in ischemic tissues, and complete differentiation of transplanted cells into mature vascular cells. Recently emerging therapeutic strategies involving adult stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, for treating ischemic CVDs have highlighted the need to control intracellular ROS production, because it critically affects the replicative senescence of ex vivo expanded therapeutic cells. Better understanding of the complexity of cellular ROS in stem cell biology might improve cell survival in ischemic tissues and enhance the regenerative potentials of transplanted stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we will discuss the nature and sources of ROS, drug-based therapeutic strategies for scavenging ROS, and EPC based therapeutic strategies for treating oxidative stress-related CVDs. Furthermore, we will discuss whether primed EPCs pretreated with natural ROS-scavenging compounds are crucial and promising therapeutic strategies for vascular repair.

  7. Involvement of oxidative stress response genes in redox homeostasis, the level of reactive oxygen species, and ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Tamara; Temple, Mark D; Guido, Ron; Jarolim, Stefanie; Breitenbach, Michael; Attfield, Paul V; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking oxidative stress response genes were used to investigate which genes are required under normal aerobic conditions to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, using intracellular glutathione redox potential (glutathione E(h)) to indicate the redox environment of the cells. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) were also assessed by FACS using dihydroethidium and rhodamine 123 as fluorescent probes. Cells became more oxidised as strains shifted from exponential growth to stationary phase. During both phases the presence of reduced thioredoxin and the activity of glutathione reductase were important for redox homeostasis. Thioredoxin reductase contributed less during exponential phase when there was a strong requirement for active Yap1p transcription factor, but was critical during stationary phase. The absence of ROS detoxification systems, such as catalases or superoxide dismutases, had a lesser effect on glutathione E(h), but a more pronounced effect on ROS levels and MMP. These results reflect the major shift in ROS generation as cells switch from fermentative to respiratory metabolism and also showed that there was not a strong correlation between ROS production, MMP and cellular redox environment. Heterogeneity was detected in populations of strains with compromised anti-oxidant defences, and as cells aged they shifted from one cell type with low ROS content to another with much higher intracellular ROS.

  8. Reactive oxygen species mediate nitric oxide production through ERK/JNK MAPK signaling in HAPI microglia after PFOS exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Nie, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ting; Mao, Jiamin; Liu, Xinhang; Gu, Yiyang; Shi, Jiyun; Xiao, Jing; Wan, Chunhua; Wu, Qiyun

    2015-10-15

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an emerging persistent contaminant that is commonly encountered during daily life, has been shown to exert toxic effects on the central nervous system (CNS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of PFOS remain largely unknown. It has been widely acknowledged that the inflammatory mediators released by hyper-activated microglia play vital roles in the pathogenesis of various neurological diseases. In the present study, we examined the impact of PFOS exposure on microglial activation and the release of proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxidative species (ROS). We found that PFOS exposure led to concentration-dependent NO and ROS production by rat HAPI microglia. We also discovered that there was rapid activation of the ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway in the HAPI microglia following PFOS treatment. Moreover, the PFOS-induced iNOS expression and NO production were attenuated after the inhibition of ERK or JNK MAPK by their corresponding inhibitors, PD98059 and SP600125. Interestingly, NAC, a ROS inhibitor, blocked iNOS expression, NO production, and activation of ERK and JNK MAPKs, which suggested that PFOS-mediated microglial NO production occurs via a ROS/ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway. Finally, by exposing SH-SY5Y cells to PFOS-treated microglia-conditioned medium, we demonstrated that NO was responsible for PFOS-mediated neuronal apoptosis.

  9. Achillolide A Protects Astrocytes against Oxidative Stress by Reducing Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species and Interfering with Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Elmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achillolide A is a natural sesquiterpene lactone that we have previously shown can inhibit microglial activation. In this study we present evidence for its beneficial effects on astrocytes under oxidative stress, a situation relevant to neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. Viability of brain astrocytes (primary cultures was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, intracellular ROS levels were detected using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, in vitro antioxidant activity was measured by differential pulse voltammetry, and protein phosphorylation was determined using specific ELISA kits. We have found that achillolide A prevented the H2O2-induced death of astrocytes, and attenuated the induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These activities could be attributed to the inhibition of the H2O2-induced phosphorylation of MAP/ERK kinase 1 (MEK1 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and to the antioxidant activity of achillolide A, but not to H2O2 scavenging. This is the first study that demonstrates its protective effects on brain astrocytes, and its ability to interfere with MAPK activation. We propose that achillolide A deserves further evaluation for its potential to be developed as a drug for the prevention/treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries where oxidative stress is part of the pathophysiology.

  10. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  11. Induction and development of the oil emulsifying system in an alkane oxidizing Rhodococcus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biotechnology, Trondheim, (Norway)

    1999-08-01

    There is a potential use of oil emulsifying bacteria for the clean-up of oil-contaminated natural environments, and oil transport and storage systems. The control mechanisms of the emulsifying abilities in these bacteria are important in relation to the optimization of such processes. A study was conducted to investigate the physiological criteria for the formation of the emulsifying activity in Rhodococcus sp. strain 094, which forms a hydrophobic cell surface when cultivated on alkanes, permitting oil-associated exponential growth. The ability of this bacteria to produce oil emulsifying agents is clearly inducible by crude oil or a number of single hydrophobic compounds. Before the cells are able to emulsify the oil, they must pass through a relatively short induction period followed by a longer period of synthesis of hydrophobic surface parts, coinciding with cell proliferation. The latter is due to the required coordination with new cell wall synthesis. If the cells are allowed to produce sufficient amounts of hydrophobic cell surface parts, they commence to emulsify the oil efficiently when the hydrophobic factor is released from the cell surface as part of their change to a more hydrophillic state. All the positive inducers were hydrophobic alkyl derivatives, and with one exception, also substrate for growth. Many of the better inducers were alkanes, and would require an alkane oxidizing system to be used by the cells. 14 ref., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Dwivedi

    Full Text Available The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM. The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  13. The application of Fe–Mn hydrous oxides based adsorbent for removing selenium species from water

    KAUST Repository

    Szlachta, Małgorzata

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the adsorptive removal of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) from water by a newly developed ion exchange adsorbent, based on Fe(III) and Mn(III) hydrous oxides, was examined. This study was conducted to determine the influence of various operating parameters, such as initial anion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH, solution temperature, and the presence of competitive anions, on the treatment performance. The high Se(IV) adsorptive capacity of the adsorbent (up to 41.02. mg/g at pH 4) was due to its high affinity for selenite, as reflected in the fast rate of uptake (batch studies) and an efficient long-term removal (column experiments). Although adsorption of anions traditionally decreases as pH increases, the mixed adsorbent was capable of purifying large volumes of Se(IV)-containing water (at pH 7) to reach concentrations lower than 10 μg/L, which meets the European Commission standards. The presence of sulphate and carbonate did not influence Se(IV) adsorption. However, high phosphate and silicate concentrations may have decreased the removal efficiency of Se(IV). Data from the batch and column adsorption experiments were fitted with a number of approved models, which revealed the adsorption mechanism and allowed for a comparison of the results. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Leaching of spent fuel in simulated disposal condition and separation of plutonium species as a function of oxidation state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2000-11-01

    The influences of compacted bentonite on the leaching of spent fuel in bentonite-saturated ground water at room temperature were investigated by analyzing the components of leachates as well as the alterated surface of them. And the plutonium species was separated by ion exchangers. The amounts of Cs, Sb, Sr, Am, Ru, Pu and U released from spent fuel by bentonite-saturated solution for the initial 165 days were 2.0, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02, 0.005, 5x10{sup -}4, 0.05 % of inventory, respectively. These values correspond to several {approx} several tens times as much as those through bentonite block which were compacted to 1.4 g/cm{sup 3}. The comparison of the cesium released in groundwater and bentonite-saturated solution through bentonite block is simular values, whose lower concentration in leachant indicates that most of radionuclides are retained by compacted bentonite, even though alkali metal such as Cs. The separation of plutonium species as a function of oxidation state by ion exchanger was succeed by two columns' method with packing materials as SiO{sup -}, SiO-SO{sub 3}{sup -}.

  15. Species-Specific Standard Redox Potential of Thiol-Disulfide Systems: A Key Parameter to Develop Agents against Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál, Béla

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic standard redox potential, a new physico-chemical parameter was introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The highly composite, codependent acid-base and redox equilibria of thiols could so far be converted into pH-dependent, apparent redox potentials (E’°) only. Since the formation of stable metal-thiolate complexes precludes the direct thiol-disulfide redox potential measurements by usual electrochemical techniques, an indirect method had to be elaborated. In this work, the species-specific, pH-independent standard redox potentials of glutathione were determined primarily by comparing it to 1-methylnicotinamide, the simplest NAD+ analogue. Secondarily, the species-specific standard redox potentials of the two-electron redox transitions of cysteamine, cysteine, homocysteine, penicillamine, and ovothiol were determined using their microscopic redox equilibrium constants with glutathione. The 30 different, microscopic standard redox potential values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress.

  16. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zong Min; Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  17. Impact of Trans-Resveratrol-Sulfates and -Glucuronides on Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity, Nitric Oxide Release and Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ladurner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is a polyphenolic natural product mainly present in grape skin, berries and peanuts. In the vasculature resveratrol is thought to boost endothelial function by increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression, by enhancing eNOS activity, and by reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Recent studies show that dietary resveratrol is metabolized in the liver and intestine into resveratrol-sulfate and -glucuronide derivatives questioning the relevance of multiple reported mechanistic in vitro data on resveratrol. In this study, we compare side by side different physiologically relevant resveratrol metabolites (resveratrol sulfates- and -glucuronides and their parent compound in their influence on eNOS enzyme activity, endothelial NO release, and intracellular ROS levels. In contrast to resveratrol, none of the tested resveratrol metabolites elevated eNOS enzyme activity and endothelial NO release or affected intracellular ROS levels, leaving the possibility that not tested metabolites are active and able to explain in vivo findings.

  18. Effects of moderate electrical stimulation on reactive species production by primary rat skeletal muscle cells: cross talk between superoxide and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertucci, Rafael Herling; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Curi, Rui; Sweeney, Gary; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The effects of a moderate electrical stimulation on superoxide and nitric oxide production by primary cultured skeletal muscle cells were evaluated. The involvement of the main sites of these reactive species production and the relationship between superoxide and nitric oxide production were also examined. Production of superoxide was evaluated by cytochrome c reduction and dihydroethidium oxidation assays. Electrical stimulation increased superoxide production after 1 h incubation. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor caused a partial decrease of superoxide generation and a significant amount of mitochondria-derived superoxide was also observed. Nitric oxide production was assessed by nitrite measurement and by using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2-DA) assay. Using both methods an increased production of nitric oxide was obtained after electrical stimulation, which was also able to induce an increase of iNOS content and NF-κB activation. The participation of superoxide in nitric oxide production was investigated by incubating cells with DAF-2-DA in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation, a superoxide generator system (xanthine-xanthine oxidase), a mixture of NOS inhibitors and SOD-PEG. Our data show that the induction of muscle contraction by a moderate electrical stimulation protocol led to an increased nitric oxide production that can be controlled by superoxide generation. The cross talk between these reactive species likely plays a role in exercise-induced maintenance and adaptation by regulating muscular glucose metabolism, force of contraction, fatigue, and antioxidant systems activities.

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to increasing concentrations of trivalent chromium in the Andean crop species Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Bucchini, Anahi E; Iacobucci, Marta; Ruiz, Karina B; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), an ancient Andean seed crop, exhibits exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to abiotic stress. The species' tolerance to heavy metals has, however, not yet been investigated nor its ability to take up and translocate chromium (Cr). This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adjustments occurring upon exposure of quinoa to several concentrations (0.01-5mM) of CrCl3. Young hydroponically grown plants were used to evaluate Cr uptake, growth, oxidative stress, and other biochemical parameters three and/or seven days after treatment. Leaves accumulated the lowest amounts of Cr, while roots and stems accumulated the most at low and at high metal concentrations, respectively. Fresh weight and photosynthetic pigments were reduced only by the higher Cr(III) doses. Substantially increased lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and proline levels were observed only with 5mM Cr(III). Except for a significant decrease at day 7 with 5mM Cr(III), total polyphenols and flavonoids maintained control levels in Cr(III)-treated plants, whereas antioxidant activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum polyamine accumulation was observed in 1mM CrCl3-treated plants. Even though α- and γ-tocopherols also showed enhanced levels only with the 1mM concentration, tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT, EC 2.6.1.5) activity increased under Cr(III) treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, results suggest that polyamines, tocopherols, and TAT activity could contribute to tolerance to 1mM Cr(III), but not to the highest concentration that, instead, generated oxidative stress.

  20. Effect of oxidative stress induced by Brevibacterium sp. BS01 on a HAB causing species--Alexandrium tamarense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Zhang

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms occur all over the world, destroying aquatic ecosystems and threatening other organisms. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal actinomycete BS01 was able to lysis dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense ATGD98-006. Physiological and biochemical responses to oxidative stress in A. tamarense were investigated to elucidate the mechanism involved in BS01 inhibition of algal growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that there were some chloroplast abnormalities in response to BS01 supernatant. The decrease in cellular-soluble protein content suggested that cell growth was greatly inhibited at high concentration of BS01 supernatant. The increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde contents following exposure to BS01 supernatant indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The content of pigment was significantly decreased after 12 h treatment, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. Moreover, the decrease of Fv/Fm ratio suggested that in the photosynthetic system, the dominant sites producing ROS were destroyed by the supernatant of the BS01 culture. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase and peroxidase increased in a short time and decreased slightly with increasing exposure time. A real-time PCR assay showed changes in the transcript abundances of two photosynthetic genes, psbA and psbD. The results showed that BS01 supernatant reduced the expression of the psbA gene after 2 h exposure, but the expression of the psbD gene was increased at concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. Our results demonstrated that the expression of the psbA gene was inhibited by the BS01 supernatant, which might block the electron transport chain, significantly enhancing ROS level and excess activity of the antioxidant system. The accumulation of ROS destoryed pigment synthesis and membrane integrity, and inhibited or

  1. Bridge-bonded formate: active intermediate or spectator species in formic acid oxidation on a Pt film electrode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-X; Heinen, M; Jusys, Z; Behm, R J

    2006-12-01

    We present and discuss the results of an in situ IR study on the mechanism and kinetics of formic acid oxidation on a Pt film/Si electrode, performed in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) flow cell configuration under controlled mass transport conditions, which specifically aimed at elucidating the role of the adsorbed bridge-bonded formates in this reaction. Potentiodynamic measurements show a complex interplay between formation and desorption/oxidation of COad and formate species and the total Faradaic current. The notably faster increase of the Faradaic current compared to the coverage of bridge-bonded formate in transient measurements at constant potential, but with different formic acid concentrations, reveals that adsorbed formate decomposition is not rate-limiting in the dominant reaction pathway. If being reactive intermediate at all, the contribution of formate adsorption/decomposition to the reaction current decreases with increasing formic acid concentration, accounting for at most 15% for 0.2 M DCOOH at 0.7 VRHE. The rapid build-up/removal of the formate adlayer and its similarity with acetate or (bi-)sulfate adsorption/desorption indicate that the formate adlayer coverage is dominated by a fast dynamic adsorption-desorption equilibrium with the electrolyte, and that formate desorption is much faster than its decomposition. The results corroborate the proposal of a triple pathway reaction mechanism including an indirect pathway, a formate pathway, and a dominant direct pathway, as presented previously (Chen, Y. X.; et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 981), in which adsorbed formates act as a site-blocking spectator in the dominant pathway rather than as an active intermediate.

  2. Ecotoxicity of titanium silicon oxide (TiSiO4) nanomaterial for terrestrial plants and soil invertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguerra, Sirine; Gavina, Ana; Ksibi, Mohamed; Rasteiro, Maria da Graça; Rocha-Santos, Teresa; Pereira, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    The huge evolution of nanotechnology and the commercialization of nanomaterials (NMs) positively contributed for innovation in several industrial sectors. Facing this rapid development and the emergence of NMs in the market, the release of this nanometric sized materials in the environment and the possible impact on different ecosystem components attracted the attention of researchers in the last few years. In our study we aimed to assess the impact of titanium silicon oxide nanomaterial (nano-TiSiO4) on soil biota to estimate a risk limit for this material. In the present research a battery of standardized ecotoxicological assays aimed at evaluating a wide range of endpoints (avoidance and reproduction of earthworms and collembolans, emergence/growth of four selected terrestrial plants) were carried out, using OECD artificial soil as test substrate spiked with aqueous suspension of different concentrations of nano-TiSiO4. The results showed a maximum avoidance percentage of 40% for earthworms (Esenia andrei) at the highest concentration tested (1000mgkg(-1) soildw of nano-TiSiO4). No significant effect on the reproductive function of both invertebrate species was recorded. Nevertheless, significant phytotoxic data was registered at least for the growth of dicotyledonous plant species (Lactuca sativa and Lycopersicon lycopersicum) with EC20 values ranging between 236 and 414 mg kg(-1) soildw of nano-TiSiO4 for L. sativa dry mass and fresh mass, respectively. Further, the characterization of nano-TiSiO4 in suspensions used to spike the soil, performed by Dynamic Light Scattering, showed the formation of aggregates with important average size diameter, thus demonstrating that the toxic effects observed were likely not size dependent. A deterministic PNEC (predicted no effect concentration) for this NM of 10.02mg kg(-1) soildw of nano-TiSiO4, is suggested, while no more ecotoxicological information exists.

  3. Surface reactive species on MnOx(0.4)-CeO2 catalysts towards soot oxidation assisted with pulse dielectric barrier discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付名利; 林俊敏; 朱文波; 吴军良; 陈礼敏; 黄碧纯; 叶代启

    2014-01-01

    MnOx(0.4)-CeO2 was investigated for soot oxidation assisted with a pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The catalysts were evaluated and characterized with TPO (temperature programmed oxidation), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The ignition temperature Ti for soot oxidation decreased from 240.8 to 216.4 ºC with the increase of the pulse DBD frequencies from 50 to 400 Hz, lower than that of the case without pulse DBD present (253.4 ºC). The results of XRD, Raman and XPS agreed well with the TPO activities of MnOx(0.4)-CeO2 towards soot oxidation. More solid solution of ceria and manganese, and surface reactive species including O2-, O-and Mn4+were responsible for the enhancement of soot oxidation due to pulse DBD injection in the present study. For solid solution favors to the activation and transformation of those species, which are be-lieved to be involved in the soot oxidation in a hybrid catalysis-plasma.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of neutral and chemically oxidized species of β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}: Fluorescence from intermediate compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwis, D.D.D.H [Department of Chemistry, The Open University of Sri Lanka, Nawala (Sri Lanka); Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Chandrika, U.G. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Jayaweera, P.M., E-mail: pradeep@sjp.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka)

    2015-02-15

    Radical cations, dications and oxidized intermediate species of three carotenoids, namely, β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin, were generated in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solutions via chemical oxidation using anhydrous FeCl{sub 3}. UV–vis, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopic studies were performed to understand and compare the nature of intermediate species generated during the chemical oxidation process and subsequent degradation. The intense emission observed at 550 nm can be assigned to the S{sub 2}→S{sub 0} (1{sup 1}B{sub u}→1{sup 1}A{sub g}) transition of the carotenoid molecules. The 350 nm excitation during the oxidation process for β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin exhibit intense fluorescence peaks at 492 nm, 493 nm and 500 nm, respectively. These peaks are assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy compounds of the three molecules that are formed with molecular oxygen prior to the formation of oxidized short-chain stable compounds. - Highlights: • Fluorescence and UV–vis studies on β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin. • Oxidation, induced by FeCl{sub 3} in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} shows blue shifted fluorescence peaks. • Fluorescence peaks were assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy forms of carotenoids. • The D0→D3 transition of radical cations are observed in the near IR region.

  5. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek, R.

    2008-12-22

    The overall goal of this project was to better understand the mechanisms by which Geobacter species transfer electrons outside the cell onto Fe(III) oxides. The rationale for this study was that Geobacter species are often the predominant microorganisms involved in in situ uranium bioremediation and the growth and activity of the Geobacter species during bioremediation is primarily supported by electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides. These studies greatly expanded the understanding of electron transfer to Fe(III). Novel concepts developed included the potential role of microbial nanowires for long range electron transfer in Geobacter species and the importance of extracytoplasmic cytochromes functioning as capacitors to permit continued electron transfer during the hunt for Fe(III) oxide. Furthermore, these studies provided target sequences that were then used in other studies to tract the activity of Geobacter species in the subsurface through monitoring the abundance of gene transcripts of the target genes. A brief summary of the major accomplishments of the project is provided.

  6. Bridging Redox Species-Coated Graphene Oxide Sheets to Electrode for Extending Battery Life Using Nanocomposite Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi Fu; Ruan, Wen Hong; Lin, Dong Ling; Zhang, Ming Qiu

    2017-01-11

    Substituting conventional electrolyte for redox electrolyte has provided a new intriguing method for extending battery life. The efficiency of utilizing the contained redox species (RS) in the redox electrolyte can benefit from increasing the specific surface area of battery electrodes from the electrode side of the electrode-electrolyte interface, but is not limited to that. Herein, a new strategy using nanocomposite electrolyte is proposed to enlarge the interface with the aid of nanoinclusions from the electrolyte side. To do this, graphene oxide (GO) sheets are first dispersed in the electrolyte solution of tungstosilicic salt/lithium sulfate/poly(vinyl alcohol) (SiWLi/Li2SO4/PVA), and then the sheets are bridged to electrode, after casting and evaporating the solution on the electrode surface. By applying in situ conductive atomic force microscopy and Raman spectra, it is confirmed that the GO sheets doped with RS of SiWLi/Li2SO4 can be bridged and electrically reduced as an extended electrode-electrolyte interface. As a result, the RS-coated GO sheets bridged to LiTi2(PO4)3//LiMn2O4 battery electrodes are found to deliver extra energy capacity (∼30 mAh/g) with excellent electrochemical cycling stability, which successfully extends the battery life by over 50%.

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  8. Exposure to 17β-Oestradiol Induces Oxidative Stress in the Non-Oestrogen Receptor Invertebrate Species Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts of various substances on all levels of organisms are under investigation. Among these substances, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs present a threat, although the environmental significance of these compounds remains largely unknown. To shed some light on this field, we assessed the effects of 17β-oestradiol on the growth, reproduction and formation of free radicals in Eisenia fetida.Although the observed effects on growth and survival were relatively weak, a strong impact on reproduction was observed (50.70% inhibition in 100 μg/kg of E2. We further demonstrated that the exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to a contaminant of emerging concern, 17β-oestradiol (E2, significantly affected the molecules involved in antioxidant defence. Exposure to E2 results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stimulation of antioxidant systems (metallothionein and reduced oxidized glutathione ratio but not phytochelatins at both the mRNA and translated protein levels. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-imaging revealed the subcuticular bioaccumulation of oestradiol-3,4-quinone, altering the levels of local antioxidants in a time-dependent manner.The present study illustrates that although most invertebrates do not possess oestrogen receptors, these organisms can be affected by oestrogen hormones, likely reflecting free diffusion into the cellular microenvironment with subsequent degradation to molecules that undergo redox cycling, producing ROS, thereby increasing environmental contamination that also perilously affects keystone animals, forming lower trophic levels.

  9. Oxidative responsiveness to multiple stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki: Interactions between temperature, acidification and cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Maura; Lanzoni, Ilaria; Nardi, Alessandro; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Marta; Fattorini, Daniele; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    High-latitude marine ecosystems are ranked to be among the most sensitive regions to climate change since highly stenothermal and specially adapted organisms might be seriously affected by global warming and ocean acidification. The present investigation was aimed to provide new insights on the sensitivity to such environmental stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki, focussing also on their synergistic effects with cadmium exposure, naturally abundant in this area for upwelling phenomena. Scallops were exposed for 2 weeks to various combinations of Cd (0 and 40 μgL-1), pH (8.05 and 7.60) and temperature (-1 and +1 °C). Beside Cd bioaccumulation, a wide panel of early warning biomarkers were analysed in digestive glands and gills including levels of metallothioneins, individual antioxidants and total oxyradical scavenging capacity, onset of oxidative cell damage like lipid peroxidation, lysosomal stability, DNA integrity and peroxisomal proliferation. Results indicated reciprocal interactions between multiple stressors and their elaboration by a quantitative hazard model based on the relevance and magnitude of effects, highlighted a different sensitivity of analysed tissues. Due to cellular adaptations to high basal Cd content, digestive gland appeared more tolerant toward other prooxidant stressors, but sensitive to variations of the metal. On the other hand, gills were more affected by various combinations of stressors occurring at higher temperature.

  10. Using the MitoB method to assess levels of reactive oxygen species in ecological studies of oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K.; Villasevil, Eugenia M.; Anderson, Graeme J.; Cairns, Andrew G.; Mullen, William; Hartley, Richard C.; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years evolutionary ecologists have become increasingly interested in the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the life-histories of animals. ROS levels have mostly been inferred indirectly due to the limitations of estimating ROS from in vitro methods. However, measuring ROS (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) content in vivo is now possible using the MitoB probe. Here, we extend and refine the MitoB method to make it suitable for ecological studies of oxidative stress using the brown trout Salmo trutta as model. The MitoB method allows an evaluation of H2O2 levels in living organisms over a timescale from hours to days. The method is flexible with regard to the duration of exposure and initial concentration of the MitoB probe, and there is no transfer of the MitoB probe between fish. H2O2 levels were consistent across subsamples of the same liver but differed between muscle subsamples and between tissues of the same animal. The MitoB method provides a convenient method for measuring ROS levels in living animals over a significant period of time. Given its wide range of possible applications, it opens the opportunity to study the role of ROS in mediating life history trade-offs in ecological settings. PMID:28117373

  11. Targeting on Asymmetric Dimethylarginine-Related Nitric Oxide-Reactive Oxygen Species Imbalance to Reprogram the Development of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tain

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset diseases, including hypertension, can originate from early life, known as the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD. Because the developing kidney is vulnerable to early-life insults, renal programming is considered key in the developmental programming of hypertension. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous nitric oxide (NO synthase inhibitor, can regulate the NO–reactive oxygen species (ROS balance, and is involved in the development of hypertension. Reprogramming interventions aimed at NO-ROS balance can be protective in both genetic and developmentally programmed hypertension. Here we review several emergent themes of the DOHaD approach regarding the impact of ADMA-related NO-ROS imbalance on programmed hypertension. We focus on the kidney in the following areas: mechanistic insights to interpret programmed hypertension; the impact of ADMA-related NO-ROS imbalance in both genetic and acquired animal models of hypertension; alterations of the renal transcriptome in response to ADMA in the developing kidney; and reprogramming strategies targeting ADMA-related NO-ROS balance to prevent programmed hypertension.

  12. Targeting on Asymmetric Dimethylarginine-Related Nitric Oxide-Reactive Oxygen Species Imbalance to Reprogram the Development of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-12-02

    Adult-onset diseases, including hypertension, can originate from early life, known as the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Because the developing kidney is vulnerable to early-life insults, renal programming is considered key in the developmental programming of hypertension. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, can regulate the NO-reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, and is involved in the development of hypertension. Reprogramming interventions aimed at NO-ROS balance can be protective in both genetic and developmentally programmed hypertension. Here we review several emergent themes of the DOHaD approach regarding the impact of ADMA-related NO-ROS imbalance on programmed hypertension. We focus on the kidney in the following areas: mechanistic insights to interpret programmed hypertension; the impact of ADMA-related NO-ROS imbalance in both genetic and acquired animal models of hypertension; alterations of the renal transcriptome in response to ADMA in the developing kidney; and reprogramming strategies targeting ADMA-related NO-ROS balance to prevent programmed hypertension.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams.

  14. Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cancer: Respirable Particulate Matter, Fibrous Dusts and Ozone as Major Causes of Lung Carcinogenesis through Reactive Oxygen Species Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Loridas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.. Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM, at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc. play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM10 and PM2.5 are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  15. Safrole oxide induced human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cell differentiation into neuron-like cells by depressing the reactive oxygen species level at the low concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Bao Xiang; Miao, Jun Ying; Yin, De Ling; Zhang, Shang Li

    2006-02-01

    Previously, we found that 5-25 microg/ml safrole oxide could inhibit apoptosis and dramatically make a morphological change in human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). But the possible mechanism by which safrole oxide function is unknown. To answer this question, in this study, we first investigated the effects of it on the activity of nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), the expressions of Fas and integrin beta4, which play important roles in HUVEC growth and apoptosis, respectively. The results showed that, at the low concentration (10 microg/ml), safrole oxide had no effects on NOS activity and the expressions of Fas and integrin beta4. Then, we investigated whether HUVECs underwent differentiation. We examined the expressions of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and neurofilament-L (NF-L). Furthermore, we analyzed the changes of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). After 10 h of treatment with 10 microg/ml safrole oxide, some HUVECs became neuron-like cells in morphology, and intensively displayed positive NSE and NF-L. Simultaneously, ROS levels dramatically decreased during HUVECs differentiation towards neuron-like cells. At the low concentration, safrole oxide induced HUVECs differentiation into neuron-like cells. Furthermore, our data suggested that safrole oxide might perform this function by depressing intracellular ROS levels instead of by affecting cell growth or apoptosis signal pathways.

  16. Glyco-redox, a link between oxidative stress and changes of glycans: Lessons from research on glutathione, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Takamatsu, Shinji; Miyoshi, Eiji; Gao, Congxiao; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Kitazume, Shinobu; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki

    2016-04-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) response is one of the most important biological phenomena. The concept introduced by Helmut Sies encouraged many researchers to examine oxidative stress under pathophysiological conditions. Our group has been interested in redox regulation under oxidative stress as well as glycobiology in relation to disease. Current studies by our group and other groups indicate that functional and structural changes of glycans are regulated by redox responses resulting from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in various diseases including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), even though very few investigators appear to be aware of these facts. Here we propose that the field "glyco-redox" will open the door to a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism associated with diseases in relation to glycan changes under oxidative stress. A tight link between structural and functional changes of glycans and redox system under oxidative stress will lead to the recognition and interest of these aspects by many scientists. Helmut's contribution in this field facilitated our future perspectives in glycobiology.

  17. Selective killing of cancer cells by iron oxide nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species via p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahamed, Maqusood, E-mail: maqusood@gmail.com; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Khan, M. A. Majeed [King Saud University, King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, Mohd. Javed [University of Lucknow, Department of Zoology (India)

    2013-01-15

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in biomedical applications. However, little is known about the anticancer activity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. This study was designed to investigate whether Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs induced toxicity in a cell-specific manner and determine the possible mechanisms of toxicity caused by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in cancer cells. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs used in this study were synthesized by green method using {alpha}-d-glucose as a reducing agent. Prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, were fairly distributed, and had an average diameter of 23 nm. Cytotoxicity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs was examined against two types of cancer cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and human lung adenocarcinoma A549) and two normal cells (human lung fibroblast IMR-90 and rat hepatocytes). Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs exerted distinct effects on cell viability via killing of cancer cells while posing no toxicity on normal cells. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were found to induce depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both types of cancer cells (HepG2 and A549). Further, co-exposure of ascorbic acid significantly attenuated the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs-induced oxidative stress. The mRNA levels of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were up-regulated in both types of cancer cells due to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs exposure. Protein level of p53, along with the higher activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes, was also up-regulated by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs selectively induced apoptosis in cancer cells (HepG2 and A549) through up-regulation of p53 that might be mediated by ROS through which most of the anticancer drugs trigger apoptosis. The present study warrants further investigation on anticancer activity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in relevant

  18. Selective killing of cancer cells by iron oxide nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species via p53 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Khan, M. A. Majeed; Akhtar, Mohd. Javed

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in biomedical applications. However, little is known about the anticancer activity of Fe3O4 NPs. This study was designed to investigate whether Fe3O4 NPs induced toxicity in a cell-specific manner and determine the possible mechanisms of toxicity caused by Fe3O4 NPs in cancer cells. Fe3O4 NPs used in this study were synthesized by green method using α- d-glucose as a reducing agent. Prepared Fe3O4 NPs were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, were fairly distributed, and had an average diameter of 23 nm. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 NPs was examined against two types of cancer cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and human lung adenocarcinoma A549) and two normal cells (human lung fibroblast IMR-90 and rat hepatocytes). Fe3O4 NPs exerted distinct effects on cell viability via killing of cancer cells while posing no toxicity on normal cells. Fe3O4 NPs were found to induce depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both types of cancer cells (HepG2 and A549). Further, co-exposure of ascorbic acid significantly attenuated the Fe3O4 NPs-induced oxidative stress. The mRNA levels of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were up-regulated in both types of cancer cells due to Fe3O4 NPs exposure. Protein level of p53, along with the higher activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes, was also up-regulated by Fe3O4 NPs. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Fe3O4 NPs selectively induced apoptosis in cancer cells (HepG2 and A549) through up-regulation of p53 that might be mediated by ROS through which most of the anticancer drugs trigger apoptosis. The present study warrants further investigation on anticancer activity of Fe3O4 NPs in relevant animal models.

  19. Study of the manganese (II) manganese (III) complexes with quinaldic acid in aprotic medium, mononuclear and binuclear species produced under these conditions and possible formation of radical species upon oxidation or reduction of the ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodini, E.M.; Funes, M.M.; Valle, M.A. del; Arancibia, V. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Electroquimica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Catolica de Chile (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The redox chemistry of the ligand Quinaldic acid (2-QA), its monoanion and its complexes with manganese (II) and manganese (III) has studied in dimethylsulphoxide using electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic measurements. The protonated ligand is reduce at -1.28 V vs SCE with the transfer of one equivalent of charge the resulting solution presents oxidation peaks at -0.02 V, +0.32 V and +1.14 V vs SCE which is indicative that both radical and dimeric species are involved in the oxidation processes. The combination of the monoanion of the ligand with Mn(II) in a 1:2 mole ratio forms a stable complex which presents a magnetic susceptibility of 5.90B.M. and conditional formation constant of 1.71 x 10``8 M``-2. Its oxidation at +0.76 V vs SCE yields a brown complex of Mn(III) with a magnetic susceptibility of 4.80 B.M. The voltammetric behaviour of the latter species indicates that is probably binuclear. This complex is reduced at +0.60 V vs SCE generating a Mn(II)-Mn(III) mixed-valance complex, and a second reduction at -0.40 V vs SCE regenerating the mononuclear Mn(II) complex. The mixed-valance complex decomposes quickly generating the corresponding Mn(II) and Mn(III) monomers. On the other hand, in the presence of this metal ion as counter-ion, both its +2 or +3 oxidation state, the monoanion of the ligand shows reduction processes that might lead to the stabilization of radical species. the voltammetric and spectroscopic characterization if these species is described. The results may be useful to the understanding of the charge transfer mechanism in biological systems. (Author) 26 refs.

  20. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Induces Microglial Death by NADPH-Oxidase-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species as well as Energy Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Purohit, Mahaveer Prasad; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2016-10-06

    Zinc oxide nanoparticle (ZnO-NP) is one of the most widely used engineered nanoparticles. Upon exposure, nanoparticle can eventually reach the brain through various routes, interact with different brain cells, and alter their activity. Microglia is the fastest glial cell to respond to any toxic insult. Nanoparticle exposure can activate microglia and induce neuroinflammation. Simultaneous to activation, microglial death can exacerbate the scenario. Therefore, we focused on studying the effect of ZnO-NP on microglia and finding out the pathway involved in the microglial death. The present study showed that the 24 h inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) of ZnO-NP for microglia is 6.6 μg/ml. Early events following ZnO-NP exposure involved increase in intracellular calcium level as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neither of NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin, (APO) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPIC) were able to reduce the ROS level and rescue microglia from ZnO-NP toxicity. In contrary, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed opposite effect. Exogenous supplementation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced ROS significantly even beyond control level but partially rescued microglial viability. Interestingly, pyruvate supplementation rescued microglia near to control level. Following 10 h of ZnO-NP exposure, intracellular ATP level was measured to be almost 50 % to the control. ZnO-NP-induced ROS as well as ATP depletion both disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently triggered the apoptotic pathway. The level of apoptosis-inducing proteins was measured by western blot analysis and found to be upregulated. Taken together, we have deciphered that ZnO-NP induced microglial apoptosis by NADPH oxidase-independent ROS as well as ATP depletion.

  1. Exposure to 17β-Oestradiol Induces Oxidative Stress in the Non-Oestrogen Receptor Invertebrate Species Eisenia fetida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Michalek, Petr; Guran, Roman; Havelkova, Barbora; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Richtera, Lukas; Beklova, Miroslava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Background The environmental impacts of various substances on all levels of organisms are under investigation. Among these substances, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) present a threat, although the environmental significance of these compounds remains largely unknown. To shed some light on this field, we assessed the effects of 17β-oestradiol on the growth, reproduction and formation of free radicals in Eisenia fetida. Methodology/Principal Findings Although the observed effects on growth and survival were relatively weak, a strong impact on reproduction was observed (50.70% inhibition in 100 μg/kg of E2). We further demonstrated that the exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to a contaminant of emerging concern, 17β-oestradiol (E2), significantly affected the molecules involved in antioxidant defence. Exposure to E2 results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the stimulation of antioxidant systems (metallothionein and reduced oxidized glutathione ratio) but not phytochelatins at both the mRNA and translated protein levels. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging revealed the subcuticular bioaccumulation of oestradiol-3,4-quinone, altering the levels of local antioxidants in a time-dependent manner. Conclusions/Significance The present study illustrates that although most invertebrates do not possess oestrogen receptors, these organisms can be affected by oestrogen hormones, likely reflecting free diffusion into the cellular microenvironment with subsequent degradation to molecules that undergo redox cycling, producing ROS, thereby increasing environmental contamination that also perilously affects keystone animals, forming lower trophic levels. PMID:26695684

  2. Loss of TRPML1 promotes production of reactive oxygen species: is oxidative damage a factor in mucolipidosis type IV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, Jessica; St Croix, Claudette; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2014-01-15

    TRPML1 (transient receptor potential mucolipin 1) is a lysosomal ion channel permeable to cations, including Fe2+. Mutations in MCOLN1, the gene coding for TRPML1, cause the LSD (lysosomal storage disease) MLIV (mucolipidosis type IV). The role of TRPML1 in the cell is disputed and the mechanisms of cell deterioration in MLIV are unclear. The demonstration of Fe2+ buildup in MLIV cells raised the possibility that TRPML1 dissipates lysosomal Fe2+ and prevents its accumulation. Since Fe2+ catalyses the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), we set out to test whether or not the loss of TRPML1 promotes ROS production by Fe2+ trapped in lysosomes. Our data show that RPE1 (retinal pigmented epithelial 1) cells develop a punctate mitochondrial phenotype within 48 h of siRNA-induced TRPML1-KD (knockdown). This mitochondrial fragmentation was aggravated by Fe2+ exposure, but was reversed by incubation with the ROS chelator α-Toc (α-tocopherol). The exposure of TRPML1-KD cells to Fe2+ led to loss of ΔΨm (mitochondrial membrane potential), ROS buildup, lipid peroxidation and increased transcription of genes responsive to cytotoxic oxidative stress in TRPML1-KD cells. These data suggest that TRPML1 redistributes Fe2+ between the lysosomes and the cytoplasm. Fe2+ buildup caused by TRPML1 loss potentiates ROS production and leads to mitochondrial deterioration. Beyond suggesting a new model for MLIV pathogenesis, these data show that TRPML1's role in the cell extends outside lysosomes.

  3. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods: Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glut...

  4. Suppressive effects of acetone extract from the stem bark of three Acacia species on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan; Rameshkumar Santhanam; Sunghyun Hong; Jin-Woo Jhoo; Songmun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the inhibitory effects of acetone extracts from the stem bark of three Acacia species(Acacia dealbata, Acacia ferruginea and Acacia leucophloea) on nitric oxide production.Methods: The lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were used to investigate the regulatory effect of acetone extracts of three Acacia stem barks on nitric oxide production and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase,cyclooxygenase-2 and tumor necrosis factor-a. Further, the phenolic profile of acetone extracts from the Acacia barks was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis.Results: All the three extracts significantly decreased LPS-induced NO production as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and tumor necrosis factor-a in a concentration dependent manner(25, 50 and 75 mg/m L). In the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis, acetone extract of Acacia ferruginea bark revealed the presence of 12 different phenolic components including quercetin, catechin, ellagic acid and rosmanol. However, Acacia dealbata and Acacia leucophloea barks each contained 6 different phenolic components.Conclusions: The acetone extracts of three Acacia species effectively inhibited the NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and the presence of different phenolic components in the bark extracts might be responsible for reducing the NO level in cells.

  5. A newly discovered oxidant defence system and its involvement in the development of Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria): reactive oxygen species and elemental iodine control medusa formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Stefan; Czech, Nicole; Gerharz, Melanie; Herrmann, Klaus; Hoffmann, Uwe; Raifer, Hartmann; Sekul, Guy; Siefker, Barbara; Sommerei, Andrea; Vedder, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    In Aurelia aurita, applied iodine induces medusa formation (strobilation). This process also occurs when the temperature is lowered. This was found to increase oxidative stress resulting in an increased production of iodine from iodide. One polyp produces several medusae (initially termed ephyrae) starting at the polyp's oral end. The spreading of strobilation down the body column is controlled by a feedback loop: ephyra anlagen decrease the tyrosine content in adjacent polyp tissue by producing melanin from tyrosine. Endogenous tyrosine is able to remove iodine by forming iodiferous tyrosine compounds. The reduced level of tyrosine causes the ephyra-polyp-border to move towards the basal end of the former polyp. We argue that an oxidant defence system may exist which makes use of iodide and tyrosine. Like other marine invertebrates, polyps of Aurelia contain iodide ions. Inevitably produced peroxides oxidise iodide into iodine. The danger to be harmed by iodine is strongly decreased by endogenous tyrosine which reacts with iodine to form iodiferous tyrosine compounds including thyroxin. Both substances together, iodide and tyrosine, form an efficient oxidant defence system which shields the tissue against damage by reactive oxygen species. In the course of evolution (from a species at the basis of the animal kingdom like Aurelia to a highly evolved species like man) the waste product thyroxin (indicating a high metabolic rate) has developed into a hormone which controls the metabolic rate.

  6. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baitao; Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted "pH-adjusting" technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co3O4 particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H2O2) at 70 °C.

  7. Theoretical Evidence for Low-Ligated Palladium(0): [Pd-L] as the Active Species in Oxidative Addition Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Fristrup, Peter; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    The oxidative addition of PhI to Pd0 has been studied by DFT with a continuum representation of the solvent. It is shown that the preferred number of ligands on palladium is lower than would be expected from “conventional wisdom” and the 18-electron rule. The most favored oxidative addition is ob...

  8. Anti-oxidative and cholinesterase inhibitory effects of leaf extracts and their isolated compounds from two closely related Croton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Aderogba, Mutalib A; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    A comparative evaluation of the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the leaf extracts of Croton gratissimus and Croton zambesicus (subgratissimus) and compounds isolated from the extracts was carried out to determine their potential and suitability or otherwise as a substitute for each other in the management of oxidative and neurodegenerative conditions. Different antioxidant assays (DPPH, FRAP, β-carotene-linoleic and the lipid peroxidation models) and the microplate assay for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition were carried out separately to study the activities of the crude leaf extracts and four solvent fractions from each of the two Croton species. Bioassay guided fractionation was used to target antioxidant constituents of the crude extracts and ethyl acetate fractions of 20% aqueous methanol extract of C. gratissimus on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 columns resulted in the isolation of kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2), apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3) and kampferol (4). The extract of C. zambesicus yielded quercetin-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside-3'-methyl ether (helichrysoside- 3'-methyl ether, 1), kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2) and apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3). Three of the isolated compounds and their different combinations were also included in the bioassays. In all the assays performed, the antioxidant capacity and AChE inhibitory effects of C. zambesicus extracts were weaker than those of C. gratissimus. This suggests that C. gratissimus may not be substituted by C. zambesicus, despite the similarity in some of their constituents. Generally, the combinations made from the isolated compounds showed better activities in most of the assays compared to the individual isolated compounds. This suggests mechanisms such as synergism and/or additive effects to be taking place. This study established low, moderate and high antioxidant

  9. Anti-Oxidative and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Effects of Leaf Extracts and Their Isolated Compounds from Two Closely Related Croton Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A comparative evaluation of the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the leaf extracts of Croton gratissimus and Croton zambesicus (subgratissimus and compounds isolated from the extracts was carried out to determine their potential and suitability or otherwise as a substitute for each other in the management of oxidative and neurodegenerative conditions. Different antioxidant assays (DPPH, FRAP, β-carotene-linoleic and the lipid peroxidation models and the microplate assay for acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition were carried out separately to study the activities of the crude leaf extracts and four solvent fractions from each of the two Croton species. Bioassay guided fractionation was used to target antioxidant constituents of the crude extracts and ethyl acetate fractions of 20% aqueous methanol extract of C. gratissimus on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 columns resulted in the isolation of kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2, apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3 and kampferol (4. The extract of C. zambesicus yielded quercetin-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl glucopyranoside-3'-methyl ether (helichrysoside- 3'-methyl ether, 1, kaempferol-3-O-β-6''(p-coumaroyl glucopyranoside (tiliroside, 2 and apigenin-6-C-glucoside (isovitexin, 3. Three of the isolated compounds and their different combinations were also included in the bioassays. In all the assays performed, the antioxidant capacity and AChE inhibitory effects of C. zambesicus extracts were weaker than those of C. gratissimus. This suggests that C. gratissimus may not be substituted by C. zambesicus, despite the similarity in some of their constituents. Generally, the combinations made from the isolated compounds showed better activities in most of the assays compared to the individual isolated compounds. This suggests mechanisms such as synergism and/or additive effects to be taking place. This study established low, moderate and high

  10. Structure-activity relationship of Cr/Ti-PILC catalysts using a pre-modification method for NO oxidation and their surface species study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei; Yu, Yang; Cai, Wei; Geng, Xinxin; Zhong, Qin

    2015-06-14

    The performances of Cr/Ti-PILC catalysts, which were prepared by the pre-modification method, are studied for the selective catalytic oxidation of NO. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the detailed relationship between physical nanoparticle structure and chemical properties. The maximum NO conversion over the Cr-HP(3)/TP catalyst reached 71.4% at 280 °C. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) techniques. The characterization results demonstrated that the enhanced catalytic activity was ascribed to several beneficial effects, which were caused by the pre-modification such as the inhibition of crystallite size, improvement of Cr species dispersion and increase of the amount of active sites. XPS and FTIR experiments indicated that two Cr(VI) species, oxidized state CrO3 and chromate species with the anionic form, were generated via pre-modification, which played different roles in the catalytic reaction. In addition, the TPR and TPD results suggest that the increased active sites (Cr(VI) species) were conducive for the preferential adsorption and activation of NO. Furthermore, DRIFTS results revealed that the intermediates, NO(+) and nitrates, interacted quickly to generate gaseous NO2.

  11. Brown adipose tissue mitochondria oxidizing fatty acids generate high levels of reactive oxygen species irrespective of the uncoupling protein-1 activity state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Peter; Wojtczak, Lech

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria from brown adipose tissue (BATM) have a high enzymatic capacity for fatty acid oxidation and therefore are an ideal model to examine the sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during fatty acid oxidation. ROS generation by BATM (isolated from 3-week-old rats) was measured during acylcarnitine oxidation as release of H(2)O(2) into the medium and as inactivation of the matrix enzyme aconitase. The following results were obtained: (1) BATM release large amounts of H(2)O(2) in the coupled as well as in the uncoupled states, several times more than skeletal muscle mitochondria. (2) H(2)O(2) release is especially large with acylcarnitines of medium-chain fatty acids (e.g. octanoylcarnitine). (3) Reverse electron transport does not contribute in a significant extent to the overall ROS generation. (4) Despite the large release of H(2)O(2), the ROS-sensitive matrix enzyme aconitase is not inactivated during acylcarnitine oxidation. (5) In contrast to acylcarnitines, oxidation of α-glycerophosphate by BATM is characterized by large H(2)O(2) release and a pronounced aconitase inactivation. We hypothesize that acylcarnitine-supported ROS generation in BATM may be mainly associated with acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and electron transferring flavoprotein-ubiquinone reductase rather than with complexes of the respiratory chain.

  12. High-valent iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV)) species in water: characterization and oxidative transformation of estrogenic hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MachalováŠišková, Karolína; Jančula, Daniel; Drahoš, Bohuslav; Machala, Libor; Babica, Pavel; Alonso, Paula Godoy; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Tuček, Jiří; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-28

    This paper presents solid state synthesis and characterization of tetra-oxy iron(iv) and iron(v) species in their salt forms (Na4FeO4-Fe(IV) and K3FeO4-Fe(V)). Stability of the synthesized salts, commonly called ferrates, in water was determined by applying the (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy technique. Within 2 s in water, Fe(IV) converted into Fe(III) while Fe(V) transformed into Fe(VI) and Fe(III) at pH = 8.2. Comparatively, Fe(VI) (bought as K2FeO4) remained stable in aqueous solution during the short time period. The oxidative removal efficiency of the high-valent iron species was then tested against five environmentally important estrogenic hormones (estron (E1), 17-β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and diethylstibestrol (DES)) in effluent water of a wastewater treatment plant. Three dosages of iron species (1, 10, and 100 mg L(-1)) were applied to the effluent water. An increase in the concentration of dosages enhanced the removal of estrogens. Both Fe(V) and Fe(VI) were effective in degrading estrogens, but Fe(IV) showed limited oxidation capacity to transform estrogens. The oxidized products of the estrogens were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) techniques. Results demonstrated the transformation of estrogens into low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as quinone-like and opened-aromatic ring species. A detailed study on E1 by using excess Fe(VI) showed the mineralization of the parent compound. The results demonstrate great potential of high-valent iron species in the degradation of endocrine disruptor chemicals like estrogens with several superior aspects including fast reactions, complete degradation and/or formation of benign organic species, and environmentally-acceptable iron oxide by-products.

  13. Effect of oxidant exposure on the release of intracellular microcystin, MIB, and geosmin from three cyanobacteria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wert, Eric C; Korak, Julie A; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2014-04-01

    The release of intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR), 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), and geosmin was investigated after the oxidation of three cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa (MA), Oscillatoria sp. (OSC), and Lyngbya sp. (LYN)). During the oxidation of 200,000 cells/mL of MA, release of intracellular MC-LR exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline of 1 μg/L during the lowest oxidant exposures (CT) tested: ozone (0 mg-min/L, below the ozone demand), chlorine (geosmin exceeded reported threshold odor values after exposure to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine, which have low reactivity with these taste and odor compounds. Ozone oxidation of OSC yielded an increase in MIB concentration at lower exposures (≤2.9 mg-min/L), likely due to insufficient oxidation by hydroxyl radicals. The release of intracellular organic matter (IOM) was also measured to determine the potential of bulk measurements to act as a surrogate for cyanotoxins and metabolite release. In all cases, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release was less than 0.25 mgC/L, which lacked the sensitivity to indicate the release of MC-LR, MIB, or geosmin. The fluorescence index proved to be a more sensitive indicator of intracellular organic matter release than DOC for MA. These results illustrate that toxic or odorous compounds may be released from cyanobacteria cells during oxidation processes with minimal changes in the DOC concentration.

  14. Competition of CO and H2 for Active Oxygen Species during the Preferential CO Oxidation (PROX on Au/TiO2 Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeusy Hartadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at an improved mechanistic understanding of the preferential oxidation of CO on supported Au catalysts, we have investigated the competition between CO and H2 for stable, active oxygen (Oact species on a Au/TiO2 catalyst during the simultaneous exposure to CO and H2 with various CO/H2 ratios at 80 °C and 400 °C by quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP reactor measurements. It is demonstrated that, at both higher and lower temperature, the maximum amount of active oxygen removal is (i independent of the CO/H2 ratio and (ii identical to the amount of active oxygen removal by CO or H2 alone. Hence, under preferential CO oxidation (PROX reaction conditions, in the simultaneous presence of CO and H2, CO and H2 compete for the same active oxygen species. In addition, also the dependency of the selectivity towards CO oxidation on the CO/H2 ratio was evaluated from these measurements. Consequences of these findings on the mechanistic understanding of the PROX reaction on Au/TiO2 will be discussed.

  15. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment.

  16. A theoretical study on the thermal oxidation of silicon carbide: Chemical species at the SiO2/SiC interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Nobuo; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nara, Jun; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Schimizu, Tatsuo; Kato, Koichi; Ohno, Takahisa

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is potentially a suitable candidate of the channel materials of power devices since it has wide bandgap, high electron mobility, and thermal conductivity. Furthermore, it is favorable for device fabrication as it can be thermally oxidized to create insulating silicon oxide (SiO2) layer. However, the SiC devices of current technology do not show acceptable performance because of a defective nature of the created SiO2/SiC stacking structure, which causes problems such as channel mobility degradation, threshold voltage increase, and leakage current. The origins of the defective nature are not understood so far, though it is presumed that they are rather concentrated at the interface. In the present study, we have performed first principles calculations to know the chemical species possibly produced at the oxide interface of thermally oxidized SiC. The First principles simulation code PHASE/0 (http://www.ciss.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/riss/english/project/device/) was used in the theoretical calculations. A portion of this research was supported by the Grant from MEXT's project and carried out in partnership with the University of Tokyo.

  17. Oxidation of methane by an N-bridged high-valent diiron-oxo species: electronic structure implications on the reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mursaleem; Vyas, Nidhi; Ansari, Azaj; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-09-14

    High-valent iron-oxo species are key intermediates in C-H bond activation of several substrates including alkanes. The biomimic heme and non-heme mononuclear Fe(IV)=O complexes are very popular in this area and have been thoroughly studied over the years. These species despite possessing aggressive catalytic ability, cannot easily activate inert C-H bonds such as those of methane. In this context dinuclear complexes have gained attention, particularly μ-nitrido dinuclear iron species [(TPP)(m-CBA)Fe(IV)(μ-N)Fe(IV)(O)(TPP(˙+))](-) reported lately exhibits remarkable catalytic abilities towards substrates such as methane. Here using DFT methods, we have explored the electronic structure and complex spin-state energetics present in this species. To gain insights into the nature of bonding, we have computed the absorption, the EPR and the Mössbauer parameters and have probed the mechanism of methane oxidation by the dinuclear Fe(IV)=O species. Calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data and our calculations predict that in [(TPP)(m-CBA)Fe(IV)(μ-N)Fe(IV)(O)(TPP(˙+))](-)species, the two high-spin iron centres are antiferromagnetically coupled leading to a doublet ground state. Our calculations estimate an extremely low kinetic barrier of 26.6 kJ mol(-1) (at doublet surface) for the C-H bond activation of methane by the dinuclear Fe(IV)=O species. Besides these mechanistic studies on the methane activation reveal the unique electronic cooperativity present in this type of dinuclear complex and unravel the key question of why mononuclear analogues are unable to perform such reactions.

  18. Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by reactive nitrogen species in cultures of the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 - questioning the existence of enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueglein, N; Kappler, A

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were suggested to couple with enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation to nitrate reduction. Denitrification proceeds via intermediates (NO2 -, NO) that can oxidize Fe(II) abiotically at neutral and particularly at acidic pH. Here, we present a revised Fe(II) quantification protocol preventing artifacts during acidic Fe extraction and evaluate the contribution of abiotic vs. enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation in cultures of the nitrate-reducing, Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1. Sulfamic acid used instead of HCl reacts with nitrite and prevents abiotic Fe(II) oxidation during Fe extraction. Abiotic experiments without sulfamic acid showed that acidification of oxic Fe(II) nitrite samples leads to 5.6-fold more Fe(II) oxidation than in anoxic samples because the formed NO becomes rapidly reoxidized by O(2) , therefore leading to abiotic oxidation and underestimation of Fe(II). With our revised protocol using sulfamic acid, we quantified oxidation of approximately 7 mm of Fe(II) by BoFeN1 within 4 days. Without addition of sulfamic acid, the same oxidation was detected within only 2 days. Additionally, abiotic incubation of Fe(II) with nitrite in the presence of goethite as surface catalyst led to similar abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rates as observed in growing BoFeN1 cultures. BoFeN1 growth was observed on acetate with N(2) O as electron acceptor. When adding Fe(II), no Fe(II) oxidation was observed, suggesting that the absence of reactive N intermediates (NO2 -, NO) precludes Fe(II) oxidation. The addition of ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)(3) ] to acetate/nitrate BoFeN1 cultures led to growth stimulation equivalent to previously described effects on growth by adding Fe(II). This suggests that elevated iron concentrations might provide a nutritional effect rather than energy-yielding Fe(II) oxidation. Our findings therefore suggest that although enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation by denitrifiers cannot be fully ruled out, its contribution to the observed Fe

  19. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Baitao, E-mail: btli@scut.edu.cn; Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-15

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 70 °C. - Graphical abstract: Cobalt-containing mesoporous silica catalysts were developed via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique. Compared with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in Co-MCM-41, the single-site Co(II) state in Co-SBA-15 was more efficient for the styrene oxidation. - Highlights: • Fast and cost-effective ultrasonic technique for preparing mesoporous materials. • Incorporation of Co via ultrasonic irradiation and “pH-adjusting”. • Physicochemical comparison between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41. • Correlation of styrene oxidation activity and catalyst structural property.

  20. Nitric Oxide is Required for Homeostasis of Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Barley Roots under Aerobic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Kruger, Nicholas J;

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen, the terminal electron acceptor for mitochondrial electron transport, is vital for plants because of its role in the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. While photosynthetic oxygen production contributes to the oxygen supply in leaves, reducing the risk of oxygen limitation of ...

  1. Influence of the atmospheric species water, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.; Kniknie, B.; Barreau, N.; Berkum, J. van; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N 2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical,

  2. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply i

  3. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  4. Oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, proton conductance and reactive oxygen species production of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Damien; Salin, Karine; Dumet, Adeline; Romestaing, Caroline; Rey, Benjamin; Voituron, Yann

    2015-10-01

    Body size is a central biological parameter affecting most biological processes (especially energetics) and the mitochondrion is a key organelle controlling metabolism and is also the cell's main source of chemical energy. However, the link between body size and mitochondrial function is still unclear, especially in ectotherms. In this study, we investigated several parameters of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver of three closely related species of frog (the common frog Rana temporaria, the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus and the bull frog Lithobates catesbeiana). These particular species were chosen because of their differences in adult body mass. We found that mitochondrial coupling efficiency was markedly increased with animal size, which led to a higher ATP production (+70%) in the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) compared with the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). This was essentially driven by a strong negative dependence of mitochondrial proton conductance on body mass. Liver mitochondria from the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) displayed 50% of the proton conductance of mitochondria from the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). Contrary to our prediction, the low mitochondrial proton conductance measured in L. catesbeiana was not associated with higher reactive oxygen species production. Instead, liver mitochondria from the larger individuals produced significantly lower levels of radical oxygen species than those from the smaller frogs. Collectively, the data show that key bioenergetics parameters of mitochondria (proton leak, ATP production efficiency and radical oxygen species production) are correlated with body mass in frogs. This research expands our understanding of the relationship between mitochondrial function and the evolution of allometric scaling in ectotherms.

  5. Mechanistic implications of the active species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by Iron complexes of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanase, Stefania; Marques-Gallego, Patricia; Browne, Wesley R.; Hage, Ronald; Bouwman, Elisabeth; Feringa, Ben L.; Reedijk, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The reactivity towards H2O2 of the complexes [Fe(pca)(2)(py)(2)]center dot py (1) and Na-2{[Fe(pca(3))](2)O}center dot 2H(2)O center dot CH3CN (2) (where pca(-) is pyrazine-2-carboxylate) and their catalytic activity in the oxidation of hydrocarbons is reported. Addition of H2O2 to 1 results in the

  6. Nitric Oxide Signalling in Plants: Cross-Talk With Ca2+, Protein Kinases and Reactive Oxygen Species

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous free radical recognized as a ubiquitous signal transducer that contributes to various biological processes in animals. It exerts most of its effects by regulating the activities of various proteins including Ca2+ channels, protein kinases and transcription factors. In plants, studies conducted over the past ten years revealed that NO also functions as an endogenous mediator in diverse physiological processes ranging from root development ...

  7. Effect of char preparation temperature on the evolution of nitrogen-containing species during char oxidation at fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, W.; Lu, J.; Yue, G. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuel Engineering; Molina, A.; Sarofim, A.F. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is gaining popularity as a means to burn coal and waste fuels because the low temperatures of fluidized bed combustors generally result in low thermal nitric oxide (NO) production. However, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions can be relativity high and strategies must be developed to reduce emissions of this greenhouse gas. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study that examined the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the conversion of char-N to N{sub 2}O, NO and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fluidized bed combustion. When anthracite coal was used, an increase in the pyrolysis temperature resulted in reduced conversion of char-N to N{sub 2}O and HCN. However, the conversion to NO increased. This observation may be due to the lower hydrogen content of the chars produced at higher temperature and their lower reactivity. Other possibilities may be that the lower char reactivity for chars produced at high pyrolysis temperature may affect the reactions occurring in the boundary layer. Chars of lower reactivity in particular, may react at lower particle temperature and under high transient oxygen concentrations. A simplified char combustion representation was used to examine the effect of temperature and equivalence ratio on HCN oxidation. A reduction of equivalence ratio could explain some of the observed variations in product distribution with increased pyrolysis temperature. 19 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  8. Roles of reactive oxygen species in UVA-induced oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid-melanin as studied by differential spectrophotometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shosuke; Kikuta, Marina; Koike, Shota; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Zadlo, Andrzej; Sarna, Tadeusz; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Eumelanin photoprotects pigmented tissues from ultraviolet (UV) damage. However, UVA-induced tanning seems to result from the photooxidation of preexisting melanin and does not contribute to photoprotection. We investigated the mechanism of UVA-induced degradation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA)-melanin taking advantage of its solubility in a neutral buffer and using a differential spectrophotometric method to detect subtle changes in its structure. Our methodology is suitable for examining the effects of various agents that interact with reactive oxygen species (ROS) to determine how ROS is involved in the UVA-induced oxidative modifications. The results show that UVA radiation induces the oxidation of DHICA to indole-5,6-quinone-2-carboxylic acid in eumelanin, which is then cleaved to form a photodegraded, pyrrolic moiety and finally to form free pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid. The possible involvement of superoxide radical and singlet oxygen in the oxidation was suggested. The generation and quenching of singlet oxygen by DHICA-melanin was confirmed by direct measurements of singlet oxygen phosphorescence.

  9. Generation of Reactive Oxygen and Anti-Oxidant Species by Hydrodynamically-Stressed Suspensions of Morinda citrofolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by plant cell suspension cultures, in response to the imposition of both biotic and abiotic stress, is well-documented. This study investigated the generation of hydrogen peroxide by hydrodynamically-stressed cultures of Morinda citrifolia, over a 5-ho...

  10. Interactive effects of herbicide and enhanced UV-B on growth, oxidative damage and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in two Azolla species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Kumar, Sushil; Parihar, Parul; Singh, Rachana

    2016-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the impact of alone and combined exposures of herbicide pretilachlor (5, 10 and 20μgml(-1)) and enhanced UV-B radiation (UV-B1; ambient +2.2kJm(-2) day(-1) and UV-B2; ambient +4.4kJm(-2) day(-1)) on growth, oxidative stress and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in two agronomically important Azolla spp. viz., Azolla microphylla and Azolla pinnata. Decreased relative growth rate (RGR) in both the species under tested stress could be linked to enhanced oxidative stress, thus higher H2O2 accumulation was observed, that in turn might have caused severe damage to lipids and proteins, thereby decreasing membrane stability. The effects were exacerbated when spp. were exposed to combined treatments of enhanced UV-B and pretilachlor. Detoxification of H2O2 is regulated by enzymes/metabolites of AsA-GSH cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity that were found to be stimulated. While, dehydroascorabte reductase (DHAR) activity, and the amount of metabolites: ascorbate (AsA), glutathione (GSH) and ratios of reduced/oxidized AsA (AsA/DHA) and GSH (GSH/GSSG), showed significant reduction with increasing doses of both the stressors, either applied alone or in combination. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), an enzyme involved in scavenging of xenobiotics, was found to be stimulated under the tested stress. This study suggests that decline in DHAR activity and in AsA/DHA ratio might have led to enhanced H2O2 accumulation, thus decreased RGR was noticed under tested stress in both the species and the effect was more pronounced in A. pinnata. Owing to better performance of AsA-GSH cycle in A. microphylla, this study substantiates the view that A. microphylla is more tolerant than A. pinnata.

  11. Influence of culture media on biofilm formation by Candida species and response of sessile cells to antifungals and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Reyna-López, Georgina Elena; Martínez-Gámez, Ma Alejandrina; Vega-González, Arturo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the influence of culture media on biofilm formation by C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis and to investigate the responses of sessile cells to antifungals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to planktonic cells. For biofilm formation, the Candida species were grown at different periods of time in YP or YNB media supplemented or not with 0.2 or 2% glucose. Sessile and planktonic cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of antifungals, H2O2, menadione or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantified by the XTT assay. C. albicans formed biofilms preferentially in YPD containing 2% glucose (YPD/2%), C. glabrata in glucose-free YNB or supplemented with 0.2% glucose (YNB/0.2%), while C. krusei and C. parapsilosis preferred YP, YPD/0.2%, and YPD/2%. Interestingly, only C. albicans produced an exopolymeric matrix. This is the first report dealing with the in vitro effect of the culture medium and glucose on the formation of biofilms in four Candida species as well as the resistance of sessile cells to antifungals, AgNPs, and ROS. Our results suggest that candidiasis in vivo is a multifactorial and complex process where the nutritional conditions, the human immune system, and the adaptability of the pathogen should be considered altogether to provide an effective treatment of the patient.

  12. Modified hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of reduced graphene oxide-silver selenide nanocomposites with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhu; Shu Ye; Asghar Ali; Kefayat Ulla; Kwang Youn Cho; Won-Chun Oh

    2015-01-01

    A visible‐light photocatalyst containing Ag2Se and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was synthesized by a facile sonochemical‐assisted hydrothermal method. X‐ray diffraction, scanning electron mi‐croscopy with energy‐dispersive X‐ray analysis, and ultraviolet‐visible diffuse reflectance spectros‐copy results indicated that the RGO‐Ag2Se nanocomposite contained small crystalline Ag2Se nano‐particles dispersed over graphene nanosheets and absorbed visible light. The high crystallinity of the nanoparticles increased photocatalytic activity by facilitating charge transport. N2 adsorp‐tion‐desorption measurements revealed that the RGO‐Ag2Se nanocomposite contained numerous pores with an average diameter of 9 nm, which should allow reactant molecules to readily access the Ag2Se nanoparticles. The RGO‐Ag2Se nanocomposite exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than bulk Ag2Se nanoparticles to degrade organic pollutant rhodamine B and industrial dye Texbrite BA‐L under visible‐light irradiation (λ>420 nm). The generation of reactive oxygen spe‐cies in RGO‐Ag2Se was evaluated through its ability to oxidize 1,5‐diphenylcarbazide to 1,5‐diphenylcarbazone. The small size of the Ag2Se nanoparticles in RGO‐Ag2Se was related to the use of ultrasonication during their formation, revealing that this approach is attractive to form po‐rous RGO‐Ag2Se materials with high photocatalytic activity under visible light.

  13. Identification of Scedosporium boydii catalase A1 gene, a reactive oxygen species detoxification factor highly expressed in response to oxidative stress and phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Sara; Staerck, Cindy; d'Almeida, Sènan M; Marot, Agnès; Delneste, Yves; Calenda, Alphonse; Tabiasco, Julie; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Fleury, Maxime J J

    2015-12-01

    Scedosporium boydii is an opportunistic filamentous fungus which may be responsible for a large variety of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. This fungus belongs to the Scedosporium apiospermum species complex which usually ranks second among the filamentous fungi colonizing the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Species of the S. apiospermum complex are able to chronically colonize the CF airways suggesting pathogenic mechanisms allowing persistence and growth of these fungi in the respiratory tract. Few putative virulence factors have been purified and characterized so far in the S. apiospermum complex including a cytosolic Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a monofunctional catalase (catalase A1). Upon microbial infection, host phagocytes release reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide, as part of the antimicrobial response. Catalases are known to protect pathogens against ROS by degradation of the hydrogen peroxide. Here, we identified the S. boydii catalase A1 gene (CATA1) and investigated its expression in response to the environmental conditions encountered in the CF airways and to the oxidative stress. Results showed that S. boydii CATA1 gene expression is not affected by hypoxia, hypercapnia or pH changes. In contrast, CATA1 gene was overexpressed in response to a chemically induced oxidative stress with a relative gene expression 37-fold higher in the presence of 250 μM H(2)O(2), 20-fold higher with 250 μM menadione and 5-fold higher with 2 mM paraquat. Moreover, S. boydii CATA1 gene expression progressively increased upon exposure to activated THP-1-derived macrophages, reaching a maximum after 12 h (26 fold). Activated HL60-derived neutrophils and activated human peripheral blood neutrophils more rapidly induced S. boydii CATA1 gene overexpression, a maximum gene expression level being reached at 75 min (17 fold) and 60 min (15 fold), respectively. In contrast expression of the gene

  14. Formation of oxidizing species via irradiation of perchlorates using high-energy electrons and D 2 + ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Parker B.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-10-01

    The perchlorate ion (ClO4-) has garnered particular interest in recent years following the discovery of perchlorate salts in the Martian regolith at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt% by the Phoenix lander in 2006 and Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover in 2013. Due to their oxidizing properties, perchlorates are suspected to play a contributing role to the surprising lack of organics on the Martian surface. In this study, magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2●6H2O) samples were irradiated with monoenergetic beams of 5 keV electrons and D2+ ions separately, sequentially, and simultaneously to simulate the effects of galactic cosmic ray exposure of perchlorates. The irradiation experiments were carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions at 50 K, after which the samples were slowly heated to 300 K (0.5 K min-1) while desorbing products were monitored by quadrupole mass spectrometry. In all cases, molecular oxygen (O2) was detected upon the onset of irradiation and again during the warmup phase. In the case of simultaneous irradiation, deuterated water (D2O) and deuterium peroxide (D2O2) were also detected as the sample was heated whereas in the D2+ experiment small amounts of D2O2 was found exclusively. When samples were irradiated sequentially, the production of D2O2 was dependent upon the sample being irradiated with D2+ ions prior to electrons. These experiments show that perchlorates are capable of producing multiple oxidizing agents (O2, D2O2) which may also account for the lack of organics on the Martian surface.

  15. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  16. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Fatty Acids from the Endemic Plant Species Rindera umbellata and the Effect of Lindelofine-N-oxide on Tubulin Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka V. Vajs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The examination of the aerial parts, roots, and seeds of the endemic plant Rindera umbellata is reported in this paper for the first time. Phytochemical investigation of R. umbellata led to the isolation and characterization of ten pyrrolizidine alkaloids and eleven fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids 1–9 were found in the aerial parts, 7 and 8 in the roots, and 6–10, together with eleven fatty acids, in the seeds of this plant species. The structures of compounds 1–10 were established based on spectroscopic studies (1H- and 13C-NMR, 2D NMR, IR and CI-MS. After trans-esterification, methyl esters of the fatty acids were analyzed using GC-MS. The effect of lindelofine-N-oxide (7 on tubulin polymerization was determined.

  17. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and fatty acids from the endemic plant species Rindera umbellata and the effect of lindelofine-N-oxide on tubulin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Boris M; Simić, Milena R; Vučković, Ivan M; Vujisić, Ljubodrag V; Novaković, Miroslav M; Trifunović, Snežana S; Nikolić-Mandić, Snežana D; Tešević, Vele V; Vajs, Vlatka V; Milosavljević, Slobodan M

    2013-09-03

    The examination of the aerial parts, roots, and seeds of the endemic plant Rindera umbellata is reported in this paper for the first time. Phytochemical investigation of R. umbellata led to the isolation and characterization of ten pyrrolizidine alkaloids and eleven fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids 1-9 were found in the aerial parts, 7 and 8 in the roots, and 6-10, together with eleven fatty acids, in the seeds of this plant species. The structures of compounds 1-10 were established based on spectroscopic studies (¹H- and ¹³C-NMR, 2D NMR, IR and CI-MS). After trans-esterification, methyl esters of the fatty acids were analyzed using GC-MS. The effect of lindelofine-N-oxide (7) on tubulin polymerization was determined.

  18. Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on growth, active oxygen species metabolism, and photosynthetic characteristics in cucumber seedlings under NaCl stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Huaifu; GUO Shirong; JIAO Yansheng; ZHANG Runhua; LI Juan

    2007-01-01

    The study was conducted by means of nutrient solution culture to investigate the effects of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on growth of cucumbe rseedlings,active oxygen species metabolism and photosynthetic characteristics in cucumber leaves under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress.The results showed that 10-400 μmol/L exogenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP),especially 100 μmol/L SNP,significantly alleviated the injury to seedlings and increased seedling growth.The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD),peroxidase (POD),catalase (CAT),and ascorbate peroxidase (APX),and the contents of photosynthetic pigments and proline also increased under 50 mmol/L NaCI stress.Similarly,net photosynthetic rate (Pn),stomatal conductance (Gs),and transpiration rate (Tr) also increased significantly.However,exogenous nitric oxide application markedly decreased membrane permeahyde (MDA) and H2O2,and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress.

  19. Production of reactive oxygen species and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat isolated Kupffer cells stimulated by Leptospira interrogans and Borrelia burgdorferi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonella Marangoni; Silvia Accardo; Rita Aldini; Massimo Guardigli; Francesca Cavrini; Vittorio Sambri; Marco Montagnani; Aldo Roda; Roberto Cevenini

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the expression of indudble nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in rat isolated Kupffer cells (KCs) stimulated by Leptospira interrogans and Borrelia burgdorferi.METHODS: Rat Kupffer cells were separated by perfusion of the liver with 0.05% collagenase, and purified by Percoll gradients. Purified Kupffer cells were tested in vitro with alive L.interogans and B. burgdorferi preparations. The production of ROS was determined by chemiluminescence, whereas iNOS protein expression was evaluated by Western blot assay using anti-iNOS antibodies.RESULTS: B. burgdorferi and to a less extent L. interrogans induced ROS production with a peak 35 min after infection. The chemiluminescence signal progressively diminished and was undetectable by 180 min of incubation. Leptospirae and borreliae induced an increased iNOS expression in Kupffer cells that peaked at 6 hours and was still evident 22 h after infection.CONCLUSION: Both genera of spirochetes induced ROS and iNOS production in rat Kupffer cells. Since the cause of liver damage both in leptospiral as well as in borrelial infections are still unknown, we suggest that leptospira and borrelia damage of the liver can be initially mediated by oxygen radicals, and is then maintained at least in part by nitric oxide.

  20. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods:Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity including antioxidant protein expression was investigated. Results: TSCE significantly attenuated intracellular ROS in the absence and presence of H2O2 by increasing GSH level. In the absence of H2O2, TSCE significantly enhanced SOD and catalase activity but did not affected on GPx. Meanwhile, TSCE significantly increased the protein expression of SOD and GPx in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  1. Reactive oxygen species at the oxide/water interface: Formation mechanisms and implications for prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Sahai, Nita; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2013-02-01

    The goal of our study is to identify free radical formation pathways on mineral surfaces. Organic molecules on early Earth might have been modified or decomposed by such pathways, thus affecting the total organic inventory for prebiotic synthesis reactions. Specifically, we evaluated several common oxide minerals under a range of environmental conditions and combinations of conditions (pH, O2 level, UV-wavelength, and particle loading), for formation of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the oxide surfaces by quantifying the generated [OHrad ] and [H2O2]. We identified anatase/rutile (β-TiO2/α-TiO2) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) as active in ROS production and, importantly, found different dominant pathways for ROS formation on anatase/rutile versus hematite. Hydroxyl radicals (OHrad ) in anatase and rutile suspensions were generated mainly through the oxidation of OH- by photo-generated holes and H2O2 was generated through the combination of an OHrad radical with an OH- and a hole. This pathway for the TiO2 phases did not require the presence of O2, and was not shut down under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, formation of H2O2 and OHrad in hematite suspensions involved reduction of O2 by electrons, which was inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The surface ROS as well as free radicals formed by reactions with other gases on early Earth atmosphere were capable of destroying molecules such as lipids and pre-RNA or RNA essential to assembly of protocells and survival of the earliest cells. At the same time, surface associated ROS and other free radicals may also have promoted aminoamide formation. Thus, the surface ROS would have affected prebiotic organic compound inventory and protocell/early life evolution.

  2. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Rajesh P. [Department of Biology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Laboratory of Photobiology and Molecular Microbiology, Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Shailendra P.; Haeder, Donat-P. [Department of Biology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Sinha, Rajeshwar P., E-mail: r.p.sinha@gmx.net [Laboratory of Photobiology and Molecular Microbiology, Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2010-07-02

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30 Wm{sup -2}, UV-A: 25.70 Wm{sup -2} and PAR: 118.06 Wm{sup -2}) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12 h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395 nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0 h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS.

  3. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Fiotakis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR and spin- trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2·- and hydroxyl (HO· radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis.Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO·, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc. and ambient particulate matter (PM, such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP. The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded, PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase.

  4. Effects of inert species in the gas phase in a model for the catalytic oxidation of CO

    CERN Document Server

    Buendia, G M

    2011-01-01

    We study by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on a surface in the presence of contaminants in the gas phase. The process is simulated by a Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model that has been modified to include the effect of the contaminants and to eliminate the unphysical oxygen-poisoned phase. The impurities can adsorb and desorb on the surface, but otherwise remain inert. We find that, if the impurities can not desorb, no matter how small their proportion in the gas mixture, the first order transition and the reactive window that characterize the ZGB model disappear. The coverages become continuous, and once the surface has reached a steady state there is no production of CO$_2$. This is quite different from the behavior of a system in which the surface presents a fixed percentage of impurities. When the contaminants are allowed to desorb, the reactive window appears again, and disappears at a value that depends on the proportion of contaminants in the gas and on their de...

  5. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the species and distribution of phosphorus in enhanced phosphorus removal sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; You, Guoxiang; Miao, Lingzhan; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang

    2017-03-01

    The short term (8h) influences of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) on the process of phosphorus removal in biofilm were investigated. At concentration of 0.1mg/L, CeO2 NPs posed no impacts on total phosphorus (TP) removal. While at 20mg/L, TP removal efficiency reduced from 85.16% to 59.62%. Results of P distribution analysis and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy implied that the anaerobic degradation of polyphosphate (polyP) and the release of orthophosphate in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were inhibited. After aerobic exposure, the average chain length of polyP in microbial cells and EPS was shorter than control, and monoester and diester phosphates in cells were observed to release into EPS. Moreover, the EPS production and its contribution to P removal increased, while the capacity of EPS in P storage declined. X-ray diffraction analysis and saturation index calculation revealed that the formation of inorganic P precipitation in biofilm was inhibited.

  6. Evaporation rates and vapor pressures of individual aerosol species formed in the atmospheric oxidation of alpha- and beta-pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilde, M; Pandis, S N

    2001-08-15

    The semivolatile oxidation products (trans-norpinic acid, pinic acid, cis-pinonic acid, etc.) of the biogenic monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, etc.) contribute to the atmospheric burden of particulate matter. Using the tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) technique evaporation rates of glutaric acid, trans-norpinic acid, and pinic acid particles were measured in a laminar flow reactor. The vapor pressure of glutaric acid was found to be log(p0 glutaric/Pa) = - 3,510 K/T + 8.647 over the temperature range 290-300 K in good agreement with the values previously reported by Tao and McMurry (1989). The measured vapor pressure of trans-norpinic acid over the temperature range 290-312 K is log(p0 norpinic/Pa) = - 2,196.9 K/T + 3.522, and the vapor pressure of pinic acid is log(p0 pinic/ Pa) = - 5,691.7 K/T + 14.73 over the temperature range 290-323 K. The uncertainty on the reported vapor pressures is estimated to be approximately +/- 50%. The vapor pressure of cis-pinonic acid is estimated to be of the order of 7 x 10(-5) Pa at 296 K.

  7. Stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptor C attenuates accumulation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide synthesis in ammonia-treated astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowrońska, Marta; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress contribute to ammonia-induced astrocytic dysfunction in hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of cultured astrocytes with 5 mmol/L ammonium chloride ('ammonia') increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the toxic NADPH oxidase reaction product, •O(2)(-). Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), natriuretic peptide C and a selective natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-C ligand, cANP((4-23),) each decreased the total ROS content both in control cells and cells treated with ammonia. However, attenuation of •O(2)(-) accumulation by ANP and cANP((4-23),) was observed in ammonia-treated cells only and the effect of cANP((4-23)) was decreased when the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein G(iα-2) was blocked with a specific anti-G(iα-2) antibody. Although in contrast to ANP, cANP((4-23)) did not elevate the cGMP content in control astrocytes, it decreased cAMP content and reduced the expression of G(iα-2), the NADPH oxidase-regulatory protein. The results show the presence of functional NPR-C in astrocytes, activation of which (i) attenuates basal ROS production, and (ii) prevents excessive accumulation of the toxic ROS species, •O(2)(-) by ammonia. Ammonia, ANP and cANP((4-23)) added separately, each stimulated formation of NO(x) (nitrates + nitrites) which was associated with up-regulation of the activity [cANP((4-23))] or/and expression (ammonia) of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase. However, the ammonia-induced increase of NO(x) was not augmented by co-addition of ANP, and was reduced to the control level by co-addition of cANP((4-23)) , indicating that activation of NPR-C may also reduce nitrosative stress. Future hepatic encephalopathy therapy might include the use of cANP((4-23)) or other NPR-C agonists to control oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by ammonia.

  8. Gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates germination of two species of light-requiring seeds via the nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Vladan; Giba, Zlatko; Djoković, Dejan; Milosavljević, Slobodan; Grubisić, Dragoljub; Konjević, Radomir

    2005-06-01

    We used two species of light-requiring seeds, Paulownia tomentosa, which have absolute light requirement (no germination in darkness), and Stellaria media seeds, which germinate in darkness to a certain extent because of presence of preformed active phytochrome, to obtain results strongly suggesting that gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates seed germination via its capability as a functional NO donor. Exogenous application of gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates gibberellin-insensitive Stellaria media seed germination in darkness as do a wide variety of NO donors. Pure gibberellic acid could replace the light requirement of P. tomentosa seeds, thus enabling them to germinate in darkness. Gibberellic acid nitrite did not have this effect. A stimulative effect from gibberellic acid nitrite could be detected only after exposure of these seeds to short, 10 min, pulse of red light. Taken together, these results suggest that gibberellic activity of gibberellic acid nitrite is lost after nitrosation but, regarding to the presence of -O-NO moiety in the molecule, gibberellic acid nitrite shares stimulative properties in seed germination with other compounds with NO-releasing properties.

  9. Determination of DPPH Radical Oxidation Caused by Methanolic Extracts of Some Microalgal Species by Linear Regression Analysis of Spectrophotometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf-Peter Hansen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The demonstrated modified spectrophotometric method makes use of the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical and its specific absorbance properties. Theabsorbance decreases when the radical is reduced by antioxidants. In contrast to otherinvestigations, the absorbance was measured at a wavelength of 550 nm. This wavelengthenabled the measurements of the stable free DPPH radical without interference frommicroalgal pigments. This approach was applied to methanolic microalgae extracts for twodifferent DPPH concentrations. The changes in absorbance measured vs. the concentrationof the methanolic extract resulted in curves with a linear decrease ending in a saturationregion. Linear regression analysis of the linear part of DPPH reduction versus extractconcentration enabled the determination of the microalgae’s methanolic extractsantioxidative potentials which was independent to the employed DPPH concentrations. Theresulting slopes showed significant differences (6 - 34 μmol DPPH g-1 extractconcentration between the single different species of microalgae (Anabaena sp.,Isochrysis galbana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Porphyridium purpureum, Synechocystissp. PCC6803 in their ability to reduce the DPPH radical. The independency of the signal on the DPPH concentration is a valuable advantage over the determination of the EC50 value.

  10. Bioaccumulation of Cry1Ab protein from an herbivore reduces anti-oxidant enzyme activities in two spider species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    Full Text Available Cry proteins are expressed in rice lines for lepidopteran pest control. These proteins can be transferred from transgenic rice plants to non-target arthropods, including planthoppers and then to a predatory spider. Movement of Cry proteins through food webs may reduce fitness of non-target arthropods, although recent publications indicated no serious changes in non-target populations. Nonetheless, Cry protein intoxication influences gene expression in Cry-sensitive insects. We posed the hypothesis that Cry protein intoxication influences enzyme activities in spiders acting in tri-trophic food webs. Here we report on the outcomes of experiments designed to test our hypothesis with two spider species. We demonstrated that the movement of CryAb protein from Drosophila culture medium into fruit flies maintained on the CryAb containing medium and from the flies to the spiders Ummeliata insecticeps and Pardosa pseudoannulata. We also show that the activities of three key metabolic enzymes, acetylcholine esterase (AchE, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were significantly influenced in the spiders after feeding on Cry1Ab-containing fruit flies. We infer from these data that Cry proteins originating in transgenic crops impacts non-target arthropods at the physiological and biochemical levels, which may be one mechanism of Cry protein-related reductions in fitness of non-target beneficial predators.

  11. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  12. Environmental enrichment and social interaction improve cognitive function and decrease reactive oxidative species in normal adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa; Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-05-01

    Environmental stimulation and increased social interactions stimulate cognitive performance, while decrease in these parameters can exacerbate cognitive decline as a function of illness, injury, or age. We examined the impact of environmental stimulation and social interactions on cognitive performance in healthy adult C57B1/6J mice. Mice were housed for 1 month individually or in groups of three (to prevent or allow social interaction) in either a standard environment (SE) or an enlarged cage containing nesting material and items classically utilized to stimulate exploration and activity ("enriched environment"; EE). Cognitive performance was tested by Y maze navigation and Novel Object Recognition (NOR; which compares the relative amount of time mice spent investigating a novel vs. a familiar object). Mice maintained for 1 month under isolated conditions in the SE statistically declined in performance versus baseline in the Y maze (p species (ROS/RNS) in brain. Environmental enrichment did not influence ROS/RNS. These findings indicate that environmental and social enrichment can positively influence cognitive performance in healthy adult mice, and support the notion that proactive approaches may delay age-related cognitive decline.

  13. Sunlight-Triggered Nanoparticle Synergy: Teamwork of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Released from Mesoporous Organosilica with Advanced Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Julia; Trepka, Bastian; Klinkenberg, Nele; Bronner, Hannah; Schleheck, David; Polarz, Sebastian

    2016-03-09

    Colonization of surfaces by microorganisms is an urging problem. In combination with the increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogenic bacteria, severe infections are reported more frequently in medical settings. Therefore, there is a large demand to explore innovative surface coatings that provide intrinsic and highly effective antibacterial activity. Materials containing silver nanoparticles have been developed in the past for this purpose, but this solution has come into criticism due to various disadvantages like notable toxicity against higher organisms, the high price, and low abundance of silver. Here, we introduce a new, sunlight-mediated organosilica nanoparticle (NP) system based on silver-free antibacterial activity. The simultaneous release of nitric oxide (NO) in combination with singlet oxygen and superoxide radicals (O2(•-)) as reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to the emergence of highly reactive peroxynitrite molecules with significantly enhanced biocidal activity. This special cooperative effect can only be realized, if the ROS-producing moieties and the functional entities releasing NO are spatially separated from each other. In one type of particle, Rose Bengal as an efficient singlet oxygen ((1)O2) producer was covalently bound to SH functionalities applying thiol-ene click chemistry. "Charging" the second type of particles with NO was realized by quantitatively transferring the thiol groups into S-nitrosothiol functionalities. We probed the oxidation power of ROS-NP alone and in combination with NO-NP using sunlight as a trigger. The high antibacterial efficiency of dual-action nanoparticles was demonstrated using disinfection assays with the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  14. Macrophages generate reactive oxygen species in response to minimally oxidized LDL: TLR4- and Syk-dependent activation of Nox2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, Sunah; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a causative role in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) stimulates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages through NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91phox/Nox2), which in turn induces production of RANTES and migration of smooth muscle cells. Peritoneal macrophages from gp91phox/Nox2−/− mice or J774 macrophages in which Nox2 was knocked down by siRNA failed to generate ROS in response to mmLDL. Because mmLDL-induced cytoskeletal changes were dependent on TLR4, we analyzed ROS generation in peritoneal macrophages from wild type, TLR4−/−, or MyD88−/− mice and found that mmLDL-mediated ROS was generated in a TLR4-dependent, but MyD88-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that ROS generation required the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that mmLDL also induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and PKC membrane translocation. Importantly, the PLCγ1 phosphorylation was reduced in J774 cells expressing Syk-specific shRNA. Nox2 modulated mmLDL activation of macrophages by regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and RANTES. We showed that purified RANTES was able to stimulate migration of mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (MASMC) and addition of neutralizing antibody against RANTES abolished the migration of MASMC stimulated by mmLDL-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that mmLDL induces generation of ROS through sequential activation of TLR4, Syk, PLCγ1, PKC, and gp91phox/Nox2 and thereby stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These data help explain mechanisms by which endogenous ligands, such as mmLDL, can induce TLR4-dependent, proatherogenic activation of macrophages. PMID:19096031

  15. The effects of oxidizing species derived from molecular oxygen on the proliferation in vitro of human granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, H E; Cooper, S; Gabig, T

    1989-01-01

    In order to better understand the enhancing effects of lowered oxygen (O2) tension on the growth in vitro of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM), the effects of oxidizing species derived from molecular O2 were assessed on CFU-GM. Low density or nonadherent low density normal human bone marrow cells were plated at ambient (20%) or lowered (5%) O2 tension in the presence of a source of colony stimulating factors, and in the absence or presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose oxidase or horseradish peroxidase, alone or in various combinations. Enhanced colony and cluster formation of CFU-GM was noted when low density cells were grown at 5% O2, or when cells were grown at 20% O2 in the presence of superoxide dismutase or glucose oxidase. Both of these enzymes are capable of generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), although by different mechanisms. Low concentrations of glucose oxidase resulted in increased formation of colonies and clusters, but higher concentrations of glucose oxidase were inhibitory. Catalase, which converts H2O2 to H2O, had no effect by itself on cells growing at 20% O2, but it eliminated the superoxide dismutase and glucose oxidase enhancing effects. Catalase decreased colony formation of cells grown at 5% O2. Removal of adherent cells ablated the growth-enhancing effects noted at lowered (5%) O2 tension and also the superoxide dismutase and catalase effects at 20% or 5% O2. Horseradish peroxidase, which converts H2O2 to a more toxic oxidant, hypochlorite, had a suppressive effect on colony and cluster numbers and at 20% O2 converted the glucose oxidase effects from stimulatory to inhibitory. The results suggest that adherent cells and low concentrations of H2O2 may mediate growth-enhancing effects of CFU-GM seen at lowered (5%) O2 tension.

  16. Reactive Sulfur Species-Mediated Activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 Pathway by 1,2-Naphthoquinone through Sulfenic Acids Formation under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Abiko, Yumi; Ida, Tomoaki; Miura, Takashi; Kakehashi, Hidenao; Ishii, Isao; Nishida, Motohiro; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-05-18

    Sulfhydration by a hydrogen sulfide anion and electrophile thiolation by reactive sulfur species (RSS) such as persulfides/polysulfides (e.g., R-S-SH/R-S-Sn-H(R)) are unique reactions in electrophilic signaling. Using 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thioacetate (1,2-NQH2-SAc) as a precursor to 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thiol (1,2-NQH2-SH) and a generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we demonstrate that protein thiols can be modified by a reactive sulfenic acid to form disulfide adducts that undergo rapid cleavage in the presence of glutathione (GSH). As expected, 1,2-NQH2-SAc is rapidly hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield 1,2-NQ-SH, resulting in a redox cycling reaction that produces ROS through a chemical disproportionation reaction. The sulfenic acid forms of 1,2-NQ-SH and 1,2-NQH2-SH were detected by derivatization experiments with dimedone. 1,2-NQH2-SOH modified Keap1 at Cys171 to produce a Keap1-S-S-1,2-NQH2 adduct. Subsequent exposure of A431 cells to 1,2-NQ or 1,2-NQH2-SAc caused an extensive chemical modification of cellular proteins in both cases. Protein adduction by 1,2-NQ through a thio ether (C-S-C) bond slowly declined through a GSH-dependent S-transarylation reaction, whereas that originating from 1,2-NQH2-SAc through a disulfide (C-S-S-C) bond was rapidly restored to the free protein thiol in the cells. Under these conditions, 1,2-NQH2-SAc activated Nrf2 and upregulated its target genes, which were enhanced by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to deplete cellular GSH. Pretreatment of catalase conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) suppressed Nrf2 activation by 1,2-NQH2-SAc. These results suggest that RSS-mediated reversible electrophilic signaling takes place through sulfenic acids formation under oxidative stress.

  17. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembly, Jason P. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Russ College of Engineering and Technology

    2007-06-01

    Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  18. Protective effects of luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide methyl ester from the ethyl acetate fraction of Lycopi Herba against pro-oxidant reactive species and low-density lipoprotein peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Ja; Lee, Hye-Sook; Park, Sun-Dong; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Won-Hwan

    2010-10-01

    In this study the potent scavenging activity of "Lycopi Herba" (LH) extract was studied using the following: evaluation of the total phenolics, measuring the antioxidant activity by Trolox equivalent antioxidant concentration, measuring the scavenging effects on reactive oxygen species, on reactive nitrogen species, and measuring the inhibitory effect on Cu(2+) induced human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro. The ethyl acetate fraction from the LH extracts were found to have a potent scavenging activity against all of the reactive species tested, as well as an inhibitory effect on LDL oxidation. Therefore, we isolated and identified luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide methyl ester as the major compound from the ethyl acetate fraction of LH and their antioxidant activities were evaluated.

  19. Insulin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase underlie the cerebrovascular insulin resistance in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Snipes, James A; Steed, Mesia M; Busija, David W

    2012-05-01

    Hyperinsulinemia accompanying insulin resistance (IR) is an independent risk factor for stroke. The objective is to examine the cerebrovascular actions of insulin in Zucker obese (ZO) rats with IR and Zucker lean (ZL) control rats. Diameter measurements of cerebral arteries showed diminished insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO compared with ZL. Endothelial denudation revealed vasoconstriction to insulin that was greater in ZO compared with ZL. Nonspecific inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) paradoxically improved vasodilation in ZO. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), supplementation of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) precursor, and inhibition of neuronal NOS or NADPH oxidase or cyclooxygenase (COX) improved insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO. Immunoblot experiments revealed that insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial NOS, and expression of GTP cyclohydrolase-I (GTP-CH) were diminished, but phosphorylation of PKC and ERK was enhanced in ZO arteries. Fluorescence studies showed increased ROS in ZO arteries in response to insulin that was sensitive to NOS inhibition and BH(4) supplementation. Thus, a vicious cycle of abnormal insulin-induced ROS generation instigating NOS uncoupling leading to further ROS production underlies the cerebrovascular IR in ZO rats. In addition, decreased bioavailability and impaired synthesis of BH(4) by GTP-CH induced by insulin promoted NOS uncoupling.

  20. Heat shock protein 27 regulates oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes:mechanisms via reactive oxygen species generation and Akt activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li; ZHANG Xiao-jin; JIANG Su-rong; DING Zheng-nian; DING Guo-xian; HUANG Jun; CHENG Yun-lin

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased reactive oxygen species(ROS)formation,which in turn promotes cardiomyocytes apoptosis,is associated with the pathogenesis and progression of various cardiac diseases such as ischemia and heart failure.Recent studies have shown that over expression of heat shock protein 27(Hsp27)confers resistance to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.However,not much is known about the regulation of myocyte survival by Hsp27.Methods The rat cardiac cell line H9c2,with a stable overexpression of Hsp27,was established,with empty vector transfected H9c2 cells as controls.Following the cells challenged by Hydrogen Peroxide(H2O2),lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)release,apoptosis,intracellular ROS,cell morphology,mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the activation of serine/threonine kinase Akt were determined.Results Along with marked suppression of H2O2-induced injury by Hsp27 overexpression in H9c2 cells,ROS generation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were also significantly depressed.Furthermore,augmented Akt activation was observed in Hsp27 overexpressed H9c2 cells following H2O2 exposure.Conclusions Hsp27 inhibits oxidative stress-induced H9c2 damage and inhibition of ROS generation and the augmentation of Akt activation may be involved in the protective signaling.

  1. Absence of Dystrophin Disrupts Skeletal Muscle Signaling: Roles of Ca2+, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Nitric Oxide in the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Froehner, Stanley C

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin is a long rod-shaped protein that connects the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton to a complex of proteins in the surface membrane (dystrophin protein complex, DPC), with further connections via laminin to other extracellular matrix proteins. Initially considered a structural complex that protected the sarcolemma from mechanical damage, the DPC is now known to serve as a scaffold for numerous signaling proteins. Absence or reduced expression of dystrophin or many of the DPC components cause the muscular dystrophies, a group of inherited diseases in which repeated bouts of muscle damage lead to atrophy and fibrosis, and eventually muscle degeneration. The normal function of dystrophin is poorly defined. In its absence a complex series of changes occur with multiple muscle proteins showing reduced or increased expression or being modified in various ways. In this review, we will consider the various proteins whose expression and function is changed in muscular dystrophies, focusing on Ca(2+)-permeable channels, nitric oxide synthase, NADPH oxidase, and caveolins. Excessive Ca(2+) entry, increased membrane permeability, disordered caveolar function, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are early changes in the disease, and the hypotheses for these phenomena will be critically considered. The aim of the review is to define the early damage pathways in muscular dystrophy which might be appropriate targets for therapy designed to minimize the muscle degeneration and slow the progression of the disease.

  2. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature.

  3. Native plant growth promoting bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and mixed or individual mycorrhizal species improved drought tolerance and oxidative metabolism in Lavandula dentata plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, E; Probanza, A; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2016-03-15

    This study evaluates the responses of Lavandula dentata under drought conditions to the inoculation with single autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (five fungal strains) or with their mixture and the effects of these inocula with a native Bacillus thuringiensis (endophytic bacteria). These microorganisms were drought tolerant and in general, increased plant growth and nutrition. Particularly, the AM fungal mixture and B. thuringiensis maximized plant biomass and compensated drought stress as values of antioxidant activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase APX)] shown. The AMF-bacteria interactions highly reduced the plant oxidative damage of lipids [malondialdehyde (MDA)] and increased the mycorrhizal development (mainly arbuscular formation representative of symbiotic functionality). These microbial interactions explain the highest potential of dually inoculated plants to tolerate drought stress. B. thuringiensis "in vitro" under osmotic stress does not reduce its PGPB (plant growth promoting bacteria) abilities as indole acetic acid (IAA) and ACC deaminase production and phosphate solubilization indicating its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. Each one of the autochthonous fungal strains maintained their particular interaction with B. thuringiensis reflecting the diversity, intrinsic abilities and inherent compatibility of these microorganisms. In general, autochthonous AM fungal species and particularly their mixture with B. thuringiensis demonstrated their potential for protecting plants against drought and helping plants to thrive in semiarid ecosystems.

  4. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway.

  5. Incorporation of Al-(hydr)oxide species onto the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles: Improving the open-circuit voltage in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, Teresa; Navas, Javier, E-mail: javier.navas@uca.es; Fernández-Lorenzo, Concha; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Gallardo, Juan Jesús; De los Santos, Desireé M.; Martín-Calleja, Joaquín

    2015-03-02

    This study presents the incorporation of Al-(hydr)oxide species onto the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles used as photoelectrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells. The semiconductors prepared were comprehensively characterized by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The percentages of Al incorporated onto the TiO{sub 2} surface were obtained, the maximum being 6.45 wt.% (Al/TiO{sub 2}). The presence of Al-(hydr)oxides in the samples was also determined, and was shown not to affect the crystalline phases present, as well as affecting the amount of dye that the semiconductors were able to absorb. These results are evidence of the presence of Al-(hydr)oxide species on the surface. Furthermore, the use of the semiconductors prepared as photoelectrodes in DSSCs led to an increase in open-circuit voltage of up to 16%. - Highlights: • The incorporation of Al-(hydr)oxides onto the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles surface was obtained. • The semiconductor prepared was used as photoelectrode in DSSCs. • The open-circuit voltage increases up to 16% using the semiconductors prepared. • The presence of Al-(hydr)oxides does not to affect the crystalline phases of TiO{sub 2}.

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor up-regulates the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 in retinal endothelial cells via reactive oxygen species, but not nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ling; WEN Liang; CHEN Yan-jiong; ZHU Yi

    2009-01-01

    Background The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in the initiation of retinal vascular leakage and nonperfusion in diabetes. The intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is the key mediator of the effect of VEGFs on retinal leukostasis. Although the VEGF is expressed in an early-stage diabetic retina, whether it directly up-regulates ICAM-1 in retinal endothelial cells (ECs) is unknown. In this study, we provided a new mechanism to explain that VEGF does up-regulate the expression of ICAM-1 in retinal ECs.Methods Bovine retinal ECs (BRECs) were isolated and cultured. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to identify BRECs. The cultured cells were divided into corresponding groups. Then, VEGF (100 ng/ml) and other inhibitors were used to treat the cells. Cell lysate and the cultured supernatant were collected, and then, the protein level of ICAM-1 and phosphorylation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were detected using Western blotting. Griess reaction was used to detect nitric oxide (NO).Results Western blotting showed that the VEGF up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 protein and increased phosphorylation of the eNOS in retinal ECs. Neither the block of NO nor protein kinase C (PKC) altered the expression of ICAM-1 or the phosphorylation of eNOS. The result of the Western blotting also showed that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or reactive oxygen species (ROS) significantly reduced the expression of ICAM-1. Inhibition of PI3K also reduced phosphorylation of eNOS. Griess reaction showed that VEGF significantly increased during NO production. When eNOS was blocked by L-NAME or PI3K was blocked by LY294002, the basal level of NO production and the increment of NO caused by VEGF could be significantly decreased.Conclusion ROS-NO coupling in the retinal endothelium may be a new mechanism that could help to explain why VEGF induces ICAM-1 expression and the resulting leukostasis in diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase-2-activity by nitric oxide-derived species in rat chondrocyte: lack of contribution to loss of cartilage anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, E; Abid, A; Cipolletta, C; Presle, N; Terlain, B; Netter, P; Jouzeau, J

    2001-04-15

    Cross-talk between inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was investigated in rat chondrocytes. In monolayers, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced COX-2 and NOS II expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, to produce high prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) levels in an apparently coordinated fashion. COX-2 mRNA was induced earlier (30 min. versus 4 hr) and less markedly (4-fold versus 12-fold at 24 hr) than NOS II, and was poorly affected by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX). IL-1beta did not stabilize COX-2 mRNA in contrast to CHX. Indomethacin and NS-398 lacked any effect on NO(2)(-) levels whereas L-NMMA and SMT reduced PGE(2) levels at concentration inhibiting NO(2)(-) production from 50 to 90%, even when added at a time allowing a complete expression of both enzymes (8 hr). Basal COX activity was unaffected by NO donors. The SOD mimetic, CuDips inhibited COX-2 activity by more than 75% whereas catalase did not. Inhibition of COX-2 by CuDips was not sensitive to catalase, consistent with a superoxide-mediated effect. In tridimensional culture, IL-1beta inhibited radiolabelled sodium sulphate incorporation while stimulating COX-2 and NOS II activities. Cartilage injury was corrected by L-NMMA or CuDips but not by NSAIDs, consistent with a peroxynitrite-mediated effect. These results show that in chondrocytes: (i) COX2 and NOS II genes are induced sequentially and distinctly by IL-1beta; (ii) COX-1 and COX-2 activity are affected differently by NO-derived species; (iii) peroxynitrite accounts likely for stimulation of COX-2 activity and inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis induced by IL-1beta.

  8. Sestrin2 decreases renal oxidative stress, lowers blood pressure, and mediates dopamine D2 receptor-induced inhibition of reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Cuevas, Santiago; Yang, Sufei; Villar, Van Anthony; Escano, Crisanto; Asico, Laureano; Yu, Peiying; Jiang, Xiaoliang; Weinman, Edward J; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2014-10-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) decreases renal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and regulates blood pressure, in part, via positive regulation of paraoxonase 2. Sestrin2, a highly conserved antioxidant protein, regulates intracellular ROS level by regenerating hyperoxidized peroxiredoxins. We hypothesized that sestrin2 may be involved in preventing excessive renal ROS production and thus contribute to the maintenance of normal blood pressure. Moreover, the D2R may decrease ROS production, in part, through the regulation of sestrin2. Renal sestrin2 expression was lower (-62±13%) in D2R(-/-) than in D2R(+/+) mice. Silencing D2R in human renal proximal tubule cells decreased sestrin2 expression (-53±3%) and increased hyperoxidized peroxiredoxins (2.9-fold). Stimulation of D2R in renal proximal tubule cells increased sestrin2 expression (1.6-fold), decreased hyperoxidized peroxiredoxins (-61±3%), and reduced ROS production (-31±4%). Silencing sestrin2 in renal proximal tubule cells increased hyperoxidized peroxiredoxins (2.1-fold) and ROS production (1.3-fold). Silencing sestrin2 also abolished D2R-induced decrease in peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation and partially prevented the inhibitory effect of D2R stimulation on ROS production. Silencing paraoxonase 2 increased sestrin2 ubiquitinylation (2.8-fold), decreased sestrin2 expression (-30±3%), and increased ROS production (1.3-fold), peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation (2.9-fold), and lipid peroxidation (2.3-fold), and blocked the increase in sestrin2 that occurs with D2R stimulation. In vivo renal selective silencing of sestrin2 by the renal subcapsular infusion of sestrin2 small interfering RNA (3 μg/day; 7 days) in mice increased renal oxidative stress (1.3-fold) and blood pressure. These results suggest that the D2R, via paraoxonase 2 and sestrin2, keeps normal renal redox balance, which contributes to the maintenance of normal blood pressure.

  9. Aerobic Exercise Training Prevents the Onset of Endothelial Dysfunction via Increased Nitric Oxide Bioavailability and Reduced Reactive Oxygen Species in an Experimental Model of Menopause.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A V N Braga

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that estrogen deficiency, arising in postmenopause, promotes endothelial dysfunction. This study evaluated the effects of aerobic exercise training on endothelial dependent vasodilation of aorta in ovariectomized rats, specifically investigating the role of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS.Female Wistar rats ovariectomized (OVX - n=20 or with intact ovary (SHAM - n=20 remained sedentary (OVX and SHAM or performed aerobic exercise training on a treadmill 5 times a week for a period of 8 weeks (OVX-TRA and SHAM-TRA. In the thoracic aorta the endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was assessed by acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, respectively. Certain aortic rings were incubated with L-NAME to assess the NO modulation on the ACh-induced vasodilation. The fluorescence to dihydroethidium in aortic slices and plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations were measured to evaluate ROS and NO bioavailability, respectively.ACh-induced vasodilation was reduced in OVX rats as compared SHAM (Rmax: SHAM: 86±3.3 vs. OVX: 57±3.0%, p<0.01. Training prevented this response in OVX-TRA (Rmax: OVX-TRA: 88±2.0%, p<0.01, while did not change it in SHAM-TRA (Rmax: SHAM-TRA: 80±2.2%, p<0.01. The L-NAME incubation abolished the differences in ACh-induced relaxation among groups. SNP-induced vasodilation was not different among groups. OVX reduced nitrite/nitrate plasma concentrations and increased ROS in aortic slices, training as effective to restore these parameters to the SHAM levels.Exercise training, even in estrogen deficiency conditions, is able to improve endothelial dependent vasodilation in rat aorta via enhanced NO bioavailability and reduced ROS levels.

  10. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics.

  11. Hydroxychavicol, a Piper betle leaf component, induces apoptosis of CML cells through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-dependent JNK and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and overrides imatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayashree B; Mahato, Sanjit K; Joshi, Kalpana; Shinde, Vaibhav; Rakshit, Srabanti; Biswas, Nabendu; Choudhury Mukherjee, Indrani; Mandal, Labanya; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Chowdhury, Avik A; Chaudhuri, Jaydeep; Paul, Kausik; Pal, Bikas C; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Pal, Churala; Manna, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Chaudhuri, Utpal; Konar, Aditya; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Santu

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic extract of Piper betle (Piper betle L.) leaves was recently found to induce apoptosis of CML cells expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl with imatinib resistance phenotype. Hydroxy-chavicol (HCH), a constituent of the alcoholic extract of Piper betle leaves, was evaluated for anti-CML activity. Here, we report that HCH and its analogues induce killing of primary cells in CML patients and leukemic cell lines expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl, including the T315I mutation, with minimal toxicity to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. HCH causes early but transient increase of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species-dependent persistent activation of JNK leads to an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide generation. This causes loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspase 9, 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase leading to apoptosis. One HCH analogue was also effective in vivo in SCID mice against grafts expressing the T315I mutation, although to a lesser extent than grafts expressing wild type Bcr-Abl, without showing significant bodyweight loss. Our data describe the role of JNK-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide for anti-CML activity of HCH and this molecule merits further testing in pre-clinical and clinical settings.

  12. Direct Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol: investigation of the active iron species in [Fe,Al]MFI catalysts by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taboada, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Steam-treated isomorphously substituted [Fe,Al]MFI zeolite is known to exhibit superior catalytic performance in the direct oxidation of benzene to phenol, using N2O as oxidant (BTOP). However, despite extensive efforts, the nature of the active sites in the [Fe,Al]MFI catalyst for the BTOP reaction

  13. Effects of quercetin on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol through the reactive oxygen species-nitric oxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Li Liu; Jun Du; Ling-Ling Fan; Xiao-Yan Liu; Luo Gu; Ying-Bin Ge

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of quercetin (3,3,4',5,7-pentahydroxy flavone),a major flavonoid in human diet,on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol.METHODS:Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 200-250 g,were randomly divided into control group (tap water ad//b/tum),ethanol treatment group (6 mL/L ethanol),quercetin treatment group (intragastric garage with 100 mg/kg of quercetin per day),and ethanol plus quercetin treatment group (quercetin and 6 mL/L ethanol).Expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 were detected by Western blot to assay gastric mucosal cell proliferation in rats.To demonstrate the influence of quercetin on the production of extra-cellular reactive oxygen species/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in rats,changes in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBAR5),protein carbonyl,nitrite and nitrate (NOx) and nitrotyrosine (NT) were determined.The activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) including iNOS and nNOS was also detected by Western blot,RESULTS:Compared to control animals,cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of animals subjected to ethanol treatment for 7 days was significant increased (increased to 290% for PCNA density P < 0.05,increased to150 for Cyclin D1 density P < 0.05 and 21.6 + 0.8 vs 42.3 + 0.7 for PCNA positive cells per view field),accompanied by an increase in ROS generation (1.298 ± 0.135 μmol vs 1.772 ± 0.078 μmol for TBARS P < 0.05;4.36 + 0.39 mmol vs 7.48 4- 0.40 mmol for carbonyl contents P < 0.05) and decrease in NO generation (11.334 + 0.467 μmol vs 7.978 ± 0.334 μmol P < 0.01 for NOx;8.986 ± 1.351 μmol vs 6.854 ± 0.460 μmol for nitrotyrosine P < 0.01) and nNOS activity (decreased to 43% P < 0.05).This function was abolished by the co-administration of quercetin.CONCLUSION:The antioxidant action of quercetin relies,in part,on its ability to stimulate nNOS and enhance production of NO that

  14. Oxidized amino acid residues in the vicinity of Q(A) and Pheo(D1) of the photosystem II reaction center: putative generation sites of reducing-side reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Laurie K; Sallans, Larry; Limbach, Patrick A; Bricker, Terry M

    2013-01-01

    Under a variety of stress conditions, Photosystem II produces reactive oxygen species on both the reducing and oxidizing sides of the photosystem. A number of different sites including the Mn4O5Ca cluster, P680, PheoD1, QA, QB and cytochrome b559 have been hypothesized to produce reactive oxygen species in the photosystem. In this communication using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry we have identified several residues on the D1 and D2 proteins from spinach which are oxidatively modified and in close proximity to QA (D1 residues (239)F, (241)Q, (242)E and the D2 residues (238)P, (239)T, (242)E and (247)M) and PheoD1 (D1 residues (130)E, (133)L and (135)F). These residues may be associated with reactive oxygen species exit pathways located on the reducing side of the photosystem, and their modification may indicate that both QA and PheoD1 are sources of reactive oxygen species on the reducing side of Photosystem II.

  15. Influence of reduction energy match among CuO species in CuO-CeO2 catalysts on the catalytic performance for CO preferential oxidation in excess hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Liu; Yunlong Xie; Wensheng Li; Renxian Zhou; Xiaoming Zheng

    2011-01-01

    In the present study,we have investigated the reducibility of CuO species on CuO-CeO2 catalysts and the influence of CuO species on the catalytic performance for CO preferential oxidation(CO PROX)in excess hydrogen.It is revealed that the smaller the difference of reduction temperature(denoted as △T)for two adjacent CuO species is,the higher the catalytic activity of CuO-CeO2 for the PROX in excess hydrogen may be obtained.It means that if the reduction energy of CuO-CU2+pairs matched better,the reduction-oxidation recycle of CuO-Cu2+pairs would go on more easily,then the transferring energy of CuO-Cu2+pairs would be lesser.Therefore,the CuO-CeO2 catalysts will be largely improved in their catalytic performance if the different CuO species on the catalysts have matched the reduction energy,which would allows them to cooperate effectively.

  16. 5-Hydroxytrytophan inhibits tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage via the suppression of reactive species (RS) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation on human fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung Jin; Lee, Jun Sik; Kim, Ji Min; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Han, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Jehun; Ha, Young Mi; No, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Yun Hee; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2010-05-26

    5-Hydroxytryptophan (5HTP), an analogue of tryptophan, is a precursor of serotonin that also has effective antioxidative and anti-apoptotic properties (1) . However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these properties of 5HTP have not been explored. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that 5HTP exerts its antioxidative action against oxidative stress and inflammation by suppressing the activation of the key pro-inflammatory transcriptional pathways, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). The study was carried out using human fibroblast cells that were challenged by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage. Results show that 5HTP significantly reduced t-BHP-induced oxidative damage in human fibroblast cells, as determined by cell cytotoxicity, intracellular reactive species (RS) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) generation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Moreover, 5HTP protected human fibroblast cells against t-BHP-induced oxidative DNA damage, as determined by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenlylindole (DAPI) staining. Pretreatment of human fibroblast cells with 5HTP also dose-dependently inhibited glutathione (GSH) depletion, indicating that it protects cells against t-BHP-induced oxidative damage. Western blot analysis revealed that 5HTP also markedly increased Bcl-2 expression and suppressed both p38MAPK and NF-kappaB activation in the t-BHP-treated human fibroblast cells. When these results are taken together, they strongly indicate that 5HTP has beneficial and protective effects against t-BHP-induced cell death in vitro, as demonstrated by its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory actions. Data further showed that the protective mechanisms underlying the actions of 5HTP against oxidative stress-induced damage are associated with RS/ONOO(-) scavenging and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and GSH depletion.

  17. Pyrite oxidation by microbial consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, B. C.; Revill, K. L.; Doyle, C.; Kendelewicz, T.; Brown, G. E.; Spormann, A. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is formed through pyrite oxidation, which produces acidity and releases toxic metals associated with pyrite and other sulfide minerals. Microbes accelerate pyrite oxidation markedly, thereby playing a major role in the production of AMD. Here, we probe pyrite oxidation by consortia of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and thiooxidans using surface-sensitive photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy and compare them with surfaces oxidized through chemical and single species cultures. Microbial oxidation resulted in the formation of distinct oxidized surface species distributed non-uniformly over the pyrite surface; consortia produced a surface both more heterogeneous and more oxidized. In contrast, chemical oxidation proceeds without the build-up of passivating oxidation products. Surface morphology was not correlated with sites of nucleation or oxidation in any obvious manner. These results demonstrate that microbial oxidation occurs through a similar mechanism to chemical oxidation, but that the presence of complex microbial communities may impact the manner by which pyrite oxidation proceeds.

  18. Nature of fly ash amendments differently influences oxidative stress alleviation in four forest tree species and metal trace element phytostabilization in aged contaminated soil: A long-term field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Sonia; Firmin, Stéphane; Verdin, Anthony; Bidar, Géraldine; Laruelle, Frédéric; Douay, Francis; Shirali, Pirouz; Fontaine, Joël; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2017-04-01

    Aided phytostabilization using coal fly ashes (CFAs) is an interesting technique to clean-up polluted soils and valorizing industrial wastes. In this context, our work aims to study the effect of two CFAs: silico-aluminous (CFA1) and sulfo-calcic (CFA2) ones, 10 years after their addition, on the phytostabilization of a highly Cd (cadmium), Pb (lead) and Zn (zinc) contaminated agricultural soil, with four forest tree species: Robinia pseudoacacia, Alnus glutinosa, Acer pseudoplatanus and Salix alba. To assess the effect of CFAs on trees, leaf fatty acid composition, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidized and reduced glutathione contents ratio (GSSG: GSH), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), Peroxidase (PO) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were examined. Our results showed that CFA amendments decreased the CaCl2-extractable fraction of Cd and Zn from the soil. However, no significant effect was observed on metal trace element (MTE) concentrations in leaves. Fatty acid percentages were only affected by the addition of sulfo-calcic CFA. The most affected species were A. glutinosa and R. pseudoacacia in which C16:0, C18:0 and C18:2 percentages increased significantly whereas the C18:3 decreased. The addition of sulfo-calcic CFA induced the antioxidant systems response in tree leaves. An increase of SOD and POD activities in leaves of trees planted on the CFA2-amended plot was recorded. Conversely, silico-aluminous CFA generated a reduction of lipid and DNA oxidation associated with the absence or low induction of anti-oxidative processes. Our study evidenced oxidative stress alleviation in tree leaves due to CFA amendments. MTE mobility in contaminated soil and their accumulation in leaves differed with the nature of CFA amendments and the selected tree species.

  19. Kinetics of the Oxidation of D-Glucose and Cellobiose by Acidic Solution of N-Bromoacetamide Using Transition Metal Complex Species,[RuCl3(H2O)2OH]-,as Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SINGH,Ashok Kumar; SRIVASTAVA,Jaya; SRIVASTAVA,Shalini; RAHMANI,Shahla

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Ru(Ⅲ)-catalyzed and Hg(Ⅱ)-co-catalyzed oxidation of D-glucose (Glc) and cellobiose (Cel) by N-bromoacetamide (NBA) in the presence of perchloric acid at 40 ℃ have been investigated.The reactions exhibit the first order kinetics with respect to NBA,but tend towards the zeroth order to higher NBA.The reactions are the first order with respect to Ru(Ⅲ) and are fractional positive order with respect to [reducing sugar].Positive effect of Cl- and Hg(Oac)2 on the rate of reaction is also evident in the oxidation of both reducing sugars.A negative effect of variation of H+ and acetamide was observed whereas the ionic strength (μ) of the medium had no influence on the oxidation rate.The rate of reaction decreased with the increase in dielectric constant and this enabled the computation of dAB,the size of the activated complex.Various activation parameters have been evaluated and suitable explanation for the formation of the most reactive activated complex has been given.The main products of the oxidation are the corresponding arabinonic acid and formic acid.HOBr and [RuCl3(H2O)2OH]- were postulated as the reactive species of oxidant and catalyst respectively.A common mechanism,consistent with the kinetic data and supported by the observed effect of ionic strength,dielectric constant and multiple regression analysis,has been proposed.Formation of complex species such as [RuCl3·S·(H2O)OH]- and RuCl3·S·OHgBr·OH during the course of reaction was fully supported by kinetic and spectral evidences.

  20. Caryophyllene oxide exhibits anti-cancer effects in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells via the inhibition of cell migration, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor and apoptotic effects of caryophyllene oxide in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cell viability of these cells was evaluated by MTT assay while as in vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of caryophyllene oxide on cell migration. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the changes in cell morphology once the cells undergo apoptosis. Caryophyllene oxide significantly led to cytotoxicity in MG-63 cells showing dose-dependent as well as time-dependent effects. Caryophyllene oxide led to an inhibition of wound closure significantly. At caryophyllene oxide doses of 20, 80 and 120 µM, the percentage of cell migration was shown to be 94.2, 67.1 and 14.8% respectively. With an increase in the caryophyllene oxide dose, the extent of apoptosis also increased characterized by cellular shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation.

  1. Profiling of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and their N-oxides in herbarium-preserved specimens of Amsinckia species using HPLC-esi(+)MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species of the Amsinckia genus (Boraginaceae) are known to produce potentially hepato-, pneumo-, and/or genotoxic dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids. However, the taxonomic differentiation of Amsinckia species can be very subtle and there seems to be marked differences in toxicity toward grazing livesto...

  2. Differential responses to salt-induced oxidative stress in three phylogenetically related plant species: Arabidopsis thaliana (glycophyte, Thellungiella salsuginea and Cakile maritima (halophytes. Involvement of ROS and NO in the control of K+/Na+ homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Corpas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity, which is usually associated with a nitro-oxidative stress component, is one of the major environmental factors limiting plant growth and development. Plants have thus developed specific ways of dealing with this problem. The compartmentalization of sodium (Na+ ions in vacuoles and the capacity to sharply discriminate between potassium (K+ and Na+ in order to maintain high K+/Na+ ratios are two of the most effective strategies to overcome salt stress. Plants require large amounts of K+ to maximize growth and yields. This macronutrient is involved in physiological processes such as growth, photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activation, stomatal movement, water and nutrient transport via the xylem and protein synthesis. Resistance to salt stress is mainly related to the capacity of plants to maintain improved K+ uptake despite competition from Na+. The Brassicaceae family includes species such as Arabidopsis thaliana (plant model for glycophytes, Thellungiella salsuginea and Cakile maritima (plant models for halophytes, which exhibit significant variations in response to salt stress. In this review, we provide a comprehensive update with respect to differential responses to salt stress in these three plant species, with particular emphasis on the potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO in maintaining K+/Na+ homeostasis and their contribution to salt tolerance.

  3. Spectroscopic, Electrochemical and Computational Characterisation of Ru Species Involved in Catalytic Water Oxidation: Evidence for a [RuV(O)(Py2Metacn)] Intermediate

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall, Carla; Codolà Duch, Zoel; Costas Salgueiro, Miquel; Lloret Fillol, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A new family of ruthenium complexes based on the N-pentadentate ligand Py2Metacn (N-methyl-N′,N′′-bis(2-picolyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) has been synthesised and its catalytic activity has been studied in the water-oxidation (WO) reaction. We have used chemical oxidants (ceric ammonium nitrate and NaIO4) to generate the WO intermediates [RuII(OH2)(Py2Metacn)]2+, [RuIII(OH2)(Py2Metacn)]3+, [RuIII(OH)(Py2Metacn)]2+ and [RuIV(O)(Py2Metacn)]2+, which have been characterised spectroscopically. Th...

  4. SYNTHESIS, REACTIVITY, AND CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF IRON/ZINC-CONTAINING SPECIES INVOLVED IN OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS UNDER GIF-TYPE CONDITIONS. (R823377)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the nature and reactivity of iron- and zinc-containing speciesgenerated in hydrocarbon-oxidizing Gif(IV)-type solutions Fe catalyst/Zn/O-2 in pyridine/acetic acid(10:1 v/v). The ultimate goal of this investigation is to unravel the role of metal...

  5. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranuch Nakchat

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  6. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation at Threonine 495 and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Formation in Response to a High H2O2 Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guterbaum, Thomas Jeremy; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Fossum, A;

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is produced in vessels during ischemia/reperfusion and during inflammation, both leading to vascular dysfunction. We investigated cellular pathways involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Threonine 495 (Thr(495)) in human umbilical vein end...... endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to H₂O₂....

  7. The influence of atmospheric species on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.; Foster, C.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Barreau, N.; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbondioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical, c

  8. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  9. Suppressive effects of acetone extract from the stem bark of three Acacia species on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The acetone extracts of three Acacia species effectively inhibited the NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and the presence of different phenolic components in the bark extracts might be responsible for reducing the NO level in cells.

  10. Reactivity of a Nickel(II) Bis(amidate) Complex with meta-Chloroperbenzoic Acid : Formation of a Potent Oxidizing Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corona, Teresa; Pfaff, Florian F; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Draksharapu, Apparao; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Ray, Kallol; Company, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the formation of a highly reactive nickel-oxygen species that has been trapped following reaction of a Ni(II) precursor bearing a macrocyclic bis(amidate) ligand with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (HmCPBA). This compound is only detectable at temperatures below 250 K and is much more

  11. Enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by gadolinium oxide nanoparticles under core-inner-shell excitation by proton or monochromatic X-ray irradiation: implication of the contribution from the interatomic de-excitation-mediated nanoradiator effect to dose enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Han, Sung-Mi; Cho, Jae-Hoon; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zaboronok, Alexander; You, He; Peach, Ken; Hill, Mark A; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Core-inner-valence ionization of high-Z nanoparticle atomic clusters can de-excite electrons through various interatomic de-excitation processes, thereby leading to the ionization of both directly exposed atoms and adjacent neutral atoms within the nanoparticles, and to an enhancement in photon-electron emission, which is termed the nanoradiator effect. To investigate the nanoradiator-mediated dose enhancement in the radio-sensitizing of high-Z nanoparticles, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured in a gadolinium oxide nanoparticle (Gd-oxide NP) solution under core-inner-valence excitation of Gd with either 50 keV monochromatic synchrotron X-rays or 45 MeV protons. This measurement was compared with either a radiation-only control or a gadolinium-chelate magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent solution containing equal amounts of gadolinium as the separate atomic species in which Gd-Gd interatomic de-excitations are absent. Ionization excitations followed by ROS measurements were performed on nanoparticle-loaded cells or aqueous solutions. Both photoexcitation and proton impact produced a dose-dependent enhancement in the production of ROS by a range of factors from 1.6 to 1.94 compared with the radiation-only control. Enhanced production of ROS, by a factor of 1.83, was observed from Gd-oxide NP atomic clusters compared with the Gd-chelate molecule, with a Gd concentration of 48 μg/mL in the core-level photon excitation, or by a factor of 1.82 under a Gd concentration of 12 μg/mL for the proton impact at 10 Gy (p < 0.02). The enhanced production of ROS in the irradiated nanoparticles suggests the potential for additional therapeutic dose enhancements in radiation treatment via the potent Gd-Gd interatomic de-excitation-driven nanoradiator effect.

  12. Propensity to metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses of two benthic species (Cerastoderma edule and Nephtys hombergii): are tolerance processes limiting their responsiveness?

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Ana

    2016-02-24

    The chronic exposure of benthic organisms to metals in sediments can lead to the development of tolerance mechanisms, thus diminishing their responsiveness. This study aims to evaluate the accumulation profiles of V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and antioxidant system responses of two benthic organisms (Cerastoderma edule, Bivalvia; Nephtys hombergii, Polychaeta). This approach will provide clarifications about the ability of each species to signalise metal contamination. Organisms of both species were collected at the Tagus estuary, in two sites with distinct contamination degrees (ALC, slightly contaminated; BAR, highly contaminated). Accordingly, C. edule accumulated higher concentrations of As, Pb and Hg at BAR compared to ALC. However, antioxidant responses of C. edule were almost unaltered at BAR and no peroxidative damage occurred, suggesting adjustment mechanisms to the presence of metals. In contrast, N. hombergii showed a minor propensity to metal accumulation, only signalising spatial differences for As and Pb and accumulating lower concentrations of metals than C. edule. The differences in metal accumulation observed between species might be due to their distinctive foraging behaviour and/or the ability of N. hombergii to minimise the metal uptake. Despite that, the accumulation of As and Pb was on the basis of the polychaete antioxidant defences inhibition at BAR, including CAT, SOD, GR and GPx. The integrated biomarker response index (IBRv2) confirmed that N. hombergii was more affected by metal exposure than C. edule. In the light of current findings, in field-based studies, the information of C. edule as a bioindicator should be complemented by that provided by another benthic species, since tolerance mechanisms to metals can hinder a correct diagnosis of sediment contamination and of the system’s health. Overall, the present study contributed to improve the lack of fundamental knowledge of two widespread and common estuarine species, providing

  13. Ethylene promotes germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity by decreasing reactive oxygen species: evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide simulated by sodium nitroprusside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingchao; Yang, Lei; Paul, Matthew; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2013-12-01

    Both ethylene and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in modulating seed germination in adverse environments. However, the mechanisms by which they interact and affect germination have not been explained. In this study, the relationship between ethylene and NO during germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity was analysed. Application of exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC, a precursor of ethylene biosynthesis) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) largely overcame the inhibition of germination induced by salinity. The effects of ACC and SNP were decreased by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO scavenger, or by aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, indicating that ethylene and NO interact during germination under salinity. Further, we demonstrated that ACC increased NO production and that SNP greatly induced the expression of the ACS2 gene involved in ethylene synthesis in Arabidopsis seeds germinating under salinity stress, suggesting that each substance influences the production of the other. Application of exogenous ACC increased germination under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) while SNP had a much smaller effect on wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0) and no effect on the ethylene insensitive mutant (ein3-1) seeds, respectively. This shows that NO increased germination under salinity indirectly through H2O2 acting via the ethylene pathway. The endogenous concentration of H2O2 was increased by salinity in germinating seeds but was decreased by exogenous ACC, which stimulated germination ultimately. To explain all these results and the regulation of germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity we propose a model involving ethylene, NO and H2O2 interaction.

  14. A Central Role for JNK/AP-1 Pathway in the Pro-Oxidant Effect of Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate through Superoxide Dismutase 1 Gene Repression and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hematopoietic Human Cancer Cell Line U937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Humberto; Afonso, Valéry; Collin, Pascal; Lomri, Abderrahim

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) known as antioxidant and specific inhibitor of NF-κB was also described as pro-oxidant by inducing cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in cancer. However, the mechanism by which PDTC indices its pro-oxidant effect is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of PDTC on the human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene transcription in hematopoietic human cancer cell line U937. We herein show for the first time that PDTC decreases SOD1 transcripts, protein and promoter activity. Furthermore, SOD1 repression by PDTC was associated with an increase in oxidative stress as evidenced by ROS production. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA) show that PDTC increased binding of activating protein-1 (AP-1) in dose dependent-manner suggesting that the MAPkinase up-stream of AP-1 is involved. Ectopic NF-κB p65 subunit overexpression had no effect on SOD1 transcription. In contrast, in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), p65 induced a marked increase of SOD1 promoter, suggesting that JNK pathway is up-stream of NF-κB signaling and controls negatively its activity. Indeed, using JNK deficient cells, PDTC effect was not observed nether on SOD1 transcription or enzymatic activity, nor on ROS production. Finally, PDTC represses SOD1 in U937 cells through JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that PDTC acts as pro-oxidant compound in JNK/AP-1 dependent-manner by repressing the superoxide dismutase 1 gene leading to intracellular ROS accumulation.

  15. A Central Role for JNK/AP-1 Pathway in the Pro-Oxidant Effect of Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate through Superoxide Dismutase 1 Gene Repression and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hematopoietic Human Cancer Cell Line U937.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Riera

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC known as antioxidant and specific inhibitor of NF-κB was also described as pro-oxidant by inducing cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation in cancer. However, the mechanism by which PDTC indices its pro-oxidant effect is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of PDTC on the human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene transcription in hematopoietic human cancer cell line U937. We herein show for the first time that PDTC decreases SOD1 transcripts, protein and promoter activity. Furthermore, SOD1 repression by PDTC was associated with an increase in oxidative stress as evidenced by ROS production. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA show that PDTC increased binding of activating protein-1 (AP-1 in dose dependent-manner suggesting that the MAPkinase up-stream of AP-1 is involved. Ectopic NF-κB p65 subunit overexpression had no effect on SOD1 transcription. In contrast, in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125, p65 induced a marked increase of SOD1 promoter, suggesting that JNK pathway is up-stream of NF-κB signaling and controls negatively its activity. Indeed, using JNK deficient cells, PDTC effect was not observed nether on SOD1 transcription or enzymatic activity, nor on ROS production. Finally, PDTC represses SOD1 in U937 cells through JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that PDTC acts as pro-oxidant compound in JNK/AP-1 dependent-manner by repressing the superoxide dismutase 1 gene leading to intracellular ROS accumulation.

  16. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil); Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo, E-mail: egpereira@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM{sub Fe}) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM{sub Fe} application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  17. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  18. Dose-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production from particulate matter exposure: comparison to oxidative potential and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuet, Wing Y.; Fok, Shierly; Verma, Vishal; Tagle Rodriguez, Marlen S.; Grosberg, Anna; Champion, Julie A.; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-11-01

    Elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations have been associated with cardiopulmonary risks. In this study, alveolar macrophages and ventricular myocytes were exposed to PM extracts from 104 ambient filters collected in multiple rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area. PM-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were measured to investigate the effect of chemical composition and determine whether chemical assays are representative of cellular responses. For summer samples, the area under the ROS/RNS dose-response curve per volume of air (AUCvolume) was significantly correlated with dithiothreitol (DTT) activity, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), brown carbon, titanium, and iron, while a relatively flat response was observed for winter samples. EC50 was also correlated with max response for all filters investigated, which suggests that certain PM constituents may be involved in cellular protective pathways. Although few metal correlations were observed, exposure to laboratory-prepared metal solutions induced ROS/RNS production, indicating that a lack of correlation does not necessarily translate to a lack of response. Collectively, these results suggest that complex interactions may occur between PM species. Furthermore, the strong correlation between organic species and ROS/RNS response highlights a need to understand the contribution of organic aerosols, especially photochemically driven secondary organic aerosols (SOA), to PM-induced health effects.

  19. Exogenous Nitric Oxide (NO) Interferes with Lead (Pb)-Induced Toxicity by Detoxifying Reactive Oxygen Species in Hydroponically Grown Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy R; Mahajan, Priyanka; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Rishi, Valbha

    2015-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is a bioactive signaling molecule that mediates a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study investigated the role of NO (as SNP [sodium nitroprusside]) in ameliorating lead (Pb)-toxicity in Triticum aestivum (wheat) roots. Pb (50 and 250 μM) alone and in combination with SNP (100 μM) was given to hydroponically grown wheat roots for a period of 0-8 h. NO supplementation reduced the accumulation of oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes, hydroxyl ions and superoxide anion) and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity in wheat roots particularly up to 6 h, thereby suggesting its role as an antioxidant. NO ameliorated Pb-induced membrane damage in wheat roots as evidenced by decreased ion-leakage and in situ histochemical localization. Pb-exposure significantly decreased in vivo NO level. The study concludes that exogenous NO partially ameliorates Pb-toxicity, but could not restore the plant growth on prolonged Pb-exposure.

  20. Exogenous Nitric Oxide (NO) Interferes with Lead (Pb)-Induced Toxicity by Detoxifying Reactive Oxygen Species in Hydroponically Grown Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy R.; Mahajan, Priyanka; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Rishi, Valbha

    2015-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is a bioactive signaling molecule that mediates a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study investigated the role of NO (as SNP [sodium nitroprusside]) in ameliorating lead (Pb)-toxicity in Triticum aestivum (wheat) roots. Pb (50 and 250 μM) alone and in combination with SNP (100 μM) was given to hydroponically grown wheat roots for a period of 0–8 h. NO supplementation reduced the accumulation of oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes, hydroxyl ions and superoxide anion) and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity in wheat roots particularly up to 6 h, thereby suggesting its role as an antioxidant. NO ameliorated Pb-induced membrane damage in wheat roots as evidenced by decreased ion-leakage and in situ histochemical localization. Pb-exposure significantly decreased in vivo NO level. The study concludes that exogenous NO partially ameliorates Pb-toxicity, but could not restore the plant growth on prolonged Pb-exposure. PMID:26402793

  1. Exogenous Nitric Oxide (NO Interferes with Lead (Pb-Induced Toxicity by Detoxifying Reactive Oxygen Species in Hydroponically Grown Wheat (Triticum aestivum Roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kaur

    Full Text Available Nitric Oxide (NO is a bioactive signaling molecule that mediates a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study investigated the role of NO (as SNP [sodium nitroprusside] in ameliorating lead (Pb-toxicity in Triticum aestivum (wheat roots. Pb (50 and 250 μM alone and in combination with SNP (100 μM was given to hydroponically grown wheat roots for a period of 0-8 h. NO supplementation reduced the accumulation of oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes, hydroxyl ions and superoxide anion and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity in wheat roots particularly up to 6 h, thereby suggesting its role as an antioxidant. NO ameliorated Pb-induced membrane damage in wheat roots as evidenced by decreased ion-leakage and in situ histochemical localization. Pb-exposure significantly decreased in vivo NO level. The study concludes that exogenous NO partially ameliorates Pb-toxicity, but could not restore the plant growth on prolonged Pb-exposure.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  3. Electrolytic oxidation of anthracite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Patton, K.M.; Heard, I.

    1981-01-01

    An anthracite slurry can be oxidized only with difficulty by electrolytic methods in which aqueous electrolytes are used if the slurry is confined to the region of the anode by a porous pot or diaphragm. However, it can be easily oxidized if the anthracite itself is used as the anode. No porous pot or diaphragm is needed. Oxidative consumption of the coal to alkali-soluble compounds is found to proceed preferentially at the edges of the aromatic planes. An oxidation model is proposed in which the chief oxidants are molecular and radical species formed by the electrolytic decomposition of water at the coal surface-electrolyte interface. The oxidation reactions proposed account for the opening of the aromatic rings and the subsequent formation of carboxylic acids. The model also explains the observed anisotropic oxidation and the need for the porous pot or diaphragm used in previous studies of the oxidation of coal slurries. ?? 1981.

  4. Replacement of tyrosine residues by phenylalanine in cytochrome P450cam alters the formation of Cpd II-like species in reactions with artificial oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Dawson, John H; Ballou, David P

    2008-05-01

    Our previous rapid-scanning stopped-flow studies of the reaction of substrate-free cytochrome P450cam with peracids [Spolitak et al. (2005) J Biol Chem 280:20300-20309; (2006) J Inorg Biochem 100:2034-2044] spectrally characterized compound I [ferryl iron plus a porphyrin pi-cation radical (Fe(IV) = O/Por(+))], as well as Cpd ES (Fe(IV) = O/Tyr.). In the present studies, we report how the substitutions in Y75F, Y96F, and Y96F/Y75F P450cam variants permit the formation of a species we attribute to Cpd II (Fe(IV) = O) in reactions with peracids and cumene hydroperoxide. These variants produce changes in hydrogen bonding patterns and increased hydrophobicity that affect the ratio of heterolytic to homolytic pathways in reactions with cumene hydroperoxide, resulting in a shift of this ratio from 84/16 for WT to 72/28 for the Y96F/Y75F double mutant. Various ways of generating the Cpd II-like species were explored, and it was possible, especially with the more hydrophobic variants, to generate large fractions of the P450cam variants as Cpd II. The Cpd II-like species is ineffective at hydroxylating camphor, but can be readily reduced by ascorbate (as well as other peroxidase substrates) to ferric P450cam, which could then bind camphor to form the high-spin heme. The difference in the spectral properties of Cpd ES and Cpd II was rationalized as possibly being due to different states of protonation.

  5. Effects of UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 advanced oxidation on unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina: Implications for removal of invasive species from ballast water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghai Wu; Hong You; Jiaxuan Du; Chuan Chen; Darui Jin

    2011-01-01

    The UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 process was investigated for ballast water treatment using Dunaliella salina as an indicator.Inactivation curves were obtained, and the toxicity of effluent was determined.Compared with individual unit processes using ozone or UV/Ag-TiO2, the inactivation efficiency of D.salina by the combined UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 process was enhanced.The presence of ozone caused an immediate decrease in chlorophyll a (chi-a) concentration.Inactivation efficiency and chl-a removal efficiency were positively correlated with ozone dose and ultraviolet intensity.The initial total residual oxidant (TRO) concentration of effluent increased with increasing ozone dose, and persistence of TRO resulted in an extended period of toxicity.The results suggest that UV/Ag-Ti02/03 has potential for ballast water treatment.

  6. Tropospheric profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, and other related trace species measured over the Atlantic near the west coast of Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, F.; Bruening, D.; Grobler, E.S.; Koppmann, R.; Kraus, A.B.; Schrimpf, W.; Weber, M.; Ehhalt, D.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    In June and December 1994, the concentrations of the nitrogen oxides NO, NO{sub 2} and NO{sub y} were measured together with ozone, photolysis frequency of NO{sub 2}, methane, CO, CO{sub 2}, PAN, and light hydrocarbons near the west coast of Europe above the Atlantic Ocean. Two vertical profiles for each season were obtained in the altitude range 1.5 to 12 km at four locations: near Prestwick (56 deg N, 9 deg W), Brest (49 deg N, 6 deg W), Faro (37 deg N, 12 deg W) and Tenerife (30 deg N, 18 deg W). The measured vertical profiles of NO are compared to the results of a low resolution 3-D chemical tracer model. (author)

  7. Enhanced flow injection analysis for measurements of S-nitrosothiols species in biological samples using highly selective amperometric nitric oxide sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Cui Huang; Hui Bo Shao

    2012-01-01

    A highly selective nitric oxide (NO) sensor is fabricated and applied to devise an enhanced flow injection analysis (FIA) system for S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) measurement in biological samples.The NO sensor is prepared using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) gas-permeable membrane loaded with Teflon AF(R) solution,a copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and 2,2-bis(trifluoroethylene)-4,5-difluoro-1,3-dioxole,to improve selectivity.This method is much simpler and possesses good performance over a wide range of RSNOs concentrations.Standard deviation for three parallel measurements of blood plasma is 4.0%.The use of the gas sensing configuration as the detector enhances selectivity of the FIA measurement vs.using less selective electrochemical detectors that do not use PTFE/Teflon type outer membranes.

  8. In vitro modulation of oxidative burstvia release of reactive oxygen species from immune cells by extracts of selected tropical medicinal herbs and food plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzi Mahomoodally; Ahmed Mesaik; M Iqbal Choudhary; Anwar H Subratty; Ameenah Gurib-Fakim

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluatein vitro immunomodulating properties and potential cytotoxicity of six tropical medicinal herbs and food plants namelyAntidesma madagascariense(Euphorbiaceae) (AM),Erythroxylum macrocarpum (Erythroxylaceae) (EM),Faujasiopsis flexuosa(Asteraceae) (FF),Pittosporum senacia (Pittosporaceae) (PS),Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae)(MC)and Ocimum tenuiflorum(Lamiaceae) (OT).Methods:Initially, the crude water and methanol extracts were probed for their capacity to trigger immune cells’NADPH oxidase andMPO-dependent activities as measured by lucigenin- and luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, respectively; as compared to receptor-dependent (serum opsonised zymosan-OPZ) or receptor-independent phorbol myristerate acetate(PMA).Results:Preliminary screening on whole human blood oxidative burst activity showed significant and concentration-dependent immunomodulating properties of three plantsAM, FF and OT. Further investigations of the fractions on isolated human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and mice monocytes using two different pathways for activation of phagocytic oxidative burst showed that ethyl acetate fraction was the most potent extract. None of the active samples had cell-death effects on humanPMNs, under the assay conditions as determined by the trypan-blue exclusion assay. Since PMA andOPZ NADPH oxidase complex is activatedvia different transduction pathways, these results suggest thatAM, FF andOTdoes not affect a specific transductional pathway, but rather directly inhibit a final common biochemical target such as theNADPH oxidase enzyme and/or scavengesROS.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that some of these plants extracts/fractions were able to modulate significantly immune response of phagocytes and monocytes at different steps, emphasizing their potential as a source of new natural alternative immunomodulatory agents.

  9. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro.

  10. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  11. Oxidative stress and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yuko; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are produced highly in myocarditis. ROS, which not only act as effectors for pathogen killing but also mediate signal transduction in the stress responsive pathways, are closely related with both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, oxidative stress overwhelming the capacity of anti-oxidative system generated in severe inflammation has been suggested to damage tissues and exacerbate inflammation. Oxidative stress worsens the autoimmunological process of myocarditis, and suppression of the anti-oxidative system and long-lasting oxidative stress could be one of the pathological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling leading to inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is considered to be one of the promising treatment targets of myocarditis. Evidences of anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis have not been fully established. Basic strategies of anti-oxidative treatments include inhibition of ROS production, activation of anti-oxidative enzymes and elimination of generated free radicals. ROS are produced by mitochondrial respiratory chain reactions and enzymes including NADPH oxidases, cyclooxygenase, and xanthine oxidase. Other systems involved in inflammation and stress response, such as NF-κB, Nrf2/Keap1, and neurohumoral factors also influence oxidative stress in myocarditis. The efficacy of anti-oxidative treatments could also depend on the etiology and the phases of myocarditis. We review in this article the pathological significance of ROS and oxidative stress, and the potential anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis.

  12. Oxidative metabolism of BDE-47, BDE-99, and HBCDs by cat liver microsomes: Implications of cats as sentinel species to monitor human exposure to environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Erratico, Claudio; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), and individual α-, β- and γ-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) isomers catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was screened using cat liver microsomes (CLMs). Six hydroxylated metabolites, namely 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-42), 3-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (3-OH-BDE-47), 5-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (5-OH-BDE-47), 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE-47), 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5'- tetrabromodiphenyl ether (4'-OH-BDE-49), and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66), were identified and quantified after incubation of BDE-47. A di-OH-tetra-BDE was also found as metabolite of BDE-47 with CLMs. 5-OH-BDE-47 was the major metabolite formed. Five hydroxylated metabolites (3'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (3'-OH-BDE-99), 5'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-99), 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE-99), 6'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-99), and 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5,5'-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4'-OH-BDE-101) were formed from BDE-99 incubated with CLMs. Concentrations of BDE-99 metabolites were lower than those of BDE-47. Four or more mono-hydroxylated HBCD (OH-HBCDs), four or more di-hydroxylated HBCD (di-OH-HBCDs), five or more mono-hydroxylated pentabromocyclododecanes (OH-PBCDs), and five or more di-hydroxylated pentabromocyclododecenes (di-OH-PBCDs) were detected after incubation of α-, β-, or γ-HBCD with CLMs. No diastereoisomeric or enantiomeric enzymatic isomerisation was observed incubating α-, β- or γ-HBCD with CLMs. Collectively, our data suggest that (i) BDE-47 is metabolized at a faster rate than BDE-99 by CLMs, (ii) OH-HBCDs are the major hydroxylated metabolites of α-, β- and γ-HBCD produced by CLMs, and (iii) the oxidative metabolism of BDE-47 and

  13. Sublethal concentrations of salicylic acid decrease the formation of reactive oxygen species but maintain an increased nitric oxide production in the root apex of the ethylene-insensitive never ripe tomato mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Irma; Poór, Péter; Gémes, Katalin

    2011-09-01

    The pattern of salicylic acid (SA)-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were different in the apex of adventitious roots in wild-type and in the ethylene-insensitive never ripe (Nr) mutants of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Ailsa Craig). ROS were upregulated, while NO remained at the control level in apical root tissues of wildtype plants exposed to sublethal concentrations of SA. In contrast, Nr plants expressing a defective ethylene receptor displayed a reduced level of RO S and a higher NO content in the apical root cells. In wild-type plants NO production seems to be RO S(H2O2)-dependent at cell death-inducing concentrations of SA, indicating that ROS and NO may interact to trigger oxidative cell death. In the absence of significant RO S accumulation, the increased NO production caused moderate reduction in cell viability in root apex of Nr plants exposed to 10(-3) M SA. This suggests that a functional ethylene signaling pathway is necessary for the control of ROS and NO production induced by SA.

  14. A STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1-regulated protein phosphatase gene rice protein phosphatase18 modulates drought and oxidative stress tolerance through abscisic acid-independent reactive oxygen species scavenging in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Hu, Honghong; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-12-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses through a complexity of signaling pathways, and the dephosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase (PP) is an important event in this process. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) PP2C gene, OsPP18, as a STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1 (SNAC1)-regulated downstream gene. The ospp18 mutant was more sensitive than wild-type plants to drought stress at both the seedling and panicle development stages. Rice plants with OsPP18 suppressed through artificial microRNA were also hypersensitive to drought stress. Microarray analysis of the mutant revealed that genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes were down-regulated in the ospp18 mutant, and the mutant exhibited reduced activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to oxidative stresses. Overexpression of OsPP18 in rice led to enhanced osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance. The expression of OsPP18 was induced by drought stress but not induced by abscisic acid (ABA). Although OsPP18 is a typical PP2C with enzymatic activity, it did not interact with SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2 protein kinases, which function in ABA signaling. Meanwhile, the expression of ABA-responsive genes was not affected in the ospp18 mutant, and the ABA sensitivities of the ospp18 mutant and OsPP18-overexpressing plants were also not altered. Together, these findings suggest that OsPP18 is a unique PP2C gene that is regulated by SNAC1 and confers drought and oxidative stress tolerance by regulating ROS homeostasis through ABA-independent pathways.

  15. In vivo induction of antioxidant response and oxidative stress associated with genotoxicity and histopathological alteration in two commercial fish species due to heavy metals exposure in northern India (Kali) river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Mahino; Usmani, Nazura; Firdaus, Fakiha; Zafeer, Mohammad Faraz; Ahmad, Shafeeque; Akhtar, Kafil; Dawar Husain, S M; Ahmad, Mir Hilal; Anis, Ehraz; Mobarak Hossain, M

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals can significantly bioaccumulate in fish tissues. The step wise mechanism of heavy metal toxicities on fish health is still limited. The present study assessed the tissue-specific antioxidant response and oxidative stress biomarkers of commercially important fish species namely, Channa striatus and Heteropneustes fossilis inhabiting Kali River of northern India where heavy-metal load is beyond the World Health Organisation - maximum permissible limits. Heavy metals chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were elevated in both fish species compared to recommended values of the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), 1999 for edible fishes. Reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CATA) activities in all tissues (brachial, neural, renal and hepatic) were altered. Cellular lipid and protein compromisation in both fishes induced by heavy metals was determined by lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation (PC) assays. Micronucleus (MN) test of erythrocytes and comet assay of liver cells confirmed genotoxicity. Histopathology of the liver, kidney and brain of affected fishes was distorted significantly with its reference fishes thereby affecting the quality and quantity of these fish stocks. This raises a serious concern as these fishes are consumed by the local population which would ultimately affect human health.

  16. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles delay human neutrophil apoptosis by a de novo protein synthesis-dependent and reactive oxygen species-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, David M; Girard, D

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the major toxic effects reported in the literature following nanoparticle (NP) exposure. Knowing the importance of neutrophils to orchestrate inflammation, it is surprising that the direct role of NPs on neutrophil biology is poorly documented. Here, we investigated if ZnO NPs can alter neutrophil biology. We found that ZnO NPs increased the cell size, induced cell shape changes, activated phosphorylation events, enhanced cell spreading onto glass, but did not induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment of neutrophils with ZnO NPs markedly and significantly inhibited apoptosis and increased de novo protein synthesis, as demonstrated by gel electrophoresis of metabolically [(35)S]-labeled cells. Utilization of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed such antiapoptotic effect. We conclude that ZnO NPs are activators of several human neutrophil functions and that they inhibit apoptosis by a de novo protein synthesis-dependent and ROS-independent mechanism. This is the first example that a NP acts on the neo-synthesis of polypeptides.

  18. Development of magnetic graphene oxide adsorbent for the removal and preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) species from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Nodeh, Hamid; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-05-01

    New-generation adsorbent, Fe3O4@SiO2/GO, was developed by modification of graphene oxide (GO) with silica-coated (SiO2) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4). The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The developed adsorbent was used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from environmental waters prior to ICP-MS analysis. Fe3O4@SiO2/GO provided high adsorption capacities, i.e., 7.51 and 11.46 mg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, at pH 4.0. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic were investigated for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. Preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) were studied using magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method at pH 9.0 as the adsorbent showed selective adsorption for As(III) only in pH range 7-10. MSPE using Fe3O4@SiO2/GO was developed with good linearities (0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1)) and high coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.9992 and 0.9985) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (3× SD/m, n = 3) obtained were 7.9 pg mL(-1) for As(III) and 28.0 pg mL(-1) for As(V). The LOD obtained is 357-1265× lower than the WHO maximum permissible limit of 10.0 ng mL(-1). The developed MSPE method showed good relative recoveries (72.55-109.71 %) and good RSDs (0.1-4.3 %, n = 3) for spring water, lake, river, and tap water samples. The new-generation adsorbent can be used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from water samples successfully. The adsorbent removal for As(III) is better than As(V).

  19. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and high-voltage-activated calcium currents in nanoparticle zinc oxide-induced cytotoxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jingxia [Nankai University, College of Medicine (China); Yao Yang [Tianjin First Central Hospital (China); Liu Shichang [Nankai University, College of Medicine (China); Zhang Tao [Nankai University, College of Life Science (China); Ren Guogang [University of Hertfordshire, Science and Technology Research Institute (United Kingdom); Yang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuoyang@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, College of Medicine (China)

    2012-11-15

    This study was to determine the possible neurotoxicity and mechanisms underlying the effects of nano-ZnO with sizes of 20-80 nm on central nervous system (CNS). The cytotoxicity of nano-ZnO was investigated in PC12 cells. The viability of cells was observed by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for cells was evaluated by a fluorometry assay. The apoptosis of cells was detected and analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, effects of nano-ZnO on the properties of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium currents were studied in acutely isolated rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The results of MTT assay showed that nano-ZnO (10{sup -4} g/mL) caused a significant decrease in cell viability (P < 0.05). Nano-ZnO induced intracellular accumulation of ROS and the apoptosis of PC12 cells with the increasing concentration of nano-ZnO in flow cytometric assay (P < 0.05). Further results of electrophysiological recording indicated that 10{sup -4} g/mL nano-ZnO first altered the current-voltage curve and the peak amplitudes of HVA calcium currents at 10 min of the recording, and the peak current amplitudes were increased significantly at the end of 30 min (P < 0.05). All these results suggested that the increase of intracellular ROS was one of potential mechanisms of cellular apoptosis induced by nano-ZnO. Nano-ZnO could cause the elevation of cytosolic calcium levels by enhancement of HVA calcium currents, which would increase the generation of intracellular ROS, and consequently promote the neuronal apoptosis.

  20. Periodontal treatment decreases plasma oxidized LDL level and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Reiko; Morita, Manabu

    2011-12-01

    Periodontitis induces excessive production of reactive oxygen species in periodontal lesions. This may impair circulating pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and induce the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in blood. The purpose of this study was to monitor circulating oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in subjects with chronic periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal treatment. Plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress in 22 otherwise healthy non-smokers with chronic periodontitis (mean age 44.0 years) were measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. At baseline, chronic periodontitis patients had higher plasma levels of oxidized LDL and oxidative stress than healthy subjects (p surgical periodontal treatment were effective in decreasing oxLDL, which was positively associated with a reduction in circulating oxidative stress.

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Neuropathy: Generation of Free Radical Species in the Glycation Reaction and Gene Polymorphisms Encoding Antioxidant Enzymes to Genetic Susceptibility to Diabetic Neuropathy in Population of Type I Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Strokov, Igor A; Nosikov, Valery V; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Sitnikov, Vladimir F; Yegorov, Yegor E; Lankin, Vadim Z

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. Clinical data support the conclusion that the severity of DN is related to the frequency and duration of hyperglycemic periods. The presented experimental and clinical evidences propose that changes in cellular function resulting in oxidative stress act as a leading factor in the development and progression of DN. Hyperglycemia- and dyslipidemia-driven oxidative stress is a major contributor, enhanced by advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation and polyol pathway activation. There are several polymorphous pathways that lead to oxidative stress in the peripheral nervous system in chronic hyperglycemia. This article demonstrates the origin of oxidative stress derived from glycation reactions and genetic variations within the antioxidant genes which could be implicated in the pathogenesis of DN. In the diabetic state, unchecked superoxide accumulation and resultant increases in polyol pathway activity, AGEs accumulation, protein kinase C activity, and hexosamine flux trigger a feed-forward system of progressive cellular dysfunction. In nerve, this confluence of metabolic and vascular disturbances leads to impaired neural function and loss of neurotrophic support, and over the long term, can mediate apoptosis of neurons and Schwann cells, the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system. In this article, we consider AGE-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as a pathogenesis factor in the development of DN. It is likely that oxidative modification of proteins and other biomolecules might be the consequence of local generation of superoxide on the interaction of the residues of L-lysine (and probably other amino acids) with α-ketoaldehydes. This phenomenon of non-enzymatic superoxide generation might be an element of autocatalytic intensification of pathophysiological action of carbonyl stress. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal formed during metabolic

  2. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  3. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmarie eGaupp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria’s interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host.

  4. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by living organisms as a result of normal cellular metabolism and environmental factors, such as air pollutants or cigarette smoke. ROS are highly reactive molecules and can damage cell structures such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins and alter their functions. The shift in the balance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of oxidants is termed “oxidative stress.” Regulation of reducing and oxidizing (redox) state i...

  5. The cytoprotective effect of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress is mediated by the upregulation of the Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression in C2C12 myoblasts through scavenging reactive oxygen species and ERK inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to confirm the protective effects of isorhamnetin against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Our results indicated that isorhamnetin inhibited the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth inhibition and exhibited scavenging activity against the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse-derived C2C12 myoblasts. Isorhamnetin also significantly attenuated H2O2-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and increased the levels of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its phosphorylation associated with the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). However, the protective effects of isorhamnetin on H2O2-induced ROS and growth inhibition were significantly abolished by an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Moreover, the potential of isorhamnetin to mediate HO-1 induction and protect against H2O2-mediated growth inhibition was abrogated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA. Additionally, isorhamnetin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. However, the specific inhibitor of ERK, but not JNK and p38 MAPK, was able to abolish the HO-1 upregulation and the Nrf2 phosphorylation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that isorhamnetin augments the cellular antioxidant defense capacity by activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway involving the activation of the ERK pathway, thus protecting the C2C12 cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria

  7. Bilirubin inhibits the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated by the toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelman, Gila; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2015-08-01

    It has been previously shown that bilirubin prevents the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to LPS. The present study examines whether this effect is exerted through modulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling. LPS-stimulated iNOS and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages was assessed by measuring cellular nitrate and superoxide ( [Formula: see text] ) production, respectively. The generation of both nitrate and [Formula: see text] in response to LPS was suppressed by TLR4 inhibitors, indicating that activation of iNOS and Nox is TLR4-dependent. While treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and bilirubin effectively abolished LPS-mediated [Formula: see text] production, hydrogen peroxide and nitrate release were inhibited by bilirubin and PEG-catalase, but not SOD, supporting that iNOS activation is primarily dependent upon intracellular H2O2. LPS treatment increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), an effect that was abolished by bilirubin. Cells transfected with murine iNOS reporter constructs in which the HIF-1α-specific hypoxia response element was disrupted exhibited a blunted response to LPS, supporting that HIF-1α mediates Nox-dependent iNOS expression. Bilirubin, but not SOD, blocked the cellular production of interferon-β, while interleukin-6 production remained unaffected. These data support that bilirubin inhibits the TLR4-mediated up-regulation of iNOS by preventing activation of HIF-1α through scavenging of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species. Bilirubin also suppresses interferon-β release via a ROS-independent mechanism. These findings characterize potential mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of bilirubin.

  8. Invasive species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of management activities and research related to invasive species on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. As part of the...

  9. Pyrite oxidation by thermophilic archaebacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.; Olsson, G.; Holst, O.; Karlsson, H.T. (Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    1990-03-01

    Three species of thermophilic archaebacteria of the genera Sulfolobus (Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and S. solfataricus) and Acidianus (Acidianus brierleyi) were tested for their ability to oxidize pyrite and to grow autotropbically on pyrite, to explore their potential for use in coal desulfurization. Only A. brierleyi was able to oxidize and grow autotrophically on pyrite. Jarosite was formed during the pyrite oxidation, resulting in the precipitation of sulfate and iron. The medium composition affected the extent of jarosite formation.

  10. Oxidative stress and hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The disproportionate imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and body’s ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates is referred to as oxidative stress. Several biological processes as well as infectious agents, physiological or environmental stress, and perturbed antioxidant response can promote oxidative stress. Oxidative stress usually happens when cells are exposed to more electrically charged reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 or O2-. The cells’ ...

  11. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  12. Methodology for the effective stabilization of tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species in Skeletal Muscle Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in eukaryotic cells' life. Up to the 1990s of the past century, ROS have been solely considered as toxic species resulting in oxidative stress, pathogenesis and aging. However, there is now clear evidence that ROS are not merely toxic species but also—within certain concentrations—useful signaling molecules regulating physiological processes. During intense skeletal muscle contractile activity myotubes' mitochondria genera...

  14. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YongChun; LIU JunFeng; HE Hong; YU YunBo; XUE Li

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on mineral oxides including SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, ZnO and TiO2, which are the main components of atmospheric particles, were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS), ion chromatography (IC), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The main products and intermediates of the heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on these oxides were identified with in situ DRIFTS and IC. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were also discussed. It is found that the reaction mechanism on these mineral oxides is the same as that on Al2O3 for the same final products and the intermediates at room temperature. Namely, OCS can be catalytically oxidized to produce surface SO42- species and gaseous CO2 through the surface hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) and HSO3- species. The activity series for heterogeneous oxidation of OCS follows: Al2O3 ≈ CaO>MgO>TiO2 ≈ ZnO>Fe2O3>SiO2. The specific area, basic hydroxyl and surface basicity of these oxides have effect on the reactivity. This study suggests that heterogeneous reactions of OCS on mineral dust may be an unneglectable sink of OCS.

  15. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  16. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  17. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Reactive oxygen species and the Antarctic macroalgal wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Charles D; Dickinson, Dale A; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly produced by algal, vascular plant, and animal cells involved in the innate immune response as cellular signals promoting defense and healing and/or as a direct defense against invading pathogens. The production of reactive species in macroalgae upon injury, however, is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we surveyed 13 species of macroalgae from the Western Antarctic Peninsula and show that the release of strong oxidants is common after macroalgal wounding. Most species released strong oxidants within 1 min of wounding and/or showed cellular accumulation of strong oxidants over an hour post-wounding. Exogenous catalase was used to show that hydrogen peroxide was a component of immediate oxidant release in one of five species, but was not responsible for the entire oxidative wound response as is common in vascular plants. The other component(s) of the oxidant cocktail released upon wounding are unknown. We were unable to detect protein nitration in extracts of four oxidant-producing species flash frozen 30 s after wounding, but a role for reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite cannot be completely ruled out. Two species showed evidence for the production of a catalase-activated oxidant, a mechanism previously known only from the laboratory and from the synthetic drug isoniazid used to kill the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The rhodophyte Palmaria decipiens, which released strong oxidants after wounding, also produced strong oxidants upon grazing by a sympatric amphipod, suggesting that oxidants are involved in the response to grazing.

  19. Compositions comprising enhanced graphene oxide structures and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Priyank Vijaya; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Belcher, Angela; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Embodiments described herein generally relate to compositions comprising a graphene oxide species. In some embodiments, the compositions advantageously have relatively high oxygen content, even after annealing.

  20. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  1. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  2. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  3. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Sena, Laura A.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to th...

  4. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  5. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there i...

  6. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  7. Hidden interactions - Trace species governing combustion and emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Concern about pollutant formation and emissions continues to be a driving force for research in combustion chemistry. Important pollutants include nitrogen oxides (NO,), sulfur oxides (SO,), chlorine species, unburned or partly burned fuel components (e.g., UHC, aldehydes, CO), aromatic and polyc......Concern about pollutant formation and emissions continues to be a driving force for research in combustion chemistry. Important pollutants include nitrogen oxides (NO,), sulfur oxides (SO,), chlorine species, unburned or partly burned fuel components (e.g., UHC, aldehydes, CO), aromatic...

  8. Toxicity assessment of textile effluents treated by advanced oxidative process (UV/TiO2 and UV/TiO2/H2O2) in the species Artemia salina L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana Carla; de Souza Freitas, Thábata Karoliny Formicoly; Palácio, Soraya Moreno; Ambrósio, Elizangela; Souza, Maísa Tatiane Ferreira; Santos, Lídia Brizola; de Cinque Almeida, Vitor; de Souza, Nilson Evelázio

    2013-03-01

    Textile industry wastes raise a great concern due to their strong coloration and toxicity. The objective of the present work was to characterize the degradation and mineralization of textile effluents by advanced oxidative processes using either TiO(2) or TiO(2)/H(2)O(2) and to monitor the toxicity of the products formed during 6-h irradiation in relation to that of the in natura effluent. The results demonstrated that the TiO(2)/H(2)O(2) association was more efficient in the mineralization of textile effluents than TiO(2), with high mineralized ion concentrations (NH (4) (+) , NO (3) (-) , and SO (4) (2-) ) and significantly decreased organic matter ratios (represented by the chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon). The toxicity of the degradation products after 4-h irradiation to Artemia salina L. was not significant (below 10 %). However, the TiO(2)/H(2)O(2) association produced more toxicity under irradiation than the TiO(2) system, which was attributed to the increased presence of oxidants in the first group. Comparatively, the photogenerated products of both TiO(2) and the TiO(2)/H(2)O(2) association were less toxic than the in natura effluent.

  9. Enargite oxidation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Da Pelo, Stefania; Musu, Elodia; Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Rossi, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    . At alkaline pH, the reactivity of enargite is apparently slightly greater. XPS spectra of surfaces conditioned at pH 11 have been interpreted as evidence of formation of a number of surface species, including cupric oxide and arsenic oxide. Treatment with hypochlorite solutions at pH 12.5 quickly produces a coating of cupric oxide. Electrochemical oxidation of enargite typically involves low current densities, confirming that the oxidation process is slow. Important surface changes occur only at high applied potentials, e.g. + 0.74 V vs. SHE. It is confirmed that, at acidic pH, the dominant process is Cu dissolution, accompanied (at + 0.56 V vs. SHE, pH = 1) by formation of native sulphur. At alkaline pH, a number of surface products have been suggested, including copper and arsenic oxides, and copper arsenates. XPS studies of the reacted surfaces demonstrate the evolution of Cu from the monovalent to the divalent state, the formation of As-O bonds, and the oxidation of sulphur to polysulphide, sulphite and eventually sulphate. In most natural and quasi-natural (mining) situations, it is expected that enargite reactivity will be slow. Moreover, it is likely that the release of arsenic will be further slowed down by at least temporary trapping in secondary phases. Therefore, an adequate management of exposed surfaces and wastes should minimize the environmental impact of enargite-bearing deposits. In spite of an increasing body of data, there are several gaps in our knowledge of enargite oxidation. The exact nature of most mechanisms and products remains poorly constrained, and there is a lack of quantitative data on the dependence on parameters such as pH and dissolved oxygen.

  10. Iron Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  11. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  12. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  13. Oxidation pathways underlying the pro-oxidant effects of apigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andueza, Aitor; García-Garzón, Antonia; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Ansorena, Eduardo; Iraburu, María J; López-Zabalza, María J; Martínez-Irujo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavone, is emerging as a promising compound for the treatment of several diseases. One of the hallmarks of apigenin is the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as judged by the oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives seen in many cell types. This study aimed to reveal some mechanisms by which apigenin can be oxidized and how apigenin-derived radicals affect the oxidation of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H(2)DCF), a probe usually employed to detect intracellular ROS. Apigenin induced a rapid oxidation of H(2)DCF in two different immortalized cell lines derived from rat and human hepatic stellate cells. However, apigenin did not generate ROS in these cells, as judged by dihydroethidium oxidation and extracellular hydrogen peroxide production. In cell-free experiments we found that oxidation of apigenin leads to the generation of a phenoxyl radical, which directly oxidizes H(2)DCF with catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The net balance of the reaction was the oxidation of the probe by molecular oxygen due to redox cycling of apigenin. This flavonoid was also able to deplete NADH and glutathione by a similar mechanism. Interestingly, H(2)DCF oxidation was significantly accelerated by apigenin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, but not with other enzymes showing peroxidase-like activity, such as cytochrome c or catalase. We conclude that in cells treated with apigenin oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives does not measure intracellular ROS and that pro- and antioxidant effects of flavonoids deduced from these experiments are inconclusive and must be confirmed by other techniques.

  14. Oxidative stress in neonatology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinati, M; Pantaleo, M; Roncetti, M; Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2014-02-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive oxidizing agents containing one or more unpaired electrons. Both in human and veterinary neonathology, it is generally accepted that oxidative stress functions as an important catalysator of neonatal disease. Soon after birth, many sudden physiological and environmental conditions make the newborn vulnerable for the negative effects of oxidative stress, which potentially can impair neonatal vitality. As a clinician, it is important to have in depth knowledge about factors affecting maternal/neonatal oxidative status and the cascades of events that enrol when the neonate is subjected to oxidative stress. This report aims at providing clinicians with an up-to-date review about oxidative stress in neonates across animal species. It will be emphasized which handlings and treatments that are applied during neonatal care or resuscitation can actually impose oxidative stress upon the neonate. Views and opinions about maternal and/or neonatal antioxydative therapy will be shared.

  15. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  16. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Miyakawa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs. In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  17. Application of hydrogen injection and oxidation to low temperature solution-processed oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Nakata, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed oxide semiconductors are promising candidates for the low cost, large scale fabrication of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this work, a method using hydrogen injection and oxidation (HIO) that allows the low temperature solution processing of oxide semiconductors was demonstrated. We found that this method significantly decreases the concentration of residual species while improving the film densification. Additionally, enhanced TFT performance was confirmed following the use of processing temperatures as low as 300 °C. The proposed process is potentially applicable to the fabrication of a wide variety of solution-processed oxide semiconductors.

  18. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  19. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  20. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative mobilization in burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Arti; Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Milner, Stephen; Bhat, Satyanarayan

    2008-02-01

    A severe burn is associated with release of inflammatory mediators which ultimately cause local and distant pathophysiological effects. Mediators including Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) are increased in affected tissue, which are implicated in pathophysiological events observed in burn patients. The purpose of this article is to understand the role of oxidative stress in burns, in order to develop therapeutic strategies. All peer-reviewed, original and review articles published in the English language literature relevant to the topic of oxidative stress in burns in animals and human subjects were selected for this review and the possible roles of ROS and RNS in the pathophysiology of burns are discussed. Both increased xanthine oxidase and neutrophil activation appear to be the oxidant sources in burns. Free radicals have been found to have beneficial effects on antimicrobial action and wound healing. However following a burn, there is an enormous production of ROS which is harmful and implicated in inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, immunosuppression, infection and sepsis, tissue damage and multiple organ failure. Thus clinical response to burn is dependent on the balance between production of free radicals and its detoxification. Supplementation of antioxidants in human and animal models has proven benefit in decreasing distant organ failure suggesting a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for the local and distant pathophysiological events observed after burn, and therefore anti-oxidant therapy might be beneficial in minimizing injury in burned patients.

  1. Generator-specific targets of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleier, L.; Wittig, I.; Heide, H.; Steger, M.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oxidative stress and redox signaling it is necessary to link their site of generation to the oxidative modification of specific targets. Here we have studied the selective modification of protein thiols by mitochondrial ROS that have been im

  2. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part I Microstructural investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Piotrowska, Kamila; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy;

    2015-01-01

    The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment ...

  3. The Role of the Reactive Oxygen Species and Oxidative Stress in the Pathomechanism of the Age-Related Ocular Diseases and Other Pathologies of the Anterior and Posterior Eye Segments in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Małgorzata; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) form under normal physiological conditions and may have both beneficial and harmful role. We search the literature and current knowledge in the aspect of ROS participation in the pathogenesis of anterior and posterior eye segment diseases in adults. ROS take part in the pathogenesis of keratoconus, Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy, and granular corneal dystrophy type 2, stimulating apoptosis of corneal cells. ROS play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma stimulating apoptotic and inflammatory pathways on the level of the trabecular meshwork and promoting retinal ganglion cells apoptosis and glial dysfunction in the posterior eye segment. ROS play a role in the pathogenesis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. ROS induce apoptosis of human lens epithelial cells. ROS promote apoptosis of vascular and neuronal cells and stimulate inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the course of diabetic retinopathy. ROS are associated with the pathophysiological parainflammation and autophagy process in the course of the age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26881021

  4. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  5. Nylon/Graphene Oxide Electrospun Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Menchaca-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide is obtained by treating graphite with strong oxidizers. The bulk material disperses in basic solutions yielding graphene oxide. Starting from exfoliated graphite, different treatments were tested to obtain the best graphite oxide conditions, including calcination for two hours at 700°C and ultrasonic agitation in acidic, basic, or peroxide solutions. Bulk particles floating in the solution were filtered, rinsed, and dried. The graphene oxide obtained was characterized under SEM and FTIR techniques. On the other hand, nylon 6-6 has excellent mechanical resistance due to the mutual attraction of its long chains. To take advantage of the properties of both materials, they were combined as a hybrid material. Electrochemical cells were prepared using porous silica as supporting electrode of the electrospun nylon/graphene oxide films for electrochemical testing. Polarization curves were performed to determine the oxidation/reduction potentials under different acidic, alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The oxidation condition was obtained in KOH and the reduction in H2SO4 solutions. Potentiostatic oxidation and reduction curves were applied to further oxidize carbon species and then reduced them, forming the nylon 6-6/functionalized graphene oxide composite coating. Electrochemical impedance measurements were performed to evaluate the coating electrochemical resistance and compared to the silica or nylon samples.

  6. Agroforestry Species Switchboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt, R.; John, I.; Ordonez, J.;

    2016-01-01

    The current version of the Agroforestry Species Switchboard documents the presence of a total of 26,135 plant species (33,813 species including synonyms) across 19 web-based databases. When available, hyperlinks to information on the selected species in particular databases are provided. In total...

  7. Antitumor Activities of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Vinardell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have received much attention recently due to their use in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. In some cases, such anticancer activity has been demonstrated to hold for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have this activity alone or when loaded with an anticancer drug, such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles that show cytotoxic effects on cancer cells include cobalt oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide. The antitumor mechanism could work through the generation of reactive oxygen species or apoptosis and necrosis, among other possibilities. Here, we review the most significant antitumor results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles.

  8. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  9. The role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. The main source of free oxygen species is cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, which can be induced by ethanol. Role of cytochrome P4502E1 in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species produced by this enzyme are more important in intracellular oxidative damage compared to species derived from activated phagocytes. Free radicals lead to lipid peroxidation, enzymatic inactivation and protein oxidation. Role of mitochondria in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. Production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is increased, and glutathione content is decreased in chronically ethanolfed animals. Oxidative stress in mitochondria leads to mitochondrial DNA damage and has a dual effect on apoptosis. Role of Kupffer cells in alcohol-induced liver injury. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with increased release of endotoxin from gut lumen into portal circulation. Endotoxin activates Kupffer cells, which then release proinflammatory cytokines and oxidants. Role of neutrophils in alcohol-induced liver injury. Alcoholic liver injury leads to the accumulation of neutrophils, which release reactive oxygen species and lysosomal enzymes and contribute to hepatocyte damage and necrosis. Role of nitric oxide in alcohol-induced oxidative stress. High amounts of nitric oxide contribute to the oxidative damage, mainly by generating peroxynitrites. Role of antioxidants in ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Chronic ethanol consumption is associated with reduced liver glutathione and α-tocopherol level and with reduced superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusion. Oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of increased production of oxidants and decreased antioxidant defense in the liver.

  10. Oxidation of artificial sweetener sucralose by advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet; Kim, Hyunook

    2014-01-01

    Sucralose, a chlorinated carbohydrate, has shown its increased use as an artificial sweetener and persistently exists in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment. This paper aims to review possible degradation of sucralose and related carbohydrates by biological, electrochemical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes. Biodegradation of sucralose in waterworks did not occur significantly. Electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates may be applied to seek degradation of sucralose. The kinetics of the oxidation of sucralose and the related carbohydrates by different oxidative species is compared. Free chlorine, ozone, and ferrate did not show any potential to degrade sucralose in water. Advanced oxidation processes, generating highly strong oxidizing agent hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), have demonstrated effectiveness in transforming sucralose in water. The mechanism of oxidation of sucralose by (•)OH is briefly discussed.

  11. Mitochondrial Signaling in Plants Under Hypoxia: Use of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim; Møller, Ian Max

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia commonly occurs in roots in water-saturated soil and in maturing and germinating seeds. We here review the role of the mitochondria in the cellular response to hypoxia with an emphasis on the turnover of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) and their potential...... removed, these compounds can react with proteins either reversibly—one-step oxidation or nitrosylation of cysteine—or irreversibly by carbonylation and this affects the properties of the oxidized proteins in, as yet, mostly unknown ways. ROS, probably hydrogen peroxide, and/or oxidized peptides...

  12. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  13. Graphene Oxides Show Angiogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Sriram, Pavithra; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Chatterjee, Suvro; Suresh, Kattimuttathu Ittara; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2015-08-05

    Angiogenesis, a process resulting in the formation of new capillaries from the pre-existing vasculature plays vital role for the development of therapeutic approaches for cancer, atherosclerosis, wound healing, and cardiovascular diseases. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and angiogenic properties of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been demonstrated, observed through several in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The results here demonstrate that the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as well as activation of phospho-eNOS and phospho-Akt might be the plausible mechanisms for GO and rGO induced angiogenesis. The results altogether suggest the possibilities for the development of alternative angiogenic therapeutic approach for the treatment of cardiovascular related diseases where angiogenesis plays a significant role.

  14. Chemical interaction of Ce-Fe mixed oxides for methane selective oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝星; 杜云鹏; 王华; 魏永刚; 李孔斋; 孙令玥

    2014-01-01

    Chemical interaction of Ce-Fe mixed oxides was investigated in methane selective oxidation via methane temperature pro-grammed reduction and methane isothermal reaction tests over Ce-Fe oxygen carriers. In methane temperature programmed reduction test, Ce-Fe oxide behaved complete oxidation at the lower temperature and selective oxidation at higher temperatures. Ce-Fe mixed oxides with the Fe content in the range of 0.1-0.5 was able to produce syngas with high selectivity in high-temperature range (800-900 °C), and a higher Fe amount over 0.5 seemed to depress the CO formation. In isothermal reaction, complete oxidation oc-curred at beginning following with selective oxidation later. Ce1-xFexO2-δ oxygen carriers (x≤0.5) were proved to be suitable for the selective oxidation of methane. Ce-Fe mixed oxides had the well-pleasing reducibility with high oxygen releasing rate and CO selec-tivity due to the interaction between Ce and Fe species. Strong chemical interaction of Ce-Fe mixed oxides originated from both Fe* activated CeO2 and Ce3+ activated iron oxides (FeOm), and those chemical interaction greatly enhanced the oxygen mobility and se-lectivity.

  15. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Thermochromatography study of volatile polonium species in various gas atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Eichler, Robert; Piguet,David; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Phenomena related to the volatilization of polonium and its compounds are critical issues for the safety assessment of the innovative lead–bismuth cooled type of nuclear reactor or accelerator driven systems. The formation and volatilization of different species of polonium and their interaction with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography using carrier gases with varied redox potential. The obtained results show that under inert and reducing conditions in the absence of moisture, elemental polonium is formed. Polonium compounds more volatile than elemental polonium can be formed if traces of moisture are present in both inert and reducing carrier gas. The use of dried oxygen as carrier gas leads to the formation of polonium oxides, which are less volatile than elemental polonium. It was also found that the volatility of polonium oxides increases with increasing oxidation state. In the presence of moisture in an oxidizing carrier gas, species are formed that are more volatile than the oxides and le...

  17. Reactive oxygen species in health and disease : Finding the right balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    When oxygen takes up an electron, reactive oxygen species are formed. These free radicals can react with important molecules in our body (DNA, proteins), just like iron rusts (oxidation). Too many reactive oxygen species, called oxidative stress, result in cellular damage causing either cell death (

  18. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  19. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  20. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  1. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  2. Role of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K.

    2009-01-01

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism ...

  3. Mechanisms of oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Z; Gokce, N; Loscalzo, J

    2003-01-01

    The endothelium regulates vascular homoeostasis through local elaboration of mediators that modulate vascular tone, platelet adhesion, inflammation, fibrinolysis, and vascular growth. Impaired vascular function contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. There is growing pathophysiological evidence that increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress participates in proatherogenic mechanisms of vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in mechanisms of vascular dysfunction is discussed, and potential antioxidant strategies are reviewed. PMID:12743334

  4. Species choice, provenance and species trials among native Brazilian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumond, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Six papers from the conference are presented. Drumond, M.A., Potential of species native to the semi-arid tropics, 766-781, (Refs. 18), reports on Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa species, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Spondias tuberosa, Ziziphus joazeiro, Cnidoscolus phyllacanthus, Bursera leptophleos (leptophloeos), Tabebuia impetiginosa, Astronium urundeuva, and Mimosa caesalpinia. Monteiro, R.F.R., Speltz, R.M., Gurgel, J.T. do A.; Silvicultural performance of 24 provenances of Araucaria angustifolia in Parana, 814-824, (Refs. 8). Pires, C.L. da S., Kalil Filho, A.N., Rosa, P.R.F. da, Parente, P.R., Zanatto, A.C.S.; Provenance trials of Cordia alliodora in the State of Sao Paulo, 988-995, (Refs. 9). Nogueira, J.C.B., Siqueira, A.C.M.F., Garrido, M.A.O., Gurgel Garrido, L.M. do A., Rosa, P.R.F., Moraes, J.L. de, Zandarin, M.A., Gurgel Filho, O.A., Trials of some native species in various regions of the State of Sao Paulo, 1051-1063, (Refs. 9) describes Centrolobium tomentosum, Peltophorum dubium, Tabebuia vellosoi, Cariniana legalis, and Balfourodendron riedelianum. Batista, M.P., Borges, J.F., Franco, M.A.B.; Early growth of a native species in comparison with exotics in northeastern Para, Brazil, 1105-1110, (Refs. 3). Jacaranda copaia is compared with Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea various hondurensis, Eucalyptus deglupta, and E. urophylla. Lima, P.C.F., Souza, S.M. de, Drumond, M.A.; Trials of native forest species at Petrolina, Pernambuco, 1139-1148, (Refs. 8), deals with Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Piptadenia obliqua, Pithecellobium foliolosum, Astronium urundeuva, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Cassia excelsa, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Parkia platycephala, Pseudobombax simplicifolium, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Caesalpinia ferrea, and Aspidosperma pyrifolium. 18 references.

  5. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  6. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  7. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  8. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases.

  9. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær;

    2016-01-01

    in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo. We conducted a randomized, double......-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine...... in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol. In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress...

  10. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M;

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...... in the oxic-anoxic transition zone. Apparently, NO is produced by ammonia oxidizers under oxic conditions and consumed by denitrification under microoxic conditions. Experimental percolation of sediment cores with aerated surface water resulted in an initial rate of NO production that was 12 times higher than...... the net NO production rate in steady state. This initial NO production rate is in the same range as the net ammonia oxidation rate, indicating that NO is transiently the main product of ammonia oxidizers. Stable isotope labeling experiments with the 15N-labeled chemical NO donor S...

  11. Formation of Al-Si Composite Oxide Film by Hydrolysis Precipitation and Anodizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe-Sheng Feng; Ying-Jie Xia; Jia Ding; Jin-Ju Chen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique in the high dielectric constant composite oxide film preparation.On the basis of nanocompsite high dielectric constant aluminum oxide film growth technology, a new idea of adulterating Si oxide species into the aluminum composite film was proposed. As a result, the specific capacitance and withstanding voltage of the composite oxide film formed at the anodizing voltage of 20V are enhanced, and the leakage current of the aluminum composite oxide film is reduced through incorporation of Si oxide species.

  12. Catalytic performance of cerium iron complex oxides for partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kongzhai; WANG Hua; WEI Yonggang; LIU Mingchun

    2008-01-01

    The cerium iron complex oxides oxygen carder was prepared by the co-precipitation method. The reactions between methane and lattice oxygen from the complex oxides were investigated in a fixed micro-reactor system. The reduced oxygen carrier could be re-oxidized by air and its initial state could be restored. The characterizations of the oxygen carriers were studied using XRD, O2-TPD, and H2-TPR. The results showed that the bulk lattice oxygen of CeO2-Fe2O3 was found to be suitable for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. There were two kinds of oxygen species on the oxygen carder: the stronger oxygen species that was responsible for the complete oxidation of methane, and the weaker oxygen species (bulk lattice oxygen) that was responsible for the selective oxidation of methane to CO and H2 at a higher temperature. Then, the lost bulk lattice oxygen could be selectively supplemented by air re-oxidation at an appropriate reaction con-dition. CeFeO3 appeared on the oxygen carrier after 10 successive redox cycles, however, it was not bad for the selectivity of CO and H2.

  13. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide and related chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagaut, Philippe; Glarborg, Peter; Alzueta, Maria U.

    2008-01-01

    For modeling the formation of nitrogen oxides in combustion via both the prompt-NO and the fuel-NO mechanisms, as well as for modeling the reduction of nitrogen oxides via reburning, a good knowledge of the kinetics of oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is required. The formation routes to HCN a...... and the thermochemistry of HCN-related species are reviewed. The available kinetic data for the oxidation of HCN are presented and a comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the oxidation of HCN is proposed and discussed....

  14. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  15. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in signalling and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Results reported in this Thesis contribute to the comprehension of the complicated world of “redox biology”. ROS regulate signalling pathways both in physiological responses and in pathogenesis and progression of diseases. In cancer cells, the increase in ROS generation from metabolic abnormalities and oncogenic signalling may trigger a redox adaptation response, leading to an up-regulation of antioxidant capacity in order to maintain the ROS level below the toxic threshold. Thus, cancer c...

  16. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and redox regulation in cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as well as in cellular response to xenobiotics, cytokines, and bacterial invasion. Oxidative stress refers to the imbalance due to excess ROS or oxidants over the capability of the cell to mount an effective antioxidant response. Oxidative stress results in macromolecular damage and is implicated in various disease states such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration, and aging. Paradoxically,...

  17. Complexation of Nitrous Oxide by Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Edwin; Neu, Rebecca C.; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated Lewis pairs comprised of a basic yet sterically encumbered phosphine with boron Lewis acids bind nitrous oxide to give intact PNNOB linkages. The synthesis, structure, and bonding of these species are described.

  18. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME, for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared.Methods: The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation.Results: Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of

  19. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, K.A.; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study o...

  20. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  1. Photo-electrochemical Oxidation of Organic C1 Molecules over WO3 Films in Aqueous Electrolyte: Competition Between Water Oxidation and C1 Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Robert; Zambrzycki, Christian; Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, R Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    To better understand organic-molecule-assisted photo-electrochemical water splitting, photo-electrochemistry and on-line mass spectrometry measurements are used to investigate the photo-electrochemical oxidation of the C1 molecules methanol, formaldehyde, and formic acid over WO3 film anodes in aqueous solution and its competition with O2 evolution from water oxidation O2 (+) and CO2 (+) ion currents show that water oxidation is strongly suppressed by the organic species. Photo-electro-oxidation of formic acid is dominated by formation of CO2 , whereas incomplete oxidation of formaldehyde and methanol prevails, with the selectivity for CO2 formation increasing with increasing potential and light intensity. The mechanistic implications for the photo-electro-oxidation of the organic molecules and its competition with water oxidation, which could be derived from this novel approach, are discussed.

  2. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays.

  3. Structure, activity and kinetics of supported molybdenum oxide and mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts prepared by flame spray pyrolysis for propane OHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Martin; Kessler, Thomas; Beato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    A series of molybdenum oxide (2 to 15 wt% Mo) and mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide (4 to 15 wt% Mo and 2 wt% V) on alumina catalysts have been synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). The materials were structurally characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and diffuse......, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and XRD confirmed the high dispersion of molybdenum and vanadia species on γ-Al2O3 as the main crystalline phase. Only at the highest loading of 15 wt% Mo, with theoretically more than monolayer coverage, some crystalline molybdenum oxide was observed....... For the mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts the surface species were separate molybdenum oxide and vanadium oxide monomers at low loadings of molybdenum, but with increasing molybdenum loading interactions between surface molybdenum and vanadium oxide species were observed with Raman spectroscopy...

  4. Oxidative electrochemical aryl C-C coupling of spiropyrans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivashenko, Oleksii; van Herpt, Jochem T.; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and definitive assignment of the species formed upon electrochemical oxidation of nitro-spiropyran (SP) is reported. The oxidative aryl C-C coupling at the indoline moiety of the SP radical cation to form covalent dimers of the ring-closed SP form is demonstrated. The coupling is block

  5. How to make a living from anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, B.; De Almeida, N.M.; Maalcke, W.J.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria primarily grow by the oxidation of ammonium coupled to nitrite reduction, using CO2 as the sole carbon source. Although they were neglected for a long time, anammox bacteria are encountered in an enormous species (micro)diversity in virtually any anoxi

  6. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a declin...

  8. Metal-related oxidative stress in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Miia J., E-mail: miikoi@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Eeva, Tapio, E-mail: teeva@utu.f [Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    Metals can cause oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which render antioxidants incapable of defence against growing amounts of free radicals. Metal toxicity is related to their oxidative state and reactivity with other compounds. Our aim is to review the mechanisms on how metals cause oxidative stress and what is known about metal-induced oxidative stress in wildlife. Taking birds as model organisms, we summarize the mechanisms responsible for antioxidant depletion and give a view of how to detect metal-induced oxidative stress in birds by using different biomarkers. The mechanisms producing the harmful effects of oxidative stress are complex with different biomolecular mechanisms associated with ecotoxicological and ecological aspects. The majority of the studies concerning metals and ROS related to oxidative stress have focused on the biomolecular level, but little is known about the effects at the cellular level or at the level of individuals or populations. - Free-living birds can be used as effective indicators of metal-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  10. The Origin of Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darwin, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In The Origin of Species Darwin outlined his theory of evolution, which proposed that species had been evolving and differentiating over time under the influence of natural selection. On its publication it became hugely influential, bringing about a seismic shift in the scientific view of humanitys

  11. Support your local species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stärk, Johanna

    Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management. Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby...

  12. Eco-friendly Oxidative Iodination of Various Arenes with Sodium Percarbonate as the Oxidantâ€

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Skulski

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six easy laboratory procedures are presented for the oxidative iodination ofvarious aromatics, mostly arenes, with either molecular iodine or potassium iodide (usedas the sources of iodinating species, I or I3 , in the presence of sodium percarbonate(SPC, a stable, cheap, easy to handle, and eco-friendly commercial oxidant.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  14. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian G. Deavall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  15. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health.

  16. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  17. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Hutchings, Nick

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows...... in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from...

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.B. Sathler

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reaction at 400oC. For coverage below the monolayer, both vanadium and niobium oxides were observed in slightly condensed superficial species. The presence of vanadium oxide on the support was found to increase the Lewis acidity and create some Bronsted acidity. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for propene were associated with vanadium oxides. The presence of niobium did not contribute to the modification of the chemical properties of superficial vanadium but did decrease the adsorption of vanadium on the alumina.

  19. The oxidation and surface speciation of indium and indium oxides exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.; Wulfsberg, Steven M.; Frith, Matthew G.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Bernasek, Steven L.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic indium and its oxides are useful in electronics applications, in transparent conducting electrodes, as well as in electrocatalytic applications. In order to understand more fully the speciation of the indium and oxygen composition of the indium surface exposed to atmospheric oxidants, XPS, HREELS, and TPD were used to study the indium surface exposed to water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Clean In and authentic samples of In2O3 and In(OH)3 were examined with XPS to provide standard spectra. Indium was exposed to O2 and H2O, and the ratio of O2 - to OH- in the O1s XPS region was used to monitor oxidation and speciation of the surface. HREELS and TPD indicate that water dissociates on the indium surface even at low temperature, and that In2O3 forms at higher temperatures. Initially, OH- is the major species at the surface. Pure In2O3 is also OH- terminated following water exposure. Ambient pressure XPS studies of water exposure to these surfaces suggest that high water pressures tend to passivate the surface, inhibiting extensive oxide formation.

  20. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  1. Oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane over supported V–Mo mixed oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN-CEZAR MARCU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium–molybdenum oxides supported on Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 were prepared by a “wet” impregnation method, characterized using XRD, N2 adsorption, UV–Vis spectroscopy, electrical conductivity measurements and tested in the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane. The catalytic performance in the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane at 400–550 °C depended on the nature of support and on the content of VMoO species on the support. The catalysts supported on alumina were more active and selective than those supported on ceria and titania.

  2. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  4. Role of nitric oxide, nitroxidative and oxidative stress in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneja, Amit; Drews, Magdalena; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    Redox-regulated processes are relevant to wound healing. A balance between bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) concentration and a level of oxidative and nitroxidative stress in wounds may be crucial in wound repair. The highly beneficial effect of bioavailable NO is attributed to scavenging of superoxide, which is the main component of oxidative stress. Also, the high level of NO can influence angiogenesis and endothelial/skeletal muscle cell remodeling and proliferation. However, under conditions of excessive and prolonged production of O(2)(-) in wounds, the supplementation of NO can be evolved in significant increase in nitroxidative stress due to production of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH). ONOOH can trigger a cascade of events leading to the generation of highly reactive and damaging radicals and oxidative species. These species (mainly CO(3)(.-), NO(2)(+), NO(2), N(2)O(3), OH(.)) can impose significant damage in biological milieu and impair the process of wound healing. Therefore, a general strategy for an acceleration of the wound healing process may include an intervention(s) leading to the decrease in oxidative stress (treatment with antioxidants and/or prevention of O(2)(-) generation by uncoupled constitutive nitric oxide synthase, cNOS) and delivery of NO (treatment with NO donors, cNOS gene therapy). Here we briefly review the role of NO, and focus on O(2)(-) and ONOOH (major components of oxidative and nitroxidative stress respectively) in the normal and impaired process of wound healing.

  5. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  6. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanisms for Diethyl Ether and its Oxidation Products, Ethyl Formate and Ethyl Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Carbon-containing compounds are present in the earth's atmosphere as the result of emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources. Their oxidation in the atmosphere, initiated by such oxidants as OH, ozone, and nitrate radicals, leads to potentially harmful secondary pollutants such as ozone, carbonyl species, organic acids and aerosols. Ethers and esters are two classes of compounds that contribute to the complex array of organic compounds found in anthropogenically-influenced air. Additional ester is present as a result of the oxidation of the ethers. In this paper, the oxidation of diethyl ether and its two main oxidation products, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate, are studied over ranges of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and NOx concentration, using an environmental chamber / FTIR absorption technique. Major end-products (the esters from diethyl ether; organic acids and anhydrides from the esters) are quantified, and these data are interpreted in terms of the chemistry of the various alkoxy and peroxy radicals generated. Emphasis is placed on the effects of chemical activation on the behavior of the alkoxy radicals, as well as on a novel peroxy radical rearrangement that may contribute to the observed products of ether oxidation under some conditions. Finally, the data are used, in conjunction with data on similar species, to provide a general representation of ether and ester oxidation in the atmosphere.

  7. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    Detritivorous macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence...... of the short-term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. On a large scale, gut denitrification in, for instance, Chironomus plumosus larvae can increase the overall nitrous oxide emission of lake sediment by a factor of eight. We...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  8. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested...... delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic...... animals is quantitatively important in nitraterich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability...

  9. Today’s oxidative stress markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Czerska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS or malondialdehyde (MDA, are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin, taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. Med Pr 2015;66(3:393–405

  10. Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO3 thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was

  11. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  12. Blood as a reactive species generator and redox status regulator during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2009-10-15

    The exact origin of reactive species and oxidative damage detected in blood is largely unknown. Blood interacts with all organs and tissues and, consequently, with many possible sources of reactive species. In addition, a multitude of oxidizable substrates are already in blood. A muscle-centric approach is frequently adopted to explain reactive species generation, which obscures the possibility that sources of reactive species and oxidative damage other than skeletal muscle may be also at work during exercise. Plasma and blood cells can autonomously produce significant amounts of reactive species at rest and during exercise. The major reactive species generators located in blood during exercise may be erythrocytes (mainly due to their quantity) and leukocytes (mainly due to their drastic activation during exercise). Therefore, it is plausible to assume that oxidative stress/damage measured frequently in blood after exercise or any other experimental intervention derives, at least in part, from the blood.

  13. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  14. Redox-State Dependent Ligand Exchange in Manganese-Based Oxidation Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdolahzadeh, Shaghayegh; de Boer, Johannes W.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-based oxidation catalysis plays a central role both in nature, in the oxidation of water in photosystem II (PSII) and the control of reactive oxygen species, as well as in chemical processes, in the oxidation of organic substrates and bleaching applications. The focus of this review is on

  15. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  16. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees.

  17. Fipronil insecticide toxicology: oxidative stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María Aránzazu; Wu, Qinghua; Ares, Irma; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-11-01

    Fipronil (FIP) is widely used across the world as a broad-spectrum phenylpyrazole insecticide and veterinary drug. FIP was the insecticide to act by targeting the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor and has favorable selective toxicity towards insects rather than mammals. However, because of accidental exposure, incorrect use of FIP or widespread FIP use leading to the contamination of water and soil, there is increasing evidence that FIP could cause a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans, such as neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, reproductive, and cytotoxic effects on vertebrate and invertebrates. In the last decade, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the various toxicities induced by FIP. To date, few reviews have addressed the toxicity of FIP in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the progress in research associated with oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for FIP-induced toxicity as well as metabolism. The present review reports that studies have been conducted to reveal the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress as a result of FIP treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. Furthermore, the metabolism of FIP was also reviewed, and during this process, various CYP450 enzymes were involved and oxidative stress might occur. The roles of various compounds in protecting against FIP-induced toxicity based on their anti-oxidative effects were also summarized to further understand the role of oxidative stress in FIP-induced toxicity.

  18. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  19. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  20. Oxidation of Proteins in Plants-Mechanisms and Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Møller, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... or postponing oxidation of residues more important for the function of the protein.......The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... of modified proteins by affinity purification. Although there are several technical caveats with such approaches, they have been useful in documenting the extent of oxidative modification of proteins and have highlighted a number of proteins where oxidative modification is critical for protein function...

  1. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Elida G; Jesuino, Rosália Santos Amorim; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Brígido, Marcelo de Macedo; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-06-30

    Survival of pathogenic fungi inside human hosts depends on evasion from the host immune system and adaptation to the host environment. Among different insults that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has to handle are reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the human host cells, and by its own metabolism. Knowing how the parasite deals with reactive species is important to understand how it establishes infection and survives within humans. The initiative to describe the P. brasiliensis transcriptome fostered new approaches to study oxidative stress response in this organism. By examining genes related to oxidative stress response, one can evaluate the parasite's ability to face this condition and infer about possible ways to overcome this ability. We report the results of a search of the P. brasiliensis assembled expressed sequence tag database for homologous sequences involved in oxidative stress response. We described several genes coding proteins involved in antioxidant defense, for example, catalase and superoxide dismutase isoenzymes, peroxiredoxin, cytochrome c peroxidase, glutathione synthesis enzymes, thioredoxin, and the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7. The transcriptome analysis of P. brasiliensis reveals a pathogen that has many resources to combat reactive species. Besides characterizing the antioxidant defense system in P. brasiliensis, we also compared the ways in which different fungi respond to oxidative damage, and we identified the basic features of this response.

  2. Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on seed germination and reactive oxygen species metabolism of seedling leaves in ryegrass under osmotic stress%外源NO对渗透胁迫下黑麦草种子萌发及活性氧代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建新; 王金成; 贾海燕; 王凤琴

    2012-01-01

    以黑麦草为试材,研究了一氧化氮(NO)供体硝普钠(SNP)对聚乙二醇6000渗透胁迫下种子萌发、幼苗叶片活性氧代谢和渗透溶质积累的影响,探讨外源NO对渗透胁迫下牧草生理响应的调节作用.结果表明:100μmol/L SNP显著提高了渗透胁迫下黑麦草种子的发芽率、发芽指数和活力指数,缓解了植株鲜重和干重的下降幅度,提高了幼苗叶片SOD、POD、APX、质膜H+-ATPase活性及谷胱甘肽、可溶性糖、游离氨基酸、脯氨酸、K+、Na+含量和植株含水量,降低了O2-.产生速率及H2O2、丙二醛和可溶性蛋白含量.表明外源NO能够促进渗透胁迫下黑麦草种子的萌发,对渗透胁迫引起的黑麦草幼苗膜脂过氧化具有缓解作用.%To discuss the regulating effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on the physiological response of herbage under osmotic stress of simulated by polyethylene glycol, we investigated the effects of exogenous NO donor sodium nitro-prusside (SNP) on the seed germination, reactive oxygen species metabolism and osmotica accumulation in seedling leaves with the experimental materials of ryegrass( Lolium perenne L) . The results showed that under the stress, applying 100 μmol/L SNP increased significantly the seed germination rate, germination index, and vigor index, alleviated the decreases of fresh and dry weights of whole plant, increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) , guaiacol peroxi-dase (POD) , ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and plasma membrane H+ — ATPase and the contents of glutathione, soluble sugar, free amino acid, proline, K+ , and Na+ as well as plant water content, and decreased O2- production rate and the contents of H2O2, malondialdehyde and soluble protein in leaves. The results indicated that exogenous NO could promote the seed germination of ryegrass under osmotic stress and alleviate the membrane lipid peroxidation induced by osmotic stress in seedling leaves.

  3. Nitric oxide accumulation is required to protect against iron-mediated oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mariana; Colman, María José Rodríguez; Gómez-Casati, Diego F; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián

    2009-02-04

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that is conserved throughout evolution. In yeast and mammals, frataxin is essential for cellular iron (Fe) homeostasis and survival during oxidative stress. In plants, frataxin deficiency causes increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and high sensitivity to oxidative stress. In this work we show that a knock-down T-DNA frataxin-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (atfh-1) contains increased total and organellar Fe levels. Frataxin deficiency leads also to nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in both, atfh-1 roots and frataxin null mutant yeast. Abnormally high NO production might be part of the defence mechanism against Fe-mediated oxidative stress.

  4. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Bulgarian species of the genus Senecio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADEZHDA KOSTOVA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Bulgarian species from the genus Senecio were studied phytochemically and/or by GC-MS analysis. Senecivernine-N-oxide was isolated and identified by spectral data for the first time. Different types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity on murine lymphocytes. At a concentration of 100 µg/ml, the alkaloid retroisosenine showed immunosuppressive effect.

  5. Concepts of keystone species and species importance in ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper discussed the keystone species concept and introduced the typical characteristics of keystone species and their identification in communities or ecosystems. Based on the research of the keystone species, the concept of species importance (SI) was first advanced in this paper. The species importance can be simply understood as the important value of species in the ecosystem, which consists of three indexes: species structural important value (SIV), functional important value (FIV) and dynamical important value (DIV). With the indexes, the evaluation was also made on species importance of arbor trees in the Three-Hardwood forests (Fraxinus mandshurica, Juglans mandshurica, and Phellodendron amurense) ecosystem.

  6. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  7. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  8. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  9. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  10. Oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Chia-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate), deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chien Sung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate, deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies.

  12. Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K A; Havrilla, C M; Brady, T C; Abramo, K H; Levin, E D

    1998-07-01

    Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study oxidative stress and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying cellular damage and response, largely because of the interest in human health issues surrounding oxidative stress. However, it is becoming apparent that oxidative stress also affects aquatic organisms exposed to environmental pollutants. Research in fish has demonstrated that mammalian and piscine systems exhibit similar toxicological and adaptive responses to oxidative stress. This suggests that piscine models, in addition to traditional mammalian models, may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress response.

  13. Oxidative stress in development: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennery, Phyllis A

    2010-10-15

    An unavoidable consequence of aerobic respiration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These may negatively impact development. Nevertheless, a certain amount of oxidative stress is required to allow for the normal progression of embryonic and fetal growth. Alterations in placental oxidative stress results in altered placental function and ultimately altered fetal growth and/or developmental programming leading to long-term consequences into adulthood. This article reviews the role of redox in fetal development and will focus on how developmental programming is influenced by the fetal and placental redox state as well as discuss potential therapeutic interventions.

  14. Prices and species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes

    . Based on a biologically defined species diver-sity index we incorporate biodiversity either as a desirable output or biodiversity loss as a detrimental input. Beside quantitative shadow price measures the main contribu-tion of the work is the evidence that parametric scores of environmental efficiency...... of biodiversity and the appropriate incorporation in stochastic fron-tier models to achieve more realistic measures of production efficiency. We use the empirical example of tobacco production drawing from as well as affecting species diversity in the surrounding forests. We apply a shadow profit distance...

  15. Bioterrorism and invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, B B; Sun, B

    2010-08-01

    The risk of dispersing invasive species, especially human pathogens, through acts of bioterrorism, cannot be neglected. However, that risk appears quite low in comparison with the risk of dispersing animal pathogens that could dramatically burden the agricultural economy of food animal producing countries, such as Australia and countries in Europe and North and South America. Although it is not directly related to bioterrorism, the intentional release of non-native species, particularly undesired companion animals or wildlife, may also have a major economic impact on the environment and, possibly, on animal and human health, in the case of accidental release of zoonotic agents.

  16. Prices and species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes

    of biodiversity and the appropriate incorporation in stochastic fron-tier models to achieve more realistic measures of production efficiency. We use the empirical example of tobacco production drawing from as well as affecting species diversity in the surrounding forests. We apply a shadow profit distance....... Based on a biologically defined species diver-sity index we incorporate biodiversity either as a desirable output or biodiversity loss as a detrimental input. Beside quantitative shadow price measures the main contribu-tion of the work is the evidence that parametric scores of environmental efficiency...

  17. Mo-V-Te-Nb oxides as catalysts for ethene production by oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center; Meiswinkel, A.; Thaller, C.; Bock, M.; Alvarado, L. [Linde AG, Pullach (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The availability of ethane in shale gas, as well as the interest in valorising previously underutilized carbon feedstocks, makes the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane an attractive alternative to the industrially established processes for production of ethylene. Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed oxide has been chosen as catalyst for the ODH reaction in view of its outstanding ability to activate alkane molecules. Catalytic test results showed that this type of catalyst can selectively oxidize ethane to ethene at moderate temperatures (350-400 C) with minor production of CO{sub x}. The catalytic performance of Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed-oxide is mainly attributable to the crystalline phase 'M1'. Rietveld analysis of the X-Ray diffractograms allowed us to quantify the amount of MoVTeNb oxide that has crystallized as M1. In this way, it was possible to find a linear correlation of the reaction rate with the abundance of M1 in the solid. Therefore, it is clear that for improving the efficiency of MoVTeNb oxide in ODH, the amount of M1 in the catalyst should be maximized. With this purpose, several MoVTeNb oxides were subject to different thermal treatments prior to the catalytic test. Structural changes in the catalyst were monitored by in-situ XRD technique. Under oxidative atmosphere, it was observed a recrystallization of M2 and possibly, amorphous oxide, into M1 phase, leading to correspondingly more active and selective catalysts (selectivities above 95 % for ethane conversions up to 40 % under industrially relevant conditions). The active site of M1 involves V species, likely with redox properties enhanced by the proximity of Mo and Te species, while the function of the crystalline structure itself is to provide the spatial configuration that allows interaction between these species. However, ethene formation rate was observed to be independent of the V content of the samples. The vanadium species exposed at the surface were studied by LEIS and by IR spectroscopy of CO

  18. A new species of Curvularia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der H.A.

    1967-01-01

    Curvularia papendorfii, isolated from South African soil, is described as a new species. This species is characterized by greater overall dimensions than in any of the known species, and a hilum to the spore that is not protuberant at all.

  19. Oxidative Stress in BPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Savas

    2009-01-01

    The present study has shown that there were not relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH. Further well designed studies should be planned to find out whether the oxidative stress-related parameters play role in BPH as an interesting pathology in regard of the etiopathogenesis. Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, oxidative stress, prostate

  20. Oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde on supported vanadium oxide catalysts compared to gas phase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döbler, Jens; Pritzsche, Marc; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-08-10

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde on silica supported vanadium oxide is studied by density functional theory. For isolated vanadium oxide species silsesquioxane-type models are adopted. The first step is dissociative adsorption of methanol yielding CH3O(O=)V(O-)2 surface complexes. This makes the O=V(OCH3)3 molecule a suited model system. The rate-limiting oxidation step involves hydrogen transfer from the methoxy group to the vanadyl oxygen atom. The transition state is biradicaloid and needs to be treated by the broken-symmetry approach. The activation energies for O=V(OCH3)3 and the silsesquioxane surface model are 147 and 154 kJ/mol. In addition, the (O=V(OCH3)3)(2) dimer (a model for polymeric vanadium oxide species) and the O=V(OCH3)3(*+) radical cation are studied. For the latter the barrier is only 80 kJ/mol, indicating a strong effect of the charge on the energy profile of the reaction and questioning the significance of gas-phase cluster studies for understanding the activity of supported oxide catalysts.

  1. Cannabidiol as an Emergent Therapeutic Strategy for Lessening the Impact of Inflammation on Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Booz, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species generation is a key weapon in the arsenal of the immune system for fighting invading pathogens and to initiate tissue repair. If excessive or unresolved, however, immune-related oxidative stress can initiate further increasing levels of oxidative stress that cause organ damage and dysfunction. Targeting oxidative stress in these various diseases therapeutically has proven more problematic than first anticipated given the complexities and perversit...

  2. Magnetic carbon xerogels for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of 4-nitrophenol solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, R.; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is a well-known advanced oxidation process for the removal of organic pollutants from industrial process waters and wastewater. Specifically, CWPO employs hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidation source and a suitable catalyst to promote its decomposition via formation of hydroxyl radicals (HO•), which exhibit high oxidizing potential and serve as effective species in the destruction of a huge range of organic pollutants

  3. Influence of O2 – plasma ambience and growth temperature on the oxidation of Mo-metal and volatilization of oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindar K. Sharma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we investigated role of the oxygen plasma on the oxidation of Mo strip surface (source of Mo and volatilization of formed oxide species. Molybdenum oxide thin films are deposited on Si substrate simultaneously by using the volatilized oxide species as vapor source. A special setup is designed to create stable discharge oxygen plasma. Both the Mo strip surface and oxide films deposited on Si substrates at different temperatures are characterized independently. The presence of well indexed and intense peaks corresponding to MoO3 and Mo8O23 oxide phases in x-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of metals strips, heated at different temperatures in oxygen plasma ambience has been considered as proof of oxidation of Mo-strip surface. The reduction in peaks intensity with increase in metal strip temperature indicates high rate of oxidation and oxide volatilization. It is observed that film formation on silicon substrate could not take place without oxygen plasma even at 500ºC. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies of Mo strips as well as the films deposited on Si substrates, at different temperatures are showing the modifications in surface morphology and agreed with the XRD results. Both Raman and FTIR observations of Mo strip are also in consonance with the XRD and SEM findings. The occurrence of oxidation of Mo metal and volatilization of oxide species at this low temperature 300ºC is reported for the first time.

  4. Coevolution of Symbiotic Species

    CERN Document Server

    Leok, B T M

    1996-01-01

    This paper will consider the coevolution of species which are symbiotic in their interaction. In particular, we shall analyse the interaction of squirrels and oak trees, and develop a mathematical framework for determining the coevolutionary equilibrium for consumption and production patterns.

  5. Mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species action in relation to boar motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flow cytometric assays of viable boar sperm were developed to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium), membrane lipid peroxidation (oxidation of lipophilic probe C11-BODIPY581/591), and mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (aggregation of mit...

  6. Natural Oxidant Demand Variability, Potential Controls, and Implications for in Situ, Oxidation-Based Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, A.; Cruz, S.; Dungan, B.; Holguin, F. O.; Ulery, A. L.; Hunter, B.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring reduced species associated with subsurface materials can impose a significant natural oxidant demand (NOD), which is the bulk consumption of oxidants by soil water, minerals, and organic matter. Although injection of oxidants has been used for chemical transformation of organic contaminants, NOD represents a challenge for the in-situ delivery of oxidants as a remediation alternative. Co-injection of complexation agents with oxidants has been proposed to facilitate the delivery of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation remediation of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates variability of NOD for different oxidants and sediments. The effect of the addition of various complexation agents, including EDTA, tween 80, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), humic acid, and four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, on the NOD was also examined. NOD was measured for a clay loam (collected from Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, AZ). Varying amounts of biosolids were mixed with subsamples of the clay loam to create three additional reference soils in order to study the effect of organic matter and other soil characteristics on the NOD. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the NOD for various oxidants, using the four soils, and replicated with and without various delivery agents. Measured NOD showed variability for each soil and oxidant composition. Additionally, significant differences were observed in NOD with the addition of delivery agents. The results support the elucidation of potential controls over NOD and have implications for in situ, oxidation-based remediation of contaminated groundwater.

  7. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk.

  8. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  9. Automated sequence analysis of atmospheric oxidation pathways: SEQUENCE version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Butler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the sequential analysis of the atmospheric oxidation of chemical species using output from a photochemical model is presented. Starting at a "root species", the algorithm traverses all possible reaction sequences which consume this species, and lead, via intermediate products, to final products. The algorithm keeps track of the effects of all of these reactions on their respective reactants and products. Upon completion, the algorithm has built a detailed picture of the effects of the oxidation of the root species on its chemical surroundings. The output of the algorithm can be used to determine product yields, radical recycling fractions, and ozone production potentials of arbitrary chemical species.

  10. Heterogeneous OH oxidation of organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.; Kroll, J.; Cappa, C.; Che, D.; Ahmed, M.; Leone, S.; Worsnop, D.; Wilson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important reactive species in both clean and polluted atmospheres, and therefore gas-phase OH chemistry has been extensively studied for decades. Due to this enormous effort the rates and mechanism of OH reactions with gas phase organics are relatively well understood. However, it unclear whether these well established gas-phase chemical mechanisms apply to the more complex heterogeneous reactions of OH radicals with organic aerosols (OA). Although recent studies have begun to examine OH oxidation of OA, numerous outstanding questions still remain regarding both the rate and chemical mechanism of these reactions. Here we present an in depth investigation of the heterogeneous oxidation of organic squalane particles by OH radicals. By combining a photochemical aerosol flow reactor with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), with both electron impact and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization, we investigate OH heterogeneous chemistry in unprecedented detail. Employing elemental composition measurements with detailed kinetics we have arrived at a simple oxidation model which accurately accounts for the evolution of squalane and its" oxidation products. In addition, by exploring a large range of OH concentrations we are able to directly measure the role of secondary particle-phase chain chemistry which can significantly accelerate the oxidation of OA in the atmosphere. Based on these measurements we have arrived at an explicit chemical mechanism for heterogeneous OH oxidation of OA which accurately accounts for our observations over a wide range of reaction conditions.

  11. Species Coexistence in Nitrifying Chemostats: A Model of Microbial Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Dumont

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, the two nitrifying functions (ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB or nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB of a nitrification reactor—operated continuously over 525 days with varying inputs—were assigned using a mathematical modeling approach together with the monitoring of bacterial phylotypes. Based on these theoretical identifications, we develop here a chemostat model that does not explicitly include only the resources’ dynamics (different forms of soluble nitrogen but also explicitly takes into account microbial inter- and intra-species interactions for the four dominant phylotypes detected in the chemostat. A comparison of the models obtained with and without interactions has shown that such interactions permit the coexistence of two competing ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and two competing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in competition for ammonium and nitrite, respectively. These interactions are analyzed and discussed.

  12. All-Oxide Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Kupfer, Benjamin; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Zaban, Arie

    2012-12-20

    Recently, a new field in photovoltaics (PV) has emerged, focusing on solar cells that are entirely based on metal oxide semiconductors. The all-oxide PV approach is very attractive due to the chemical stability, nontoxicity, and abundance of many metal oxides that potentially allow manufacturing under ambient conditions. Already today, metal oxides (MOs) are widely used as components in PV cells such as transparent conducting front electrodes or electron-transport layers, while only very few MOs have been used as light absorbers. In this Perspective, we review recent developments of all-oxide PV systems, which until today were mostly based on Cu2O as an absorber. Furthermore, ferroelectric BiFeO3-based PV systems are discussed, which have recently attracted considerable attention. The performance of all-oxide PV cells is discussed in terms of general PV principles, and directions for progress are proposed, pointing toward the development of novel metal oxide semiconductors using combinatorial methods.

  13. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  14. Features oxidative processes in sturgeons fish (Acipenseridae (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Symon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To anayze scientific sources on physiological-biochemical pecularities of reducing-oxidizing processes, including peroxide oxidation of lipids and work of the system of antioxidant protection system in sturgeon species (Acipenseridae. The initiation and process of the oxidative stress have been described. The main products of peroxide oxidation of lipids, antioxidants of natural and artificial origin, organs and tissues for the studies of reducing-oxidizing processes have been examined. Findings. The work generalizes the processes of lipid peroxidation. Briefly outlined the main mechanism of action of antioxidant enzymes. Antioxidant defense system plays one of key role in the life of organism due regulating its series of metabolic processes, use of assessing of its state gives an opportunity obtain quantitative information on the progress of these processes. The products of free radical peroxidation (dien conjugates and malonic dialdehyde can also act as a sort of biomarkers of tissue damage, because their content can judge about the intensity of the flow of free radical processes in the various systems in organism. The review contains a description of the peculiarities of the liver and its involvement in lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense system. It is shown the most common antioxidants used in the feeding of sturgeon. Organs and tissues, which should be used for studying the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids in sturgeon species, have been examined. Practical value. The systematized data regarding peroxide oxidation of lipids, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection system allow finding a balance between these processes. The data on antioxidants, which are used in feeds for sturgeon species, will be useful for sturgeon culturists. The array of the generalized information will be important for scientists who study the pecularities of the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids and antioxidant protection system in

  15. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part I Microstructural investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Piotrowska, Kamila; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment with solution containing HNO3 caused dissolution of Cu and Si from the intermetallic particles in the aluminium substrate. The growth rate of oxide layer was observed to be a function of MnO4- and NO3- ions present in the aqueous solution. The NO3- ions exhibit higher affinity towards the intermetallic particles resulting in poor coverage by the steam generated oxide layer compared to the coating formed using MnO4- ions. Further, increase in the concentration of NO3- ions in the solution retards precipitation of the steam generated aluminium hydroxide layer.

  16. Novel mesoporous mixed Nb-M (M = V, Mo, and Sb) oxides for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Bhatt, Salil; Beaucage, Gregory; Guliants, Vadim V; Mamedov, Sergey; Soman, Rajiv S

    2005-12-15

    Novel thermally stable mesoporous mixed metal Nb-M (M = V, Mo and Sb) oxides were synthesized in the presence of a nonionic Pluronic P123 surfactant. These oxides displayed promising pore structures and chemical compositions for selective oxidative functionalization of propane: high surface areas (up to 200 m2/g), large pore sizes (5-14 nm), and high pore volumes (up to 0.46 cm3/g). The oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propylene over mesoporous mixed metal Nb-M oxides employed as a probe reaction suggested that the M component was dispersed as the molecular surface species and also formed a solid solution with NbOx in the inorganic walls of these mesoporous mixed metal oxides.

  17. Conversion of cropland to forest increases soil CH4 oxidation and abundance of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with stand age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bárcena, Teresa G; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Gundersen, Per

    2014-01-01

    -oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) on pmoA and amoA genes. Our study showed that CH4 oxidation rates and the abundance of MOB increased simultaneously with time since afforestation, suggesting that the methanotrophic activity is reflected...... in the abundance of this functional group. The development of forest soils resulted in increased soil organic carbon and reduced bulk density, and these were the two variables that most strongly related to CH4 oxidation rates in the forest soils. For the top mineral soil layer (0–5 cm) CH4 oxidation rates did...... not differ between even aged stands from oak and larch, and were significantly smaller under Norway spruce. Compared to the other tree species Norway spruce caused a decrease in the abundance of MOB over time that could explain the decreased oxidation rates. However, the cause for the lower abundance remains...

  18. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of thiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, C L

    2000-01-01

    -molecular-weight thiols such as reduced glutathione (GSH), and sulfur-containing amino acids in proteins, are major targets for HOCl. Radicals have not generally been implicated as intermediates in thiol oxidation by HOCl, though there is considerable literature evidence for the involvement of radicals in the metal ion...... to the thiol, thiyl radicals are the major species detected by EPR spin trapping. When the HOCl is present in excess over the thiol, additional radicals are detected with compounds which contain amine functions; these additional radicals are assigned to nitrogen-centered species. Evidence is presented...... for the involvement of sulfenyl chlorides (RSCl) in the formation of these radicals, and studies with an authentic sulfenyl chloride have demonstrated that this compound readily decomposes in thermal-, metal-ion- or light-catalysed reactions to give thiyl radicals. The formation of thiyl radicals on oxidation...

  19. Positive feedback in species communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes the eventual population densities in a species community depend on the initial densities or the arrival times of species. If arrival times determine species composition, a priority effect has occurred. Priority effects may occur if the species community exhibits alternative stable states (

  20. Arctic species resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lars O.; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Jeppesen, Erik

    The peak of biological activities in Arctic ecosystems is characterized by a relative short and intense period between the start of snowmelt until the onset of frost. Recent climate changes have induced larger seasonal variation in both timing of snowmelt as well as changes mean temperatures...... and precipitation. Concurrently, phenological change has been recorded in a wide range of plants and animals, with climate change seemingly being the primary driver of these changes. A major concern is whether species and biological systems embrace the plasticity in their phenological responses needed for tracking...... the predicted increase in climate variability. Whereas species may show relatively high phenological resilience to climate change per se, the resilience of systems may be more constrained by the inherent dependence through consumer-resource interactions across trophic levels. During the last 15 years...

  1. Identification of Malassezia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindo, A J; Sophia, S K C; Kalyani, J; Anandan, S

    2004-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are lipophilic unipolar yeasts recognized as commensals of skin that may be pathogenic under certain conditions. The genus Malassezia now comprises of seven species. This study was aimed at using a simple practical approach to speciate Malassezia yeasts from clinical material. Seventy skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor infection, positive in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH), were cultured onto modified Dixon's agar (mDixon's agar) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and incubated at 32 degrees C. Speciation was done on the basis of Gram stain morphology, catalase test, and utilization of Tweens. Out of 70 scrapings 48 (68.75%) showed growth on mDixon's agar. The commonest isolate was M. sympodialis (28, 58%) followed by M. globosa (19, 40%) and one isolate was (2%) of M. restricta. M. sympodialis was the commonest species affecting our population and there was no isolation of M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis and M. furfur.

  2. A novel approach in psoriasis: first usage of known protein oxidation markers to prove oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Cevat; Köse, Kader; Utaş, Serap; Tanrikulu, Esen; Taşlidere, Nazan

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, an inflammatory/hyperproliferative skin disease characterized by the cutaneous accumulation of neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species, as revealed in a number of studies. This study was performed to demonstrate the presence of oxidative stress in psoriasis, as measured by protein oxidation markers. Twenty-nine psoriasis patients were selected based on disease severity assessment using body surface area as well as the psoriasis area severity index (PASI), and were grouped as mild (PASI ≤ 10) and moderate-to-severe (PASI > 10). The measured parameters in psoriatic patients and fourteen healthy volunteers were as follows: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, neopterin, total lipid hydroperoxides (LHP), pyrrolized protein (PP), protein carbonyl compounds (PCC), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), thiol levels, along with complete blood count. Except lower thiols, all parameters were found to be higher in total patients as well as in subgroups, compared to controls. There was no significant difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, protein oxidation in psoriatics, not only in moderate-to-severe, but also in mild patients, may be explained by the findings of inflammation, phagocytic cell oxidation, and MPO-hypochlorous acid-oxidation reactions; as reflected by increased total/differential leucocytes counts, CRP, ESR as well as MPO, neopterin, AOPP, PCC, PP, LHP, and decreased thiol levels. Demonstrating the AOPP and PP formation for the first time, oxidants from active neutrophils/monocytes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, leading to oxidative stress, especially by protein oxidation.

  3. Trichoderma species from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chu-long; XU Tong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Seventeen species of Trichoderma, isolated from soil or tree bark from China are identified based on morphological and physiological characters, and from their phylogenetic position inferred from parsimony analyses of nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA cluster (ITS1 and 2) and partial sequences of translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) . There were T. citrinoviride, T. longibrachiatum, T. sinensis in section Longibrachiatum, T. atroviride, T.koningii, T. viride, T. asperellum, T. hamatum, T. erinaceum in section Trichoderma, T.harzianum (H.lixii) , T. inhamatum, T. velutinum , T. cerinum , T. strictipile , T. spirale ,T. virens, H. nigrovirens (Trichoderma sp.) in section Pachybasium. Among them four species:T. asperellum , T. velutinum , T. cerinum , T. spirale were reported firstly in China. In addition, two suspected new taxa (Trichoderma spp.) in Trichoderma section were proposed:Trichoderma sp. 1 (ZAUT261, 4, 4A, 15A, 2C), Trichoderma sp. 2 (2B, 5, 7A, 7B, 9A).Trichoderma sp. 1 was similar to T. hamatum , but the temperature optimum for mycelial growth was lower than that of T. hamatum and the species tended to form hemisphaerical pustule with Telatively larger conidia (average length 4.6 μm × 2.8 μm). Trichoderma sp. 2 was distinguished morphologically from related species T. strigosum, T. pubescens, T. erinaceum, T. hamatum and Trichoderma sp. 1 in pustules on CMD without fertile or sterile conidiophore elongation and distinctive phialide shape, the conidiophore branches similar to T. koningii, but the conidia similar to T. viride, subglobose, conspicuously tuberculate.

  4. Bounding species distribution models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN; Catherine S. JARNEVICH; Wayne E. ESAIAS; Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern.Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development,yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations.We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches:classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models,and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations,bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors,to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States.Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding,and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models,like those presented here,should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5):642-647,2011].

  5. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Poljsak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Oxidative stress may be considered a biological imperfection; therefore, the Dawkins' theory of imperfect adaptation of beings to environment was applied to the role of oxidative stress in processes like famine and infectious diseases and their consequences at the molecular level such as mutations and cell signaling. Arguments are presented that oxidative damage is not necessarily an evolutionary mistake but may be beneficial for reproduction; this may prevail over its harmfulness to health and longevity in evolution. Thus, Dawkins' principle of biological “malevolence” may be an additional biological paradigm for explaining the consequences of oxidative stress.

  7. In situ studies of fuel oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C; Walker, Robert A

    2007-03-15

    Existing electrochemical experiments and models of fuel oxidation postulate about the importance of different oxidation pathways and relative fuel conversion efficiencies, but specific information is often lacking. Experiments described below present the first direct, in situ measurements of relevant chemical species formed on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes operating with both butane and CO fuel feeds. Raman spectroscopy is used to acquire vibrational spectra from SOFC anodes at 715 degrees C during operation. Both C4H10 and CO form graphitic intermediates. In the limit of a large oxide flux, excess butane forms ordered graphite but only transiently. At higher cell potentials (e.g., less current being drawn) ordered and disordered graphite form on the Ni cermet anode following exposure to butane, and under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions the graphite persists indefinitely. The chemistry of CO oxidation is such that ordered graphite and a Ni-COO intermediate form only at intermediate cell potentials. Concurrent voltammetry studies show that the formation of graphite with butane at OCV leads first to decreased cell performance after exposure to 25 cm3 butane, then recovered performance after 75 cm3. CO voltammetry data show that at lower potentials the oxide flux through the YSZ electrolyte is sufficient to oxidize the Ni in the anode especially near the interface with the electrolyte.

  8. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings on metallic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fengyu; Lu, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of Cr-containing steel as an interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cells, CoFe alloy coatings with Co:Fe ratios of 9:1, 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, and 5:5 are deposited by electrodeposition and then oxidized to CoxFe1-x oxide coatings with a thickness of ∼6 μm as protective layers on the interconnect. The area specific resistance of the coated interconnect increases with the Fe content. Higher Co content oxide coatings are more effective in limiting the growth of the chromia scale while all coatings are effective in inhibiting Cr diffusion and evaporation. With the Co0.8Fe0.2 oxide coated interconnect, the electrochemical performance of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode is improved. Only 1.54 atomic percentage of Cr is detected on the surface of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode while no Cr is detected 0.66 μm or more into the cathode. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings are promising candidates for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects with the advantage of using existing cathode species for compatibility and performance enhancement.

  9. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  10. Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on seed germination, seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities of several plant species%外源NO对不同作物种子萌发、幼苗生长及抗氧化酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀玮; 董元杰; 邱现奎; 王全辉; 王艳华; 胡国庆

    2012-01-01

    以浓度分别为0、0.01、0.1、1.0 mmol/L的硝普钠(Sodium nitroprusside,SNP,NO供体)处理玉米、小麦、花生、小白菜、萝卜、黄瓜的种子和幼苗,研究了以上几种浓度的SNP对作物种子萌发和幼苗生长及抗氧化酶活性的影响。结果表明:SNP对多数种子萌发影响表现为低浓度(0.01和0.1 mmol/L)促进,高浓度(1.0 mmol/L)抑制,其中对萝卜发芽率的促进作用最显著;低浓度SNP可有效促进植物幼苗地上部的生长,其中对小麦、黄瓜的促进效果最显著,同时可显著促进根系的伸长,其中对萝卜的促进效果最显著,且对植物幼苗生长的影响与作物种类有关;SNP对多数植物的根系活力有明显的促进作用,其中对萝卜的促进效果最显著;适宜浓度的SNP可以提高作物CAT、POD和SOD活性以及可溶性蛋白含量,并降低MDA含量,不同作物SNP的适宜浓度不同,其中0.1mmol/L SNP对多数作物的处理效果最好。%Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in growth and development of plants. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is used as NO donor to examine the effects of NO on seed germination, seedling growth and activities of antioxidant enzymes of maize, wheat, peanut, pakchoi, radish and cucumber. The results show that the low concentrations (0. 01 and 0. 1 retool/L) of SNP could promote the germination viability and germination percentage of seeds, while the high concentration ( 1.0 mmol/L) of SNP inhibits seed germination, and the effects on radish are the most obvious. The low concentrations of SNP promotes the growth of shoot significantly, and the effects on wheat and cucumber are the most obvious. The low concentrations of SNP also promote the growth of roots, and the effects on radish are the most obvious. The effects of SNP on seedling growth maybe related to the plant species. SNP could promote the root activities of most plants, and the effect on radish is the most

  11. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  12. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response.

  13. Recent advances in heterogeneous selective oxidation catalysis for sustainable chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye; Yang, Yanhui

    2014-05-21

    Oxidation catalysis not only plays a crucial role in the current chemical industry for the production of key intermediates such as alcohols, epoxides, aldehydes, ketones and organic acids, but also will contribute to the establishment of novel green and sustainable chemical processes. This review is devoted to dealing with selective oxidation reactions, which are important from the viewpoint of green and sustainable chemistry and still remain challenging. Actually, some well-known highly challenging chemical reactions involve selective oxidation reactions, such as the selective oxidation of methane by oxygen. On the other hand some important oxidation reactions, such as the aerobic oxidation of alcohols in the liquid phase and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen, have attracted much attention in recent years because of their high significance in green or energy chemistry. This article summarizes recent advances in the development of new catalytic materials or novel catalytic systems for these challenging oxidation reactions. A deep scientific understanding of the mechanisms, active species and active structures for these systems are also discussed. Furthermore, connections among these distinct catalytic oxidation systems are highlighted, to gain insight for the breakthrough in rational design of efficient catalytic systems for challenging oxidation reactions.

  14. CO2 Hydrogenation over Oxide-Supported PtCo Catalysts: The Role of the Oxide Support in Determining the Product Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, Shyam; Yu, Weiting; Yang, Xiaofang; Yan, Binhang; Huang, Yanqiang; Wan, Weiming; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G

    2016-07-04

    By simply changing the oxide support, the selectivity of a metal-oxide catalysts can be tuned. For the CO2 hydrogenation over PtCo bimetallic catalysts supported on different reducible oxides (CeO2 , ZrO2 , and TiO2 ), replacing a TiO2 support by CeO2 or ZrO2 selectively strengthens the binding of C,O-bound and O-bound species at the PtCo-oxide interface, leading to a different product selectivity. These results reveal mechanistic insights into how the catalytic performance of metal-oxide catalysts can be fine-tuned.

  15. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  16. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  17. Mechanism of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues require oxygen to meet their energetic demands. However, the consumption of oxygen also results in the generation of free radicals that may have damaging effects on cells. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of reactive oxygen species due to its high demand for oxygen, and its abundance of highly peroxidisable substrates. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance in the redox state of the cell, either by overproduction of reactive oxygen species, or by dysfunction of the antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress has been detected in a range of neurodegenerative disease, and emerging evidence from in vitro and in vivo disease models suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in disease pathogenesis. However, the promise of antioxidants as novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases has not been borne out in clinical studies. In this review, we critically assess the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a crucial player in common neurodegenerative disease and discuss the source of free radicals in such diseases. Furthermore, we examine the issues surrounding the failure to translate this hypothesis into an effective clinical treatment.

  18. Species of Timber Shade Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Prawoto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L. like most tropical trees is recalcitrant in tissue culture. Somatic embryogenesis is generally efficient micropropagation technique to multiply elite material. However, Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. One of the factors often considered as a component of in vitro recalsitrance is a high phenolic content and oxidation of these compounds. In cocoa tissue culture accumulate large amounts of poliphenolics compounds which probably impair further development. This study was conducted to investigate the composition of phenolic compounds in cocoa flower and leaves, and their changes troughout the somatic embryogenesis process. Calli were induced in cacao floral and leaves explants on a half-strenght Murashige and Skoog medium containing 30 g/L Glucose and combination of 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 D with kinetin (kin. Total polyphenol content was observed on Sulawesi 1 cocoa clone. Embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus were also compared. The percentage of callus production from flower tissue is 85%, percentage of embryogenic callus 40 %, although  the percentage of somatic embryo production from embryogenic callus callus is 70%. The conservation of callus into somatic embryos followed by decline in phenol content and an increase in peroxidase. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non-embryogenic conditions. So that, phenolic compound can influence the production of calli and an absence the phenolic compound can enhance production of somatic embryo.Kata kunci: Theobroma cacao L., polifenol, embrio somatik, kalus, flavonoid, katekin, in vitro recalcitance

  19. Plant peroxisomes: A nitro-oxidative cocktail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Corpas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although peroxisomes are very simple organelles, research on different species has provided us with an understanding of their importance in terms of cell viability. In addition to the significant role played by plant peroxisomes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS, data gathered over the last two decades show that these organelles are an endogenous source of nitric oxide (NO and related molecules called reactive nitrogen species (RNS. Molecules such as NO and H2O2 act as retrograde signals among the different cellular compartments, thus facilitating integral cellular adaptation to physiological and environmental changes. However, under nitro-oxidative conditions, part of this network can be overloaded, possibly leading to cellular damage and even cell death. This review aims to update our knowledge of the ROS/RNS metabolism, whose important role in plant peroxisomes is still underestimated. However, this pioneering approach, in which key elements such as β-oxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD and NO have been mainly described in relation to plant peroxisomes, could also be used to explore peroxisomes from other organisms.

  20. Oxidation states of molybdenum in oxide films formed in sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okonkwo, I.A.; Doff, J.; Baron-Wiechec, A. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jones, G. [Waters Corporation, Floats Rd, Roundthorn Ind. Est., Manchester M23 9LZ (United Kingdom); Koroleva, E.V. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Skeldon, P., E-mail: p.skeldon@manchester.ac.uk [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-31

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the oxidation states of molybdenum in thin films formed potentiostatically, over a range of potentials, in either 1 mol dm{sup -3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 10 mol dm{sup -3} NaOH at 20 Degree-Sign C. Mo 3d spectra suggested that MoO{sub 2} and Mo(OH){sub 2} were the main components of the films, with smaller amounts of MoO{sub 3} and possibly Mo{sub 2}O{sub 5}. O 1s spectra indicated the presence of oxygen as oxide and hydroxide species and as bound water. Ion beam analysis revealed the formation of thin films at all potentials, with significant losses of oxidized molybdenum to the electrolyte. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxides are formed on molybdenum in sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum IV and VI are identified by XPS, with MoO2 species dominating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thicknesses of films are determined by ion beam analysis for a range of potentials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films form at low efficiency due to loss of molybdenum species to electrolyte.

  1. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaléna Vaváková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed.

  2. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaváková, Magdaléna; Ďuračková, Zdeňka; Trebatická, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed.

  3. Ruthenium(III Catalysis in Perborate Oxidation of 5-Oxoacids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shree Devi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium(III catalyzes perborate oxidation of substituted 5-oxoacids in acidic solution. The catalyzed oxidation is first order with respect to the oxidant and catalyst. The rate of ruthenium(III catalyzed oxidation displays the Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the reductant and is independent of [H+] of the medium. Hydrogen peroxide is the reactive species of perborate and the kinetic results reveal formation of ruthenium(III peroxo species-5-oxoacid complex. Electron-releasing substituents accelerate the reaction rate and electron-withdrawing substituents retard it. The order of reactivity among the studied 5-oxoacids is p-methoxy ≫  p-methyl > p-phenyl > −H > p-chloro > p-bromo > m-nitro. Activation parameters are evaluated using Arrhenius and Eyring’s plots. A mechanism consistent with the observed kinetic data is proposed and discussed. A suitable rate law is derived based on the mechanism.

  4. Fluorine compounds for doping conductive oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Tim; Li, Xiaonan; Barnes, Teresa M; Torres, Jr., Robert; Wyse, Carrie L

    2013-04-23

    Methods of forming a conductive fluorine-doped metal oxide layer on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition are described. The methods may include heating the substrate in a processing chamber, and introducing a metal-containing precursor and a fluorine-containing precursor to the processing chamber. The methods may also include adding an oxygen-containing precursor to the processing chamber. The precursors are reacted to deposit the fluorine-doped metal oxide layer on the substrate. Methods may also include forming the conductive fluorine-doped metal oxide layer by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. These methods may include providing the substrate in a processing chamber, and introducing a metal-containing precursor, and a fluorine-containing precursor to the processing chamber. A plasma may be formed that includes species from the metal-containing precursor and the fluorine-containing precursor. The species may react to deposit the fluorine-doped metal oxide layer on the substrate.

  5. Assessing the Cost of Helping : The Roles of Body Condition and Oxidative Balance in Seychelles Warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Crommenacker, Janske; Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S.; Rands, Sean A.

    2011-01-01

    In cooperatively breeding species, helping close relatives may provide important fitness benefits. However, helping can be energetically expensive and may result in increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Consequently, an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance can lead to higher oxidative stress sus

  6. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  7. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  8. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  9. Role of reactive nitrogen species in blood platelet functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2007-12-01

    Blood platelets, in analogy to other circulating blood cells, can generate reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that may behave as second messengers and may regulate platelet functions. Accumulating evidence suggest a role of ROS/RNS in platelet activation. On the other hand, an increased production of ROS/RNS causes oxidative stress, and thus, may contribute to the development of different diseases, including vascular complications, inflammatory and psychiatric illnesses. Oxidative stress in platelets leads to chemical changes in a wide range of their components, and platelet proteins may be initial targets of ROS/RNS action. It has been demonstrated that reaction of proteins with ROS/RNS results in the oxidation and nitration of some amino acid residues, formation of aggregates or fragmentation of proteins. In oxidized proteins new carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides are also formed. In platelets, low molecular weight thiols such as glutathione (GSH), cysteine and cysteinylglycine and protein thiols may be also target for ROS/RNS action. This review describes the chemical structure and biological activities of reactive nitrogen species, mainly nitric oxide ((*)NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and their effects on blood platelet functions, and the mechanisms involved in their action on platelets.

  10. The electrochemical oxidation of dimethyl disulfide-Anodic methylsulfanylation of phenols and aromatic ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quang Tho Do [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Environnement, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, BP 10808, 49008 ANGERS Cedex 01 (France); Elothmani, Driss [Laboratoire GRAPPE, Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture d' Angers, BP 30748, 49007 ANGERS Cedex 01 (France); Simonet, Jacques [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie Moleculaire (UMR CNRS 6510), Universite de RENNES 1, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Guillanton, Georges Le [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Environnement, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, BP 10808, 49008 ANGERS Cedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: gleguill@uco.fr

    2005-08-30

    The electrochemical oxidation of dimethyl disulfide was investigated in acetonitrile and dichloromethane. The nature of the oxidation strongly depends on the nucleophilicity of the solvent. In acetonitrile a one-electron oxidation is observed and the consecutive species did not exhibit any reactivity towards aromatic compounds subject to electrophile substitution. On the contrary, the oxidation of dimethyl disulfide in methylene chloride afforded a two-electron process with the formation of a species consistent with CH{sub 3} -S{sup +}. Its reactivity towards phenols and aromatic ethers was confirmed and showed a selective monomethylsulfanylation in most of the cases.

  11. Metal oxides as photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mansoob Khan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxides are of great technological importance in environmental remediation and electronics because of their capability to generate charge carriers when stimulated with required amount of energy. The promising arrangement of electronic structure, light absorption properties, and charge transport characteristics of most of the metal oxides has made possible its application as photocatalyst. In this article definition of metal oxides as photocatalyst, structural characteristics, requirements of the photocatalyst, classification of photocatalysts and the mechanism of the photocatalytic process are discussed.

  12. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  13. Influence of the sulfur species reactivity on biofilm conformation during pyrite colonization by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, René H; García-Meza, J Viridiana; Cruz, Roel; Valdez-Pérez, Donato; González, Ignacio

    2012-08-01

    Massive pyrite (FeS₂) electrodes were potentiostatically modified by means of variable oxidation pulse to induce formation of diverse surface sulfur species (S(n)²⁻, S⁰). The evolution of reactivity of the resulting surfaces considers transition from passive (e.g., Fe(1-x )S₂) to active sulfur species (e.g., Fe(1-x )S(2-y ), S⁰). Selected modified pyrite surfaces were incubated with cells of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans for 24 h in a specific culture medium (pH 2). Abiotic control experiments were also performed to compare chemical and biological oxidation. After incubation, the attached cells density and their exopolysaccharides were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on bio-oxidized surfaces; additionally, S(n)²⁻/S⁰ speciation was carried out on bio-oxidized and abiotic pyrite surfaces using Raman spectroscopy. Our results indicate an important correlation between the evolution of S(n)²⁻/S⁰ surface species ratio and biofilm formation. Hence, pyrite surfaces with mainly passive-sulfur species were less colonized by A. thiooxidans as compared to surfaces with active sulfur species. These results provide knowledge that may contribute to establishing interfacial conditions that enhance or delay metal sulfide (MS) dissolution, as a function of the biofilm formed by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

  14. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  15. Initial stages of anodic oxidation of silver in sodium hydroxide solution studied by potential sweep voltammetry and ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, J.M.M.; Alderliesten, P.T.; Bootsma, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The first stages of the oxidation of polycrystalline silver electrodes in NaOH solutions were studied by potential sweep voltammetry and ellipsometry. Formation of bulk Ag2O was found to be preceded by dissolution of silver species and deposition of a surface oxide. The equilibrium oxide coverage de

  16. Diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress—A concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Ullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human body is continuously exposed to different types of agents that results in the production of reactive species called as free radicals (ROS/RNS which by the transfer of their free unpaired electron causes the oxidation of cellular machinery. In order to encounter the deleterious effects of such species, body has got endogenous antioxidant systems or it obtains exogenous antioxidants from diet that neutralizes such species and keeps the homeostasis of body. Any imbalance between the RS and antioxidants leads to produce a condition known as “oxidative stress” that results in the development of pathological condition among which one is diabetes. Most of the studies reveal the inference of oxidative stress in diabetes pathogenesis by the alteration in enzymatic systems, lipid peroxidation, impaired Glutathione metabolism and decreased Vitamin C levels. Lipids, proteins, DNA damage, Glutathione, catalane and superoxide dismutase are various biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress induced complications of diabetes may include stroke, neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. The basic aim of this review was to summarize the basics of oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus.

  17. Tyrosine can protect against oxidative stress through ferryl hemoglobin reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; He, Yingjie; Chen, Chao; Tian, Rong; Xiao, Qiang; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2014-08-01

    The toxic mechanism of hemoglobin (Hb) under oxidative stress is linked to the formations of highly cytotoxic ferryl species and subsequently heme-to-protein cross-linked derivative of Hb (Hb-X). In this study, we have examined the effects of free tyrosine and its analogues (3-chlorotyrosine, phenylalanine) on the stability of ferryl hemoglobin and the formation of Hb-X. The results showed that free tyrosine (not phenylalanine, 10-500 μM) was an efficient reducing agent of ferryl species and also effective at preventing the formation of cytotoxic Hb-X. Meanwhile, the dimeric tyrosine was formed as the oxidation product of tyrosine during Hb redox reaction. Compared with free tyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine, an oxidation product of tyrosine and a proposed biomarker for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in vivo, exhibited stronger antioxidant properties in Hb-induced oxidative stress, which was consistent with its more efficient ability in the reduction of ferryl species. These results showed that the presence of tyrosine and its derivative in vivo and vitro could ameliorate oxidative damage through ferryl heme reduction. The antioxidant ability, therefore, may provide new insights into the nutritional and physiological significance of free tyrosine with redox active heme proteins-related oxidative stress.

  18. Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Moran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%, grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05% than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%. This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32– or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus. Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in

  19. Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taujale, Saru; Zhang, Huichun

    2012-03-01

    Manganese oxides typically exist as mixtures with other metal oxides in soil-water environments; however, information is only available on their redox activity as single oxides. To bridge this gap, we examined three binary oxide mixtures containing MnO(2) and a secondary metal oxide (Al(2)O(3), SiO(2) or TiO(2)). The goal was to understand how these secondary oxides affect the oxidative reactivity of MnO(2). SEM images suggest significant heteroaggregation between Al(2)O(3) and MnO(2) and to a lesser extent between SiO(2)/TiO(2) and MnO(2). Using triclosan and chlorophene as probe compounds, pseudofirst-order kinetic results showed that Al(2)O(3) had the strongest inhibitory effect on MnO(2) reactivity, followed by SiO(2) and then TiO(2). Al(3+) ion or soluble SiO(2) had comparable inhibitory effects as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2), indicating the dominant inhibitory mechanism was surface complexation/precipitation of Al/Si species on MnO(2) surfaces. TiO(2) inhibited MnO(2) reactivity only when a limited amount of triclosan was present. Due to strong adsorption and slow desorption of triclosan by TiO(2), precursor-complex formation between triclosan and MnO(2) was much slower and likely became the new rate-limiting step (as opposed to electron transfer in all other cases). These mechanisms can also explain the observed adsorption behavior of triclosan by the binary oxide mixtures and single oxides.

  20. Identification of malassezia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindo A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia spp. are lipophilic unipolar yeasts recognized as commensals of skin that may be pathogenic under certain conditions. The genus Malassezia now comprises of seven species. This study was aimed at using a simple practical approach to speciate Malassezia yeasts from clinical material. Seventy skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor infection, positive in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH, were cultured onto modified Dixon′s agar (mDixon′s agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA and incubated at 32ºC. Speciation was done on the basis of Gram stain morphology, catalase test, and utilization of Tweens. Out of 70 scrapings 48 (68.75% showed growth on mDixon′s agar. The commonest isolate was M. sympodialis (28, 58% followed by M. globosa (19, 40% and one isolate was (2% of M. restricta. M. sympodialis was the commonest species affecting our population and there was no isolation of M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis and M. furfur.

  1. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  2. Save Our Species: Protecting Endangered Species from Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This full-size poster profiles 11 wildlife species that are endangered. Color illustrations of animals and plants are accompanied by narrative describing their habitats and reasons for endangerment. The reverse side of the poster contains information on the Endangered Species Act, why protecting endangered and threatened species is important, how…

  3. Suppression of Methionine Oxidation of a Pharmaceutical Antibody Stored in a Polymer-Based Syringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masato, Amano; Kiichi, Fukui; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Oxidation of methionine residues is one of the well-known deteriorations in monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Because methionine oxidation may affect their efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile, oxidation levels should be strictly controlled during their storage period. In this study, we revealed that when a therapeutic antibody was filled into a cyclo olefin polymer-based syringe and stored in a blister pack with an oxygen absorber, the methionine oxidation production under thermal or light stress was suppressed because of the reduction in the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Also unexpectedly, fewer amounts of the high-molecular-weight species and the acidic variants of the antibody were generated under thermal or light stress. Although the high-molecular-weight species contains methionine oxidants at similar levels to those in a monomer species, they were likely to be constituted from a higher amount of the oxidative species of internal disulfide linkage, tyrosine, or histidine. Because the dissolved oxygen could be readily removed from the mAb solution in the polymer-based syringe owing to its high gas permeability, this study shows the advantages of the polymer-based syringe with an oxygen absorber over glass syringes in terms of the suppression of the methionine oxidation and oxidative high molecular species.

  4. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  5. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  6. Chronic deficit in nitric oxide elicits oxidative stress and augments T-type calcium-channel contribution to vascular tone of rodent arteries and arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howitt, Lauren; Kuo, Ivana Y; Ellis, Anthie;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: As cardiovascular disease is characterized by reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, our aim was to determine the impact of this change on the mechanism underlying vascular tone of pressurized arteries in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used pressurized cerebral and mesenteric......, by regulating the bioavailability of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase. Our data provide evidence for a novel causal link between nitric oxide deficit, oxidative stress, and T-type calcium channel function....

  7. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  8. C-H bond activation by metal-superoxo species: what drives high reactivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Azaj; Jayapal, Prabha; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-01-01

    Metal-superoxo species are ubiquitous in metalloenzymes and bioinorganic chemistry and are known for their high reactivity and their ability to activate inert C-H bonds. The comparative oxidative abilities of M-O2(.-) species (M = Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III), and Cu(II)) towards C-H bond activation reaction are presented. These superoxo species generated by oxygen activation are found to be aggressive oxidants compared to their high-valent metal-oxo counterparts generated by O⋅⋅⋅O bond cleavage. Our calculations illustrate the superior oxidative abilities of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-superoxo species compared to the others and suggest that the reactivity may be correlated to the magnetic exchange parameter.

  9. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  11. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  12. New species of Malaysian ferns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1962-01-01

    The present paper includes descriptions of several new species of ferns found among recent collections from various parts of Malaysia; also two new combinations of names of species which are of interest on account of their taxonomic history.

  13. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, D.W.; Dalsgaard, B.; Svenning, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship betw...

  14. DJ-1 protects melanocytes against H2O2-induced oxidative stress via reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species(ROS)and inhibiting cell apoptosis%DJ-1降低细胞内ROS并抑制细胞凋亡保护黑素细胞抵抗H2O2诱导的氧化应激

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志勇; 刘玲; 李春英; 坚哲; 李凯; 李强; 高天文

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate DJ-1 expression and protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in primary human melanocytes.Methods The expression and location of DJ-1 in primary melanocytes were identified by immunofluorescence.After cultured melanocytes were exposed to H2O2 for 24 hours,modified MTT assay was used to assess the proliferation of cells and to choose the suitable concentration of H2O2 for the following experiment.Western blot was used to detect D J-1 expression in melanocytes after being treated with 0.5 mmol/L H2O2 for 24 hours.Some melanocytes were divided into 3 groups to be reversely transfected with PBS(mock control group),non-targeting siRNA(negative control group)and DJ-1 targeting siRNA(DJ-1 group).Optical microscopy was utilized to observe the morphologic changes of transfected melanocytes.At 48 hours after the transfection,the melanocytes were stimulated with H2O2 for 24 hours.Subsequently,modified MTT assay,2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate(DCFH-DA)and annexin Ⅴ-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide were used to determine cell viability,intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)level and apoptosis rate respectively.Results DJ-1 was expressed in both melanocyte nucleus and cytoplasm,and predominantly in the nucleus.H2O2 inhibited the cell viability in a dose dependent manner.After treatment with H2O2 of 0.5 mmol/L for 24 hours,the cell viability began to decrease in melanocytes with the expression level of DJ-1 being 2.23 times that in the untreated melanocytes(both P < 0.05).Compared with the mock control group,the dendrites of melanocytes in DJ-1 group were obviously shortened with cytoplasm vacuolization.After 24-hour treatment with H2O2 of 0.5 mmol/L,the cell viability in the DJ-1 group dropped to 35% of that in the mock control group(P < 0.05),while the intracellular ROS fluorescence intensity( FI) and apoptosis rate were higher in the DJ-1 group than in the mock control group (902 ± 40 vs.529± 32,58q%

  15. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  16. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed on...

  17. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  18. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  19. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  20. Barrier and porous anodic oxides on InSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleiman, A.; Hashimoto, T. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.skeldon@manchester.ac.uk; Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Echeverria, F. [Dpto de Ing. Metalurgica y de Materiales, Universidad de Antioquia, Oficina 18-240, Calle 67 No. 53-108, A.A. 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Graham, M.J.; Sproule, G.I.; Moisa, S. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal Road, Ottawa, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Habazaki, H. [Graduate Engineering School, Hokkaido University, N13 W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Bailey, P.; Noakes, T.C.Q. [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Anodizing of InSb at 5 mA cm{sup -2} in sodium tungstate electrolyte is shown to produce barrier-type amorphous oxide at relatively low voltages, to about 40 V, and porous-type amorphous oxide at increased voltages. The barrier-type amorphous oxide, consisting of units of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, distributed relatively uniformly throughout the film, develops at a formation ratio of 2.2 {+-} 0.2 nm V{sup -1}. The outer 15-20% of the film also contains tungsten species. The relatively high efficiency of barrier film growth reduces significantly with transition to porous oxide, which is associated additionally with generation of oxygen at the film surface. The final oxide, at 65 V, comprises pores, of typical diameter 80 nm, orientated approximately normal to the substrate and extending from a barrier region to the film surface.

  1. The immunopathogenic role of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, cancer, and aging. Basal levels of ROS production in cells could be related to several physiological functions including cell proliferation, apoptosis and homeostasis. However, excessive ROS production above basal levels would impair and oxidize DNA, lipids, sugars and proteins and consequently result in dysfunction of these molecules within cells and finally cell death. A leading theory of the cause of aging indicates that free radical damage and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Because the brain utilizes 20% more oxygen than other tissues that also undergo mitochondrial respiration, the potential for ROS exposure increases. In fact, AD has been demonstrated to be highly associated with cellular oxidative stress, including augmentation of protein oxidation, protein nitration, glycoloxidation and lipid peroxidation as well as accumulation of Amyloid β (Aβ). The treatment with anti-oxidant compounds can provide protection against oxidative stress and Aβ toxicity. In this review, our aim was to clarify the role of ROS in pathogenesis of AD and will discuss therapeutic efficacy of some antioxidants studies in recent years in this disease.

  2. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C. Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of oxidative stress in melanoma development, we speculated that this increased susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress (and greater reliance on p16 for suppression of ROS may explain why genetic compromise of p16 is more commonly associated with predisposition to melanoma rather than other cancers. Here we show that the presence of melanin accounts for this differential oxidative stress in normal and p16-depleted melanocytes. Thus the presence of melanin in the skin appears to be a double-edged sword: it protects melanocytes as well as neighboring keratinocytes in the skin through its capacity to absorb UV radiation, but its synthesis in melanocytes results in higher levels of intracellular ROS that may increase melanoma susceptibility.

  3. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  4. Crosstalk between oxidative and nitrosative stress and arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozos, Ioana; Luca, Constantin Tudor

    2017-02-01

    Arterial stiffness, the expression of reduced arterial elasticity, is an effective predictor of cardiovascular disorders. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between exposure to toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant systems. The increase in reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is termed nitrosative stress. We review the main mechanisms and products linking arterial stiffness with oxidative and nitrosative stress in several disorders, focusing on recent experimental and clinical data, and the mechanisms explaining benefits of antioxidant therapy. Oxidative and nitrosative stress play important roles in arterial stiffness elevation in several disorders, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity, peripheral arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, thalassemia, Kawasaki disease and malignant disorders. Oxidative and nitrosative stress are responsible for endothelial dysfunction due to uncoupling of the nitric oxide synthase, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA in vascular endothelial cells, associated with inflammation, arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. Regular physical exercise, caloric restriction, red wine, statins, sartans, metformin, oestradiol, curcumin and combinations of antioxidant vitamins are therapeutic strategies that may decrease arterial stiffness and oxidative stress thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. ROS and RNS represent potential therapeutic targets for preventing progression of arterial stiffness.

  5. Timeless standards for species delimitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Dalton S; Santos, Charles Morphy D; Krell, Frank-Thorsten; Dubois, Alain; Nihei, Silvio S; Oliveira, Otto M P; Pont, Adrian; Song, Hojun; Verdade, Vanessa K; Fachin, Diego A; Klassa, Bruna; Lamas, Carlos José E; Oliveira, Sarah S; Carvalho, Claudio J B De; Mello-Patiu, Cátia A; Hajdu, Eduardo; Couri, Márcia S; Silva, Vera C; Capellari, Renato S; Falaschi, Rafaela L; Feitosa, Rodrigo M; Prendini, Lorenzo; Pombal, José P Jr; Fernández, Fernando; Rocha, Rosana M; Lattke, John E; Caramaschi, Ulisses; Duarte, Marcelo; Marques, Antonio Carlos; Reis, Roberto E; Kurina, Olavi; Takiya, Daniela M; Tavares, Marcos; Fernandes, Daniel Silva; Franco, Francisco Luís; Cuezzo, Fabiana; Paulson, Dennis; Guénard, Benoit; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Steiner, Florian M; Fisher, Brian L; Johnson, Robert A; Delsinne, Thibaut Dominique; Donoso, David A; Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Carpenter, James M; Herman, Lee; Grimaldi, David

    2016-07-08

    Recently a new species of bombyliid fly, Marleyimyia xylocopae, was described by Marshall & Evenhuis (2015) based on two photographs taken during fieldwork in the Republic of South Africa. This species has no preserved holotype. The paper generated some buzz, especially among dipterists, because in most cases photographs taken in the field provide insufficient information for properly diagnosing and documenting species of Diptera.

  6. Electrosmog and species conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: abalmorimartinez@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Despite the widespread use of wireless telephone networks around the world, authorities and researchers have paid little attention to the potential harmful effects of mobile phone radiation on wildlife. This paper briefly reviews the available scientific information on this topic and recommends further studies and specific lines of research to confirm or refute the experimental results to date. Controls must be introduced and technology rendered safe for the environment, particularly, threatened species. - Highlights: • Studies have shown effects in both animals and plants. • Two thirds of the studies reported ecological effects. • There is little research in this area and further research is needed. • The technology must be safe. • Controls should be introduced to mitigate the possible effects.

  7. Fiber type-specific nitric oxide protects oxidative myofibers against cachectic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengli Yu

    Full Text Available Oxidative skeletal muscles are more resistant than glycolytic muscles to cachexia caused by chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism for the protection associated with oxidative phenotype remains elusive. We hypothesized that differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO determine the fiber type susceptibility. Here, we show that intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS in mice resulted in higher level of ROS and greater expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiqitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx/atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1, in glycolytic white vastus lateralis muscle than in oxidative soleus muscle. By contrast, NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNos and antioxidant gene expression were greatly enhanced in oxidative, but not in glycolytic muscles, suggesting that NO mediates protection against muscle wasting. NO donors enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and blocked cytokine/endotoxin-induced MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression in cultured myoblasts and in skeletal muscle in vivo. Our studies reveal a novel protective mechanism in oxidative myofibers mediated by enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and suggest a significant value of enhanced NO signaling as a new therapeutic strategy for cachexia.

  8. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea W.U. Busch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.

  9. Steel oxidation phenomena during Molten Corium siliceous Concrete Interaction (MCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Brusset, Mathieu; Piluso, Pascal [CEA/DEN/Cadarache, SMTA/LPMA, 13108 St. Paul lez-Durance (France); Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 rue du four solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu Odeillo (France); Bottomley, Paul David; Wiss, Thierry [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe, German (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Corium metallic phase oxidation during corium-concrete interaction is studied. • Steel is separated from the oxide melt or emulsified inside the oxide melt. • Oxidation layer depends on the nature of the interfaces and location in the corium. • Oxides formed are (Fe,Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Concrete gases are not sufficient to explain the experimental steel oxidation. - Abstract: The VULCANO facility at CEA Cadarache is a Molten Corium Concrete Interaction (MCCI) installation for testing material reactions representative of the late stages of a nuclear reactor severe accident. The objectives of the VBS-U3 test were to study ablation phenomena and oxidation of the metallic phase when two liquid phases are present: oxide phase and metallic phase (steel). In this paper we describe the materials post-test analysis of the VULCANO VBS-U3 test performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements in Karlsruhe (JRC-ITU) with the focus on the metallic phase oxidation of the corium. Post-test analyses show that the remaining metallic phase of the corium is under two forms: drops discontinuously dispersed in the oxide phase forming an emulsion and a continuous metallic ingot clearly separated from the oxide phase. In average, taking into account or not the metallic phase dispersed in the oxide phase, between 60% and 70% of the steel has been oxidized. The size of the drops and their proportion in the oxide phase is depending on their distance from horizontal and vertical walls of the concrete test section. Oxidation mechanisms are mainly depending on two parameters: nature of the metallic interface and localization in the test section. Calculations at thermodynamic equilibrium show that the only product from steel oxidation is (Fe,Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is never formed. Moreover taking into account the two gaseous species coming from the concrete (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O), considered up to now as being the only sources

  10. Theoretical predictions of arsenic and selenium species under atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan-Pendergast, M.T.; Przybylek, M.; Lindblad, M.; Wilcox, J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    Thermochemical properties of arsenic and selenium species thought to be released into the atmosphere during the coal combustion were examined using ab initio methods. At various levels of theory, calculated geometries and vibrational frequencies of the species were compared with experimental data, where available. Through a comparison of equilibrium constants for a series of gaseous arsenic and selenium oxidation reactions involving OH and HO{sub 2}, five thermodynamically favored reactions were found. In addition, it was determined that all favored reactions were more likely to go to completion tinder tropospheric, rather than stratospheric, conditions.

  11. New reagents for detecting free radicals and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Amiri Olia, Mina; Schiesser, Carl H; Taylor, Michelle K

    2014-09-21

    Free radicals and oxidative stress play important roles in the deterioration of materials, and free radicals are important intermediates in many biological processes. The ability to detect these reactive species is a key step on the road to their understanding and ultimate control. This short review highlights recent progress in the development of reagents for the detection of free radicals and reactive oxygen species with broad application to materials science as well as biology.

  12. In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Characterization of the Synthesis of Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) synthesised from GO, has a promising future in fields ranging from electronics to energy technologies[1]. GO may be synthesized by the modified Hummer’s method[2], where a mixture of potassium permanganate and concentrated sulfuric acid forms...... the ground pillar for the oxidation of graphite to GO. rGO can be synthesized by a broad range of methods, with the chemical and the thermal reduction routes being very common[3]. The synthesis mechanism of GO by the modified Hummer’s method is still unknown, even though the active oxidizing species...... by placing a mixture of permanganate and sulphuric acid in a capillary next to graphite. The synthesis was then initiated by gently pushing the fluid mixture into the powder with N2 gas. The in situ XRD of the GO synthes