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Sample records for al4o2cl102 oxide species

  1. Oxidation and detoxification of trivalent arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aposhian, H. Vasken; Zakharyan, Robert A.; Avram, Mihaela D.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Wollenberg, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic compounds with a +3 oxidation state are more toxic than analogous compounds with a +5 oxidation state, for example, arsenite versus arsenate, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III ) versus monomethylarsonic acid (MMA V ), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA III ) versus dimethylarsinic acid (DMA V ). It is no longer believed that the methylation of arsenite is the beginning of a methylation-mediated detoxication pathway. The oxidation of these +3 compounds to their less toxic +5 analogs by hydrogen peroxide needs investigation and consideration as a potential mechanism for detoxification. Xanthine oxidase uses oxygen to oxidize hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. Hydrogen peroxide and reactive oxygen are also products. The oxidation of +3 arsenicals by the hydrogen peroxide produced in the xanthine oxidase reaction was blocked by catalase or allopurinol but not by scavengers of the hydroxy radical, e.g., mannitol or potassium iodide. Melatonin, the singlet oxygen radical scavenger, did not inhibit the oxidation. The production of H 2 O 2 by xanthine oxidase may be an important route for decreasing the toxicity of trivalent arsenic species by oxidizing them to their less toxic pentavalent analogs. In addition, there are many other reactions that produce hydrogen peroxide in the cell. Although chemists have used hydrogen peroxide for the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate to purify water, we are not aware of any published account of its potential importance in the detoxification of trivalent arsenicals in biological systems. At present, this oxidation of the +3 oxidation state arsenicals is based on evidence from in vitro experiments. In vivo experiments are needed to substantiate the role and importance of H 2 O 2 in arsenic detoxication in mammals

  2. Thermal oxidation of silicon with two oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild-Maior, A.A.; Filimon, S.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model for the thermal oxidation of silicon in wet oxygen is presented. It is shown that the presence of oxygen in the oxidation furnace has an important effect when the water temperature is not too high (less than about 65 deg C). The model is in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  3. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    satisfactorily oxidation of OCS over a wide range of stoichiometric air–fuel ratios (0.5 ≤λ≤7.3), temperatures (450–1700 K), and pressures (0.02–3.0 atm) under dry conditions. The governing reaction mechanisms are outlined based on calculations with the kinetic model. The oxidation rate of OCS is controlled...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  4. Free radicals, reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress and its classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-12-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) initially considered as only damaging agents in living organisms further were found to play positive roles also. This paper describes ROS homeostasis, principles of their investigation and technical approaches to investigate ROS-related processes. Especial attention is paid to complications related to experimental documentation of these processes, their diversity, spatiotemporal distribution, relationships with physiological state of the organisms. Imbalance between ROS generation and elimination in favor of the first with certain consequences for cell physiology has been called "oxidative stress". Although almost 30years passed since the first definition of oxidative stress was introduced by Helmut Sies, to date we have no accepted classification of oxidative stress. In order to fill up this gape here classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity is proposed. Due to that oxidative stress may be classified as basal oxidative stress (BOS), low intensity oxidative stress (LOS), intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS), and high intensity oxidative stress (HOS). Another classification of potential interest may differentiate three categories such as mild oxidative stress (MOS), temperate oxidative stress (TOS), and finally severe (strong) oxidative stress (SOS). Perspective directions of investigations in the field include development of sophisticated classification of oxidative stresses, accurate identification of cellular ROS targets and their arranged responses to ROS influence, real in situ functions and operation of so-called "antioxidants", intracellular spatiotemporal distribution and effects of ROS, deciphering of molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular response to ROS attacks, and ROS involvement in realization of normal cellular functions in cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A model for oxidizing species concentrations in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Chexal, B.; Pathania, R.; Chun, J.; Ballinger, R.; Abdollahian, D.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate and control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel internal components requires knowledge of the concentration of oxidizing species that affects the electrochemical potentials in various regions of a BWR. In a BWR flow circuit, as water flows through the radiation field, the radiolysis process and chemical reactions lead to the production of species such as oxygen, hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide. Since chemistry measurements are difficult inside BWRs, analytical tools have been developed by Ruiz and Lin, Ibe and Uchida and Chun and Ballinger for estimating the concentration of species that provide the necessary input for water chemistry control and material protection

  6. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  7. Total free radical species and oxidation equivalent in polluted air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoying; Jia, Shiming; Niu, Xiuli; Tian, Haoqi; Liu, Yanrong; Chen, Xuefu; Li, Lan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Shi, Gaofeng

    2017-12-31

    Free radicals are the most important chemical intermediate or agent of the atmosphere and influenced by thousands of reactants. The free radicals determine the oxidizing power of the polluted air. Various gases present in smog or haze are oxidants and induce organ and cellular damage via generation of free radical species. At present, however, the high variability of total free radicals in polluted air has prevented the detection of possible trends or distributions in the concentration of those species. The total free radicals are a kind of contaminants with colorless, tasteless characteristics, and almost imperceptible by human body. Here we present total free radical detection and distribution characteristics, and analyze the effects of total free radicals in polluted air on human health. We find that the total free radical values can be described by not only a linear dependence on ozone at higher temperature period, but also a linear delay dependence on particulate matter at lower temperature period throughout the measurement period. The total free radical species distribution is decrease from west to east in Lanzhou, which closely related to the distribution of the air pollutants. The total free radical oxidation capacity in polluted air roughly matches the effects of tobacco smoke produced by the incomplete combustion of a controlled amount of tobacco in a smoke chamber. A relatively unsophisticated chromatographic fingerprint similarity is used for indicating preliminarily the effect of total free radicals in polluted air on human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling in bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Moriarty, Roisin; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    It is now well accepted that radiation induced bystander effects can occur in cells exposed to media from irradiated cells. The aim of this study was to follow the bystander cells in real time following addition of media from irradiated cells and to determine the effect of inhibiting these signals. A human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells, was irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) with γ irradiation, conditioned medium was harvested after one hour and added to recipient bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, Glutathione levels, caspase activation, cytotoxicity and cell viability was measured after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media to bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in bystander cells treated with 0.5Gy ICCM were analysed in real time using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. The levels of reactive oxygen species were also measured in real time after the addition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase pathway inhibitors. ROS and glutathione levels were observed to increase after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). Caspase activation was found to increase 4 hours after irradiated cell conditioned media treatment (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM) and this increase was observed up to 8 hours and there after a reduction in caspase activation was observed. A decrease in cell viability was observed but no major change in cytotoxicity was found in HaCaT cells after treatment with irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). This study involved the identification of key signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione and caspases generated in bystander cells. These results suggest a clear connection between reactive oxygen species and cell survival pathways with persistent production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in bystander cells following exposure to irradiated cell

  9. Aqueous chemistry of chlorine: chemistry, analysis, and environmental fate of reactive oxidant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R.L.; Carpenter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews (1) the chemistry of chlorine relative to its reactions in fresh, estuarine, and marine waters and the formation of reactive oxidant species; (2) the current status of chemical analysis of reactive chlorine species and chlorine-produced oxidant species relative to analysis of low concentrations (microgram-per-liter range) and determination of accuracy and precision of methods; and (3) the environmental fate of chlorine and chlorine-produced oxidant species.

  10. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  11. Hydrous Ferric Oxides in Sediment Catalyze Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species during Sulfide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Murphy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article describes the formation of reactive oxygen species as a result of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by Fe(III-containing sediments suspended in oxygenated seawater over the pH range 7.00 and 8.25. Sediment samples were obtained from across the coastal littoral zone in South Carolina, US, at locations from the beach edge to the forested edge of a Spartina dominated estuarine salt marsh and suspended in aerated seawater. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production was initiated in sediment suspensions by the addition of sodium bisulfide. The subsequent loss of HS-, formation of Fe(II (as indicated by Ferrozine, and superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were monitored over time. The concentration of superoxide rose from the baseline and then persisted at an apparent steady state concentration of approximately 500 nanomolar at pH 8.25 and 200 nanomolar at pH 7.00 respectively until >97% hydrogen sulfide was consumed. Measured superoxide was used to predict hydrogen peroxide yield based on superoxide dismutation. Dismutation alone quantitatively predicted hydrogen peroxide formation at pH 8.25 but over predicted hydrogen peroxide formation at pH 7 by a factor of approximately 102. Experiments conducted with episodic spikes of added hydrogen peroxide indicated rapid hydrogen peroxide consumption could account for its apparent low instantaneous yield, presumably the result of its reaction with Fe(II species, polysulfides or bisulfite. All sediment samples were characterized for total Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, Co and hydrous ferric oxide by acid extraction followed by mass spectrometric or spectroscopic characterization. Sediments with the highest loadings of hydrous ferric oxide were the only sediments that produced significant dissolved Fe(II species or ROS as a result of sulfide exposure.

  12. Formation of Supported Graphene Oxide: Evidence for Enolate Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Zbynek; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Netzer, Falko P; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2018-04-18

    Graphene oxides are promising materials for novel electronic devices or anchoring of the active sites for catalytic applications. Here we focus on understanding the atomic oxygen (AO) binding and mobility on different regions of graphene (Gr) on Ru(0001). Differences in the Gr/Ru lattices result in the superstructure, which offers an array of distinct adsorption sites. We employ scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory to map out the chemical identity and stability of prepared AO functionalities in different Gr regions. The AO diffusion is utilized to establish that in the regions that are close to the metal substrate the terminally bonded enolate groups are strongly preferred over bridge-bonded epoxy groups. No oxygen species are observed on the graphene regions that are far from the underlying Ru, indicating their low relative stability. This study provides a clear fundamental basis for understanding the local structural, electronic factors and C-Ru bond strengthening/weakening processes that affect the stability of enolate and epoxy species.

  13. Former land-use and tree species affect nitrogen oxide emissions from a tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Erickson; Eric A. Davidson; Michael Keller

    2002-01-01

    Species composition in successional dry forests in the tropics varies widely, but the effect of this variation on biogeochemical processes is not well known. We examined fluxes of N oxides (nitrous and nitric oxide), soil N cycling, and litter chemistry (C/N ratio) in four successional dry forests on similar soils in western Puerto Rico with differing species...

  14. Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

    2013-05-07

    Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01Ba, Ca, La, or K; 0.02oxides.

  15. Comparing and interpreting laboratory results of Hg oxidation by a chlorine species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Hans; Romero, Carlos E.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    2007-01-01

    Several researchers have performed experimental work in attempts to explain the effects of various flue-gas components on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg 0 ). Some have concluded that water (H 2 O) inhibits Hg oxidation by chlorine (Cl 2 ). In recently published work, it was found that sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxide (NO) also have an inhibitory effect on Hg oxidation. This paper aims to serve three purposes. First, to present data obtained in a laboratory scale apparatus, designed to test the effects of Cl 2 on the oxidation of Hg 0 with respect to temperature. The results show that as temperature increases, Cl 2 is less effective as an Hg oxidizing agent. Second, this paper presents a consolidation of data taken from several sources, where the effects of various flue-gas components on the oxidation of Hg 0 is observed and discussed. The summary of these results shows the following general trends: at high temperatures, hydrogen chloride (HCl) is the primary chlorine species responsible for Hg 0 oxidation, while at lower temperatures, Cl 2 is the dominant species. Third, a simple two reaction model is suggested to predict the experimental data shown in this paper. The results show that the predicted percent Hg oxidation values correspond very well with the observed experimental values

  16. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hervouet, E.; Čížková, Alena; Demont, J.; Vojtíšková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, N.; Keijer, J.; Simonnet, H.; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, S.; Godinot, C.; Houštěk, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2008), s. 1528-1537 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA303/07/0781 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carcinoma * mitochondrial biogenesis * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.930, year: 2008

  17. Super-oxidation of silicon nanoclusters: magnetism and reactive oxygen species at the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeshkin, Sergey; Baturin, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Evgeny; Matsko, Nikita; Uspenskii, Yurii; Naumova, Anastasia; Feya, Oleg; Schoonen, Martin A.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon nanoclusters depending on the temperature and oxygen pressure is explored from first principles using the evolutionary algorithm, and structural and thermodynamic analysis. From our calculations of 90 SinOm clusters we found that under normal conditions oxidation does not stop at the stoichiometric SiO2 composition, as it does in bulk silicon, but goes further placing extra oxygen atoms on the cluster surface. These extra atoms are responsible for light emission, relevant to reactive oxygen species and many of them are magnetic. We argue that the super-oxidation effect is size-independent and discuss its relevance to nanotechnology and miscellaneous applications, including biomedical ones.

  18. Mechanism of pyrogallol red oxidation induced by free radicals and reactive oxidant species. A kinetic and spectroelectrochemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atala, E; Velásquez, G; Vergara, C; Mardones, C; Reyes, J; Tapia, R A; Quina, F; Mendes, M A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Aspée, A; López-Alarcón, C

    2013-05-02

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) presents high reactivity toward reactive (radical and nonradical) species (RS). This property of PGR, together with its characteristic spectroscopic absorption in the visible region, has allowed developing methodologies aimed at evaluating the antioxidant capacity of foods, beverages, and human fluids. These methods are based on the evaluation of the consumption of PGR induced by RS and its inhibition by antioxidants. However, at present, there are no reports regarding the degradation mechanism of PGR, limiting the extrapolation to how antioxidants behave in different systems comprising different RS. In the present study, we evaluate the kinetics of PGR consumption promoted by different RS (peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide, and hypochlorite) using spectroscopic techniques and detection of product by HPLC mass spectrometry. The same pattern of oxidation and spectroscopic properties of the products is observed, independently of the RS employed. Mass analysis indicates the formation of only one product identified as a quinone derivative, excluding the formation of peroxides or hydroperoxides and/or chlorinated compounds, in agreement with FOX's assays and oxygen consumption experiments. Cyclic voltammetry, carried out at different pH's, shows an irreversible oxidation of PGR, indicating the initial formation of a phenoxy radical and a second charge transfer reaction generating an ortho-quinone derivative. Spectroelectrochemical oxidation of PGR shows oxidation products with identical UV-visible absorption properties to those observed in RS-induced oxidation.

  19. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Couto Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise.

  20. Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Elisa Couto; Silva, Albená Nunes; de Oliveira, Marta Rubino

    2012-01-01

    This review offers an overview of the influence of reactive species produced during exercise and their effect on exercise adaptation. Reactive species and free radicals are unstable molecules that oxidize other molecules in order to become stable. Although they play important roles in our body, they can also lead to oxidative stress impairing diverse cellular functions. During exercise, reactive species can be produced mainly, but not exclusively, by the following mechanisms: electron leak at the mitochondrial electron transport chain, ischemia/reperfusion and activation of endothelial xanthine oxidase, inflammatory response, and autooxidation of catecholamines. Chronic exercise also leads to the upregulation of the body's antioxidant defence mechanism, which helps minimize the oxidative stress that may occur after an acute bout of exercise. Recent studies show a beneficial role of the reactive species, produced during a bout of exercise, that lead to important training adaptations: angiogenesis, mitochondria biogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy. The adaptations occur depending on the mechanic, and consequently biochemical, stimulus within the muscle. This is a new area of study that promises important findings in the sphere of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and exercise. PMID:22701757

  1. Comparison of oxidative stress in four Tillandsia species exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčik, Jozef; Babula, Petr; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Hedbavny, Josef

    2014-07-01

    This is first study comparing four morphologically variable species of the genus Tillandsia and therefore various responses to the cadmium (Cd) action were expected. In accordance, Cd accumulation increased in order Tillandsia fasciculata Tillandsia brachycaulos Tillandsia pruinosa Tillandsia capillaris, reaching 29.6 and 197.4 μg g(-1) DW in first and last species after watering with 2 μM Cd(2+) solution over 30 days. Fluorescence visualization of oxidative stress confirmed increase in ROS and especially elevation in hydroperoxides though no visible symptoms appeared on the plants. At the same time, nitric oxide generation and nitroso-glutathione depletion by Cd treatment were typically observed. Fluorescence staining of Cd using two dyes (PhenGreen and Leadmium) showed that Leadmium fits better with AAS quantification. Macro- and micro-nutrients were not considerably affected except for zinc. Reduced glutathione content was the highest in control T. fasciculata while oxidized glutathione in T. capillaris. Ascorbic acid amount revealed extreme quantitative differences among species and decreased in T. fasciculata only. Free amino acids accumulation was similar among species except for T. capillaris and Cd caused both depletion and increase but without high quantitative differences. Data are explanatively discussed in the context of limited literature related to oxidative stress in epiphytic plants and with general responses of plants to cadmium/heavy metals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability of oxidized iron species and the redox budget of slab-derived fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Valle, C.; Hin, R.; Testemale, D.; Borca, C.; Grolimund, D.

    2017-12-01

    The high oxidation state of subduction zone magmas compared to magmas from other locations might result from the influx of oxidized fluid from the subducted oceanic plate into the mantle wedge. However, the nature of the chemical agent(s) and the mechanism responsible for the transfer of the oxidized signature from the slab to the mantle wedge remains poorly understood. In this contribution, we will discuss the oxidizing capacity of slab-derived fluids in the light of experimental results of the solubility and speciation of iron in high-pressure fluids that mimic the slab flux. Iron-bearing mineral assemblages were equilibrated with chlorinated aqueous fluids and hydrous granitic melts at different oxygen fugacities relevant for the present day crust/mantle. The concentration of iron and the distribution of stability of oxidized iron species were monitored up to 2.5 GPa and 800 °C using a combination of diamond trap experiments and XANES measurements in diamond anvil cells. The results illustrate the role of coordination chemistry involving halogen and polymerized species in the stability of oxidized iron in the fluids. The concentration of Fe3+ in the fluids progressively decreases as temperature increases, regardless of fluid composition and pressure. This implies that the fluid capacity to transport Fe3+ at high temperature may be limited, even at the redox conditions relevant for the present day crust and mantle. With the new experimental results, we place constrains on the oxidizing capacity of Fe-bearing metasomatic fluids and discuss the transfer of the oxidizing signature and the conditions for the genesis of oxidized arc magmas.

  3. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au 3 + and Ag 3 + clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au 3 + the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO 2 from N 2 O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag 3 O x + (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N 2 O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  4. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-01

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au3+ and Ag3+ clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au3+ the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO2 from N2O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag3Ox+ (n = 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N2O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  5. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioavailability of cadmium adsorbed on various oxides minerals to wetland plant species Phragmites australis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang He; Jia Yongfeng; Wang Shaofeng; Zhu Huijie; Wu Xing

    2009-01-01

    The bioavailability of heavy metals strongly depends on their speciation in the environment. The effect of different chemical speciations of cadmium ions (i.e. adsorbed on different oxide minerals) on its bioavailability to wetland plant Phragmites australis was studied. Goethite, magnetite, gibbsite, alumina, and manganese oxide were chosen as representatives of metal (hydr)oxides commonly present in sediment. The cultivar system with Hoagland solution as nutrition supply, and single metal oxide with adsorbed Cd as contaminant was applied to study Cd accumulation by P. australis. The bioaccumulation degree in root after the 45-day treatment followed the order: Al(OH) 3 > Al 2 O 3 > Fe 3 O 4 > MnO 2 > FeOOH. The concentration of Cd in stem and leaf followed a similar order although it was considerably lower than that in root. Low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs), acetic acid, malic acid and citric acid were used to evaluate the desorbability of Cd from different oxides, which can be indicative of Cd-oxide bonding strength and Cd bioavailability. Desorption of Cd by acetic acid and malic acid followed the order: Al(OH) 3 > Fe 3 O 4 > Al 2 O 3 > FeOOH > MnO 2 , while by citric acid: Al(OH) 3 ≥ Al 2 O 3 > Fe 3 O 4 > FeOOH > MnO 2 . This was consistent with the Cd accumulation degree in the plant. Cd adsorbed on Al(OH) 3 was the most easily desorbable species and most bioavailable to P. australis among the oxide minerals, whereas MnO 2 adsorbed Cd was least desorbable by LMWOAs hence constituted the least bioavailable Cd species adsorbed on the oxide minerals.

  7. Bioavailability of cadmium adsorbed on various oxides minerals to wetland plant species Phragmites australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang He, E-mail: he.wangworld@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jia Yongfeng, E-mail: yongfeng.jia@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang Shaofeng [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhu Huijie; Wu Xing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-08-15

    The bioavailability of heavy metals strongly depends on their speciation in the environment. The effect of different chemical speciations of cadmium ions (i.e. adsorbed on different oxide minerals) on its bioavailability to wetland plant Phragmites australis was studied. Goethite, magnetite, gibbsite, alumina, and manganese oxide were chosen as representatives of metal (hydr)oxides commonly present in sediment. The cultivar system with Hoagland solution as nutrition supply, and single metal oxide with adsorbed Cd as contaminant was applied to study Cd accumulation by P. australis. The bioaccumulation degree in root after the 45-day treatment followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > MnO{sub 2} > FeOOH. The concentration of Cd in stem and leaf followed a similar order although it was considerably lower than that in root. Low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs), acetic acid, malic acid and citric acid were used to evaluate the desorbability of Cd from different oxides, which can be indicative of Cd-oxide bonding strength and Cd bioavailability. Desorption of Cd by acetic acid and malic acid followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}, while by citric acid: Al(OH){sub 3} {>=} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}. This was consistent with the Cd accumulation degree in the plant. Cd adsorbed on Al(OH){sub 3} was the most easily desorbable species and most bioavailable to P. australis among the oxide minerals, whereas MnO{sub 2} adsorbed Cd was least desorbable by LMWOAs hence constituted the least bioavailable Cd species adsorbed on the oxide minerals.

  8. Phenol by direct hydroxylation of benzene with nitrous oxide - role of surface oxygen species in the reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitzmann, A.; Klemm, E.; Emig, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie 1; Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Technical Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Transient experiments in a Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) Reactor were performed to elucidate the role of surface oyxgen species in the oxidation of benzene to phenol on ZSM-5 type zeolites with nitrous oxide as a selective oxidant. It was shown by puls experiments with nitrous oxide that the mean lifetime of the generated surface oxygen species is between 0.2s at 500 C and about 4.2 s at 400 C. Afterwards the surface oxygen species desorb as molecular oxygen into the gas phase where total oxidation will take place if hydrocarbons are present. Dual puls experiments consisting of a nitrous oxide puls followed by a benzene puls allowed studying the reactivity of the surface oxygen species formed during the first puls. The observation of the phenol formation was impeded due to the strong sorption of phenol. Multipulse experiments were necessary to reach a pseudo steady state phenol yield. (orig.)

  9. Effects of preconditioning the rhizosphere of different plant species on biotic methane oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndanga, Éliane M; Lopera, Carolina B; Bradley, Robert L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2016-09-01

    The rhizosphere is known as the most active biogeochemical layer of the soil. Therefore, it could be a beneficial environment for biotic methane oxidation. The aim of this study was to document - by means of batch incubation tests - the kinetics of CH4 oxidation in rhizosphere soils that were previously exposed to methane. Soils from three pre-exposure to CH4 zones were sampled: the never-before pre-exposed (NEX), the moderately pre-exposed (MEX) and the very pre-exposed (VEX). For each pre-exposure zone, the rhizosphere of several plant species was collected, pre-incubated, placed in glass vials and submitted to CH4 concentrations varying from 0.5% to 10%. The time to the beginning of CH4 consumption and the CH4 oxidation rate were recorded. The results showed that the fastest CH4 consumption occurred for the very pre-exposed rhizosphere. Specifically, a statistically significant difference in CH4 oxidation half-life was found between the rhizosphere of the VEX vegetated with a mixture of different plants and the NEX vegetated with ryegrass. This difference was attributed to the combined effect of the preconditioning level and plant species as well as to the organic matter content. Regardless of the preconditioning level, the oxidation rate values obtained in this study were comparable to those reported in the reviewed literature for mature compost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira species from Dutch coastal North Sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Caroline Marianne Haaijer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite-oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to first enrich nitrifiers and ultimately nitrite oxidizers from Dutch coastal North Sea water. With solely ammonia as the substrate an active nitrifiying community consisting of novel marine Nitrosomonas aerobic ammonia oxidizers (AOB and Nitrospina and Nitrospira NOB was obtained which converted a maximum of 2 mmoles of ammonia per liter per day. Switching the feed of the culture to nitrite as a sole substrate resulted in a Nitrospira NOB dominated community (approximately 80% of the total microbial community based on FISH and metagenomic data converting a maximum of 3 mmoles of nitrite per liter per day. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Nitrospira enriched from the North Sea is a novel Nitrospira species with Nitrospira marina as the next taxonomically described relative (94% 16S rRNA sequence identity. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a cell plan typical for Nitrospira species. The cytoplasm contained electron light particles that might represent glycogen storage. A large periplasmic space was present which was filled with electron dense particles. Nitrospira-targeted PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of the enriched Nitrospira species in a time series of North Sea genomic DNA samples. The availability of this new Nitrospira species enrichment culture facilitates further in-depth studies such as determination of physiological constraints, and comparison to other NOB species.

  11. Oxidation, characterization, and separation of non-pertechnetate species in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, N.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Under DOE`s privatization initiative, Lockheed Martin and British Nuclear Fuels Limited are preparing to stabilize the caustic tank waste generated from plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Pretreatment of Hanford tank waste will separate it into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The scope of the technetium problem is indicated by its inventory in the waste: {approximately}2000 kg. Technetium would normally exist as the pertechnetate anion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, in aqueous solution. However, evidence obtained at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) indicates that the combination of radiolysis, heat, organic complexants, and time may have reduced and complexed a significant fraction of the technetium in the tank waste. These species are in a form that is not amenable to current separation techniques based on pertechnetate removal. Thus, it is crucial that methods be developed to set technetium to pertechnetate so these technologies can meet the required technetium decontamination factor. If this is not possible, then alternative separation processes will need to be developed to remove these non-pertechnetate species from the waste. The simplest, most cost-effective approach to this problem is to convert the non-pertechnetate species to pertechnetate. Chemical, electrochemical, and photochemical oxidation methods, as well as hydrothermal treatment, are being applied to Hanford waste samples to ensure that the method works on the unknown technetium species in the waste. The degree of oxidation will be measured by determining the technetium distribution coefficient, {sup Tc}K{sub d}, between the waste and Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin, and comparing it to the true pertechnetate K{sub d} value for the waste matrix. Other species in the waste, including all the organic material, could be oxidized by these methods, thus selective oxidation is desirable to minimize the cost, time, and secondary waste generation.

  12. Assessment of oxidant susceptibility of red blood cells in various species based on cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Michael J; Meiselman, Herbert J; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M; Pyne, Michael; Kakanis, Michael; Keane, James; Brenu, Ekua; Christy, Rhys; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the oxidant susceptibility of red blood cells (RBC) from four species (echidna, human, koala, Tasmanian devil) based on changes in cellular deformability. These species were specifically chosen based on differences in lifestyle and/or biology associated with varied levels of oxidative stress. The major focus was the influence of superoxide radicals generated within the cell (phenazine methosulfate, PMS, 50 μM) or in the extracellular medium (xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine, XO-HX, 0.1 U/ml XO) on RBC deformability at various shear stresses (SS). RBC deformability was assessed by laser-diffraction analysis using a "slit-flow ektacytometer". Both superoxide-generating treatments resulted in significant increases of methemoglobin for all species (p koala cells exhibited a similar sigmoid-like response to SS, short-beaked echidna values were markedly lower and only increased slightly with SS, while Tasmanian devil RBC were extremely rigid. The effect of XO-HX on RBC deformability was less when compared with PMS (i.e., smaller increase in rigidity) with the exception of Tasmanian devil RBC which exhibited essentially no deformation even at the highest SS; Tasmanian devil RBC response to XO-HX was thus comparable to that observed with PMS. Our findings indicate that ektacytometry can be used to determine the oxidant susceptibility of RBC from different species which varies significantly among mammals representing diverse lifestyles and evolutionary histories. These differences in susceptibility are consistent with species-specific discrepancies between observed and allometrically-predicted life spans and are compatible with the oxidant theory of aging.

  13. DetOx: a program for determining anomalous scattering factors of mixed-oxidation-state species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Karim J; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Nowell, Harriott; Thompson, Amber L; Allan, David R; Cooper, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Overlapping absorption edges will occur when an element is present in multiple oxidation states within a material. DetOx is a program for partitioning overlapping X-ray absorption spectra into contributions from individual atomic species and computing the dependence of the anomalous scattering factors on X-ray energy. It is demonstrated how these results can be used in combination with X-ray diffraction data to determine the oxidation state of ions at specific sites in a mixed-valance material, GaCl(2).

  14. Nitric oxide-related species-induced protein oxidation: reversible, irreversible, and protective effects on enzyme function of papain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Antti J; Kankuri, Esko; Rauhala, Pekka

    2005-04-15

    Protein oxidation, irreversible modification, and inactivation may play key roles in various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, we studied the effects of the potentially in vivo occurring nitric oxide-related species on two different markers of protein oxidation: protein carbonyl generation on bovine serum albumine (BSA) and loss of activity of a cysteine-dependent protease, papain, in vitro by using Angeli's salt, papanonoate, SIN-1, and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as donors of nitroxyl, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, and nitrosonium ions, respectively. Angeli's salt, SIN-1, and papanonoate (0-1000 microM) all generated a concentration-dependent increase in carbonyl formation on BSA (107, 60, and 45%, respectively). GSNO did not affect carbonyl formation. Papain was inhibited by Angeli's salt, SIN-1, papanonoate, and GSNO with IC50 values of 0.62, 2.3, 54, and 80 microM, respectively. Angeli's salt (3.16 microM)-induced papain inactivation was only partially reversible, while the effects of GSNO (316 microM) and papanonoate (316 microM) were reversible upon addition of excess DTT. The Angeli's salt-mediated DTT-irreversible inhibition of papain was prevented by GSNO or papanonoate pretreatment, hypothetically through mixed disulfide formation or S-nitrosylation of the catalytically critical thiol group of papain. These results, for the first time, compare the generation of carbonyls in proteins by Angeli's salt, papanonoate, and SIN-1. Furthermore, these results suggest that S-nitrosothiols may have a novel function in protecting critical thiols from irreversible oxidative damage.

  15. Chemically emulsified crude oil as substrate for bacterial oxidation : differences in species response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of bacterial species to oxidize alkanes in crude oil in water emulsions was studied. Alkanes in crude oil need specific physiological adaptations to the microorganisms. Synthesis of biosurfactants has been considered as a prerequisite for either specific adhesion mechanisms to large oil drops or emulsification of oil followed by uptake of submicron oil droplets. In this study four bacterial species were tested. Emulsions were prepared by nonionic sorbitan ester and polyoxyethylene ether surfactants. The oxidation rates were measured. Both positive and negative effects of surfactant amendments were observed. The same surfactant affected different bacteria in different ways. The response to the surfactant amendment depended on the physiological state of the bacteria. The results showed that surfactants resulted in decreased cell adhesion to the oil phase for all the bacteria. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  16. Biochemical leaf traits as indicators of tolerance potential in tree species from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest against oxidative environmental stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Solange E; Bulbovas, Patricia; Lima, Marcos E L; Domingos, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    The tolerance potential against the oxidative injury in native plants from forest ecosystems affected by environmental stressors depends on how efficiently they keep their pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance. Great variations in plant tolerance are expected, highlighting the higher relevance of measuring biochemical leaf trait indicators of oxidative injury in species with similar functions in the forest than in single species. The use of this functional approach seems very useful in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest because it still holds high plant diversity and was the focus of this study. We aimed at determining the tolerance potential of tree species from the Atlantic Forest remnants in SE Brazil against multiple oxidative environmental stressors. We assumed that pioneer tree species are more tolerant against oxidative stress than non-pioneer tree species and that their tolerance potential vary spatially in response to distinct combined effects of oxidative environmental stressors. The study was carried out in three Atlantic Forest remnants, which differ in physiognomy, species composition, climatic characteristics and air pollution exposure. Leaves of three pioneer and three non-pioneer species were collected from each forest remnant during wet (January 2015) and dry periods (June 2015), for analyses of non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants and oxidative injury indicators. Both hypotheses were confirmed. The pioneer tree species displayed biochemical leaf traits (e.g. high levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione and carotenoids and lower lipid peroxidation) that indicate their higher potential tolerance against oxidative environmental stressors than non-pioneer species. The biochemical leaf traits of both successional groups of species varied between the forest remnants, in response to a linear combination of oxidative environmental stressors, from natural (relative humidity and temperature) and anthropogenic sources (ozone and nitrogen dioxide). Copyright © 2016

  17. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Contributions of distinct gold species to catalytic reactivity for carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Wen; Du, Pei-Pei; Fu, Xin-Pu; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Si, Rui; Huang, Yu-Ying; Jia, Chun-Jiang; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Small-size (carbon monoxide at room temperature, by the aid of in situ X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. We find that the metallic gold component in clusters or particles plays a much more critical role as the active site than the cationic single-atom gold species for the room-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation reaction.

  19. Low-Cost Synthesis of Smart Biocompatible Graphene Oxide Reduced Species by Means of GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Tiziana; Armata, Nerina; Pendolino, Flavio; Colombo, Paolo; Lo Celso, Fabrizio; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is focused on the engineering of biocompatible complex systems composed of an inorganic and bio part. Graphene oxide (GO) and/or graphite oxide (GtO) were taken into account as potential substrates to the linkage of the protein such as Anemonia sulcata recombinant green fluorescent protein (rAsGFP). The complex system is obtained through a reduction process between GO/GtO and rAsGFP archiving an environmentally friendly biosynthesis. Spectroscopic measurements support the formation of reduced species. In particular, photoluminescence shows a change in the activity of the protein when a bond is formed, highlighted by a loss of the maximum emission signal of rAsGFP and a redshift of the maximum absorption peak of the GO/GtO species. Moreover, the hemolysis assay reveals a lower value in the presence of less oxidized graphene species providing evidence for a biocompatible material. This singular aspect can be approached as a promising method for circulating pharmaceutical preparations via intravenous administration in the field of drug delivery.

  20. Oxidative Stability of Tc(I) Tricarbonyl Species Relevant to the Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hall, Gabriel B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walter, Eric D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Technetium (Tc), which exists predominately in the liquid supernatant and salt cake fractions of the nuclear tank waste stored at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site, is one of the most difficult contaminants to dispose of and/or remediate. In the strongly alkaline environments prevalent in the tank waste, its dominant chemical form is pertechnetate (TcO4-, oxidation state +7). However, based on experimentation to-date, a significant fraction of the soluble Tc cannot be effectively separated from the wastes and may be present as a non-pertechnetate species. The presence of a non pertechnetate species significantly complicates disposition of low-activity waste (LAW), and the development of methods to either convert them to pertechnetate or to separate the non-pertechnetate species directly is needed. The challenge is the uncertainty regarding the nature and stability of the alkaline-soluble, low-valence, non pertechnetate species in the liquid tank waste. One objective of the Tc management project is to address this knowledge gap. This fiscal year (FY) 2015 report summarizes experimental work exploring the oxidative stability of model low-valence Tc(I) tricarbonyl species, derived from the [Tc(CO)3]+ moiety. These compounds are of interest due to their implied presence in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Work in part was initiated in FY 2014, and a series of samples containing non-pertechnetate Tc generated ex situ or in situ in pseudo-Hanford tank supernatant simulant solutions was prepared and monitored for oxidation to Tc(VII) (Levitskaia et al. 2014). This experimentation continued in FY 2015, and new series of samples containing Tc(I) as [Tc(CO)3]+•Ligand was tested. The monitoring method used for these studies was a combination of 99Tc NMR and EPR spectroscopies.

  1. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Matsubara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is characterized by disturbed extravillous trophoblast migration toward uterine spiral arteries leading to increased uteroplacental vascular resistance and by vascular dysfunction resulting in reduced systemic vasodilatory properties. Its pathogenesis is mediated by an altered bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO and tissue damage caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, superoxide (O2− rapidly inactivates NO and forms peroxynitrite (ONOO−. It is known that ONOO− accumulates in the placental tissues and injures the placental function in PE. In addition, ROS could stimulate platelet adhesion and aggregation leading to intravascular coagulopathy. ROS-induced coagulopathy causes placental infarction and impairs the uteroplacental blood flow in PE. The disorders could lead to the reduction of oxygen and nutrients required for normal fetal development resulting in fetal growth restriction. On the other hand, several antioxidants scavenge ROS and protect tissues against oxidative damage. Placental antioxidants including catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx protect the vasculature from ROS and maintain the vascular function. However, placental ischemia in PE decreases the antioxidant activity resulting in further elevated oxidative stress, which leads to the appearance of the pathological conditions of PE including hypertension and proteinuria. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between ROS and antioxidant activity. This review provides new insights about roles of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of PE.

  2. Things fall apart: Fragmentation reactions in the oxidative aging of organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J. H.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Daumit, K. E.; Kessler, S. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds involves a wide array of chemical transformations, including functionalization reactions (addition of polar functional groups to the carbon skeleton), fragmentation reactions (formation of lower carbon-number products via C-C bond scission), and accretion reactions (increases in molecular weight by the combination of two chemical species). Each of these reaction classes can lead to large changes in volatility, and hence can have major implications for atmospheric organic aerosol (OA). For example, the formation of OA is predominantly driven by functionalization and accretion reactions, which generally lead to decreases in volatility. Here we describe a series of laboratory studies of the subsequent organic "aging", the multiday oxidation processes that occur after the initial OA formation and growth. In these studies, the multigenerational oxidation of organic compounds in various phases (the gas phase, the condensed OA phase, and the aqueous phase) is carried out within either an environmental chamber or a flow reactor, and monitored using various high-resolution mass spectrometric techniques. In all cases it is found that fragmentation reactions play a major role in the observed aging chemistry, dominated by the formation of small, volatile oxidation products. These results suggest that multi-day oxidative aging processes do not lead to sustained aerosol growth, but rather may serve as a chemical sink for atmospheric OA.

  3. Bud Dormancy in Perennial Fruit Tree Species: A Pivotal Role for Oxidative Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Beauvieux

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For perennial plants, bud dormancy is a crucial step as its progression over winter determines the quality of bud break, flowering, and fruiting. In the past decades, many studies, based on metabolic, physiological, subcellular, genetic, and genomic analyses, have unraveled mechanisms underlying bud dormancy progression. Overall, all the pathways identified are interconnected in a very complex manner. Here, we review early and recent findings on the dormancy processes in buds of temperate fruit trees species including hormonal signaling, the role of plasma membrane, carbohydrate metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress, with an effort to link them together and emphasize the central role of reactive oxygen species accumulation in the control of dormancy progression.

  4. Antimicrobial Effect of Copper Oxide Nanoparticles on Some Oral Bacteria and Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Acid producing bacteria including Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli cause tooth demineralization and lead to tooth decay. Also, oral colonization of the species of Candida has been reported in many studies that are resistant to antifungal agents. Objectives: In this study, antibacterial and antifungal effects of nano-CuO were studied against some oral bacteria and yeast fungi. Materials and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs for oral bacterial and fungal test strains were determined in 96-well microtiter plate technique. The agar diffusion test (ADT was employed to assess the antifungal properties of nystatin. Results: The MIC50 value of CuO NPs was determined at the range of 1–10 µg/ml for S. mutans, < 1 µg/ml for L. acidophilus, and 10 µg/ml for L. casei. Higher concentrations of CuO NPs (100-1000 µg/ml were effective on the bacterial cell growth, resulting in 100% reduction in the optical density in TSB medium. The cells of Candida albicans, C. krusei and C. glabrata were treated with CuO NPs and the results showed a decrease in fungal growth at a concentration of 1-1000 µg/ml in TSB medium. The MIC50 value of CuO NPs was determined 1000 µg/ml for three species of Candida. The diameter of growth inhibition zones of 1100 µg/ml nystatin was obtained 15-21 mm for clinical isolates of three species of Candida. Conclusions: With respect to the potential bactericidal activity of CuO NPs on various cariogenic bacteria examined in this study, these NPs could be introduce as a candidate control agent for preventing dental caries or dental infections. In our study, on the other hand, Nano copper oxide had a weak effect on the candida species.

  5. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  6. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  7. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  8. Dichlone-induced oxidative stress in a model insect species, Spodoptera eridania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S; Zaman, K; MacGill, R S; Batcabe, J P; Pardini, R S

    1995-11-01

    Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania, larvae were provided ad libitum 0.002-0.25% w/w dichlone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (CNQ). Larval mortality occurred in a time-and-dose dependent manner, with an LC17 of 0.01% and an LC50 of 0.26% CNQ at day-5. Extracts of larvae fed control, 0.01, and 0.25% CNQ diets for 5 days were assayed for antioxidant enzymes. While 0.01% CNQ had a mild effect, 0.25% CNQ profoundly increased levels of all antioxidant enzymes that were examined. The increases as compared to control were: 5.3-, 1.9-, 3.2-, 2.6-, 2.8-, and 3.5-fold higher for superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione transferase and its peroxidase activity, glutathione reductase and DT-diaphorase, respectively. At 0.01% CNQ, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were similar to the control group. However, despite the induction from 0.25% CNQ of all enzymes examined, the lipid peroxidation was not attenuated; the TBARS were 29.7% over the control value. High mortalities and CNQ-induced pathologies reflected in retarded growth, wasting syndrome, and diuresis clearly indicated that the insect sustained severe oxidant-induced injuries before appropriate defenses were fully mobilized. Thus, this quinone causes an oxidative stress in a model insect species analogous to that observed in mammalian species.

  9. Inhibition of Rho Kinase Induces Antioxidative Molecules and Suppresses Reactive Oxidative Species in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Fujimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of rho kinase inhibitors on oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork (TM cells. Methods. TM cells were isolated from the eyes of cynomolgus monkeys. Y-27632 and menadione were used to inhibit rho kinase and induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, respectively. The cynomolgus monkey array and 12,613 probes were used in DNA microarray analysis, and the affected genes were categorized using gene ontology analysis. The mRNA levels of the target genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Intracellular oxidative stress was detected using a fluorescent reagent sensitive to ROS. Cell viability was assessed by the WST-8 assay. Results. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in antioxidant activity, and upregulation of catalase was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR after 30 min treatment with Y-27632. Production of ROS was increased by menadione, and the effect was partly suppressed by pretreatment with Y-27632. At a lower dose of menadione, Y-27632 stimulated TM cells and significantly increased their viability following menadione treatment compared to control cells. Conclusion. Using microarray analysis, Y-27632 was shown to upregulate antioxidative genes including catalase and partially reduce ROS production and cell death by oxidative stress caused by menadione.

  10. Reactive oxygen species are key mediators of the nitric oxide apoptotic pathway in anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Leticia I; Poliandri, Ariel H; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2007-03-01

    We previously showed that long-term exposure of anterior pituitary cells to nitric oxide (NO) induces apoptosis. The intracellular signals underlying this effect remained unclear. In this study, we searched for possible mechanisms involved in the early stages of the NO apoptotic cascade. Caspase 3 was activated by NO with no apparent disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. NO caused a rapid increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this increase seems to be dependent of mitochondrial electron transport chain. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine avoided ROS increase, prevented the NO-induced caspase 3 activation, and reduced the NO apoptotic effect. Catalase was inactivated by NO, while glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not modified at first, but increased at later times of NO exposure. The increase of GSH level is important for the scavenging of the NO-induced ROS overproduction. Our results indicate that ROS have an essential role as a trigger of the NO apoptotic cascade in anterior pituitary cells. The permanent inhibition of catalase may strengthen the oxidative damage induced by NO. GPx activity and GSH level augment in response to the oxidative damage, though this increase seems not to be enough to rescue the cells from the NO effect.

  11. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Quinlan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ, with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo. However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo, and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo.

  12. On the Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide on Red Blood Cell Deformability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Diederich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main function of red blood cells (RBCs is the transport of respiratory gases along the vascular tree. To fulfill their task, RBCs are able to elastically deform in response to mechanical forces and, pass through the narrow vessels of the microcirculation. Decreased RBC deformability was observed in pathological conditions linked to increased oxidative stress or decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability, like hypertension. Treatments with oxidants and with NO were shown to affect RBC deformability ex vivo, but the mechanisms underpinning these effects are unknown. In this study we investigate whether changes in intracellular redox status/oxidative stress or nitrosation reactions induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS or NO may affect RBC deformability. In a case-control study comparing RBCs from healthy and hypertensive participants, we found that RBC deformability was decreased, and levels of ROS were increased in RBCs from hypertensive patients as compared to RBCs from aged-matched healthy controls, while NO levels in RBCs were not significantly different. To study the effects of oxidants on RBC redox state and deformability, RBCs from healthy volunteers were treated with increasing concentrations of tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH. We found that high concentrations of t-BuOOH (≥ 1 mM significantly decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio in RBCs, decreased RBC deformability and increased blood bulk viscosity. Moreover, RBCs from Nrf2 knockout (KO mice, a strain genetically deficient in a number of antioxidant/reducing enzymes, were more susceptible to t-BuOOH-induced impairment in RBC deformability as compared to wild type (WT mice. To study the role of NO in RBC deformability we treated RBC suspensions from human volunteers with NO donors and nitrosothiols and analyzed deformability of RBCs from mice lacking the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. We found that NO donors induced S-nitrosation of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin, but did not affect

  13. Efficient oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds with molecular oxygen catalyzed by N-hydroxyphthalimide combined with a Co species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahama; Yoshino; Keitoku; Sakaguchi; Ishii

    2000-10-06

    Highly efficient catalytic oxidation of alcohols with molecular oxygen by N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) combined with a Co species was developed. The oxidation of 2-octanol in the presence of catalytic amounts of NHPI and Co(OAc)2 under atmospheric dioxygen in AcOEt at 70 degrees C gave 2-octanone in 93% yield. The oxidation was significantly enhanced by adding a small amount of benzoic acid to proceed smoothly even at room temperature. Primary alcohols were oxidized by NHPI in the absence of any metal catalyst to form the corresponding carboxylic acids in good yields. In the oxidation of terminal vic-diols such as 1,2-butanediol, carbon-carbon bond cleavage was induced to give one carbon less carboxylic acids such as propionic acid, while internal vic-diols were selectively oxidized to 1,2-diketones.

  14. Pentose Phosphate Shunt Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Production Controlling Trypanosoma cruzi in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-jie Koo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism provides substrates for reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO generation, which are a part of the macrophage (Mφ anti-microbial response. Mφs infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc produce insufficient levels of oxidative species and lower levels of glycolysis compared to classical Mφs. How Mφs fail to elicit a potent ROS/NO response during infection and its link to glycolysis is unknown. Herein, we evaluated for ROS, NO, and cytokine production in the presence of metabolic modulators of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Metabolic status was analyzed by Seahorse Flux Analyzer and mass spectrometry and validated by RNAi. Tc infection of RAW264.7 or bone marrow-derived Mφs elicited a substantial increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and moderate levels of ROS/NO by 18 h. Interferon (IFN-γ addition enhanced the Tc-induced ROS/NO release and shut down mitochondrial respiration to the levels noted in classical Mφs. Inhibition of PPAR-α attenuated the ROS/NO response and was insufficient for complete metabolic shift. Deprivation of glucose and inhibition of pyruvate transport showed that Krebs cycle and glycolysis support ROS/NO generation in Tc + IFN-γ stimulated Mφs. Metabolic profiling and RNAi studies showed that glycolysis-pentose phosphate pathway (PPP at 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was essential for ROS/NO response and control of parasite replication in Mφ. We conclude that IFN-γ, but not inhibition of PPAR-α, supports metabolic upregulation of glycolytic-PPP for eliciting potent ROS/NO response in Tc-infected Mφs. Chemical analogs enhancing the glucose-PPP will be beneficial in controlling Tc replication and dissemination by Mφs.

  15. Interaction between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species, Heme Oxygenase, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulates Phagocytosis in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMacrophages are cells of the innate immune system that populate every organ. They are required not only for defense against invading pathogens and tissue repair but also for maintenance of tissue homeostasis and iron homeostasis.AimThe aim of this study is to understand whether heme oxygenase (HO and nitric oxide synthase (NOS contribute to the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX activity and phagocytosis, two key components of macrophage function.MethodsThis study was carried out using resting J774A.1 macrophages treated with hemin or vehicle. Activity of NOS, HO, or NOX was inhibited using specific inhibitors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was determined by Amplex® red assay, and phagocytosis was measured using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria. In addition, we analyzed the fate of the intracellular heme by using electron spin resonance.ResultsWe show that both enzymes NOS and HO are essential for phagocytic activity of macrophages. NOS does not directly affect phagocytosis, but stimulates NOX activity via nitric oxide-triggered ROS production of mitochondria. Treatment of macrophages with hemin results in intracellular accumulation of ferrous heme and an inhibition of phagocytosis. In contrast to NOS, HO products, including carbon monoxide, neither clearly affect NOX activity nor clearly affect phagocytosis, but phagocytosis is accelerated by HO-mediated degradation of heme.ConclusionBoth enzymes contribute to the bactericidal activity of macrophages independently, by controlling different pathways.

  16. Thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides with interlayers of hydroxide and peroxide species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Ta-Lei; Lybeck, Jenni; Chan, Ting-Shan; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Tewari, Girish C.; Rautama, Eeva-Leena; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit

    2013-01-01

    Among the thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides, [M m A 2 O m+2 ] q CoO 2 , the parent m=0 phases exhibit divergent chemical features but are less understood than the more common m>0 members of the series. Here we synthesize Sr-for-Ca substituted [(Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 ] q CoO 2 zero phases up to x=0.2 through low-temperature hydrothermal conversion of precursor powders of the m=1 misfit system, [Co(Ca 1−x Sr x ) 2 O 3 ] q CoO 2 . In the zero-phase [(Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 ] q CoO 2 system, as the Sr content x increases the lattice expands anisotropically along the c axis such that the ab-plane dimension and the misfit parameter q remain essentially constant. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest the presence of peroxide-type oxygen species in the (Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 rock-salt block and together with infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and low-temperature resistivity and thermopower measurements evidence that the isovalent Sr-for-Ca substitution controls the balance between the peroxide and hydroxide species in the (Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 block but leaves the valence of Co essentially intact in the CoO 2 block. The higher electrical conductivity of the Sr-substituted phases is explained as a consequence of increased carrier mobility. - Graphical abstract: Among the thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides, [M m A 2 O m+2 ] q CoO 2 , the parent zero (m=0) phases exhibit divergent chemical features. For [(Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 ] q CoO 2 , X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest the presence of peroxide-type oxygen species in the (Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 rock-salt block and together with thermogravimetric and low-temperature transport-property measurements evidence that the isovalent Sr-for-Ca substitution controls the balance between the peroxide and hydroxide species in the (Ca 1−x Sr x ) z (O,OH) 2 block but leaves the valence of Co essentially intact in the CoO 2 block. - Highlights: • Parent m=0 [M m A 2 O

  17. Oxidation of laser-induced plasma species in different background conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bator, Matthias; Schneider, Christof W.; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    The evolution of Lu and LuO species in a laser ablation plasma from different targets has been investigated by simultaneously performing mass spectrometry and plasma imaging. Ablation was achieved with a 248 nm KrF laser from a Lu, a Lu2O5 and a LuMnO3 target under different background gas conditions. Mass spectrometry measurements show very similar intensities and ratios for the respective species for all three targets under the same ablation conditions. This indicates only a small influence of the target on the final Lu and LuO contents in the plasma, with the major influence coming from collisions with the background gas. Furthermore, spatially, timely and spectrally resolved plasma imaging was utilized to clearly identify the shockwave at the plasma front as the main region for Lu oxidation. A strong decrease of Lu intensities together with a directly correlated increase of LuO was observed toward the outer regions of the plasma.

  18. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefny, Mohamed Mokhtar; Pattyn, Cedric; Benedikt, Jan; Lukes, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A remote microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet ( µ APPJ) with He, He/H 2 O, He/O 2 , and He/O 2 /H 2 O gas mixtures was used to study the transport of reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid and the following aqueous phase chemistry. The effects induced by the µ APPJ in water were quantitatively studied using phenol as a chemical probe and by measuring H 2 O 2 concentration and pH values. These results were combined with the analysis of the absolute densities of the reactive species and the modeling of convective/diffusion transport and recombination reactions in the effluent of the plasma jet. Additionally, modified plasma jets were used to show that the role of emitted photons in aqueous chemistry is negligible for these plasma sources. The fastest phenol degradation was measured for the He/O 2 plasma, followed by He/H 2 O, He/O 2 /H 2 O, and He plasmas. The modeled quantitative flux of O atoms into the liquid in the He/O 2 plasma case was highly comparable with the phenol degradation rate and showed a very high transfer efficiency of reactive species from the plasma into the liquid, where more than half of the O atoms leaving the jet nozzle entered the liquid. The results indicate that the high oxidative effect of He/O 2 plasma was primarily due to solvated O atoms, whereas OH radicals dominated the oxidative effects induced in water by plasmas with other gas mixtures. These findings help to understand, in a quantitative way, the complex interaction of cold atmospheric plasmas with aqueous solutions and will allow a better understanding of the interaction of these plasmas with water or buffered solutions containing biological macromolecules, microorganisms, or even eukaryotic cells. Additionally, the µ APPJ He/O 2 plasma source seems to be an ideal tool for the generation of O atoms in aqueous solutions for any future studies of their reactivity. (paper)

  19. Characterization of a trinuclear ruthenium species in catalytic water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 in neutral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biaobiao; Li, Fei; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Chengbing; Chen, Lin; Sun, Licheng

    2016-06-30

    A Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV)-O-Ru(III) type trinuclear species was crystallographically characterized in water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 (H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; pic = 4-picoline) under neutral conditions. The formation of a ruthenium trimer due to the reaction of Ru(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O with Ru(II)-OH2 was fully confirmed by chemical, electrochemical and photochemical methods. Since the oxidation of the trimer was proposed to lead to catalyst decomposition, the photocatalytic water oxidation activity was rationally improved by the suppression of the formation of the trimer.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of super-reduced cobalamin and cobinamide species by thiosulfate, sulfite and dithionite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereven'kov, Ilia A; Salnikov, Denis S; Makarov, Sergei V; Boss, Gerry R; Koifman, Oskar I

    2013-11-21

    We studied the kinetics of reactions of cob(I)alamin and cob(I)inamide with thiosulfate, sulfite, and dithionite by UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and stopped-flow spectroscopy. We found that the two Co(I) species were oxidized by these sulfur-containing compounds to Co(II) forms: oxidation by excess thiosulfate leads to penta-coordinate complexes and oxidation by excess sulfite or dithionite leads to hexa-coordinate Co(II)-SO2(-) complexes. The net scheme involves transfer of three electrons in the case of oxidation by thiosulfate and one electron for oxidation by sulfite and dithionite. On the basis of kinetic data, the nature of the reactive oxidants was suggested, i.e., HS2O3(-) (for oxidation by thiosulfate), S2O5(2-), HSO3(-), and aquated SO2 (for oxidation by sulfite), and S2O4(2-) and SO2(-) (for oxidation by dithionite). No difference was observed in kinetics with cob(i)alamin or cob(i)inamide as reductants.

  1. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol develop...

  2. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...... mice exhibit decreased oxygen consumption and develop oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, leading to JNK activation and impaired insulin signaling. This effect is mimicked by knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured myoblasts, which exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidation, increased reactive oxygen species......, activation of JNK, increased serine and decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and decreased insulin signaling. Thus, Sirt3 plays an important role in diabetes through regulation of mitochondrial oxidation, reactive oxygen species production, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  3. Thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides with interlayers of hydroxide and peroxide species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ta-Lei; Lybeck, Jenni; Chan, Ting-Shan; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Tewari, Girish C.; Rautama, Eeva-Leena; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit

    2013-12-01

    Among the thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides, [MmA2Om+2]qCoO2, the parent m=0 phases exhibit divergent chemical features but are less understood than the more common m>0 members of the series. Here we synthesize Sr-for-Ca substituted [(Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2]qCoO2 zero phases up to x=0.2 through low-temperature hydrothermal conversion of precursor powders of the m=1 misfit system, [Co(Ca1-xSrx)2O3]qCoO2. In the zero-phase [(Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2]qCoO2 system, as the Sr content x increases the lattice expands anisotropically along the c axis such that the ab-plane dimension and the misfit parameter q remain essentially constant. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest the presence of peroxide-type oxygen species in the (Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2 rock-salt block and together with infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and low-temperature resistivity and thermopower measurements evidence that the isovalent Sr-for-Ca substitution controls the balance between the peroxide and hydroxide species in the (Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2 block but leaves the valence of Co essentially intact in the CoO2 block. The higher electrical conductivity of the Sr-substituted phases is explained as a consequence of increased carrier mobility.

  4. Nitrous oxide production from temperate and tropical oyster species in response to nutrient loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Garate, M.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic pollution, such as nitrogen (N), has the potential to increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in marine ecosystems. Some organisms can be used as important biological indicators for GHG emissions to their environment based on their feeding habits. With large inputs of these anthropogenic pollutants, emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent GHG, can be potentially increased from temperate invertebrates, though not much is known about tropical invertebrates. Thus, we compared N2O emissions in response to N additions from the temperate oyster species Crassostrea virginica and compared it to a tropical species, Isognomon alatus, found in Puerto Rico. Oysters were exposed to two seawater treatments: (1) no nutrient addition (control) and (2) 100µM ammonium nitrate. Each treatment had 4-5 replicates. Measurements for dissolved N2O and nutrients were taken at the start of the incubation and then at two, four, and five hours by collecting water samples of each tank. Dissolved N2O concentrations were analyzed using gas chromatography. We hypothesized that the N addition treatment would produce more N2O for both Rhode Island and Puerto Rico. We found that there was no significant difference between the control and N enriched treatments for C. virginica over the short timespan, although the N enriched treatment did have a steady trend in increasing in N2O concentration over time. Further analysis is needed for the I. alatus, though we expect an increase in N2O emissions due to warmer water temperatures, which might enhance microbial metabolism and production of N2O. This differs from work previously done in a long-term experiment on C. virginica, which showed that N2O significantly in the N enriched treatment over 28-days. Our study shows that short-term pulses of N may not potentially increase N2O emissions, though further analysis is needed for longer-term exposures.

  5. Emulsification of crude oil by an alkane-oxidizing Rhodococcus species isolated from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredholt, H.; Bruheim, P.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Scince and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Josefsen, K.; Vatland, A. [SINTEF SI, Oslo (Norway). Industrial Chemistry Div.

    1998-04-01

    A Rhodococcus species, which has proven to be the best of 99 oil-emulsifying bacteria isolated from seawater, was characterized. This bacterium produced very stable oil-in-water emulsions from different crude oils with various content of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, by utilizing C{sub 1}1 and C{sub 3}3 n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. Bacteria that produce stable emulsions are often able to adhere strongly to hydrocarbons or hydrophobic surfaces. It was at these surfaces that extensive emulsification of the residual oil and accumulation of acidic oxidation products occurred. The acidic products were consumed in a second step. This step was characterized by linear growth and an increasing number of cells growing in the water phase. The most extensive emulsification occurred at the end of the exponential phase. There was no evidence of surfactants at the end of the exponential phase, however, a polymeric compound with emulsifying activity, tightly bound to the oil droplets, was isolated, suggesting that the emulsification resulted from the release of the hydrophobic cell surface discarded during growth limitations. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Emissions of nitric oxide from 79 plant species in response to simulated nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Juan; Wu Feihua; Liu Tingwu; Chen Lei; Xiao Qiang; Dong Xuejun; He Junxian; Pei Zhenming; Zheng Hailei

    2012-01-01

    To assess the potential contribution of nitric oxide (NO) emission from the plants grown under the increasing nitrogen (N) deposition to atmospheric NO budget, the effects of simulated N deposition on NO emission and various leaf traits (e.g., specific leaf area, leaf N concentration, net photosynthetic rate, etc.) were investigated in 79 plant species classified by 13 plant functional groups. Simulated N deposition induced the significant increase of NO emission from most functional groups, especially from conifer, gymnosperm and C 3 herb. Moreover, the change rate of NO emission was significantly correlated with the change rate of various leaf traits. We conclude that the plants grown under atmospheric N deposition, especially in conifer, gymnosperm and C 3 herb, should be taken into account as an important biological source of NO and potentially contribute to atmospheric NO budget. - Highlights: ► Simulated N deposition induces the significant increase of NO emission from plants. ► The increased NO emission is closely related to leaf N level and net photosynthesis. ► Abundant nitrite accumulation is a reason of NO emission induced by excess N input. ► The plants grown under N deposition potentially contribute to atmospheric NO budget. - Simulated N deposition induced a significant increase of NO emission from 79 plants.

  7. Oxidation and reduction of copper and iron species in steam generator deposits - Effects of hydrazine, carbohydrazide and catalyzed hydrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, C.R.; Varrin, R.D.; Gorman, J.A.; McIlree, A.R.; Stanley, R.

    2002-01-01

    It has long been suspected that oxidation and reduction of secondary side deposits in PWR steam generators have a significant influence on the onset of intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 steam generator tubes. It is believed that these same processes could affect the possible future occurrence of IGA/SCC of thermally treated Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 tubes that are in newer steam generators. The working hypothesis for describing the influence of oxides on accelerated tube degradation is that deposits formed during normal operation are oxidized during lay-up. During subsequent operation, these oxidized species accelerate tube degradation by raising the electrochemical potential. (authors)

  8. Influence of silicon species on the transformation of green rust I(Cl-) in aqueous solution by oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Gadadhar; Fujieda, Shun; Shinoda, Kozo; Yamaguchi, Shinichi; Korosaki, Masao; Suzuki, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Addition of silicate species and silica to GRI(Cl - ) increased oxidation time. → The lepidocrocite particle size in silicate added case has been reduced significantly. → The influence of silicate was attributed to its adsorption on lepidocrocite. → Silicate also influenced GRI(Cl - ) transformation due to adsorption on it. - Abstract: X-ray diffraction (XRD) and solution analysis were used for characterizing the influence of different silicon species on oxidation of green rust (GRI(Cl - )) suspension. While addition of silicon to metallic iron enhanced the formation of β-FeOOH, GRI(Cl - ) in aqueous solution oxidized into lepidocrocite and oxidation was delayed in presence of silica and silicate species as noticed from potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the particle size of lepidocrocite was reduced due to silicate addition. The influence of silicate was attributed to its adsorption on GRI(Cl - ) and lepidocrocite particles as confirmed from ICP-AES analysis of supernatant solution.

  9. Comparative Study of Different Methods to Determine the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar A. Najim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS followed by an increase in oxidative stress is associated with cellular responses to nanoparticle induced cell damages. Finding the best method for assessing intracellular ROS production is the key step in the detection of oxidative stress induced injury. This study evaluates and compares four different methods for the measurement of intracellular ROS generation using fluorogenic probe, 2´,7´-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was utilised as a positive control to assess the reactivity of the probe. Spherically shaped zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles with an average particle size of 85.7 nm were used to determine the diverse roles of ROS in nanotoxicity in Hs888Lu and U937 cell lines. The results showed that different methods exhibit different patterns of ROS measurement. In conclusion this study found that the time point at which the DCFH-DA is added to the reaction, the incubation time and the oxidative species that is responsible for the oxidation of DCFH, have impact on the intracellular ROS measurement.

  10. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in plant mitochondria: origin and redundant regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhina, Olga; Fagerstedt, Kurt V

    2010-04-01

    Plant mitochondria differ from their mammalian counterparts in many respects, which are due to the unique and variable surroundings of plant mitochondria. In green leaves, plant mitochondria are surrounded by ample respiratory substrates and abundant molecular oxygen, both resulting from active photosynthesis, while in roots and bulky rhizomes and fruit carbohydrates may be plenty, whereas oxygen levels are falling. Several enzymatic complexes in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) are capable of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation under physiological and pathological conditions. Inherently connected parameters such as the redox state of electron carriers in the ETC, ATP synthase activity and inner mitochondrial membrane potential, when affected by external stimuli, can give rise to ROS formation via complexes I and III, and by reverse electron transport (RET) from complex II. Superoxide radicals produced are quickly scavenged by superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and the resulting H(2)O(2) is detoxified by peroxiredoxin-thioredoxin system or by the enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, found in the mitochondrial matrix. Arginine-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-releasing activity of enzymatic origin has been detected in plant mitochondria. The molecular identity of the enzyme is not clear but the involvement of mitochondria-localized enzymes responsible for arginine catabolism, arginase and ornithine aminotransferase has been shown in the regulation of NO efflux. Besides direct control by antioxidants, mitochondrial ROS production is tightly controlled by multiple redundant systems affecting inner membrane potential: NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases, alternative oxidase (AOX), uncoupling proteins, ATP-sensitive K(+) channel and a number of matrix and intermembrane enzymes capable of direct electron donation to ETC. NO removal, on the other hand, takes place either by reactions with molecular oxygen or superoxide resulting in peroxynitrite, nitrite or nitrate

  11. Species-Dependent Effects of the Urban Environment on Fatty Acid Composition and Oxidative Stress in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Isaksson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecological impacts of urbanization include the loss of biodiversity and changes in species composition and population densities. However, how the urban environment affects fundamental physiological parameters is largely unknown. Here, we investigated physiological components related to health and nutrition, namely, plasma fatty acids (FA and lipid peroxidation at inter-habitat and interspecific levels. Specifically, we compared four passerine bird species—the great tit (Parus major, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus, and the tree sparrow (P. montanus—from urban and rural environments. Significant interactions between species and habitat were revealed for the majority of the FAs. Interestingly, the observed inter-habitat variation in FAs was frequently in opposite directions when comparing species from the two families (tits, Paridae; sparrows, Passeridae. These patterns suggest that sparrows and tits feed on different food sources, or modulate their FA metabolism differently, across the urban-rural gradient. By using canonical discriminant analyses (CDA, we further demonstrated species-specific signals in FA composition, with misclassification of species being <1% within habitats and <7% between habitats. Finally, the urban-rural FA differences between species and families were manifested in two indices of health. Firstly, urban blue tits had a higher total ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated FA ratio than rural conspecifics, which is believed to increase inflammatory responses. Secondly, urban sparrows of both species showed higher lipid peroxidation indices (indicating a higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation if exposed to pro-oxidants, and consequently, a higher level of lipid peroxidation compared to their rural conspecifics. Collectively, the species- and habitat-specific differences in plasma FA composition, which are linked to nutrition and metabolism, suggest that the urban environment affect tits and

  12. Cytosolic NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase protects macrophages from LPS-induced nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Oky; Kim, Yong Chan; Shin, Han-Jae; Lee, Jie-Oh; Huh, Tae-Lin; Kang, Kwang-il; Kim, Young Sang; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Hayyoung

    2004-04-30

    Macrophages activated by microbial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produce bursts of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox protection systems are essential for the survival of the macrophages since the nitric oxide and ROS can be toxic to them as well as to pathogens. Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) we found that cytosolic NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPc) is strongly upregulated by nitric oxide in macrophages. The levels of IDPc mRNA and of the corresponding enzymatic activity were markedly increased by treatment of RAW264.7 cells or peritoneal macrophages with LPS or SNAP (a nitric oxide donor). Over-expression of IDPc reduced intracellular peroxide levels and enhanced the survival of H2O2- and SNAP-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. IDPc is known to generate NADPH, a cellular reducing agent, via oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. The expression of enzymes implicated in redox protection, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, was relatively unaffected by LPS and SNAP. We propose that the induction of IDPc is one of the main self-protection mechanisms of macrophages against LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  13. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  14. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  15. Antioxidant effects of crude extracts from Baccharis species: inhibition of myeloperoxidase activity, protection against lipid peroxidation, and action as oxidative species scavenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago O. Vieira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to show a comparison of the antioxidant properties of aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from Baccharis articulata (Lam. Pers., Baccharis trimera (Less. DC., Baccharis spicata (Lam. Baill. and Baccharis usterii Heering, Asteraceae, by several techniques covering a range of oxidant species and of biotargets. We have investigated the ability of the plant extracts to scavenge DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical, action against lipid peroxidation of membranes including rat liver microsomes and soy bean phosphatidylcholine liposomes by ascorbyl radical and peroxynitrite. Hydroxyl radical scavenger activity was measured monitoring the deoxyribose oxidation. The hypochlorous acid scavenger activity was also evaluated by the prevention of protein carbonylation and finally the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity inhibition. The results obtained suggest that the Baccharis extracts studied present a significant antioxidant activity scavenging free radicals and protecting biomolecules from the oxidation. We can suggest that the supposed therapeutic efficacy of this plant could be due, in part, to these properties.

  16. Application of powerful oxidizers in the synthesis of new high-oxidation state actinide and related species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.M.

    1984-11-01

    The fluorinating and oxide scavenging ability of XeF 6 have been studied by bringing XeF 6 into interaction with oxide-fluoride compounds of the third-transition-series elements (W, Re and Os) and uranium, in their highest oxidation states. A + MOF 5 - and A + M 2 O 2 F 9 - (A = K or Cs, M = W or U) were converted to A + MF 7 - by XeF 6 , but the rhenium and osmium compounds, K + ReO 2 F 4 - and XeF 5 + OsO 3 F 3 - , resisted interaction with XeF 6 . Strong interactions between XeF 2 or KrF 2 and the solvent have been observed for their solutions in anhydrous HF. Both XeF 2 and KrF 2 are seen to be effective in breaking up the polymeric (HF)/sub n/ chains. Only weak interactions occur between cations and anions of KrF + AuF 6 - and Kr 2 F 3 + AuF 6 - in HF. The AuF 6 - anions are slightly distorted from O/sub h/ symmetry. Kr 2 F 3 + cations in HF have the same dissymmetric V-shape which occurs in crystalline salts. A low-temperature orthorhombic form, β-ReF 6 + SbF 6 - , a high-temperature rhombohedral form, α-ReF 6 + SbF 6 - , and a ReF 6 + AuF 6 - have been prepared. These compounds possess only kinetic stability at ambient temperature and at approx. 20 0 C are best represented as ReF 6 + ReF 7 MF 6 - MF 5 . Thermochemical energy evaluations indicate that the ionization potential of ReF 6 is 261 kcal mole -1 and that the fluoride-ion affinity of ReF 6 + is -214 kcal mole -1 . This is more exothermal than the corresponding process for IF 6 + (-208 kcal mole -1 ). In contrast, ReOF 5 is shown to be a better fluoro-base than IOF 5 and also is a better base than ReF 7 . ReOF 4 + MF 6 - (M = Sb, Au and As) salts are of higher thermal stability than their ReF 6 + MF 6 - analogues

  17. Mixed species biofilms of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii impair the oxidative response of bovine neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Joey S; Buret, Andre G; Ceri, Howard; Storey, Douglas G; Anderson, Stefanie J; Morck, Douglas W

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms composed of anaerobic bacteria can result in persistent infections and chronic inflammation. Host immune cells have difficulties clearing biofilm-related infections and this can result in tissue damage. Neutrophils are a vital component of the innate immune system and help clear biofilms. The comparative neutrophilic response to biofilms versus planktonic bacteria remains incompletely understood, particularly in the context of mixed infections. The objective of this study was to generate mixed species anaerobic bacterial biofilms composed of two opportunistic pathogens, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii, and evaluate neutrophil responses to extracellular fractions from both biofilms and planktonic cell co-cultures of the same bacteria. Purified bovine neutrophils exposed to culture supernatants from mixed species planktonic bacteria showed elevated oxidative activity compared to neutrophils exposed to biofilms composed of the same bacteria. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide plays a significant role in the stimulation of neutrophils; biofilms produced substantially more lipopolysaccharide than planktonic bacteria under these experimental conditions. Removal of lipopolysaccharide significantly reduced neutrophil oxidative response to culture supernatants of planktonic bacteria. Oxidative responses to LPS-removed biofilm supernatants and LPS-removed planktonic cell supernatants were similar. The limited neutrophil response to biofilm bacteria observed in this study supports the reduced ability of the innate immune system to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Lipopolysaccharide is likely important in neutrophil response; however, the presence of other extracellular, immune modifying molecules in the bacterial media also appears to be important in altering neutrophil function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rap1 signaling is required for suppression of Ras-generated reactive oxygen species and protection against oxidative stress in T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remans, Philip H. J.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; van Laar, Jacob M.; Sanders, Marjolein E.; Papendrecht-van der Voort, Ellen A. M.; Zwartkruis, Fried J. T.; Levarht, E. W. Nivine; Rosas, Marcela; Coffer, Paul J.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Bos, Johannes L.; Tak, Paul P.; Verweij, Cornelis L.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2004-01-01

    Transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in optimizing transcriptional and proliferative responses to TCR signaling in T lymphocytes. Conversely, chronic oxidative stress leads to decreased proliferative responses and enhanced transcription of inflammatory gene

  19. Nitrous oxide fluxes from forest floor, tree stems and canopies of boreal tree species during spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikarainen, Iikka; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Machacova, Katerina; Pihlatie, Mari

    2017-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as small sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) due to microbial N2O production in the soils. Recent evidence shows that trees may play an important role in N2O exchange of forest ecosystems by offering pathways for soil produced N2O to the atmosphere. To confirm magnitude, variability and the origin of the tree mediated N2O emissions more research is needed, especially in boreal forests which have been in a minority in such investigation. We measured forest floor, tree stem and shoot N2O exchange of three boreal tree species at the beginning of the growing season (13.4.-13.6.2015) at SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, located in Southern Finland (61˚ 51´N, 24˚ 17´E, 181 a.s.l.). The fluxes were measured in silver birch (Betula pendula), downy birch (B. pubescens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) on two sites with differing soil type and characteristics (paludified and mineral soil), vegetation cover and forest structure. The aim was to study the vertical profile of N2O fluxes at stem level and to observe temporal changes in N2O fluxes over the beginning of the growing season. The N2O exchange was determined using the static chamber technique and gas chromatographic analyses. Scaffold towers were used for measurements at multiple stem heights and at the canopy level. Overall, the N2O fluxes from the forest floor and trees at both sites were very small and close to the detection limit. The measured trees mainly emitted N2O from their stems and shoots, while the forest floor acted as a sink of N2O at the paludified site and as a small source of N2O at the mineral soil site. Stem emissions from all the trees at both sites were on average below 0.5 μg N2O m-2 of stem area h-1, and the shoot emissions varied between 0.2 and 0.5 ng N2O m-2 g-1 dry biomass. When the N2O fluxes were scaled up to the whole forest ecosystem, based on the tree biomass and stand density, the N2O emissions from birch and spruce trees at the paludified site

  20. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. A kinetic study of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence of glyoxylic acid oxidation by manganese species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otamonga, Jean-Paul; Abdel-Mageed, Amal; Agater, Irena B; Jewsbury, Roger A

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence, the kinetics of the decay of the oxidant and the chemiluminescence emission were followed for oxidations by permanganate, manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) (aq) of glyoxylic acid, using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Results are reported for the glyoxylic acid oxidized under pseudo first-order conditions and in an acidic medium at 25 °C. For permanganate under these conditions, the decay is sigmoidal, consistent with autocatalysis, and for manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) it is pseudo first order. The effects of the presence of aqueous formaldehyde and Mn(2+) were observed and a fit to a simple mechanism is discussed. It is concluded that chemiluminescent enhancement in these systems is best explained by reaction kinetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  3. Spatially Resolved Distribution of Fe Species around Microbes at the Submicron Scale in Natural Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Takeichi, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Miyahara, Masaaki; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Ohigashi, Takuji; Mase, Kazuhiko; Ono, Kanta; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2017-09-27

    Natural bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) were investigated using local-analyzable synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with a submicron-scale resolution. Cell, cell sheath interface (EPS), and sheath in the BIOS were clearly depicted using C-, N-, and O- near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) obtained through STXM measurements. Fe-NEXAFS obtained from different regions of BIOS indicated that the most dominant iron mineral species was ferrihydrite. Fe(II)- and/or Fe(III)-acidic polysaccharides accompanied ferrihydrite near the cell and EPS regions. Our STXM/NEXAFS analysis showed that Fe species change continuously between the cell, EPS, and sheath under several 10-nm scales.

  4. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), č. článku 5057610. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : oxidative stress * developing rat brain * lipid peroxidation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.593, year: 2016

  5. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  6. The role of iron species on the turbidity of oxidized phenol solutions in a photo-Fenton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Natalia; Camarero, Luis M; Lomas, Jose M; Perez-Arce, Jonatan

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at establishing the contribution of the iron species to the turbidity of phenol solutions oxidized with photo-Fenton technology. During oxidation, turbidity increases linearly with time till a maximum value, according to a formation rate that shows a dependence of second order with respect to the catalyst concentration. Next, the decrease in turbidity shows the evolution of second-order kinetics, where the kinetics constant is inversely proportional to the dosage of iron, of order 0.7. The concentration of iron species is analysed at the point of maximum turbidity, as a function of the total amount of iron. Then, it is found that using dosages FeT=0-15.0 mg/L, the majority iron species was found to be ferrous ions, indicating that its concentration increases linearly with the dosage of total iron. This result may indicate that the photo-reaction of ferric ion occurs leading to the regeneration of ferrous ion. The results, obtained by operating with initial dosages FeT=15.0 and 25.0 mg/L, suggest that ferrous ion concentration decreases while ferric ion concentration increases in a complementary manner. This fact could be explained as a regeneration cycle of the iron species. The observed turbidity is generated due to the iron being added as a catalyst and the organic matter present in the system. Later, it was found that at the point of maximum turbidity, the concentration of ferrous ions is inversely proportional to the concentration of phenol and its dihydroxylated intermediates.

  7. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Paital, Biswaranjan; Dandapat, Jagneswar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  8. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Bihari Nityananda Chainy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  9. The Effect of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae: The Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra A. Gallina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS production was investigated in the marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi (SM, exposed to 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DECA, 2E,4E/Z-octadienal (OCTA, 2E,4E/Z-heptadienal (HEPTA and a mix of these last two (MIX. When exposed to polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA, a decrease of NO was observed, proportional to the PUA concentration (85% of the initial level after 180 min with 66 µM DECA. Only OCTA, HEPTA and MIX induced a parallel increase of ROS, the highest (2.9-times the control with OCTA concentrations twice the EC50 for growth at 24 h (20 μM. The synthesis of carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll cycle (XC was enhanced during exposure, suggesting their antioxidant activity. Our data provide evidence that specific pathways exist as a reaction to PUA and that they depend upon the PUA used and/or the diatom species. In fact, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT produces NO in response to DECA, but not to OCTA. We advance the hypothesis that SM perceives OCTA and HEPTA as intra-population infochemicals (as it produces PUA, while PT (non-PUA producing species perceives them as allelochemicals. The ability to produce and to use PUA as infochemicals may underlie ecological traits of different diatom species and modulate ecological success in natural communities.

  10. Reproductive effort affects oxidative status and stress in an Antarctic penguin species: An experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Colominas-Ciuró

    Full Text Available The oxidative cost of reproduction has been a matter of debate in recent years presumably because of the lack of proper experimental studies. Based on the hypothesis that different brood sizes produce differential reproductive costs, an experimental manipulation during breeding of Adélie penguins was conducted at Hope Bay, Antarctica, to study oxidative status and stress. We predict that a lower reproductive effort should be positively related to low oxidative and physiological stress. We randomly assigned nests with two chicks to a control reproductive effort group (CRE, and by removing one chick from some nests with two chicks, formed a second, low reproductive effort group (LRE. We examined how oxidative status in blood plasma (reactive oxygen metabolites, ROMs, and total antioxidant capacity, OXY and stress (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, H/L responded to a lower production of offspring total biomass. Our nest manipulation showed significant differences in offspring total biomass, which was lower in the LRE group. As predicted, the LRE group had higher antioxidant capacity than individuals in the CRE group. We have also found, although marginally significant, interactions between sex and treatment in the three variables analysed. Females had higher OXY, lower ROMs and lower H/L ratio when rearing one chick, whereas males did so when rearing two except for OXY which was high regardless of treatment. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between the H/L ratio and OXY in females. Finally, we have found a negative and significant relationship between the duration of the experiment and OXY and ROMs and positive with H/L ratio which suggests that indeed breeding penguins are paying an effort in physiological terms in relation to the duration of the chick rearing. In conclusion, a reduction of the reproductive effort decreased oxidative stress in this long-lived bird meaning that a link exists between breeding effort and oxidative

  11. Reproductive effort affects oxidative status and stress in an Antarctic penguin species: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colominas-Ciuró, Roger; Santos, Mercedes; Coria, Néstor; Barbosa, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The oxidative cost of reproduction has been a matter of debate in recent years presumably because of the lack of proper experimental studies. Based on the hypothesis that different brood sizes produce differential reproductive costs, an experimental manipulation during breeding of Adélie penguins was conducted at Hope Bay, Antarctica, to study oxidative status and stress. We predict that a lower reproductive effort should be positively related to low oxidative and physiological stress. We randomly assigned nests with two chicks to a control reproductive effort group (CRE), and by removing one chick from some nests with two chicks, formed a second, low reproductive effort group (LRE). We examined how oxidative status in blood plasma (reactive oxygen metabolites, ROMs, and total antioxidant capacity, OXY) and stress (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, H/L) responded to a lower production of offspring total biomass. Our nest manipulation showed significant differences in offspring total biomass, which was lower in the LRE group. As predicted, the LRE group had higher antioxidant capacity than individuals in the CRE group. We have also found, although marginally significant, interactions between sex and treatment in the three variables analysed. Females had higher OXY, lower ROMs and lower H/L ratio when rearing one chick, whereas males did so when rearing two except for OXY which was high regardless of treatment. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between the H/L ratio and OXY in females. Finally, we have found a negative and significant relationship between the duration of the experiment and OXY and ROMs and positive with H/L ratio which suggests that indeed breeding penguins are paying an effort in physiological terms in relation to the duration of the chick rearing. In conclusion, a reduction of the reproductive effort decreased oxidative stress in this long-lived bird meaning that a link exists between breeding effort and oxidative stress. However

  12. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hefny, M.M.; Pattyn, C.; Lukeš, Petr; Benedikt, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 40 (2016), s. 404002 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14080 Grant - others:European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) COST TD1208 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : atmospheric pressure plasma * transport of reactive species * reactive oxygen species * aqueous phase chemistry * plasma and liquids * phenol aqueous chemistry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0022-3727/49/40/404002

  13. Acetone sensors based on TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals modified with tungsten oxide species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epifani, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.epifani@le.imm.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche – Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), via Monteroni c/o Campus Universitario, I-73100, Lecce (Italy); Comini, Elisabetta [SENSOR Lab, Department of Information Engineering, Brescia University and CNR-INO, via Valotti, 9, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Díaz, Raül [Electrochemical Processes Unit, IMDEA Energy Institute, Avda. Ramón de la Sagra, 3 28935 Móstoles (Spain); Genç, Aziz [Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Bartin University, 74100, Bartin (Turkey); Andreu, Teresa [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research- (IREC), Jardíns de les Dones de Negre, 1, E-08930 Sant Adrià del Besos, Barcelona, CAT (Spain); Siciliano, Pietro [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche – Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), via Monteroni c/o Campus Universitario, I-73100, Lecce (Italy); Morante, Joan R. [Catalonia Institute for Energy Research- (IREC), Jardíns de les Dones de Negre, 1, E-08930 Sant Adrià del Besos, Barcelona, CAT (Spain); Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C./ Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-25

    TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were prepared by sol–gel/solvothermal processing and modified by the addition of W precursor before the solvothermal step. The W: Ti nominal atomic ratio (R{sub W}) was fixed to 0.16 and 0.64. Surface modification of TiO{sub 2} occurred for R{sub W} = 0.16 while for R{sub W} = 0.64 nanocomposites with WO{sub 3} nanocrystals were obtained after heat-treatment at 500 °C. Pure TiO{sub 2} proved to be very poorly performing in acetone sensing in all the operating conditions. Instead, the addition of both W concentrations largely enhanced the sensor response. It ranged over two orders of magnitude of conductance variation for all the tested concentrations at as low as 200 °C operating temperature. The results showed that it is possible to enhance the performance of an otherwise almost inactive oxide like TiO{sub 2} by proper combination with another more active oxide like WO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Sensing architecture are synthesized, combining WO{sub 3} and of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. • Surface layers of W oxides or heterojunctions of TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} are obtained. • Simple TiO{sub 2} surface modification by W oxides boosts the TiO{sub 2} acetone response. • High responses even at 200 °C show catalytic effect of WO{sub 3} addition.

  14. Influence of reactive oxygen species during deposition of iron oxide films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranak, V.; Hubicka, Z.; Cada, M.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Wulff, H.; Helm, C. A.; Hippler, R.

    2018-03-01

    Iron oxide films were deposited using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of an iron cathode in an argon/oxygen gas mixture at different gas pressures (0.5 Pa, 1.5 Pa, and 5.0 Pa). The HiPIMS system was operated at a repetition frequency f  =  100 Hz with a duty cycle of 1%. A main goal is a comparison of film growth during conventional and electron cyclotron wave resonance-assisted HiPIMS. The deposition plasma was investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy and energy-resolved mass spectrometry. Active oxygen species were detected and their kinetic energy was found to depend on the gas pressure. Deposited films were characterized by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. Optical properties and crystallinity of as-deposited films were found to depend on the deposition conditions. Deposition of hematite iron oxide films with the HiPIMS-ECWR discharge is attributed to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species.

  15. DFT studies of the substituent effects of dimethylamino on non-heme active oxidizing species: iron(V)-oxo species or iron(IV)-oxo acetate aminopyridine cation radical species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Wei; Xia, Chungu; Wang, Yong

    2017-10-01

    Through the introduction of dimethylamino (Me 2 N) substituent at the pyridine ring of 2-((R)-2-[(R)-1-(pyridine-2-ylmethyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]pyrrolidin-1-ylmethyl)pyridine (PDP) ligand, the non-heme Fe II ( Me2N PDP)/H 2 O 2 /AcOH catalyst system was found to exhibit significant higher catalytic activity and enantioselectivity than the non-substituent one in the asymmetric epoxidation experiments. The mechanistic origin of the remarkable substituent effects in these oxidation reactions has not been well established. To ascertain the potent oxidant and the related reaction mechanism, a detailed DFT calculation was performed. Interestingly, a novel Fe(IV)-oxo Me2N PDP cation radical species, [( Me2N PDP) + · Fe IV (O)(OAc)] 2+ ( Me2N 5), with about one spin spreading over the non-heme Me2N PDP ligand was formed via a carboxylic-acid-assisted O-O bond heterolysis, which is reminiscent of Compound I (an Fe(IV)(O)(porphyrin cation radical) species) in cytochrome P450 chemistry. Me2N 5 is energetically comparable with the cyclic ferric peracetate species Me2N 6, while in the pristine Fe(PDP) catalyst system, H 6 is more stable than H 5. Comparison of the activation energy for the ethylene epoxidation promoted by Me2N 5 and Me2N 6, Me2N 5 is supposed as the true oxidant triggering the epoxidation of olefins. In addition, a systematic research on the substituent effects varied from the electron-donating substituent (dMM, the substituents at sites 3, 4, and 5 of the pyridine ring: methyl, methoxyl, and methyl) to the electron-withdrawing one (CF 3 , 2,6-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) on the electronic structure of the reaction intermediates has also been investigated. An alternative cyclic ferric peracetate complex is obtained, indicating that the substituents at the pyridine ring of PDP ligands have significant impacts on the electronic structure of the oxidants.

  16. Nitrous oxide emission from polyculture constructed wetlands: Effect of plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yanhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Min Hang, Shanghai 200240 (China); Inamori, Ryuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Kong Hainan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Min Hang, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: remanda@126.com; Xu Kaiqin [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science, Wuhan Unviversity, Wuhan 430072 (China); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Zhang Jixiang [School of Economics and Management, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210096 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Loss of nitrogen from the soil-plant system has raised environmental concern. This study assessed the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in the subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CWs). To better understand the mechanism of N{sub 2}O emission, spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in four kinds of wetlands soil were compared. N{sub 2}O emission data showed large temporal and spatial variation ranging from -5.5 to 32.7 mg N{sub 2}O m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. The highest N{sub 2}O emission occurred in the cell planted with Phragmites australis and Zizania latifolia. Whereas, the lower emission rate were obtained in the cell planted with P. australis and Typha latifolia. These revealed that Z. latifolia stimulated the N{sub 2}O emission. Transportation of more organic matter and oxygen for AOB growth may be the reason. The study of AOB also supported this result, indicating that the root structure of Z. latifolia was favored by AOB for N{sub 2}O formation. - Zizania latifolia has a large contribution to global warming.

  17. Optical emission studies of atomic and ionic species in the ionized sputter-deposition process of magnesium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Koyama, Y.; Iwaya, M.; Shinohara, M.; Fujiyama, H.

    2005-01-01

    Planar magnetron (PM) power and ICP-RF power dependences of the optical emission intensities of excited atomic and ionic species in the reactive ionized sputter-deposition of magnesium oxide (MgO) thin films were investigated. With the increase in PM power at constant ICP-RF power, Mg I emission intensity increased and Ar I emission intensity gradually decreased. With the increase in ICP-RF power at constant PM power, the Mg I emission intensity increased at lower ICP-RF power and then gradually decreased at higher ICP-RF power; on the contrary, Ar I emission intensity monotonically increased. Emission intensity of atomic oxygen was negligibly small compared with those of Mg I and Ar I under the metallic sputtering mode condition

  18. Achillolide A Protects Astrocytes against Oxidative Stress by Reducing Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species and Interfering with Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Elmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achillolide A is a natural sesquiterpene lactone that we have previously shown can inhibit microglial activation. In this study we present evidence for its beneficial effects on astrocytes under oxidative stress, a situation relevant to neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. Viability of brain astrocytes (primary cultures was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, intracellular ROS levels were detected using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, in vitro antioxidant activity was measured by differential pulse voltammetry, and protein phosphorylation was determined using specific ELISA kits. We have found that achillolide A prevented the H2O2-induced death of astrocytes, and attenuated the induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These activities could be attributed to the inhibition of the H2O2-induced phosphorylation of MAP/ERK kinase 1 (MEK1 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and to the antioxidant activity of achillolide A, but not to H2O2 scavenging. This is the first study that demonstrates its protective effects on brain astrocytes, and its ability to interfere with MAPK activation. We propose that achillolide A deserves further evaluation for its potential to be developed as a drug for the prevention/treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries where oxidative stress is part of the pathophysiology.

  19. The application of Fe–Mn hydrous oxides based adsorbent for removing selenium species from water

    KAUST Repository

    Szlachta, Małgorzata

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the adsorptive removal of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) from water by a newly developed ion exchange adsorbent, based on Fe(III) and Mn(III) hydrous oxides, was examined. This study was conducted to determine the influence of various operating parameters, such as initial anion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH, solution temperature, and the presence of competitive anions, on the treatment performance. The high Se(IV) adsorptive capacity of the adsorbent (up to 41.02. mg/g at pH 4) was due to its high affinity for selenite, as reflected in the fast rate of uptake (batch studies) and an efficient long-term removal (column experiments). Although adsorption of anions traditionally decreases as pH increases, the mixed adsorbent was capable of purifying large volumes of Se(IV)-containing water (at pH 7) to reach concentrations lower than 10 μg/L, which meets the European Commission standards. The presence of sulphate and carbonate did not influence Se(IV) adsorption. However, high phosphate and silicate concentrations may have decreased the removal efficiency of Se(IV). Data from the batch and column adsorption experiments were fitted with a number of approved models, which revealed the adsorption mechanism and allowed for a comparison of the results. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Multi-omics reveal the lifestyle of the acidophilic, mineral-oxidizing model species Leptospirillum ferriphilumT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christel, Stephan; Herold, Malte; Bellenberg, Sören; El Hajjami, Mohamed; Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Pivkin, Igor V; Sand, Wolfgang; Wilmes, Paul; Poetsch, Ansgar; Dopson, Mark

    2017-11-17

    Leptospirillum ferriphilum plays a major role in acidic, metal rich environments where it represents one of the most prevalent iron oxidizers. These milieus include acid rock and mine drainage as well as biomining operations. Despite its perceived importance, no complete genome sequence of this model species' type strain is available, limiting the possibilities to investigate the strategies and adaptations Leptospirillum ferriphilum T applies to survive and compete in its niche. This study presents a complete, circular genome of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T DSM 14647 obtained by PacBio SMRT long read sequencing for use as a high quality reference. Analysis of the functionally annotated genome, mRNA transcripts, and protein concentrations revealed a previously undiscovered nitrogenase cluster for atmospheric nitrogen fixation and elucidated metabolic systems taking part in energy conservation, carbon fixation, pH homeostasis, heavy metal tolerance, oxidative stress response, chemotaxis and motility, quorum sensing, and biofilm formation. Additionally, mRNA transcript counts and protein concentrations were compared between cells grown in continuous culture using ferrous iron as substrate and bioleaching cultures containing chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2 ). Leptospirillum ferriphilum T adaptations to growth on chalcopyrite included a possibly enhanced production of reducing power, reduced carbon dioxide fixation, as well as elevated RNA transcripts and proteins involved in heavy metal resistance, with special emphasis on copper efflux systems. Finally, expression and translation of genes responsible for chemotaxis and motility were enhanced. IMPORTANCE Leptospirillum ferriphilum is one of the most important iron-oxidizers in the context of acidic and metal rich environments during moderately thermophilic biomining. A high-quality circular genome of Leptospirillum ferriphilum T coupled with functional omics data provides new insights into its metabolic properties, such as the

  1. Leaching of spent fuel in simulated disposal condition and separation of plutonium species as a function of oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2000-11-01

    The influences of compacted bentonite on the leaching of spent fuel in bentonite-saturated ground water at room temperature were investigated by analyzing the components of leachates as well as the alterated surface of them. And the plutonium species was separated by ion exchangers. The amounts of Cs, Sb, Sr, Am, Ru, Pu and U released from spent fuel by bentonite-saturated solution for the initial 165 days were 2.0, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02, 0.005, 5x10 - 4, 0.05 % of inventory, respectively. These values correspond to several ∼ several tens times as much as those through bentonite block which were compacted to 1.4 g/cm 3 . The comparison of the cesium released in groundwater and bentonite-saturated solution through bentonite block is simular values, whose lower concentration in leachant indicates that most of radionuclides are retained by compacted bentonite, even though alkali metal such as Cs. The separation of plutonium species as a function of oxidation state by ion exchanger was succeed by two columns' method with packing materials as SiO - , SiO-SO 3 -

  2. Sporothrix brasiliensis produces the highest levels of oxidative stress in a murine model among the species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Nunes Mario

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We compared indicators of oxidative stress in the tissue of mice infected with strains from Sporothrix schenckii complex. METHODS: Mice were inoculated with Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix mexicana or Sporothrix albicans. The activity of catalase and glutathione were accessed in the liver and spleen. RESULTS: Animals infected with S. brasiliensis exhibited splenomegaly and significant decrease in catalase activity, and protein and non-protein thiol content compared to animals infected with the other species. CONCLUSIONS: Sporothrix brasiliensis exhibits higher pathogenicity compared to other species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by increasing oxidative stress in animal tissue.

  3. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zong Min, E-mail: mzmncit@163.com [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The coexisted phase of p(2 × 1)and c(6 × 2) on Cu(110)-O surface using AFM under UHV at low temperature. • Two different c(6 × 2) phase depending on the status of the tip apex. • Electronic state of tip seriously effect the resolution and stability of the sample surface. - Abstract: In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  4. Chemotaxonomic Diversity of Three Ficus Species: Their Discrimination Using Chemometric Analysis and Their Role in Combating Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musayeib, Nawal; Ebada, Sherif S; Gad, Haidy A; Youssef, Fadia S; Ashour, Mohamed Lotfy

    2017-10-01

    Genus Ficus (Moraceae) constitutes more than 850 species and about 2000 varieties and it acts as a golden mine that could afford effective and safe remedies combating many health disorders. Discrimination of Ficus cordata , Ficus ingens , and Ficus palmata using chemometric analysis and assessment of their role in combating oxidative stress. Phytochemical profiling of the methanol extracts of the three Ficus species and their successive fractions was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Their discrimination was carried out using the obtained spectral data applying chemometric unsupervised pattern-recognition techniques, namely, principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis. In vitro hepatoprotective and antioxidant evaluation of the samples was performed using human hepatocellular carcinoma cells challenged by carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ). Altogether, 22 compounds belonging to polyphenolics, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins were identified in the three Ficus species. Aviprin is the most abundant compound in F. cordata while chlorogenic acid and psoralen were present in high percentages in F. ingens and F. palmata , respectively. Chemometric analyses showed that F. palmata and F. cordata are more closely related chemically to each other rather than F. ingens . The ethyl acetate fractions of all the examined species showed a marked hepatoprotective efficacy accounting for 54.78%, 55.46%, and 56.42% reduction in serum level of alanine transaminase and 56.82%, 54.16%, and 57.06% suppression in serum level of aspartate transaminase, respectively, at 100 μg/mL comparable to CCl 4 -treated cells. Ficus species exhibited a no table antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity owing to their richness in polyphenolics and furanocoumarins. Ficus cordata , Ficus ingens , and Ficus palmata were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry that revealed

  5. Resveratrol induces acute endothelium-dependent renal vasodilation mediated through nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordish, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is suggested to have beneficial cardiovascular and renoprotective effects. Resveratrol increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesized resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, mediated through increased NO production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In anesthetized rats, we found 5.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) of resveratrol increased renal blood flow (RBF) by 8% [from 6.98 ± 0.42 to 7.54 ± 0.17 ml·min−1·gram of kidney weight−1 (gkw); n = 8; P resveratrol before and after 10 mg/kg bw of the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME reduced the increase in RBF to resveratrol by 54% (from 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.27 ± 0.06 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 10; P resveratrol before and after 1 mg/kg bw tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. Resveratrol increased RBF 7.6% (from 5.91 ± 0.32 to 6.36 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P resveratrol-induced increase in RBF (from 0.45 ± 0.12 to 0.10 ± 0.05 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P Resveratrol-induced vasodilation remained unaffected. We conclude intravenous resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, partially mediated by increased NO production/NO bioavailability and superoxide scavenging but not by inducing vasodilatory cyclooxygenase products. PMID:24431202

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate nitric oxide production through ERK/JNK MAPK signaling in HAPI microglia after PFOS exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cheng; Nie, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ting; Mao, Jiamin; Liu, Xinhang; Gu, Yiyang; Shi, Jiyun; Xiao, Jing; Wan, Chunhua; Wu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an emerging persistent contaminant that is commonly encountered during daily life, has been shown to exert toxic effects on the central nervous system (CNS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of PFOS remain largely unknown. It has been widely acknowledged that the inflammatory mediators released by hyper-activated microglia play vital roles in the pathogenesis of various neurological diseases. In the present study, we examined the impact of PFOS exposure on microglial activation and the release of proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxidative species (ROS). We found that PFOS exposure led to concentration-dependent NO and ROS production by rat HAPI microglia. We also discovered that there was rapid activation of the ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway in the HAPI microglia following PFOS treatment. Moreover, the PFOS-induced iNOS expression and NO production were attenuated after the inhibition of ERK or JNK MAPK by their corresponding inhibitors, PD98059 and SP600125. Interestingly, NAC, a ROS inhibitor, blocked iNOS expression, NO production, and activation of ERK and JNK MAPKs, which suggested that PFOS-mediated microglial NO production occurs via a ROS/ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway. Finally, by exposing SH-SY5Y cells to PFOS-treated microglia-conditioned medium, we demonstrated that NO was responsible for PFOS-mediated neuronal apoptosis. - Highlights: • PFOS exposure induced expression of iNOS and production of NO in HAPI microglia. • PFOS induced the production of ROS in HAPI microglia. • ERK/JNK MAPK pathways were activated following PFOS exposure in HAPI microglia. • NO released by HAPI microglia participated in the apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate nitric oxide production through ERK/JNK MAPK signaling in HAPI microglia after PFOS exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng; Nie, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yan [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Li, Ting; Mao, Jiamin [Department of Labor and Environmental Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Liu, Xinhang [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Gu, Yiyang; Shi, Jiyun [Department of Labor and Environmental Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Xiao, Jing [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Wan, Chunhua [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China); Wu, Qiyun, E-mail: wqy@ntu.edu.cn [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226001 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an emerging persistent contaminant that is commonly encountered during daily life, has been shown to exert toxic effects on the central nervous system (CNS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of PFOS remain largely unknown. It has been widely acknowledged that the inflammatory mediators released by hyper-activated microglia play vital roles in the pathogenesis of various neurological diseases. In the present study, we examined the impact of PFOS exposure on microglial activation and the release of proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxidative species (ROS). We found that PFOS exposure led to concentration-dependent NO and ROS production by rat HAPI microglia. We also discovered that there was rapid activation of the ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway in the HAPI microglia following PFOS treatment. Moreover, the PFOS-induced iNOS expression and NO production were attenuated after the inhibition of ERK or JNK MAPK by their corresponding inhibitors, PD98059 and SP600125. Interestingly, NAC, a ROS inhibitor, blocked iNOS expression, NO production, and activation of ERK and JNK MAPKs, which suggested that PFOS-mediated microglial NO production occurs via a ROS/ERK/JNK MAPK signaling pathway. Finally, by exposing SH-SY5Y cells to PFOS-treated microglia-conditioned medium, we demonstrated that NO was responsible for PFOS-mediated neuronal apoptosis. - Highlights: • PFOS exposure induced expression of iNOS and production of NO in HAPI microglia. • PFOS induced the production of ROS in HAPI microglia. • ERK/JNK MAPK pathways were activated following PFOS exposure in HAPI microglia. • NO released by HAPI microglia participated in the apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells.

  8. Effect of oxidative stress induced by Brevibacterium sp. BS01 on a HAB causing species--Alexandrium tamarense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Zhang

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms occur all over the world, destroying aquatic ecosystems and threatening other organisms. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal actinomycete BS01 was able to lysis dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense ATGD98-006. Physiological and biochemical responses to oxidative stress in A. tamarense were investigated to elucidate the mechanism involved in BS01 inhibition of algal growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that there were some chloroplast abnormalities in response to BS01 supernatant. The decrease in cellular-soluble protein content suggested that cell growth was greatly inhibited at high concentration of BS01 supernatant. The increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde contents following exposure to BS01 supernatant indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The content of pigment was significantly decreased after 12 h treatment, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. Moreover, the decrease of Fv/Fm ratio suggested that in the photosynthetic system, the dominant sites producing ROS were destroyed by the supernatant of the BS01 culture. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase and peroxidase increased in a short time and decreased slightly with increasing exposure time. A real-time PCR assay showed changes in the transcript abundances of two photosynthetic genes, psbA and psbD. The results showed that BS01 supernatant reduced the expression of the psbA gene after 2 h exposure, but the expression of the psbD gene was increased at concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. Our results demonstrated that the expression of the psbA gene was inhibited by the BS01 supernatant, which might block the electron transport chain, significantly enhancing ROS level and excess activity of the antioxidant system. The accumulation of ROS destoryed pigment synthesis and membrane integrity, and inhibited or

  9. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to increasing concentrations of trivalent chromium in the Andean crop species Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Bucchini, Anahi E; Iacobucci, Marta; Ruiz, Karina B; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), an ancient Andean seed crop, exhibits exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to abiotic stress. The species' tolerance to heavy metals has, however, not yet been investigated nor its ability to take up and translocate chromium (Cr). This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adjustments occurring upon exposure of quinoa to several concentrations (0.01-5mM) of CrCl3. Young hydroponically grown plants were used to evaluate Cr uptake, growth, oxidative stress, and other biochemical parameters three and/or seven days after treatment. Leaves accumulated the lowest amounts of Cr, while roots and stems accumulated the most at low and at high metal concentrations, respectively. Fresh weight and photosynthetic pigments were reduced only by the higher Cr(III) doses. Substantially increased lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and proline levels were observed only with 5mM Cr(III). Except for a significant decrease at day 7 with 5mM Cr(III), total polyphenols and flavonoids maintained control levels in Cr(III)-treated plants, whereas antioxidant activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum polyamine accumulation was observed in 1mM CrCl3-treated plants. Even though α- and γ-tocopherols also showed enhanced levels only with the 1mM concentration, tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT, EC 2.6.1.5) activity increased under Cr(III) treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, results suggest that polyamines, tocopherols, and TAT activity could contribute to tolerance to 1mM Cr(III), but not to the highest concentration that, instead, generated oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced selectivity in non-heme iron catalysed oxidation of alkanes with peracids : evidence for involvement of Fe(IV)=O species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Tieme A. van den; Boer, Johannes W. de; Browne, Wesley R.; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic alkane oxidation with high selectivity using peracids and an (N4Py)Fe complex is presented and the role of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)=O]2+ species, molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals in the catalysis is discussed.

  11. High-valent iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV)) species in water: characterization and oxidative transformation of estrogenic hormones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machalová-Šišková, K.; Jančula, Daniel; Drahoš, B.; Machala, L.; Babica, Pavel; Godoy Alonso, Paula; Trávníček, Z.; Tuček, J.; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Sharma, V. K.; Zbořil, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 28 (2016), s. 18802-18810 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/196 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : high-valent iron species * estrogenic hormones * oxidative transformation Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  12. Integrated use of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative damage in two fish species to assess pollution in man-made hydroelectric reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuragui, M M; Paulino, M G; Pereira, C D S; Carvalho, C S; Sadauskas-Henrique, H; Fernandes, M N

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between contaminant body burden and the oxidative stress status of the gills and livers of two wild fish species in the Furnas Hydroelectric Power Station (HPS) reservoir (Minas Gerais, Brazil). Gills and livers presented similar pathways of metals and organochlorine bioaccumulation. During June, organochlorines were associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO), indicating oxidative stress due to the inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In the most polluted areas, metal concentrations in the liver were associated with metallothionein. During December, contaminants in the gills and liver were associated with catalase activity and LPO. Aldrin/dieldrin was the contaminant most associated with oxidative damage in the livers of both species. This integrated approach shed light on the relationship between adverse biological effects and bioaccumulation of contaminants inputted by intensive agricultural practices and proved to be a suitable tool for assessing the environmental quality of man-made reservoirs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of neutral and chemically oxidized species of β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin in CH2Cl2: Fluorescence from intermediate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwis, D.D.D.H; Chandrika, U.G.; Jayaweera, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cations, dications and oxidized intermediate species of three carotenoids, namely, β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin, were generated in CH 2 Cl 2 solutions via chemical oxidation using anhydrous FeCl 3 . UV–vis, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopic studies were performed to understand and compare the nature of intermediate species generated during the chemical oxidation process and subsequent degradation. The intense emission observed at 550 nm can be assigned to the S 2 →S 0 (1 1 B u →1 1 A g ) transition of the carotenoid molecules. The 350 nm excitation during the oxidation process for β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin exhibit intense fluorescence peaks at 492 nm, 493 nm and 500 nm, respectively. These peaks are assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy compounds of the three molecules that are formed with molecular oxygen prior to the formation of oxidized short-chain stable compounds. - Highlights: • Fluorescence and UV–vis studies on β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin. • Oxidation, induced by FeCl 3 in CH 2 Cl 2 shows blue shifted fluorescence peaks. • Fluorescence peaks were assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy forms of carotenoids. • The D0→D3 transition of radical cations are observed in the near IR region

  14. Spectroscopic studies of neutral and chemically oxidized species of β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}: Fluorescence from intermediate compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwis, D.D.D.H [Department of Chemistry, The Open University of Sri Lanka, Nawala (Sri Lanka); Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Chandrika, U.G. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Jayaweera, P.M., E-mail: pradeep@sjp.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka)

    2015-02-15

    Radical cations, dications and oxidized intermediate species of three carotenoids, namely, β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin, were generated in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solutions via chemical oxidation using anhydrous FeCl{sub 3}. UV–vis, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopic studies were performed to understand and compare the nature of intermediate species generated during the chemical oxidation process and subsequent degradation. The intense emission observed at 550 nm can be assigned to the S{sub 2}→S{sub 0} (1{sup 1}B{sub u}→1{sup 1}A{sub g}) transition of the carotenoid molecules. The 350 nm excitation during the oxidation process for β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin exhibit intense fluorescence peaks at 492 nm, 493 nm and 500 nm, respectively. These peaks are assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy compounds of the three molecules that are formed with molecular oxygen prior to the formation of oxidized short-chain stable compounds. - Highlights: • Fluorescence and UV–vis studies on β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin. • Oxidation, induced by FeCl{sub 3} in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} shows blue shifted fluorescence peaks. • Fluorescence peaks were assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy forms of carotenoids. • The D0→D3 transition of radical cations are observed in the near IR region.

  15. Exposure to 17β-Oestradiol Induces Oxidative Stress in the Non-Oestrogen Receptor Invertebrate Species Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts of various substances on all levels of organisms are under investigation. Among these substances, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs present a threat, although the environmental significance of these compounds remains largely unknown. To shed some light on this field, we assessed the effects of 17β-oestradiol on the growth, reproduction and formation of free radicals in Eisenia fetida.Although the observed effects on growth and survival were relatively weak, a strong impact on reproduction was observed (50.70% inhibition in 100 μg/kg of E2. We further demonstrated that the exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to a contaminant of emerging concern, 17β-oestradiol (E2, significantly affected the molecules involved in antioxidant defence. Exposure to E2 results in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stimulation of antioxidant systems (metallothionein and reduced oxidized glutathione ratio but not phytochelatins at both the mRNA and translated protein levels. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-imaging revealed the subcuticular bioaccumulation of oestradiol-3,4-quinone, altering the levels of local antioxidants in a time-dependent manner.The present study illustrates that although most invertebrates do not possess oestrogen receptors, these organisms can be affected by oestrogen hormones, likely reflecting free diffusion into the cellular microenvironment with subsequent degradation to molecules that undergo redox cycling, producing ROS, thereby increasing environmental contamination that also perilously affects keystone animals, forming lower trophic levels.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams.

  17. Human Leukemic Cells performing Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS Generate an Antioxidant Response Independently of Reactive Oxygen species (ROS Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ul Haq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell metabolism is altered during leukemogenesis. Cells performing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through mitochondrial activity. To limit the deleterious effects of excess ROS, certain gene promoters contain antioxidant response elements (ARE, e.g. the genes NQO-1 and HO-1. ROS induces conformational changes in KEAP1 and releases NRF2, which activates AREs. We show in vitro and in vivo that OXPHOS induces, both in primary leukemic cells and cell lines, de novo expression of NQO-1 and HO-1 and also the MAPK ERK5 and decreases KEAP1 mRNA. ERK5 activates the transcription factor MEF2, which binds to the promoter of the miR-23a–27a–24-2 cluster. Newly generated miR-23a destabilizes KEAP1 mRNA by binding to its 3′UTR. Lower KEAP1 levels increase the basal expression of the NRF2-dependent genes NQO-1 and HO-1. Hence, leukemic cells performing OXPHOS, independently of de novo ROS production, generate an antioxidant response to protect themselves from ROS.

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  19. Bridging Redox Species-Coated Graphene Oxide Sheets to Electrode for Extending Battery Life Using Nanocomposite Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi Fu; Ruan, Wen Hong; Lin, Dong Ling; Zhang, Ming Qiu

    2017-01-11

    Substituting conventional electrolyte for redox electrolyte has provided a new intriguing method for extending battery life. The efficiency of utilizing the contained redox species (RS) in the redox electrolyte can benefit from increasing the specific surface area of battery electrodes from the electrode side of the electrode-electrolyte interface, but is not limited to that. Herein, a new strategy using nanocomposite electrolyte is proposed to enlarge the interface with the aid of nanoinclusions from the electrolyte side. To do this, graphene oxide (GO) sheets are first dispersed in the electrolyte solution of tungstosilicic salt/lithium sulfate/poly(vinyl alcohol) (SiWLi/Li 2 SO 4 /PVA), and then the sheets are bridged to electrode, after casting and evaporating the solution on the electrode surface. By applying in situ conductive atomic force microscopy and Raman spectra, it is confirmed that the GO sheets doped with RS of SiWLi/Li 2 SO 4 can be bridged and electrically reduced as an extended electrode-electrolyte interface. As a result, the RS-coated GO sheets bridged to LiTi 2 (PO 4 ) 3 //LiMn 2 O 4 battery electrodes are found to deliver extra energy capacity (∼30 mAh/g) with excellent electrochemical cycling stability, which successfully extends the battery life by over 50%.

  20. Oxidative responsiveness to multiple stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki: Interactions between temperature, acidification and cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Maura; Lanzoni, Ilaria; Nardi, Alessandro; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Marta; Fattorini, Daniele; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    High-latitude marine ecosystems are ranked to be among the most sensitive regions to climate change since highly stenothermal and specially adapted organisms might be seriously affected by global warming and ocean acidification. The present investigation was aimed to provide new insights on the sensitivity to such environmental stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki, focussing also on their synergistic effects with cadmium exposure, naturally abundant in this area for upwelling phenomena. Scallops were exposed for 2 weeks to various combinations of Cd (0 and 40 μgL-1), pH (8.05 and 7.60) and temperature (-1 and +1 °C). Beside Cd bioaccumulation, a wide panel of early warning biomarkers were analysed in digestive glands and gills including levels of metallothioneins, individual antioxidants and total oxyradical scavenging capacity, onset of oxidative cell damage like lipid peroxidation, lysosomal stability, DNA integrity and peroxisomal proliferation. Results indicated reciprocal interactions between multiple stressors and their elaboration by a quantitative hazard model based on the relevance and magnitude of effects, highlighted a different sensitivity of analysed tissues. Due to cellular adaptations to high basal Cd content, digestive gland appeared more tolerant toward other prooxidant stressors, but sensitive to variations of the metal. On the other hand, gills were more affected by various combinations of stressors occurring at higher temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cancer: Respirable Particulate Matter, Fibrous Dusts and Ozone as Major Causes of Lung Carcinogenesis through Reactive Oxygen Species Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Loridas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.. Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM, at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc. play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM10 and PM2.5 are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  2. Study on the effect of reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress on the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis and the tenderness of yak meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Yu, Qun-Li; Han, Ling; Ma, Xiu-Li; Song, Ren-De; Zhao, Suo-Nan; Zhang, Wen-Hua

    2018-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidative stress on activation of mitochondrial apoptosis and tenderness of yak meat during postmortem ageing. Oxidative stress degree, Ca 2+ levels, membrane permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptotic factors and the shear force were examined. Results showed that the ROS generated by H 2 O 2 significantly increased mitochondrial oxidative stress by decreasing the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, and increasing lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, oxidative stress enhanced Ca 2+ production and cytochrome c release, changed the levels of Bcl-2 family proteins and activated caspase-9 and -3 activities. Ultimately, oxidative stress increased the apoptosis rate and tenderness of yak meat. These observations confirmed that ROS-mediated oxidative stress participates in the activation of the apoptotic cascade reaction involving Ca 2+ and Bcl-2 family proteins. The results further suggested that ROS-mediated oxidative stress plays a significant role in meat tenderization through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Profiling of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and their N-oxides in herbarium-preserved specimens of amsinckia species using HPLC-esi(+)MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colegate, Steven M; Welsh, Stanley L; Gardner, Dale R; Betz, Joseph M; Panter, Kip E

    2014-07-30

    Species of the Amsinckia genus (Boraginaceae) are known to produce potentially hepato-, pneumo-, and/or genotoxic dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids. However, the taxonomic differentiation of Amsinckia species can be very subtle and there seems to be marked differences in toxicity toward grazing livestock. Methanol extracts of mass-limited leaf samples from herbarium specimens (collected from 1899 to 2013) of 10 Amsinckia species and one variety were analyzed using HPLC-esi(+)MS and MS/MS for the presence of potentially toxic dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and/or their N-oxides. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids were detected in all specimens examined ranging from about 1 to 4000 μg/g of plant. Usually occurring mainly as their N-oxides, the predominant alkaloids were the epimeric lycopsamine and intermedine. Also sometimes observed in higher concentrations were the 3'- and 7-acetyl derivatives of lycopsamine/intermedine and their N-oxides. Within a designated species, an inconsistent profile was often observed that may be due to natural variation, taxonomic misassignment, or nonuniform degradation due to plant collection and storage differences.

  4. Mechanistic studies of the oxidation of soluble species of ruthenium in nitric acid solutions. Application to the removal of ruthenium from nuclear fuel dissolution solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the most troublesome fission products during nuclear fuel reprocessing. His removal from nitric acid fuel dissolution solutions, above the PUREX process, is under consideration. Electro-volatilization could be a possible way to eliminate this element. It consists in the oxidation of soluble ruthenium species coupled with the volatilization of formed RuO 4 . Soluble species are nitrate and nitro complexes of nitrosyl ruthenium RuNO 3+ . The first part of this work deals with the direct oxidation of RuNO 3+ at a golden or a platinum anode. It has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and infrared and UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy. The oxidation of RuNO 3+ begins with an adsorption step, which precedes the formation of RuO 4 . Then a reaction between RuO 4 and RuNO 3+ occurs to produce a Ru IV compound, which is also electro-oxidized to RuO 4 . The second part concerns potentiostatic electro-volatilization experiences. The rate of electro-volatilization decreases with increasing HNO 3 concentration. At low concentrations, kinetic is controlled by the volatilization of RuO 4 . The rate-determining step is the oxidation of RuNO 3+ at concentrations higher than 1 M. In HNO 3 4 M, the addition of AgNO 3 is required to accelerate the oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The last part is devoted to the study of the indirect oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The electrocatalytic power of electro-generated Ag II is illustrated by voltammetric techniques and potentiostatic electrolysis. The existence of a limit concentration of AgNO 3 is shown (which value depends on experimental conditions) beyond which kinetic is controlled by the RuO 4 volatilization step. These results indicate that the electro-volatilization kinetic could be increased by optimizing the volatilization conditions. (author)

  5. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Induces Microglial Death by NADPH-Oxidase-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species as well as Energy Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Purohit, Mahaveer Prasad; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2017-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticle (ZnO-NP) is one of the most widely used engineered nanoparticles. Upon exposure, nanoparticle can eventually reach the brain through various routes, interact with different brain cells, and alter their activity. Microglia is the fastest glial cell to respond to any toxic insult. Nanoparticle exposure can activate microglia and induce neuroinflammation. Simultaneous to activation, microglial death can exacerbate the scenario. Therefore, we focused on studying the effect of ZnO-NP on microglia and finding out the pathway involved in the microglial death. The present study showed that the 24 h inhibitory concentration 50 (IC 50 ) of ZnO-NP for microglia is 6.6 μg/ml. Early events following ZnO-NP exposure involved increase in intracellular calcium level as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neither of NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin, (APO) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPIC) were able to reduce the ROS level and rescue microglia from ZnO-NP toxicity. In contrary, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed opposite effect. Exogenous supplementation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced ROS significantly even beyond control level but partially rescued microglial viability. Interestingly, pyruvate supplementation rescued microglia near to control level. Following 10 h of ZnO-NP exposure, intracellular ATP level was measured to be almost 50 % to the control. ZnO-NP-induced ROS as well as ATP depletion both disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently triggered the apoptotic pathway. The level of apoptosis-inducing proteins was measured by western blot analysis and found to be upregulated. Taken together, we have deciphered that ZnO-NP induced microglial apoptosis by NADPH oxidase-independent ROS as well as ATP depletion.

  6. Up-regulation of A1M/α1-microglobulin in skin by heme and reactive oxygen species gives protection from oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Magnus G; Allhorn, Maria; Larsson, Jörgen; Cederlund, Martin; Lundqvist, Katarina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Sørensen, Ole E; Mörgelin, Matthias; Akerström, Bo

    2011-01-01

    During bleeding the skin is subjected to oxidative insults from free heme and radicals, generated from extracellular hemoglobin. The lipocalin α(1)-microglobulin (A1M) was recently shown to have reductase properties, reducing heme-proteins and other substrates, and to scavenge heme and radicals. We investigated the expression and localization of A1M in skin and the possible role of A1M in the protection of skin tissue from damage induced by heme and reactive oxygen species. Skin explants, keratinocyte cultures and purified collagen I were exposed to heme, reactive oxygen species, and/or A1M and investigated by biochemical methods and electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that A1M is localized ubiquitously in the dermal and epidermal layers, and that the A1M-gene is expressed in keratinocytes and up-regulated after exposure to heme and reactive oxygen species. A1M inhibited the heme- and reactive oxygen species-induced ultrastructural damage, up-regulation of antioxidation and cell cycle regulatory genes, and protein carbonyl formation in skin and keratinocytes. Finally, A1M bound to purified collagen I (K(d) = 0.96×10(-6) M) and could inhibit and repair the destruction of collagen fibrils by heme and reactive oxygen species. The results suggest that A1M may have a physiological role in protection of skin cells and matrix against oxidative damage following bleeding.

  7. Study of the Chemistry of Coordination of Oxide-anions of Nitrogen with Species of Iron and Copper as Models of Enzymes of the Cycle of the Nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Espinoza, F

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, a study is carried out about the reactivity of some nitrogen oxide-anions, like nitrite (NO 2 - ) and trioxide-dinitrate (N 2 O 3 2- ), besides nitric oxide (NO), with copper species, iron, and cobalt in their states of oxidation II, in presence of the binding spectator bispicen. The synthesis and characterization of the [Cu(bispicen)NO 2 ]BF 4 was obtained, which can help to consolidate some mechanisms, proposed for the action of the nitrite reductase. The Fe(bispicen)(NO 2 ) 2 was also characterized; this is the fourth compound that presents two nitrites coordinated to an iron (II) through nitrogen. It has the characteristic of possessing short connection distances, which gives it a special attractiveness, and it opens the possibility of studying a spin exchange [es

  8. The effect of lipid peroxidation products on reactive oxygen species formation and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrožová, Gabriela; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2011), s. 145-152 ISSN 0887-2333 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC08058; GA ČR(CZ) GA524/08/1753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : lipid peroxidation products * reactive oxygen species * nitric oxide Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2011

  9. A criterion based on computational singular perturbation for the identification of quasi steady state species: A reduced mechanism for methane oxidation with NO chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    A criterion based on computational singular perturbation (CSP) is proposed to effectively distinguish the quasi steady state (QSS) species from the fast species induced by reactions in partial equilibrium. Together with the method of directed relation graph (DRG), it was applied to the reduction of GRI-Mech 3.0 for methane oxidation, leading to the development of a 19-species reduced mechanism with 15 lumped steps, with the concentrations of the QSS species solved analytically for maximum computational efficiency. Compared to the 12-step and 16-species augmented reduced mechanism (ARM) previously developed by Sung, Law and Chen, three species, namely O, CH{sub 3}OH, and CH{sub 2}CO, are now excluded from the QSS species list. The reduced mechanism was validated with a variety of phenomena including perfectly stirred reactors, auto-ignition, and premixed and non-premixed flames, with the worst-case error being less than 10% over a wide range of parameters. This mechanism was then supplemented with the reactions involving NO formation, followed by validations in both homogeneous and diffusive systems. (author)

  10. Properties of photocatalytically generated oxygen species produced by Ag2Se-graphene oxide heterojunction and its application for the visible-light degradation of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ze-Da; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung

    2017-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by the interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substances in aqueous environments, and these ROS are capable of destroying various organic pollutants in wastewater. In this study, the photocatalytic degradation of ammonia in petrochemical wastewater was investigated by solar light photocatalysis. We used graphene oxide modified Ag2Se nanoparticles to enhance the activity of photochemically generated oxygen (PGO) species. There was a catastrophic decrease in the surface area and pore volume of the Ag2Se-graphene oxide (Ag2Se-G) samples because of the deposition of Ag2Se. The generation of ROS was detected by the oxidation of 1,5- diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) to 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO). It was revealed that the photocurrent density and PGO effect increased with the graphene oxide modified. The experimental results indicate that this heterogeneous catalyst achieved a degradation of 88.43% under visiblelight irradiation. The NH3 degradation product was N2 and neither NO2- nor NO3- were detected.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. The effect of lipid peroxidation products on reactive oxygen species formation and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozova, Gabriela; Pekarova, Michaela; Lojek, Antonin

    2011-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation induced by oxidants leads to the formation of highly reactive metabolites. These can affect various immune functions, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lipid peroxidation products (LPPs) - acrolein, 4-hydroxynonenal, and malondialdehyde - on ROS and NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and to compare these effects with the cytotoxic properties of LPPs. Macrophages were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (0.1 μg/ml) and treated with selected LPPs (concentration range: 0.1-100 μM). ATP test, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, Griess reaction, Western blotting analysis, amperometric and total peroxyl radical-trapping antioxidant parameter assay were used for determining the LPPs cytotoxicity, ROS and NO production, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, NO scavenging, and antioxidant properties of LPPs, respectively. Our study shows that the cytotoxic action of acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal works in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, our results imply that acrolein, 4-hydroxynonenal, and malondialdehyde can inhibit, to a different degree, ROS and NO production in stimulated macrophages, partially independently of their toxic effect. Also, changes in enzymatic pathways (especially NADPH-oxidase and nitric oxide synthase inhibition) and NO scavenging properties are included in the downregulation of reactive species formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Theoretical Evidence for Low-Ligated Palladium(0): [Pd-L] as the Active Species in Oxidative Addition Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Fristrup, Peter; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    The oxidative addition of PhI to Pd0 has been studied by DFT with a continuum representation of the solvent. It is shown that the preferred number of ligands on palladium is lower than would be expected from “conventional wisdom” and the 18-electron rule. The most favored oxidative addition is ob...

  13. Efficient oxidative dissolution of V2O3 by the in situ electro-generated reactive oxygen species on N-doped carbon felt electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Yudong; Wang, Yunting; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel alkaline electro-Fenton-like was applied for V 2 O 3 oxidative dissolution. • N-doped carbon felt electrode was fabricated for the two-electron ORR. • ROS including ·OH and HO 2 − was in-situ generated from the electrochemical system. • A significant enhancement of V 2 O 3 dissolution was achieved due to the ROS. - Abstract: Oxidative dissolution is a critical step for the efficient remediation of heavy metal oxides in large-scale solid wastes. In the present study, a novel electro-oxidative dissolution process of V 2 O 3 to VO 4 3− is achieved by the in-situ generated reactive oxygen species on the N-doped carbon felt cathode in alkaline media. The electro-catalytic HO 2 − generation and hydrophilic behavior were significantly enhanced by the introduction of nitrogen-containing functional groups. Besides, the mechanism of electrochemical vanadium conversion is systematically illustrated, and a vanadium self-induced electro-Fenton-like reaction is proposed. By employing the radical quenching and ESR measurements, the contributions for V(III) dissolution is determined to be 43.5% by HO 2 − and 56.5% by hydroxyl radicals, respectively. It should be noted that the V 2 O 3 solid particles can be efficiently dissolved via adsorption-reaction scheme on the carbon felt electrode. This novel electrochemical strategy provides a promising solution for the heavy metal oxide treatment and further understanding for the in situ reactive oxygen species.

  14. Interspecific variability of endocrine disruption and oxidative stress in two bivalve species from the Ria Formosa Lagoon (south coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are highly productive ecosystems that have been increasingly affected by anthropogenic activities. In this study, the presence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs and their relation to oxidative stress were assessed in two bivalve species (mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis and clams Ruditapes decussatus from the Ria Formosa Lagoon (south Portugal. We applied the alkali-labile phosphate (ALP assay to determine vitellogenin-like protein levels, and the lipid peroxidation (LPO method to assess oxidative damage. Mussels and clams exhibited the same pattern of ALP concentrations, with no differences between genders and higher levels in winter. R. decussatus showed higher ALP values than M. galloprovincialis, possibly associated with a stronger responsiveness of clams to EDCs or due to the influence of the reproductive cycle. Mussels exhibited a more evident seasonal effect for LPO, indicating that these organisms are more influenced by seasonal fluctuations in the water column compared to the sediment-associated clams. Both species appear to be under the influence of EDC exposure (which could induce Vg-like protein synthesis and oxidative stressors (leading to lipid peroxidation in the Ria Formosa Lagoon, particularly in winter, reflecting the presence of different contaminants in Ria Formosa and environmental changes, as well as complex interactions between them.

  15. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment.

  16. Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas Species Onto Graphene Oxide-TiO2 Nanocomposite-Coated Catheters: In vitro Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Ananya; Vimala, R.

    The present study focuses on the development of an in vitro model system for biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aerouginosa onto small discs of foley catheter. Catheter disc used for the study was coated with graphene oxide-titanium oxide composite (GO-TiO2) and titanium oxide (TiO2) and characterized through XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy. Morphological analysis was done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biofilm formed on the catheter surface was quantified by crystal violet (CV) staining method and a colorimetric assay (MTT assay) which involves the reduction of tetrazolium salt. The catheter coated with GO-TiO2 showed reduced biofilm growth in comparison to the TiO2-coated and uncoated catheter, thus indicating that it could be successfully used in coating biomedical devices to prevent biofilm formation which is a major cause of nosocomial infection.

  17. Synthesis of cobalt-containing mesoporous catalysts using the ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” method: Importance of cobalt species in styrene oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Baitao, E-mail: btli@scut.edu.cn; Zhu, Yanrun; Jin, Xiaojing

    2015-01-15

    Cobalt-containing SBA-15 and MCM-41 (Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41) mesoporous catalysts were prepared via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique in this study. Their physiochemical structures were comprehensively characterized and correlated with catalytic activity in oxidation of styrene. The nature of cobalt species depended on the type of mesoporous silica as well as pH values. The different catalytic performance between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41 catalysts originated from cobalt species. Cobalt species were homogenously incorporated into the siliceous framework of Co-SBA-15 in single-site Co(II) state, while Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were loaded on Co-MCM-41 catalysts. The styrene oxidation tests showed that the single-site Co(II) state was more beneficial to the catalytic oxidation of styrene. The higher styrene conversion and benzaldehyde selectivity over Co-SBA-15 catalysts were mainly attributed to single-site Co(II) state incorporated into the framework of SBA-15. The highest conversion of styrene (34.7%) with benzaldehyde selectivity of 88.2% was obtained over Co-SBA-15 catalyst prepared at pH of 7.5, at the mole ratio of 1:1 (styrene to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 70 °C. - Graphical abstract: Cobalt-containing mesoporous silica catalysts were developed via ultrasonic-assisted “pH-adjusting” technique. Compared with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in Co-MCM-41, the single-site Co(II) state in Co-SBA-15 was more efficient for the styrene oxidation. - Highlights: • Fast and cost-effective ultrasonic technique for preparing mesoporous materials. • Incorporation of Co via ultrasonic irradiation and “pH-adjusting”. • Physicochemical comparison between Co-SBA-15 and Co-MCM-41. • Correlation of styrene oxidation activity and catalyst structural property.

  18. Metformin prevents ischemia reperfusion-induced oxidative stress in the fatty liver by attenuation of reactive oxygen species formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cahová, M.; Páleníčková, E.; Danková, H.; Sticová, E.; Burian, M.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Červinková, Z.; Kučera, O.; Gladkova, Ch.; Stopka, Pavel; Křížová, Jana; Papáčková, Z.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 309, č. 2 (2015), G100-G111 ISSN 0193-1857 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : metformin * oxidative stress * mitochondrial respiration * liver injury * 31P MR spectroscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 3.297, year: 2015

  19. Overexpression of Endogenous Anti-Oxidants with Selenium Supplementation Protects Trophoblast Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Apoptosis in a Bcl-2-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Alisha; Vanderlelie, Jessica J; Holland, Olivia; Perkins, Anthony V

    2017-06-01

    The human placenta provides life support for the developing foetus, and a healthy placenta is a prerequisite to a healthy start to life. Placental tissue is subject to oxidative stress which can lead to pathological conditions of pregnancy such as preeclampsia, preterm labour and intrauterine growth restriction. Up-regulation of endogenous anti-oxidants may alleviate placental oxidative stress and provide a therapy for these complications of pregnancy. In this study, selenium supplementation, as inorganic sodium selenite (NaSel) or organic selenomethionine (SeMet), was used to increase the protein production and cellular activity of the important redox active proteins glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (Thx-Red). Placental trophoblast cell lines, BeWo, JEG-3 and Swan-71, were cultured in various concentrations of NaSel or SeMet for 24 h and cell extracts prepared for western blots and enzyme assays. Rotenone and antimycin were used to stimulate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and induce apoptosis. Trophoblast cells supplemented with 100 nM NaSel and 500 nM SeMet exhibited significantly enhanced expression and activity of both GPx and Thx-Red. Antimycin and rotenone were found to generate ROS when measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) assay, and selenium supplementation was shown to reduce ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. Rotenone, 100 μM treatment for 4 h, caused trophoblast cell apoptosis as evidenced by increased Annexin V binding and decreased expression of Bcl-2. In both assays of apoptosis, selenium supplementation was able to prevent apoptosis, preserve Bcl-2 expression and protect trophoblast cells from mitochondrial oxidative stress. This data suggests that selenoproteins such as GPx and Thx-Red have an important role in protecting trophoblast cells from mitochondrial oxidative stress and that selenium supplementation may be important in treating some placental pathologies.

  20. 1,4-Diamino-2-butanone, a wide-spectrum microbicide, yields reactive species by metal-catalyzed oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Chrislaine O; Alves, Maria Julia M; Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2011-06-15

    The α-aminoketone 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DAB), a putrescine analogue, is highly toxic to various microorganisms, including Trypanosoma cruzi. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying DAB's cytotoxic properties. We report here that DAB (pK(a) 7.5 and 9.5) undergoes aerobic oxidation in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, at 37°C, catalyzed by Fe(II) and Cu(II) ions yielding NH(4)(+) ion, H(2)O(2), and 4-amino-2-oxobutanal (oxoDAB). OxoDAB, like methylglyoxal and other α-oxoaldehydes, is expected to cause protein aggregation and nucleobase lesions. Propagation of DAB oxidation by superoxide radical was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of added SOD (50 U ml-1) and stimulatory effect of xanthine/xanthine oxidase, a source of superoxide radical. EPR spin trapping studies with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-1-oxide (DMPO) revealed an adduct attributable to DMPO-HO(•), and those with α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone or 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonic acid, a six-line adduct assignable to a DAB(•) resonant enoyl radical adduct. Added horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and bovine apo-transferrin underwent oxidative changes in tryptophan residues in the presence of 1.0-10 mM DAB. Iron release from HoSF was observed as well. Assays performed with fluorescein-encapsulated liposomes of cardiolipin and phosphatidylcholine (20:80) incubated with DAB resulted in extensive lipid peroxidation and consequent vesicle permeabilization. DAB (0-10 mM) administration to cultured LLC-MK2 epithelial cells caused a decline in cell viability, which was inhibited by preaddition of either catalase (4.5 μM) or aminoguanidine (25 mM). Our findings support the hypothesis that DAB toxicity to several pathogenic microorganisms previously described may involve not only reported inhibition of polyamine metabolism but also DAB pro-oxidant activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitric Oxide is Required for Homeostasis of Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Barley Roots under Aerobic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Kruger, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen, the terminal electron acceptor for mitochondrial electron transport, is vital for plants because of its role in the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. While photosynthetic oxygen production contributes to the oxygen supply in leaves, reducing the risk of oxygen limitation of ...... electron transport chain (Gupta et al., 2011). Thus, NO could influence oxygen consumption under normal aerobic conditions in roots, and it is this specific function that is assessed here.......Oxygen, the terminal electron acceptor for mitochondrial electron transport, is vital for plants because of its role in the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. While photosynthetic oxygen production contributes to the oxygen supply in leaves, reducing the risk of oxygen limitation...

  2. Influence of reactive oxygen species during deposition of iron oxide films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straňák, V.; Hubička, Zdeněk; Čada, Martin; Bogdanowicz, R.; Wulff, H.; Helm, C.A.; Hippler, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 9 (2018), s. 1-12, č. článku 095205. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) * iron oxide thin films * wüstite * magnetite * maghemite * hematite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics ) Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  3. Nitric oxide-related species inhibit evoked neurotransmission but enhance spontaneous miniature synaptic currents in central neuronal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Zhuo-Hua; Segal, Michael M.; Lipton, Stuart A.

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO·) does not react significantly with thiol groups under physiological conditions, whereas a variety of endogenous NO donor molecules facilitate rapid transfer to thiol of nitrosonium ion (NO+, with one less electron than NO·). Here, nitrosonium donors are shown to decrease the efficacy of evoked neurotransmission while increasing the frequency of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). In contrast, pure NO· donors have littl...

  4. Inhibitory effects of C2 to C10 1-alkynes on ammonia oxidation in two Nitrososphaera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A E; Taylor, K; Tennigkeit, B; Palatinszky, M; Stieglmeier, M; Myrold, D D; Schleper, C; Wagner, M; Bottomley, P J

    2015-03-01

    A previous study showed that ammonia oxidation by the Thaumarchaeota Nitrosopumilus maritimus (group 1.1a) was resistant to concentrations of the C8 1-alkyne, octyne, which completely inhibits activity by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. In this study, the inhibitory effects of octyne and other C2 to C10 1-alkynes were evaluated on the nitrite production activity of two pure culture isolates from Thaumarchaeota group 1.1b, Nitrososphaera viennensis strain EN76 and Nitrososphaera gargensis. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis were insensitive to concentrations of octyne that cause complete and irreversible inactivation of nitrite production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. However, octyne concentrations (≥20 μM) that did not inhibit N. maritimus partially inhibited nitrite production in N. viennensis and N. gargensis in a manner that did not show the characteristics of irreversible inactivation. In contrast to previous studies with an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, octyne inhibition of N. viennensis was: (i) fully and immediately reversible, (ii) not competitive with NH4 (+), and (iii) without effect on the competitive interaction between NH4 (+) and acetylene. Both N. viennensis and N. gargensis demonstrated the same overall trend in regard to 1-alkyne inhibition as previously observed for N. maritimus, being highly sensitive to ≤C5 alkynes and more resistant to longer-chain length alkynes. Reproducible differences were observed among N. maritimus, N. viennensis, and N. gargensis in regard to the extent of their resistance/sensitivity to C6 and C7 1-alkynes, which may indicate differences in the ammonia monooxygenase binding and catalytic site(s) among the Thaumarchaeota. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Hormone replacement therapy increases levels of antibodies against heat shock protein 65 and certain species of oxidized low density lipoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uint L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT reduces cardiovascular risks, although the initiation of therapy may be associated with transient adverse ischemic and thrombotic events. Antibodies against heat shock protein (Hsp and oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL have been found in atherosclerotic lesions and plasma of patients with coronary artery disease and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of HRT on the immune response by measuring plasma levels of antibodies against Hsp 65 and LDL with a low and high degree of copper-mediated oxidative modification of 20 postmenopausal women before and 90 days after receiving orally 0.625 mg equine conjugate estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate per day. HRT significantly increased antibodies against Hsp 65 (0.316 ± 0.03 vs 0.558 ± 0.11 and against LDL with a low degree of oxidative modification (0.100 ± 0.01 vs 0.217 ± 0.02 (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively, ANOVA. The hormone-mediated immune response may trigger an inflammatory response within the vessel wall and potentially increase plaque burden. Whether or not this immune response is temporary or sustained and deleterious requires further investigation.

  6. Prediction of overpotential and effective thickness of Ni/YSZ anode for solid oxide fuel cell by improved species territory adsorption model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2017-06-01

    The reliability of analytical model for hydrogen oxidation at Ni/YSZ anode in solid oxide fuel cell named as species territory adsorption model has been improved by introducing referenced thermodynamic and kinetic parameters predicted by density function theory calculations. The model can explicitly predict anode overpotential using unknown values of quantities of state for oxygen migration process in YSZ near a triple phase boundary (TPB), frequency factor for hydrogen oxidation, and effective anode thickness. The former two are determined through careful fitting process between the predicted and experimental results of Ni/YSZ cermet and Ni-patterned anodes. This makes it possible to estimate effective anode thickness, which tends to increase with temperature in six kinds of Ni/YSZ anodes in references. In addition, the comparison between the proposed model and a published numerical simulation indicates that the model can predict more precise dependence of anode overpotential on steam partial pressure than that by Butler-Volmer equation with empirical exchange current density. The introduction of present model into numerical simulation instead of Butler-Volmer equation can give more accurate prediction of anode polarization.

  7. Interactive effects of herbicide and enhanced UV-B on growth, oxidative damage and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in two Azolla species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo Mohan; Kumar, Sushil; Parihar, Parul; Singh, Rachana

    2016-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the impact of alone and combined exposures of herbicide pretilachlor (5, 10 and 20μgml(-1)) and enhanced UV-B radiation (UV-B1; ambient +2.2kJm(-2) day(-1) and UV-B2; ambient +4.4kJm(-2) day(-1)) on growth, oxidative stress and the ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in two agronomically important Azolla spp. viz., Azolla microphylla and Azolla pinnata. Decreased relative growth rate (RGR) in both the species under tested stress could be linked to enhanced oxidative stress, thus higher H2O2 accumulation was observed, that in turn might have caused severe damage to lipids and proteins, thereby decreasing membrane stability. The effects were exacerbated when spp. were exposed to combined treatments of enhanced UV-B and pretilachlor. Detoxification of H2O2 is regulated by enzymes/metabolites of AsA-GSH cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity that were found to be stimulated. While, dehydroascorabte reductase (DHAR) activity, and the amount of metabolites: ascorbate (AsA), glutathione (GSH) and ratios of reduced/oxidized AsA (AsA/DHA) and GSH (GSH/GSSG), showed significant reduction with increasing doses of both the stressors, either applied alone or in combination. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), an enzyme involved in scavenging of xenobiotics, was found to be stimulated under the tested stress. This study suggests that decline in DHAR activity and in AsA/DHA ratio might have led to enhanced H2O2 accumulation, thus decreased RGR was noticed under tested stress in both the species and the effect was more pronounced in A. pinnata. Owing to better performance of AsA-GSH cycle in A. microphylla, this study substantiates the view that A. microphylla is more tolerant than A. pinnata. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramond, JB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available identified in a wide range of natural (e.g. soils, sediments, estuarine, and freshwaters) and man created or impacted habitats (e.g. wastewater treatment plants and agricultural soils). However, little is known on the plant-species association of AOBs...

  9. Quantitative iTRAQ-based secretome analysis reveals species-specific and temporal shifts in carbon utilization strategies among manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Wu, Si; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2017-09-01

    Fungi generate a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes and reactive metabolites, collectively known as the secretome, that synergistically drive plant litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or directly compared temporal patterns of enzyme utilization among diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon (C) degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of iTRAQ proteomics and custom bioinformatic analyses to compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi over a three-week time course. We demonstrate that although the fungi produce a similar suite of extracellular enzymes, they exhibit striking differences in the regulation of these enzymes among species and over time, revealing species-specific and temporal shifts in C utilization strategies as they degrade the same substrate. Specifically, our findings suggest that Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a and Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f employ sequential enzyme secretion patterns concomitant with decreasing resource availability, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a preferentially degrades proteinaceous substrate before switching to carbohydrates, and Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a utilizes primarily peptidases to aggressively attack carbon sources in a concentrated burst. This work highlights the diversity of operative metabolic strategies among cellulose-degrading Ascomycetes and enhances our understanding of their role in C turnover in the environment.

  10. New evidence on the formation of oxidizing species in corona discharge in contact with liquid and their reactions with organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magureanu, M; Dobrin, D; Bradu, C; Gherendi, F; Mandache, N B; Parvulescu, V I

    2016-12-01

    The objective of these investigations is to understand in more detail how organic compounds in water are degraded during plasma treatment. The formation of oxidizing species (ozone (O 3 ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and hydroxyl radicals (OH)) in a pulsed corona discharge in contact with liquid is investigated. The degradation of a target organic compound (methylparaben) in aqueous solution was increased when combining plasma treatment with ozonation, using the O 3 generated in the discharge. Enhanced mass transfer of O 3 obtained in this plasma+O 3 configuration leads to a six fold increase of MeP oxidation rate. The evolution of oxidants concentration during treatment of MeP solutions provides information on their consumption in reactions with MeP and its oxidation products. The correlation of MeP degradation results (MeP removal and mineralization) with O 3 consumption and the identified reaction products confirms that although O 3 plays an important role in the degradation, for the mineralization OH radicals have an essential contribution. The concentration of OH radicals is diminished in the solutions containing MeP as compared to plasma-treated water, indicating OH consumption in reactions with the target compound and its degradation products. The concentration of H 2 O 2 in the liquid can be either increased or reduced in the presence of MeP, depending on its initial concentration. On the one hand, decomposition of H 2 O 2 by OH or O 3 is suppressed in the presence of MeP, but on the other hand less OH radicals are available for its formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Site of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in skeletal muscle of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its relationship with exercise oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Maestu, Luis; Tejedor, Alberto; Lázaro, Alberto; de Miguel, Javier; Alvarez-Sala, Luis; González-Aragoneses, Federico; Simón, Carlos; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-09-01

    Exercise triggers skeletal muscle oxidative stress in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this research was to study the specific sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of patients with COPD and its relationship with local oxidative stress induced by exercise. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained in 16 patients with COPD (66 ± 10 yr; FEV(1), 54 ± 12% ref) and in 14 control subjects with normal lung function who required surgery because of lung cancer (65 ± 7 yr; FEV(1), 91 ± 14% ref) at rest and after exercise. In these biopsies we isolated mitochondria and mitochondrial membrane fragments and determined in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption (Mit$$\\stackrel{.}{\\hbox{ V }}$$o(2)) and ROS production before and after inhibition of complex I (rotenone), complex II (stigmatellin), and complex III (antimycin-A). We related the in vitro ROS production during state 3 respiration), which mostly corresponds to the mitochondria respiratory state during exercise, with skeletal muscle oxidative stress after exercise, as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances.State 3 Mit$$\\stackrel{.}{\\hbox{ V }}$$o(2) was similar in patients with COPD and control subjects (191 ± 27 versus 229 ± 46 nmol/min/mg; P = 0.058), whereas H(2)O(2) production was higher in the former (147 ± 39 versus 51 ± 8 pmol/mg/h; P release by mitochondria in patients with COPD and in control subjects. The mitochondrial production of H(2)O(2) in state 3 respiration was related (r = 0.69; P < 0.001) to postexercise muscle thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels. Our results show that complex III is the main site of the enhanced mitochondrial H(2)O(2) production that occurs in skeletal muscle of patients with COPD, and the latter appears to contribute to muscle oxidative damage.

  12. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    OpenAIRE

    Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Paital, Biswaranjan; Dandapat, Jagneswar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing envi...

  13. Influence of Culture Media on Biofilm Formation by Candida Species and Response of Sessile Cells to Antifungals and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isela Serrano-Fujarte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to evaluate the influence of culture media on biofilm formation by C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis and to investigate the responses of sessile cells to antifungals and reactive oxygen species (ROS as compared to planktonic cells. For biofilm formation, the Candida species were grown at different periods of time in YP or YNB media supplemented or not with 0.2 or 2% glucose. Sessile and planktonic cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of antifungals, H2O2, menadione or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and quantified by the XTT assay. C. albicans formed biofilms preferentially in YPD containing 2% glucose (YPD/2%, C. glabrata in glucose-free YNB or supplemented with 0.2% glucose (YNB/0.2%, while C. krusei and C. parapsilosis preferred YP, YPD/0.2%, and YPD/2%. Interestingly, only C. albicans produced an exopolymeric matrix. This is the first report dealing with the in vitro effect of the culture medium and glucose on the formation of biofilms in four Candida species as well as the resistance of sessile cells to antifungals, AgNPs, and ROS. Our results suggest that candidiasis in vivo is a multifactorial and complex process where the nutritional conditions, the human immune system, and the adaptability of the pathogen should be considered altogether to provide an effective treatment of the patient.

  14. Influence of Culture Media on Biofilm Formation by Candida Species and Response of Sessile Cells to Antifungals and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; Reyna-López, Georgina Elena; Martínez-Gámez, Ma. Alejandrina; Vega-González, Arturo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the influence of culture media on biofilm formation by C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis and to investigate the responses of sessile cells to antifungals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to planktonic cells. For biofilm formation, the Candida species were grown at different periods of time in YP or YNB media supplemented or not with 0.2 or 2% glucose. Sessile and planktonic cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of antifungals, H2O2, menadione or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantified by the XTT assay. C. albicans formed biofilms preferentially in YPD containing 2% glucose (YPD/2%), C. glabrata in glucose-free YNB or supplemented with 0.2% glucose (YNB/0.2%), while C. krusei and C. parapsilosis preferred YP, YPD/0.2%, and YPD/2%. Interestingly, only C. albicans produced an exopolymeric matrix. This is the first report dealing with the in vitro effect of the culture medium and glucose on the formation of biofilms in four Candida species as well as the resistance of sessile cells to antifungals, AgNPs, and ROS. Our results suggest that candidiasis in vivo is a multifactorial and complex process where the nutritional conditions, the human immune system, and the adaptability of the pathogen should be considered altogether to provide an effective treatment of the patient. PMID:25705688

  15. Influence of culture media on biofilm formation by Candida species and response of sessile cells to antifungals and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Reyna-López, Georgina Elena; Martínez-Gámez, Ma Alejandrina; Vega-González, Arturo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the influence of culture media on biofilm formation by C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis and to investigate the responses of sessile cells to antifungals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to planktonic cells. For biofilm formation, the Candida species were grown at different periods of time in YP or YNB media supplemented or not with 0.2 or 2% glucose. Sessile and planktonic cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of antifungals, H2O2, menadione or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantified by the XTT assay. C. albicans formed biofilms preferentially in YPD containing 2% glucose (YPD/2%), C. glabrata in glucose-free YNB or supplemented with 0.2% glucose (YNB/0.2%), while C. krusei and C. parapsilosis preferred YP, YPD/0.2%, and YPD/2%. Interestingly, only C. albicans produced an exopolymeric matrix. This is the first report dealing with the in vitro effect of the culture medium and glucose on the formation of biofilms in four Candida species as well as the resistance of sessile cells to antifungals, AgNPs, and ROS. Our results suggest that candidiasis in vivo is a multifactorial and complex process where the nutritional conditions, the human immune system, and the adaptability of the pathogen should be considered altogether to provide an effective treatment of the patient.

  16. Measurements and kinetic modeling of atomic species in fuel-oxidizer mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, C.; Eckert, Z.; Yin, Z.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents the results of number density measurements of metastable Ar atoms and ground state H atoms in diluted mixtures of H2 and O2 with Ar, as well as ground state O atoms in diluted H2-O2-Ar, CH4-O2-Ar, C3H8-O2-Ar, and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge. The measurements have been made in a nanosecond pulse, double dielectric barrier discharge plasma sustained in a flow reactor between two plane electrodes encapsulated within dielectric material, at an initial temperature of 500 K and pressures ranging from 300 Torr to 700 Torr. Metastable Ar atom number density distribution in the afterglow is measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and used to characterize plasma uniformity. Temperature rise in the reacting flow is measured by Rayleigh scattering. H atom and O atom number densities are measured by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared with kinetic model predictions, showing good agreement, with the exception of extremely lean mixtures. O atoms and H atoms in the plasma are produced mainly during quenching of electronically excited Ar atoms generated by electron impact. In H2-Ar and O2-Ar mixtures, the atoms decay by three-body recombination. In H2-O2-Ar, CH4-O2-Ar, and C3H8-O2-Ar mixtures, O atoms decay in a reaction with OH, generated during H atom reaction with HO2, with the latter produced by three-body H atom recombination with O2. The net process of O atom decay is O  +  H  →  OH, such that the decay rate is controlled by the amount of H atoms produced in the discharge. In extra lean mixtures of propane and ethylene with O2-Ar the model underpredicts the O atom decay rate. At these conditions, when fuel is completely oxidized by the end of the discharge burst, the net process of O atom decay, O  +  O  →  O2, becomes nearly independent of H atom number density. Lack of agreement with the data at these conditions is

  17. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  18. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Fatty Acids from the Endemic Plant Species Rindera umbellata and the Effect of Lindelofine-N-oxide on Tubulin Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka V. Vajs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The examination of the aerial parts, roots, and seeds of the endemic plant Rindera umbellata is reported in this paper for the first time. Phytochemical investigation of R. umbellata led to the isolation and characterization of ten pyrrolizidine alkaloids and eleven fatty acids in the form of triglycerides. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids 1–9 were found in the aerial parts, 7 and 8 in the roots, and 6–10, together with eleven fatty acids, in the seeds of this plant species. The structures of compounds 1–10 were established based on spectroscopic studies (1H- and 13C-NMR, 2D NMR, IR and CI-MS. After trans-esterification, methyl esters of the fatty acids were analyzed using GC-MS. The effect of lindelofine-N-oxide (7 on tubulin polymerization was determined.

  19. Transcription, Signaling Receptor Activity, Oxidative Phosphorylation, and Fatty Acid Metabolism Mediate the Presence of Closely Related Species in Distinct Intertidal and Cold-Seep Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campenhout, Jelle; Vanreusel, Ann; Van Belleghem, Steven; Derycke, Sofie

    2015-12-03

    Bathyal cold seeps are isolated extreme deep-sea environments characterized by low species diversity while biomass can be high. The Håkon Mosby mud volcano (Barents Sea, 1,280 m) is a rather stable chemosynthetic driven habitat characterized by prominent surface bacterial mats with high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Here, the nematode Halomonhystera hermesi thrives in high abundances (11,000 individuals 10 cm(-2)). Halomonhystera hermesi is a member of the intertidal Halomonhystera disjuncta species complex that includes five cryptic species (GD1-5). GD1-5's common habitat is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations. Here, we compared the transcriptomes of H. hermesi and GD1, H. hermesi's closest relative. Genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation are more strongly expressed in H. hermesi than in GD1, and many genes were only observed in H. hermesi while being completely absent in GD1. Both observations could in part be attributed to high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Additionally, fatty acid elongation was also prominent in H. hermesi confirming the importance of highly unsaturated fatty acids in this species. Significant higher amounts of transcription factors and genes involved in signaling receptor activity were observed in GD1 (many of which were completely absent in H. hermesi), allowing fast signaling and transcriptional reprogramming which can mediate survival in dynamic intertidal environments. GC content was approximately 8% higher in H. hermesi coding unigenes resulting in differential codon usage between both species and a higher proportion of amino acids with GC-rich codons in H. hermesi. In general our results showed that most pathways were active in both environments and that only three genes are under natural selection. This indicates that also plasticity should be taken in consideration in the evolutionary history of Halomonhystera species. Such plasticity, as well as possible

  20. The nitric oxide prodrug JS-K is effective against non-small-cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciag, Anna E; Chakrapani, Harinath; Saavedra, Joseph E; Morris, Nicole L; Holland, Ryan J; Kosak, Ken M; Shami, Paul J; Anderson, Lucy M; Keefer, Larry K

    2011-02-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is among the most common and deadly forms of human malignancies. Early detection is unusual, and there are no curative therapies in most cases. Diazeniumdiolate-based nitric oxide (NO)-releasing prodrugs are a growing class of promising NO-based therapeutics. Here, we show that O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K) is a potent cytotoxic agent against a subset of human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines both in vitro and as xenografts in mice. JS-K treatment led to 75% reduction in the growth of H1703 lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo. Differences in sensitivity to JS-K in different lung cancer cell lines seem to be related to their endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Other related factors, levels of peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) and 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine glycosylase (OGG1), also correlated with drug sensitivity. Treatment of the lung adenocarcinoma cells with JS-K resulted in oxidative/nitrosative stress in cells with high basal levels of ROS/RNS, which, combined with the arylating properties of the compound, was reflected in glutathione depletion and alteration in cellular redox potential, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and cytochrome c release. Inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by nitration was associated with increased superoxide and significant DNA damage. Apoptosis followed these events. Taken together, the data suggest that diazeniumdiolate-based NO-releasing prodrugs may have application as a personalized therapy for lung cancers characterized by high levels of ROS/RNS. PRX1 and OGG1 proteins, which can be easily measured, could function as biomarkers for identifying tumors sensitive to the therapy.

  1. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Navid B.; Milliron, Delia J.; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  2. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milliron, Delia J. [McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Aich, Nirupam [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260 (United States); Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  3. Up-regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2α expression by N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate in PC12 cells; involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Nobuteru; Nabemoto, Maiko; Hatori, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Fujino, Hiromichi; Saito, Takeshi; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Disulfiram (an alcohol-aversive drug) and related compounds are known to provoke several side effects involving behavioral and neurological complications. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is considered as one of the main toxic species of disulfiram and acts as an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase. Since arachidonic acid (AA) formation is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related to toxicity in neuronal cells, we investigated the effects of DDC on AA release and expression of the α type of cytosolic phospholipase A 2 (cPLA 2 α) in PC12 cells. Treatment with 80-120 μM DDC that causes a moderate increase in ROS levels without cell toxicity stimulated cPLA 2 α mRNA and its protein expression. The expression was mediated by extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), one of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with N G nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 1 mM) and oxy-hemoglobin (a scavenger of nitric oxide, 2 mg/mL) abolished the DDC-induced responses (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cPLA 2 α expression). We also showed DDC-induced up-regulation of the mRNA expression of lipocortin 1, an inhibitor of PLA 2 . Furthermore, DDC treatment of the cells enhanced Ca 2+ -ionophore-induced AA release in 30 min, although the effect was limited. Changes in AA metabolism in DDC-treated cells may have a potential role in mediating neurotoxic actions of disulfiram. In this study, we show the first to demonstrate the up-regulation of cPLA 2 α expression by DDC treatment in neuronal cells

  4. The roles of phosphate and tungstate species in surface acidities of TiO2-ZrO2 binary oxides - A comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Manchal; Shen, Po-fan; Chang, Sue-min

    2018-05-01

    Porous tungstated and phosphated TiO2-ZrO2 (TZ) binary oxides with high and strong acidity were successfully prepared by means of sol-gel or impregnation approaches. In addition, the influences of the two types of modifiers on the microstructures and acidity were systematically examined, compared, and clarified. The TZ oxide derived from a surfactant-templating method exhibited a high surface area of 195 m2/g with a pore size of 6.3 nm. Moreover, it had a high acidity of 859 μmol/g with a density of 4.4 μmol/nm2 because of defective surface. Phosphation significantly increased the acidity to 1547 μmol/g and showed the highest acid density of 6.7 μmol/nm2 at a surface P density of 22.7P/nm2. On the other hand, tungstated compounds just showed the highest acidity of 972 μmol/g and the highest acid density of 4.8 μmol/nm2 at 4.7 W/nm2. Compared to tungstate species, phosphate anions are more capable of promoting the acidity because they are able to distort the host network and inhibit elemental rearrangement. While Lewis acidity prevailed in the tungstated compounds, Brønsted acidity was dominant in the phosphated oxides. The Wdbnd O and Psbnd OH groups were responsible for strong acidity in the modified compounds. Phosphated compounds formed strong Brønsted acid sites on the Psbnd OH groups with a particular strength, and tungstation produced Lewis acid sites with a continuous strength on the metal ions adjacent to the tungstate moieties. Cyclic NH3 adsorption-desorption processes revealed that the active sites for NH3 adsorption were stable in both the tungstate and phosphate modified compounds, revealing that these solid acids are promising as the adsorbents for removal of base gases.

  5. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Fiotakis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR and spin- trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2·- and hydroxyl (HO· radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis.Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO·, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc. and ambient particulate matter (PM, such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP. The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded, PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase.

  6. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Vlachogianni, Thomais; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and spin-trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2•−) and hydroxyl (HO•) radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT) solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis). Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO•, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc.) and ambient particulate matter (PM), such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded), PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase. PMID:19440393

  7. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies. A possible role of reactive-oxygen-species induced epitopes in chronic plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A. Al-Shobaili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26 against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22. Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis.

  8. Improving the chemical compatibility of sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells: Blocking the reactive species by controlled crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Zou, Qi; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Tang, Dian; Yang, Hiswen

    2012-10-01

    The chemical compatibility of sealing glass is of great importance for Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this work, the interfacial reaction between sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloy is characterized by reacting Cr2O3 powders with a representative SrO-containing glass crystallized by different heat-treatment schedules. The crystalline structure and crystalline content of sealing glass are determined by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the fraction of Cr6+ decreases from 39.8 ± 1.9% for quenched glass to 8.2 ± 0.4% for glass crystallized at 900 °C for 2 h. In addition, the interfacial reaction can be further reduced with increasing crystallization temperature and time as well as the addition of nucleation agent (TiO2). The formation of some Sr-containing crystalline phases, Sr2SiO4 and Sr(TiO3), contributes to the improvement of chemical compatibility of sealing glass, in agreement with the results of thermodynamic calculations.

  9. Nitrous oxide emission potentials of Burkholderia species isolated from the leaves of a boreal peat moss Sphagnum fuscum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Wang, Mengcen; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Using a culture-based nitrous oxide (N2O) emission assay, three active N2O emitters were isolated from Sphagnum fuscum leaves and all identified as members of Burkholderia. These isolates showed N2O emission in the medium supplemented with [Formula: see text] but not with [Formula: see text], and Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 showed the most efficient N2O emission (0.20 μg·vial(-1)·day(-1)) at 1.0 mM KNO3. In Burkholderia sp. SF-E2, the optimum pH for N2O production was 5.0, close to that of the phyllosphere of Sphagnum mosses, while the optimum temperature was uniquely over 30 °C. The stimulating effect of additional 1.5 mM sucrose on N2O emission was ignorable, but Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 upon exposure to 100 mg·L(-1) E-caffeic acid showed uniquely 67-fold higher N2O emission. All of the three N2O emitters were negative in both acetylene inhibition assay and PCR assay for nosZ-detection, suggesting that N2O reductase or the gene itself is missing in the N2O-emitting Burkholderia.

  10. Fate of isotopically labeled zinc oxide nanoparticles in sediment and effects on two endobenthic species, the clam Scrobicularia plana and the ragworm Hediste diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Valsami-Jones, Eugénia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Although it is reported that metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, which are among the most rapidly commercialized materials, can cause toxicity to organisms, their fate in the environment and toxicity to marine organisms are not well understood. In this study, we used a stable isotope labelling approach to trace the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in sediments and also investigated bio-uptake in two estuarine intra-sedimentary invertebrates Scrobicularia plana and Nereis diversicolor. We selected exposure to 3 mg kg(-1) sediment ZnO NPs since this level is a realistic prediction of the environmental concentration in sediments. 67ZnO NPs (DLS: 21-34 nm, positively charged: 31.3 mV) suspensions were synthesised in diethylene glycol (DEG). We explored the fate of 67ZnO NPs in sediment, 67Zn bioaccumulation and the biochemical (biomarkers of defence and damage) and behavioural (burrowing kinetics and feeding rates) biomarkers in both species to 67ZnO NPs and DEG on its own during a 16 d laboratory exposure. After exposure, 67Zn concentrations in sediment showed higher levels in the upper section (1cm: 2.59 mg kg(-1)) decreasing progressively (2 cm: 1.63 mg kg(-1), 3 cm: 0.90 mg kg(-1), 4 cm: 0.67 mg kg(-1)) to a minimum value at the bottom (5 cm: 0.31 mg kg(-1)). 67Zn bioaccumulation was observed in both organisms exposed to 67ZnO NPs in DEG but no major inter-species differences were found. At the biochemical level, 67ZnO NPs exposure significantly induced increased glutathione-S-transferase activity in worms and catalase activity in clams whereas superoxide dismutase activity and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels were not affected in any species. Exposure to DEG on its own leads to a significant increase of metallothionein-like protein levels in clams compared with those exposed to 67ZnO NPs or controls. Burrowing behaviour as well as feeding rate were significantly impaired in both species exposed to 67ZnO NPs. Concerning exposure to DEG on its own

  11. Surface Species and Metal Oxidation State during H2-Assisted NH3-SCR of NOx over Alumina-Supported Silver and Indium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ström

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alumina-supported silver and indium catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR of NOx with ammonia. Particularly, we focus on the active phase of the catalyst and the formation of surface species, as a function of the gas environment. Diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy was used to follow the oxidation state of the silver and indium phases, and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS was used to elucidate the formation of surface species during SCR conditions. In addition, the NOx reduction efficiency of the materials was evaluated using H2-assisted NH3-SCR. The DRIFTS results show that the Ag/Al2O3 sample forms NO-containing surface species during SCR conditions to a higher extent compared to the In/Al2O3 sample. The silver sample also appears to be more reduced by H2 than the indium sample, as revealed by UV-vis spectroscopic experiments. Addition of H2, however, may promote the formation of highly dispersed In2O3 clusters, which previously have been suggested to be important for the SCR reaction. The affinity to adsorb NH3 is confirmed by both temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS to be higher for the In/Al2O3 sample compared to Ag/Al2O3. The strong adsorption of NH3 may inhibit (self-poison the NH3 activation, thereby hindering further reaction over this catalyst, which is also shown by the lower SCR activity compared to Ag/Al2O3.

  12. Determination of DPPH Radical Oxidation Caused by Methanolic Extracts of Some Microalgal Species by Linear Regression Analysis of Spectrophotometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf-Peter Hansen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The demonstrated modified spectrophotometric method makes use of the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical and its specific absorbance properties. Theabsorbance decreases when the radical is reduced by antioxidants. In contrast to otherinvestigations, the absorbance was measured at a wavelength of 550 nm. This wavelengthenabled the measurements of the stable free DPPH radical without interference frommicroalgal pigments. This approach was applied to methanolic microalgae extracts for twodifferent DPPH concentrations. The changes in absorbance measured vs. the concentrationof the methanolic extract resulted in curves with a linear decrease ending in a saturationregion. Linear regression analysis of the linear part of DPPH reduction versus extractconcentration enabled the determination of the microalgae’s methanolic extractsantioxidative potentials which was independent to the employed DPPH concentrations. Theresulting slopes showed significant differences (6 - 34 μmol DPPH g-1 extractconcentration between the single different species of microalgae (Anabaena sp.,Isochrysis galbana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Porphyridium purpureum, Synechocystissp. PCC6803 in their ability to reduce the DPPH radical. The independency of the signal on the DPPH concentration is a valuable advantage over the determination of the EC50 value.

  13. Multi-species counter-current diffusion model for etching depleted uranium oxide in NF3, RF glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, H.H.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Results of recent experiments investigating the decontamination of depleted UO 2 using NF 3 gas, RF gloss discharge, showed that etching rate decreased monotonically with immersion time to the end point. In addition to the formation of non-volatile reaction products on UO 2 surface, the accumulation of UF 6 in the sheath contributed to the decrease in etch rate with immersion time. To investigate the latter, a transient, multi-species, counter-current diffusion model for UO 2 etching is developed. Model results indicated that, depending on gas pressure and absorbed power, the diffusion coefficient of F in the sheath decreased at the end point by ∼15%. At 17.0 Pa and 200 W, the mole fraction of F at UO 2 surface decreased rapidly with immersion time to 61% and 86% of its initial value, after one and two characteristic etch time, respectively, it became almost zero at the end point, reached after 4--5 characteristic etch times

  14. When bad guys become good ones: the key role of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in the plant responses to abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Dos Santos Farnese

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The natural environment of plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and their ability to respond to these stresses is highly flexible and finely balanced through the interaction between signaling molecules. In this review, we highlight the integrated action between reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, particularly nitric oxide (NO, involved in the acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Under stressful conditions, the biosynthesis transport and the metabolism of ROS and NO influence plant response mechanisms. The enzymes involved in ROS and NO synthesis and scavenging can be found in different cells compartments and their temporal and spatial locations are determinant for signaling mechanisms. Both ROS and NO are involved in long distances signaling (ROS wave and GSNO transport, promoting an acquired systemic acclimation to abiotic stresses. The mechanisms of abiotic stresses response triggered by ROS and NO involve some general steps, as the enhancement of antioxidant systems, but also stress-specific mechanisms, according to the stress type (drought, hypoxia, heavy metals, etc, and demand the interaction with other signaling molecules, such as MAPK, plant hormones and calcium. The transduction of ROS and NO bioactivity involves post-translational modifications of proteins, particularly S-glutathionylation for ROS, and S-nitrosylation for NO. These changes may alter the activity, stability, and interaction with other molecules or subcellular location of proteins, changing the entire cell dynamics and contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, despite the recent advances about the roles of ROS and NO in signaling cascades, many challenges remain, and future studies focusing on the signaling of these molecules in planta are still necessary.

  15. When Bad Guys Become Good Ones: The Key Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in the Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnese, Fernanda S; Menezes-Silva, Paulo E; Gusman, Grasielle S; Oliveira, Juraci A

    2016-01-01

    The natural environment of plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and their ability to respond to these stresses is highly flexible and finely balanced through the interaction between signaling molecules. In this review, we highlight the integrated action between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), particularly nitric oxide (NO), involved in the acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Under stressful conditions, the biosynthesis transport and the metabolism of ROS and NO influence plant response mechanisms. The enzymes involved in ROS and NO synthesis and scavenging can be found in different cells compartments and their temporal and spatial locations are determinant for signaling mechanisms. Both ROS and NO are involved in long distances signaling (ROS wave and GSNO transport), promoting an acquired systemic acclimation to abiotic stresses. The mechanisms of abiotic stresses response triggered by ROS and NO involve some general steps, as the enhancement of antioxidant systems, but also stress-specific mechanisms, according to the stress type (drought, hypoxia, heavy metals, etc.), and demand the interaction with other signaling molecules, such as MAPK, plant hormones, and calcium. The transduction of ROS and NO bioactivity involves post-translational modifications of proteins, particularly S-glutathionylation for ROS, and S-nitrosylation for NO. These changes may alter the activity, stability, and interaction with other molecules or subcellular location of proteins, changing the entire cell dynamics and contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, despite the recent advances about the roles of ROS and NO in signaling cascades, many challenges remain, and future studies focusing on the signaling of these molecules in planta are still necessary.

  16. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembly, Jason P. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Russ College of Engineering and Technology

    2007-06-01

    Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  17. Native plant growth promoting bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and mixed or individual mycorrhizal species improved drought tolerance and oxidative metabolism in Lavandula dentata plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, E; Probanza, A; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2016-03-15

    This study evaluates the responses of Lavandula dentata under drought conditions to the inoculation with single autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (five fungal strains) or with their mixture and the effects of these inocula with a native Bacillus thuringiensis (endophytic bacteria). These microorganisms were drought tolerant and in general, increased plant growth and nutrition. Particularly, the AM fungal mixture and B. thuringiensis maximized plant biomass and compensated drought stress as values of antioxidant activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase APX)] shown. The AMF-bacteria interactions highly reduced the plant oxidative damage of lipids [malondialdehyde (MDA)] and increased the mycorrhizal development (mainly arbuscular formation representative of symbiotic functionality). These microbial interactions explain the highest potential of dually inoculated plants to tolerate drought stress. B. thuringiensis "in vitro" under osmotic stress does not reduce its PGPB (plant growth promoting bacteria) abilities as indole acetic acid (IAA) and ACC deaminase production and phosphate solubilization indicating its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. Each one of the autochthonous fungal strains maintained their particular interaction with B. thuringiensis reflecting the diversity, intrinsic abilities and inherent compatibility of these microorganisms. In general, autochthonous AM fungal species and particularly their mixture with B. thuringiensis demonstrated their potential for protecting plants against drought and helping plants to thrive in semiarid ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and glutathione depletion after accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by oligodendroglial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are currently used for various neurobiological applications. To investigate the consequences of a treatment of brain cells with such particles, we have applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONP that had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 60 nm to oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells. After exposure to 4 mM iron applied as DMSA–IONP, these cells increased their total specific iron content within 8 h 600-fold from 7 to 4,200 nmol/mg cellular protein. The strong iron accumulation was accompanied by a change in cell morphology, although the cell viability was not compromized. DMSA–IONP treatment caused a concentration-dependent increase in the iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the specific content of the cellular antioxidative tripeptide glutathione. During a 16 h recovery phase in IONP-free culture medium following exposure to DMSA–IONP, OLN-93 cells maintained their high iron content and replenished their cellular glutathione content. These data demonstrate that viable OLN-93 cells have a remarkable potential to deal successfully with the consequences of an accumulation of large amounts of iron after exposure to DMSA–IONP.

  19. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Mediating Chemotherapeutic Drug Induced Bystander Response in Human Cancer Cells Exposed In-Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Mani; Rao, Bhavna S; Deepika, Ramasamy; Paul, Solomon F.D.; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2012-01-01

    Background The intention of cancer chemotherapy is to control the growth of cancer cells using chemical agents. However, the occurrence of second malignancies has raised concerns, leading to re-evaluation of the current strategy in use for chemotherapeutic agents. Although the mechanisms involved in second malignancy remain ambiguous, therapeutic-agent-induced non-DNA targeted effects like bystander response and genomic instability cannot be eliminated completely. Hence, Bleomycin (BLM) and Neocarzinostatin (NCS), chemotherapeutic drugs with a mode of action similar to ionizing radiation, were used to study the mechanism of bystander response in human cancer cells (A549, CCRF-CEM and HL-60) by employing co-culture methodology. Methods Bystander effect was quantified using micronucleus (MN) assay and in-situ immunofluorescence(γH2AX assay).The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in mediating the bystander response was explored by pre-treating bystander cells with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and C-PTIO respectively. Results Bystander response was observed only in CCRF-CEM and A549 cells (P bystander response on treatment with DMSO, suggests that ROS has a more significant role in mediating the bystander response.Since the possibility of the ROS and NO in mediating these bystander effect was confirmed, mechanistic control of these signaling molecules could either reduce radiation damage and potential carcinogenicity of normal tissues (by reducing bystander signaling) or maximize cell sterilization during chemotherapy (by amplifying bystander responses in tumors). PMID:29147282

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor up-regulates the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 in retinal endothelial cells via reactive oxygen species, but not nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ling; WEN Liang; CHEN Yan-jiong; ZHU Yi

    2009-01-01

    Background The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in the initiation of retinal vascular leakage and nonperfusion in diabetes. The intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is the key mediator of the effect of VEGFs on retinal leukostasis. Although the VEGF is expressed in an early-stage diabetic retina, whether it directly up-regulates ICAM-1 in retinal endothelial cells (ECs) is unknown. In this study, we provided a new mechanism to explain that VEGF does up-regulate the expression of ICAM-1 in retinal ECs.Methods Bovine retinal ECs (BRECs) were isolated and cultured. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to identify BRECs. The cultured cells were divided into corresponding groups. Then, VEGF (100 ng/ml) and other inhibitors were used to treat the cells. Cell lysate and the cultured supernatant were collected, and then, the protein level of ICAM-1 and phosphorylation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were detected using Western blotting. Griess reaction was used to detect nitric oxide (NO).Results Western blotting showed that the VEGF up-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 protein and increased phosphorylation of the eNOS in retinal ECs. Neither the block of NO nor protein kinase C (PKC) altered the expression of ICAM-1 or the phosphorylation of eNOS. The result of the Western blotting also showed that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or reactive oxygen species (ROS) significantly reduced the expression of ICAM-1. Inhibition of PI3K also reduced phosphorylation of eNOS. Griess reaction showed that VEGF significantly increased during NO production. When eNOS was blocked by L-NAME or PI3K was blocked by LY294002, the basal level of NO production and the increment of NO caused by VEGF could be significantly decreased.Conclusion ROS-NO coupling in the retinal endothelium may be a new mechanism that could help to explain why VEGF induces ICAM-1 expression and the resulting leukostasis in diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance molecules of embryonic stem cells through elevation of intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Behr, Sascha; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may be regulated by mechanical strain. Herein, signaling molecules underlying mechanical stimulation of vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance cues were investigated in ES cell-derived embryoid bodies. Treatment of embryoid bodies with 10% static mechanical strain using a Flexercell strain system significantly increased CD31-positive vascular structures and the angiogenesis guidance molecules plexinB1, ephrin B2, neuropilin1 (NRP1), semaphorin 4D (sem4D) and robo4 as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) as evaluated by Western blot and real time RT-PCR. In contrast ephrin type 4 receptor B (EphB4) expression was down-regulated upon mechanical strain, indicating an arterial-type differentiation. Robo1 protein expression was modestly increased with no change in mRNA expression. Mechanical strain increased intracellular calcium as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Mechanical strain-induced vasculogenesis was abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS2870, upon chelation of intracellular calcium by BAPTA as well as upon siRNA inactivation of ephrin B2, NRP1 and robo4. BAPTA blunted the strain-induced expression of angiogenic growth factors, the increase in NO and ROS as well as the expression of NRP1, sem4D and plexinB1, whereas ephrin B2, EphB4 as well as robo1 and robo4 expression were not impaired. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis of ES cells by the intracellular messengers ROS, NO and calcium as well as by upregulation of angiogenesis guidance molecules and the angiogenic growth factors VEGF, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Propensity to metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses of two benthic species (Cerastoderma edule and Nephtys hombergii): are tolerance processes limiting their responsiveness?

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Ana; Piló , David; Araú jo, Olinda; Pereira, Fá bio; Guilherme, Sofia; Carvalho, Susana; Santos, Maria Ana; Pacheco, Má rio; Pereira, Patrí cia

    2016-01-01

    and antioxidant system responses of two benthic organisms (Cerastoderma edule, Bivalvia; Nephtys hombergii, Polychaeta). This approach will provide clarifications about the ability of each species to signalise metal contamination. Organisms of both species were

  3. Hydroxychavicol, a Piper betle leaf component, induces apoptosis of CML cells through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-dependent JNK and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and overrides imatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayashree B; Mahato, Sanjit K; Joshi, Kalpana; Shinde, Vaibhav; Rakshit, Srabanti; Biswas, Nabendu; Choudhury Mukherjee, Indrani; Mandal, Labanya; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Chowdhury, Avik A; Chaudhuri, Jaydeep; Paul, Kausik; Pal, Bikas C; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Pal, Churala; Manna, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Chaudhuri, Utpal; Konar, Aditya; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Santu

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic extract of Piper betle (Piper betle L.) leaves was recently found to induce apoptosis of CML cells expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl with imatinib resistance phenotype. Hydroxy-chavicol (HCH), a constituent of the alcoholic extract of Piper betle leaves, was evaluated for anti-CML activity. Here, we report that HCH and its analogues induce killing of primary cells in CML patients and leukemic cell lines expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl, including the T315I mutation, with minimal toxicity to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. HCH causes early but transient increase of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species-dependent persistent activation of JNK leads to an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide generation. This causes loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspase 9, 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase leading to apoptosis. One HCH analogue was also effective in vivo in SCID mice against grafts expressing the T315I mutation, although to a lesser extent than grafts expressing wild type Bcr-Abl, without showing significant bodyweight loss. Our data describe the role of JNK-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide for anti-CML activity of HCH and this molecule merits further testing in pre-clinical and clinical settings. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Oxidized amino acid residues in the vicinity of Q(A and Pheo(D1 of the photosystem II reaction center: putative generation sites of reducing-side reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie K Frankel

    Full Text Available Under a variety of stress conditions, Photosystem II produces reactive oxygen species on both the reducing and oxidizing sides of the photosystem. A number of different sites including the Mn4O5Ca cluster, P680, PheoD1, QA, QB and cytochrome b559 have been hypothesized to produce reactive oxygen species in the photosystem. In this communication using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry we have identified several residues on the D1 and D2 proteins from spinach which are oxidatively modified and in close proximity to QA (D1 residues (239F, (241Q, (242E and the D2 residues (238P, (239T, (242E and (247M and PheoD1 (D1 residues (130E, (133L and (135F. These residues may be associated with reactive oxygen species exit pathways located on the reducing side of the photosystem, and their modification may indicate that both QA and PheoD1 are sources of reactive oxygen species on the reducing side of Photosystem II.

  5. EPR spectroscopy on irradiated nickel tetracyanide in NaCl host lattice: mechanism for the simultaneous formation of reduced and oxidized species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga de Araujo, M.; Pinhal, Nelson Moreira; Vugman, Ney Vernon

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidized and reduced Ni 2+ complexes produced by X-ray irradiation on single crystals of NaCl doped with [Ni(CN) 4 ] 2- is studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at room temperature. The interdependent generation of these two complexes is attributed to migration of the charge compensating vacancy from the reduced to the oxidized complex in a reversible reaction. At higher X-ray doses, there is a predominant formation of the reduced complex

  6. Caryophyllene oxide exhibits anti-cancer effects in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells via the inhibition of cell migration, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor and apoptotic effects of caryophyllene oxide in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cell viability of these cells was evaluated by MTT assay while as in vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of caryophyllene oxide on cell migration. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the changes in cell morphology once the cells undergo apoptosis. Caryophyllene oxide significantly led to cytotoxicity in MG-63 cells showing dose-dependent as well as time-dependent effects. Caryophyllene oxide led to an inhibition of wound closure significantly. At caryophyllene oxide doses of 20, 80 and 120 µM, the percentage of cell migration was shown to be 94.2, 67.1 and 14.8% respectively. With an increase in the caryophyllene oxide dose, the extent of apoptosis also increased characterized by cellular shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation.

  7. Ultra-violet absorption cross sections of isotopically substituted nitrous oxide species: 14N14NO, 15N14NO, 14N15NO and 15N15NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. von Hessberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The isotopically substituted nitrous oxide species 14N14NO, 15N14NO, 14N15NO and 15N15NO were investigated by ultra-violet (UV absorption spectroscopy. High precision cross sections were obtained for the wavelength range 181 to 218nm at temperatures of 233 and 283K. These data are used to calculate photolytic isotopic fractionation constants as a function of wavelength. The fractionation constants were used in a three-dimensional chemical transport model in order to simulate the actual fractionation of N2O in the stratosphere, and the results were found to be in good agreement with field studies.

  8. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation at Threonine 495 and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Formation in Response to a High H2O2 Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guterbaum, Thomas Jeremy; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Fossum, A

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is produced in vessels during ischemia/reperfusion and during inflammation, both leading to vascular dysfunction. We investigated cellular pathways involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Threonine 495 (Thr(495)) in human umbilical vein end...

  9. An epigrammatic (abridged) recounting of the myriad tales of astonishing deeds and dire consequences pertaining to nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in mitochondria with an ancillary missive concerning the origins of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Diane E.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the life and death of cells. These organelles serve as the major energy-producing powerhouse, whereby the generation of ATP is associated with the utilization of molecular oxygen. A significant fraction (2-3%) of molecular oxygen consumed by mitochondria may be reduced in a one-electron fashion to yield a series of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. ROS are capable of damaging components of the electron transport apparatus and can, in turn, disrupt mitochondrial functioning, limiting cellular ATP levels and ultimately resulting in cell death. ROS-induced disruption of electron transport can perpetuate production of deleterious ROS and propagate mitochondrial damage. Consequently, mitochondria are highly enriched with water-soluble and lipid-soluble antioxidants (glutathione, ascorbate, Vitamin E, and coenzyme Q) and antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, thioredoxins, and peroxiredoxin. Another important antioxidant acting as a very effective scavenger of reactive lipid (peroxyl, alkoxyl) radicals is nitric oxide (NO) generated by mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase. However, NO can also be very disruptive to mitochondria function, a process facilitated by its high reactivity with superoxide. This interaction results in the formation of peroxynitrite, an oxidant capable of causing oxidative/nitrosative stress, further aggravating mitochondrial dysfunction, causing ATP depletion and damage to cells. Thus, in the most general sense, the effects of NO in mitochondria may be either protective or deleterious depending on specific conditions of local redox environment (redox potential, ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione, transition metals, and the presence of other oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals)

  10. Determination of arsenic species in human urine using HPLC with on-line photooxidation or microwave-assisted oxidation combined with flow-injection HG-AAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, R.; Begerow, J.; Dunemann, L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medizinisches Institut fuer Umwelthygiene, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    An improved analytical procedure is presented for the separation and simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (toxic) and not hydride-forming (non-toxic) arsenic species in human urine. Separation was performed by cation-exchange chromatography using a new solid phase type based on the continuous bed chromatography (CBC) technology. This column permits by a factor of 4 higher flow rates than conventional columns resulting in a drastical reduction of retention times without any loss of resolution. Using this type of column, arsenobetaine (AsBet), arsenocholine (AsChol), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were separated from the more toxic arsenic species arsenous acid (As(III)), arsenic acid (As(V)), and methylarsonic acid (MA) within only 4 min. The HPLC system was coupled via a flow injection system and either a UV or a microwave (MW) reactor to the HG-AAS instrument. UV photolysis and MW digestion were used to transform AsBet and AsChol to hydride-forming species and to make them accessible to HG-AAS. UV photolysis turned out to be more suitable for this application than MW digestion, because the latter technique led to peak broadening and poorer performance. The described procedure was applied to the determination of arsenic species in urine samples of non-occupationally exposed persons before and 12 h after seafood consumption. Detection limits were about 1 {mu}g/L for each arsenic species. After consumption, the AsBet and DMA excretion increased by at least a factor of 150 for AsBet and by a factor of 6 for DMA, respectively, while the excretion of the other species did not increase significantly. This invalidates the use of total urinary arsenic as well as total hydride-forming arsenic as an indicator for exposure to inorganic arsenic. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  11. Biotransformation of Daclatasvir In Vitro and in Nonclinical Species: Formation of the Main Metabolite by Pyrrolidine δ-Oxidation and Rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenying; Zhao, Weiping; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lopez, Omar D; Leet, John E; Fancher, R Marcus; Nguyen, Van; Goodrich, Jason; Easter, John; Hong, Yang; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Chang, Shu Y; Ma, Li; Belema, Makonen; Hamann, Lawrence G; Gao, Min; Zhu, Mingshe; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Humphreys, W Griffith; Johnson, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Daclatasvir is a first-in-class, potent, and selective inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A replication complex. In support of nonclinical studies during discovery and exploratory development, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used in connection with synthetic and radiosynthetic approaches to investigate the biotransformation of daclatasvir in vitro and in cynomolgus monkeys, dogs, mice, and rats. The results of these studies indicated that disposition of daclatasvir was accomplished mainly by the release of unchanged daclatasvir into bile and feces and, secondarily, by oxidative metabolism. Cytochrome P450s were the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of daclatasvir. Oxidative pathways included δ-oxidation of the pyrrolidine moiety, resulting in ring opening to an aminoaldehyde intermediate followed by an intramolecular reaction between the aldehyde and the proximal imidazole nitrogen atom. Despite robust formation of the resulting metabolite in multiple systems, rates of covalent binding to protein associated with metabolism of daclatasvir were modest (55.2-67.8 pmol/mg/h) in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form)-supplemented liver microsomes (human, monkey, rat), suggesting that intramolecular rearrangement was favored over intermolecular binding in the formation of this metabolite. This biotransformation profile supported the continued development of daclatasvir, which is now marketed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Absorption mechanisms for cationic and anionic mineral species on ferric iron polymer hydroxides and oxidation products of ferrous iron in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandon, Remi

    1982-01-01

    Adsorbents obtained by hydrolysing the Fe 3+ , 6H 2 O ion are made of polymers with aquo (H 2 O), hydroxo (-OH...) and oxo (...O...) ligands. Radioactive tracers reveal the importance of chemical mechanisms in adsorption phenomena on ferric oxide in aqueous media. Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Mn 2+ cations are exchanged with hydrogen from hydroxo groups. CrO 4 2- , SeO 3 2- and Sb(OH) 6 - anions form covalent associations in place of iron ligands. The adsorption of hydrolyzed ions results in strong oxygen bridge bonds. In fresh water, Co and Mn participate alone in physical electrostatic adsorption. Iron II oxidation products generate chemical adsorptions. Zn 2+ and Sb(OH) 6 - associate with ferric hydroxides from oxidized Fe 2+ . 60 Co, 54 Mn and 51 Cr form covalent associations between unpaired 3d iron electrons and the adsorbed element. This process is not predominant with selenium IV or VI reduced to the metallic state or fixed on ferric hydroxide in the selenite form. These conclusions can be applied to pollutant analysis and to water purification and contribute to our understanding of the role of iron in the distribution of oligo-elements in aqueous media. (author) [fr

  13. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  14. VOx species supported on Al2O3-SBA-15 prepared by the grafting of alumina onto SBA-15: structure and activity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Botková, Š.; Čapek, L.; Setnička, M.; Bulánek, R.; Čičmanec, P.; Kalužová, A.; Pastva, Jakub; Zukal, Arnošt

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 1 (2016), s. 319-333 ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/0196 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ethane * UV-Vis * VOx species * Al2O3-SBA-15 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  15. Propensity to metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses of two benthic species (Cerastoderma edule and Nephtys hombergii): are tolerance processes limiting their responsiveness?

    KAUST Repository

    Marques, Ana

    2016-02-24

    The chronic exposure of benthic organisms to metals in sediments can lead to the development of tolerance mechanisms, thus diminishing their responsiveness. This study aims to evaluate the accumulation profiles of V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and antioxidant system responses of two benthic organisms (Cerastoderma edule, Bivalvia; Nephtys hombergii, Polychaeta). This approach will provide clarifications about the ability of each species to signalise metal contamination. Organisms of both species were collected at the Tagus estuary, in two sites with distinct contamination degrees (ALC, slightly contaminated; BAR, highly contaminated). Accordingly, C. edule accumulated higher concentrations of As, Pb and Hg at BAR compared to ALC. However, antioxidant responses of C. edule were almost unaltered at BAR and no peroxidative damage occurred, suggesting adjustment mechanisms to the presence of metals. In contrast, N. hombergii showed a minor propensity to metal accumulation, only signalising spatial differences for As and Pb and accumulating lower concentrations of metals than C. edule. The differences in metal accumulation observed between species might be due to their distinctive foraging behaviour and/or the ability of N. hombergii to minimise the metal uptake. Despite that, the accumulation of As and Pb was on the basis of the polychaete antioxidant defences inhibition at BAR, including CAT, SOD, GR and GPx. The integrated biomarker response index (IBRv2) confirmed that N. hombergii was more affected by metal exposure than C. edule. In the light of current findings, in field-based studies, the information of C. edule as a bioindicator should be complemented by that provided by another benthic species, since tolerance mechanisms to metals can hinder a correct diagnosis of sediment contamination and of the system’s health. Overall, the present study contributed to improve the lack of fundamental knowledge of two widespread and common estuarine species, providing

  16. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  17. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  18. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil); Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo, E-mail: egpereira@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM{sub Fe}) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM{sub Fe} application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  19. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio; Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM Fe ) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM Fe application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  20. Biotransformation and neurotoxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its two-electron oxidation product, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium (MPDP+) species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, E.Y.

    1989-01-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) specifically destroys the nitrostriatal tract in humans and certain laboratory animals, and produces a Parkinsonian syndrome. The mechanism of cellular toxicity induced by the metabolites, however, has not been elucidated. The in vitro and in vivo metabolic behavior of MPTP and MPDP + and the possible role of factors other than MAO in determining the fate of these species was examined. Neuromelanin, which enhanced the rate of oxidation of MPDP + to MPP + , may also act as a reservoir in the substantia nigra to trap MPP + and prolong its exposure to susceptible brain neurons. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), reported to increase the neurotoxic effect of MPTP in mice potentiated the formation of MPDP + from the MAO B catalyzed biotransformation of MPTP and significantly lowered brain dopamine levels in animals pretreated with DDC before MPTP administration. The ability of the dihydropyridinium species to gain access to susceptible neurons via the dopamine uptake system was assessed using the stable, 3,4-dihydro-2-methyl-9-H-indeno [2,1-c]pryidinium (DMIP + ) species. DMIP + , however, proved to be a poor inhibitor of both [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]MPP + uptake

  1. Determination of arsenic species in seafood samples from the Aegean Sea by liquid chromatography-(photo-oxidation)-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, Richard [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Soeroes, Csilla [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Ipolyi, Ildiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, Peter [Department of Applied Chemistry, Corvinus University, Villanyi ut 29-35, 1118 Budapest (Hungary); Thomaidis, Nikolaos S. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Panepistiomopolis Zografou, 15776 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: ntho@chem.uoa.gr

    2005-08-15

    In this study arsenic compounds were determined in mussels (Mytulis galloprovincialis), anchovies (Engraulis encrasicholus), sea-breams (Sparus aurata), sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and sardines (Sardina pilchardus) collected from Aegean Sea using liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry [LC-(PO)-HG-AFS] system. Twelve arsenicals were separated and determined on the basis of their difference in two properties: (i) the pK {sub a} values and (ii) hydride generation capacity. The separation was carried out both with an anion- and a cation-exchange column, with and without photo-oxidation. In all the samples arsenobetaine, AB was detected as the major compound (concentrations ranging between 2.7 and 23.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight), with trace amounts of arsenite, As(III), dimethylarsinic acid, DMA and arsenocholine, AC, also present. Arsenosugars were detected only in the mussel samples (in concentrations of 0.9-3.6 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight), along with the presence of an unknown compound, which, based on its retention time on the anion-exchange column Hamilton PRP-X100 and a recent communication [E. Schmeisser, R. Raml, K.A. Francesconi, D. Kuehnelt, A. Lindberg, Cs. Soeroes, W. Goessler, Chem. Commun. 16 (2004) 1824], is supposed to be a thio-arsenic analogue.

  2. Observations and Explicit Modeling of Summertime Carbonyl Formation in Beijing: Identification of Key Precursor Species and Their Impact on Atmospheric Oxidation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Xue, Likun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Lee, Shuncheng; Blake, Donald R.; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Wenxing

    2018-01-01

    Carbonyls are an important group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that play critical roles in tropospheric chemistry. To better understand the formation mechanisms of carbonyl compounds, extensive measurements of carbonyls and related parameters were conducted in Beijing in summer 2008. Formaldehyde (11.17 ± 5.32 ppbv), acetone (6.98 ± 3.01 ppbv), and acetaldehyde (5.27 ± 2.24 ppbv) were the most abundant carbonyl species. Two dicarbonyls, glyoxal (0.68 ± 0.26 ppbv) and methylglyoxal (MGLY; 1.10 ± 0.44 ppbv), were also present in relatively high concentrations. An observation-based chemical box model was used to simulate the in situ production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, and MGLY and quantify their contributions to ozone formation and ROx budget. All four carbonyls showed similar formation mechanisms but exhibited different precursor distributions. Alkenes (mainly isoprene and ethene) were the dominant precursors of formaldehyde, while both alkenes (e.g., propene, i-butene, and cis-2-pentene) and alkanes (mainly i-pentane) were major precursors of acetaldehyde. For dicarbonyls, both isoprene and aromatic VOCs were the dominant parent hydrocarbons of glyoxal and MGLY. Photolysis of oxygenated VOCs was the dominant source of ROx radicals (approximately >80% for HO2 and approximately >70% for RO2) in Beijing. Ozone production occurred under a mixed-control regime with carbonyls being the key VOC species. Overall, this study provides some new insights into the formation mechanisms of carbonyls, especially their parent hydrocarbon species, and underlines the important role of carbonyls in radical chemistry and ozone pollution in Beijing. Reducing the emissions of alkenes and aromatics would be an effective way to mitigate photochemical pollution in Beijing.

  3. Tropospheric profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, and other related trace species measured over the Atlantic near the west coast of Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, F; Bruening, D; Grobler, E S; Koppmann, R; Kraus, A B; Schrimpf, W; Weber, M; Ehhalt, D H [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In June and December 1994, the concentrations of the nitrogen oxides NO, NO{sub 2} and NO{sub y} were measured together with ozone, photolysis frequency of NO{sub 2}, methane, CO, CO{sub 2}, PAN, and light hydrocarbons near the west coast of Europe above the Atlantic Ocean. Two vertical profiles for each season were obtained in the altitude range 1.5 to 12 km at four locations: near Prestwick (56 deg N, 9 deg W), Brest (49 deg N, 6 deg W), Faro (37 deg N, 12 deg W) and Tenerife (30 deg N, 18 deg W). The measured vertical profiles of NO are compared to the results of a low resolution 3-D chemical tracer model. (author)

  4. Tropospheric profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, and other related trace species measured over the Atlantic near the west coast of Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, F.; Bruening, D.; Grobler, E.S.; Koppmann, R.; Kraus, A.B.; Schrimpf, W.; Weber, M.; Ehhalt, D.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    In June and December 1994, the concentrations of the nitrogen oxides NO, NO{sub 2} and NO{sub y} were measured together with ozone, photolysis frequency of NO{sub 2}, methane, CO, CO{sub 2}, PAN, and light hydrocarbons near the west coast of Europe above the Atlantic Ocean. Two vertical profiles for each season were obtained in the altitude range 1.5 to 12 km at four locations: near Prestwick (56 deg N, 9 deg W), Brest (49 deg N, 6 deg W), Faro (37 deg N, 12 deg W) and Tenerife (30 deg N, 18 deg W). The measured vertical profiles of NO are compared to the results of a low resolution 3-D chemical tracer model. (author)

  5. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH)52-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH) 5 2- has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH) 5 2- complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  6. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inst. Lavoisier, IREM UMR 8637, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles (France); Eysseric, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  7. Effects of UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 advanced oxidation on unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina: implications for removal of invasive species from ballast water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Donghai; You, Hong; Du, Jiaxuan; Chen, Chuan; Jin, Darui

    2011-01-01

    The UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 process was investigated for ballast water treatment using Dunaliella salina as an indicator. Inactivation curves were obtained, and the toxicity of effluent was determined. Compared with individual unit processes using ozone or UV/Ag-TiO2, the inactivation efficiency of D. salina by the combined UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 process was enhanced. The presence of ozone caused an immediate decrease in chlorophyll a (chl-a) concentration. Inactivation efficiency and ch1-a removal efficiency were positively correlated with ozone dose and ultraviolet intensity. The initial total residual oxidant (TRO) concentration of effluent increased with increasing ozone dose, and persistence of TRO resulted in an extended period of toxicity. The results suggest that UV/Ag-TiO2/O3 has potential for ballast water treatment.

  8. Interaction effect between thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in the synergistic extraction of trivalent lanthanides. Determination of the composition of the extracted species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaro, D I.T.; Atalla, L T

    1987-04-01

    The distribution constant of thenoyltrifluoroacetone between 10/sup -3/ M HNO/sub 3/ and cyclohexane was determined by means of spectrophotometric measurements of HTTA concentration in the aqueous phase. The distribution ratio of HTTA, when TOPO is present, and the equilibrium constant of the reaction between HTTA and TOPO in the organic phase were also determined, and the latter was calculated. The composition of the extracted lanthanide complexes was established. The equilibrium constants of the reactions that give rise to the species were also calculated.

  9. Microwave-Assisted Sample Treatment in a Fully Automated Flow-Based Instrument: Oxidation of Reduced Technetium Species in the Analysis of Total Technetium-99 in Caustic Aged Nuclear Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Grate, Jay W.

    2004-01-01

    An automated flow-based instrument for microwave-assisted treatment of liquid samples has been developed and characterized. The instrument utilizes a flow-through reaction vessel design that facilitates the addition of multiple reagents during sample treatment, removal of the gaseous reaction products, and enables quantitative removal of liquids from the reaction vessel for carryover-free operations. Matrix modification and speciation control chemistries that are required for the radiochemical determination of total 99Tc in caustic aged nuclear waste samples have been investigated. A rapid and quantitative oxidation procedure using peroxydisulfate in acidic solution was developed to convert reduced technetium species to pertechnetate in samples with high content of reducing organics. The effectiveness of the automated sample treatment procedures has been validated in the radiochemical analysis of total 99Tc in caustic aged nuclear waste matrixes from the Hanford site

  10. The Nitric Oxide Prodrug JS-K Is Effective against Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen SpeciesS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Saavedra, Joseph E.; Morris, Nicole L.; Holland, Ryan J.; Kosak, Ken M.; Shami, Paul J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Keefer, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    Non–small-cell lung cancer is among the most common and deadly forms of human malignancies. Early detection is unusual, and there are no curative therapies in most cases. Diazeniumdiolate-based nitric oxide (NO)-releasing prodrugs are a growing class of promising NO-based therapeutics. Here, we show that O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K) is a potent cytotoxic agent against a subset of human non–small-cell lung cancer cell lines both in vitro and as xenografts in mice. JS-K treatment led to 75% reduction in the growth of H1703 lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo. Differences in sensitivity to JS-K in different lung cancer cell lines seem to be related to their endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Other related factors, levels of peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) and 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine glycosylase (OGG1), also correlated with drug sensitivity. Treatment of the lung adenocarcinoma cells with JS-K resulted in oxidative/nitrosative stress in cells with high basal levels of ROS/RNS, which, combined with the arylating properties of the compound, was reflected in glutathione depletion and alteration in cellular redox potential, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and cytochrome c release. Inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by nitration was associated with increased superoxide and significant DNA damage. Apoptosis followed these events. Taken together, the data suggest that diazeniumdiolate-based NO-releasing prodrugs may have application as a personalized therapy for lung cancers characterized by high levels of ROS/RNS. PRX1 and OGG1 proteins, which can be easily measured, could function as biomarkers for identifying tumors sensitive to the therapy. PMID:20962031

  11. Intracellular forms of menadione-dependent small-colony variants of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are hypersusceptible to β-lactams in a THP-1 cell model due to cooperation between vacuolar acidic pH and oxidant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Laetitia G; Lemaire, Sandrine; Kahl, Barbara C; Becker, Karsten; Proctor, Richard A; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2012-12-01

    Phagocytosed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are susceptible to β-lactams because of an acid-induced conformational change of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2a within phagolysosomes. We have examined whether this mechanism applies to menD and hemB small-colony variants (SCVs) of the COL MRSA strain, using cloxacillin, meropenem, doripenem, and vancomycin as comparator. Intracellularly, the change in cfu from post-phagocytosis inoculum was measured after 24 h of incubation with antibiotics combined or not with N-acetylcysteine (NAC; oxidant species scavenger); the relative potency (C(s)) was calculated from the Hill equation of concentration-response curves. Extracellularly, the effect of a pre-incubation with H(2)O(2) was determined on MICs and killing at pH 7.4 and 5.5. Intracellularly, the β-lactam C(s) was similar for the COL strain and the hemB mutant and not modified or slightly decreased (2- to 16-fold) by NAC. In contrast, the C(s) was 100- to 900-fold lower for the menD mutant, but similar to that for the COL strain when NAC was present. Extracellularly, β-lactam MICs were markedly reduced at pH 5.5 for the parental strain and the haemin-supplemented hemB mutant, with limited additional effect of pre-incubation with H(2)O(2). In contrast, MICs remained elevated at pH 5.5 for the menD mutant (supplemented with menadione sodium bisulphite or not), but were 7-10 dilutions lower after pre-incubation with H(2)O(2). Vancomycin MICs were unaltered in all conditions, with no marked effect of NAC on C(s). Cooperation between acidic pH and oxidant species confers high potency to β-lactams against intracellular forms of menD SCVs of MRSA.

  12. Oxidative metabolism of BDE-47, BDE-99, and HBCDs by cat liver microsomes: Implications of cats as sentinel species to monitor human exposure to environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Erratico, Claudio; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), and individual α-, β- and γ-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) isomers catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was screened using cat liver microsomes (CLMs). Six hydroxylated metabolites, namely 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-42), 3-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (3-OH-BDE-47), 5-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (5-OH-BDE-47), 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE-47), 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5'- tetrabromodiphenyl ether (4'-OH-BDE-49), and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66), were identified and quantified after incubation of BDE-47. A di-OH-tetra-BDE was also found as metabolite of BDE-47 with CLMs. 5-OH-BDE-47 was the major metabolite formed. Five hydroxylated metabolites (3'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (3'-OH-BDE-99), 5'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-99), 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE-99), 6'-hydroxy-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-99), and 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5,5'-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4'-OH-BDE-101) were formed from BDE-99 incubated with CLMs. Concentrations of BDE-99 metabolites were lower than those of BDE-47. Four or more mono-hydroxylated HBCD (OH-HBCDs), four or more di-hydroxylated HBCD (di-OH-HBCDs), five or more mono-hydroxylated pentabromocyclododecanes (OH-PBCDs), and five or more di-hydroxylated pentabromocyclododecenes (di-OH-PBCDs) were detected after incubation of α-, β-, or γ-HBCD with CLMs. No diastereoisomeric or enantiomeric enzymatic isomerisation was observed incubating α-, β- or γ-HBCD with CLMs. Collectively, our data suggest that (i) BDE-47 is metabolized at a faster rate than BDE-99 by CLMs, (ii) OH-HBCDs are the major hydroxylated metabolites of α-, β- and γ-HBCD produced by CLMs, and (iii) the oxidative metabolism of BDE-47 and

  13. Graphene-supported zinc oxide solid-phase microextraction coating with enhanced selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of sulfur volatiles in Allium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2012-10-19

    A graphene-supported zinc oxide (ZnO) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared via a sol-gel approach. Graphite oxide (GO), with rich oxygen-containing groups, was selected as the starting material to anchor ZnO on its nucleation center. After being deoxidized by hydrazine, the Zn(OH)2/GO coating was dehydrated at high temperature to give the ZnO/graphene coating. Sol-gel technology could efficiently incorporate ZnO/graphene composites into the sol-gel network and provided strong chemical bonding between sol-gel polymeric SPME coating and silica fiber surface, which enhanced the durability of the fiber and allowed more than 200 replicate extractions. Results indicated that pure ZnO coated fiber did not show adsorption selectivity toward sulfur compounds, which might because the ZnO nanoparticles were enwrapped in the sol-gel network, and the strong coordination action between Zn ion and S ion was therefore blocked. The incorporation of graphene into ZnO based sol-gel network greatly enlarged the BET surface area from 1.2 m2/g to 169.4 m2/g and further increased the adsorption sites. Combining the superior properties of extraordinary surface area of graphene and the strong coordination action of ZnO to sulfur compounds, the ZnO/graphene SPME fiber showed much higher adsorption affinity to 1-octanethiol (enrichment factor, EF, 1087) than other aliphatic compounds without sulfur-containing groups (EFsPDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) SPME fibers. Several most abundant sulfur volatiles in Chinese chive and garlic sprout were analyzed using the ZnO/graphene SPME fiber in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Their limits of detection were 0.1-0.7 μg/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) using one fiber ranged from 3.6% to 9.1%. The fiber-to-fiber reproducibility for three parallel prepared fibers was 4.8-10.8%. The contents were in the range of 1.0-46.4 μg/g with recoveries of 80.1-91.6% for four main

  14. Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Nitric Oxide (NO) by Gelidium elegans Using Alternative Drying and Extraction Conditions in 3T3-L1 and RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2012-06-01

    Gelidium (G.) elegans is a red alga inhabiting intertidal areas of North East Asia. We examined anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of G. elegans, depending on drying and extraction conditions, by determining reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in 3T3-L1 and RAW 264.7 cells. Extraction yields of samples using hot air drying (HD) and far-infrared ray drying (FID) were significantly higher than those using natural air drying (ND). The 70% ethanol extracts showed the highest total phenol and flavonoid contents compared to other extracts (0, 30, and 50% ethanol) under tested drying conditions. The scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitrite correlated with total phenol or flavonoid content in the extracts. The greatest DPPH scavenging effect was observed in 70% ethanol extract from FID and HD conditions. The production of ROS and NO in 3T3-L1 and macrophage cells greatly decreased with the 70% ethanol extraction derived from FID. This study suggests that 70% ethanol extraction of G. elegans dried by FID is the most optimal condition to obtain efficiently antioxidant compounds of G. elegans.

  15. Micro-oxygenation does not eliminate hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans from wine; it simply shifts redox and complex-related equilibria to reversible oxidized species and complexed forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Eduardo; Hernandez-Orte, Purificación; Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Ferreira, Vicente

    2018-03-15

    This work seeks to assess the effects of micro-oxygenation (MOX) on the present and potential levels of Volatile Sulfur Compounds (VSCs) of wine. With such purpose, three red wines with a tendency to develop sulfury off-odors were subjected to three different MOX conditions (4.4-20mg/L delivered at 0.05 or 0.2mg/L/day). Samples were further subjected to Accelerated Reductive aging (AR) and analyzed for free and Brine Releasable (BR) VSCs and redox potential. Although MOX induced strong decreases in the levels of all free VSCs, hardly affected the ability of the wine to release back hydrogen sulfide and other mercaptans during AR-aging. During aging BR-levels of MOX samples became in most cases similar or higher than non-oxygenated controls. BR-levels and the fractions free/BR follow characteristic sigmoid plots when represented versus redox potential suggesting that all changes are the result of reversible equilibria between free, metal-complexed and oxidized forms of VSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  17. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmarie eGaupp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria’s interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host.

  18. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da; Perreault, François; Oukarroum, Abdallah; Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso; Popovic, Radovan; Matias, William Gerson

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr_2O_3-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr_2O_3-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr_2O_3-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L"−"1 Cr_2O_3-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L"−"1 Cr_2O_3-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr_2O_3-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr_2O_3-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L"−"1 at 72 h. • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L"−"1. • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  19. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  20. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria

  2. β-Cell protection and antidiabetic activities of Crassocephalum crepidioides (Asteraceae) Benth. S. Moore extract against alloxan-induced oxidative stress via regulation of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Entaz; Akter, Kazi-Marjahan; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Hwa-Young; Rashid, Harun-Or; Choi, Min-Kyung; Bhattarai, Kashi Raj; Hossain, Mir Mohammad Monir; Ara, Joushan; Mazumder, Kishor; Raihan, Obayed; Chae, Han-Jung; Yoon, Hyonok

    2017-03-29

    Medicinal plants are becoming more popular in the treatment of various diseases because of the adverse effects of the current therapy, especially antioxidant plant components such as phenols and flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative diseases like diabetes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate β-cell protection and antidiabetic activities of Crassocephalum crepidioides (Asteraceae) Benth. S. Moore. The in-vitro study was conducted by the pancreatic β-cell culture and α-amylase inhibition technique which includes two methods, namely starch-iodine method and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNSA) method. On the other hand, the in-vivo study was performed by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) method and alloxan-induced diabetes method by using Wistar albino rat. At the end pancreatic specimens were removed and processed for histopathological study. The plant extract showed significant (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01) effect on hyperglycemia as compared to standard (Gliclazide) in OGTT. The plant extract showed efficient protection activity of pancreatic β-cell from cell death in INS-1 cell line by significantly reduced (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01) the levels alloxan-induced apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In addition, the plant extract showed a significant (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01) effect on hyperglycemia by increases in percent of β-cells present in each islet (45% - 60%) compared to the diabetic group. The result showed that C. crepidioides had β-cell protection and antidiabetic activities in pancreatic β-cell culture and Wistar albino rat.

  3. SALMONELLA SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ... of Salmonella species serotypes in relation to age and sex among children, ..... However, most antimicrobials show sufficient selective toxicity to be of value in ... salmonellosis should be given good attention (Barrow et al., 2007). To reduce ...

  4. Shocked plate metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Koker, J.G.; Rice, W.W. Jr.; Jensen, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing metal atom oxidation lasing wherein an explosively shocked grooved metal plate produces metal vapor jets directed through an appropriate gaseous oxidizer are described. Reaction of the metal vapor with the oxidizer produces molecular species having a population inversion therein. (U.S.)

  5. Catalytic oxidation using nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide is a very inert gas used generally as oxidant as it offers some advantage compared with other oxidants such as O2 but a considerably higher temperature (> 526 °C is often required. For particular cases such as the oxidation of sugar alcohols, especially for the oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes, N2O has the advantage over O2 of a higher reaction selectivity. In the present paper we present the modelling of oxidation reaction of sugar alcohols using an oxidizing agent in low concentrations, which is important to suppress subsequent oxidation reactions due to the very low residual concentrations of the oxidizing agent. For orientation experiments we chose nitrous oxide generated by thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Kinetic modeling of the reaction was performed after determination of the differential equations that describe the system under study.

  6. Biochemical basis of the high resistance to oxidative stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aerobic organisms experience oxidative stress due to generation of reactive oxygen species during normal aerobic metabolism. In addition, several chemicals also generate reactive oxygen species which induce oxidative stress. Thus oxidative stress constitutes a major threat to organisms living in aerobic environments.

  7. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-02-02

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds.

  8. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Tomofuji; Koichiro Irie; Toshihiro Sanbe; Tetsuji Azuma; Daisuke Ekuni; Naofumi Tamaki; Tatsuo Yamamoto; Manabu Morita

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress). Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. Fo...

  9. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  10. Interactions of silica with iron oxides: Effects on oxide transformations and sorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P

    1995-08-01

    This report is a review of the literature on the adsorption of silica species on iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, and its effects on the adsorption of other species and on oxide interconversion reactions. The information is discussed briefly in the contexts of nuclear waste disposal and boiler-water chemistry. (author). 76 refs.

  11. Interactions of silica with iron oxides: Effects on oxide transformations and sorption properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1995-08-01

    This report is a review of the literature on the adsorption of silica species on iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, and its effects on the adsorption of other species and on oxide interconversion reactions. The information is discussed briefly in the contexts of nuclear waste disposal and boiler-water chemistry. (author). 76 refs

  12. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  13. Chemistry of phospholipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M

    2012-10-01

    The oxidation of lipids has long been a topic of interest in biological and food sciences, and the fundamental principles of non-enzymatic free radical attack on phospholipids are well established, although questions about detail of the mechanisms remain. The number of end products that are formed following the initiation of phospholipid peroxidation is large, and is continually growing as new structures of oxidized phospholipids are elucidated. Common products are phospholipids with esterified isoprostane-like structures and chain-shortened products containing hydroxy, carbonyl or carboxylic acid groups; the carbonyl-containing compounds are reactive and readily form adducts with proteins and other biomolecules. Phospholipids can also be attacked by reactive nitrogen and chlorine species, further expanding the range of products to nitrated and chlorinated phospholipids. Key to understanding the mechanisms of oxidation is the development of advanced and sensitive technologies that enable structural elucidation. Tandem mass spectrometry has proved invaluable in this respect and is generally the method of choice for structural work. A number of studies have investigated whether individual oxidized phospholipid products occur in vivo, and mass spectrometry techniques have been instrumental in detecting a variety of oxidation products in biological samples such as atherosclerotic plaque material, brain tissue, intestinal tissue and plasma, although relatively few have achieved an absolute quantitative analysis. The levels of oxidized phospholipids in vivo is a critical question, as there is now substantial evidence that many of these compounds are bioactive and could contribute to pathology. The challenges for the future will be to adopt lipidomic approaches to map the profile of oxidized phospholipid formation in different biological conditions, and relate this to their effects in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidized phospholipids

  14. Krypton oxides under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Łata, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300?GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamical...

  15. mediated oxidation of vic-dioxime to furoxan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    membered heterocycles and exhibit nitric oxide (NO) ... copper complexes (via chelation through nitrogen atoms of ... ammonium nitrate, this oxidation process was observed to take ... failed to produce the blue intermediate species at low ...

  16. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  17. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  18. Endangered Species Day | Endangered Species Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual Top 10 Report Protecting the Endangered Species Act Wildlife Voices Stand for Wolves Endangered Campaigns Wildlife Voices Protecting the Endangered Species Act Annual Top 10 Report Endangered Species Day Stand for Wolves Vanishing BOOK: A Wild Success The Endangered Species Act at 40 Endangered Species The

  19. Compositions comprising enhanced graphene oxide structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyank Vijaya; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Belcher, Angela; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Embodiments described herein generally relate to compositions comprising a graphene oxide species. In some embodiments, the compositions advantageously have relatively high oxygen content, even after annealing.

  20. Selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Henao, Luis F.; Castro F, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    It is presented a revision and discussion about the characteristics and factors that relate activity and selectivity in the catalytic and not catalytic partial oxidation of methane and the effect of variables as the temperature, pressure and others in the methane conversion to methanol. It thinks about the zeolites use modified for the catalytic oxidation of natural gas

  1. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Bae, Insoo, E-mail: ib42@georgetown.edu [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2014-04-03

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  2. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  3. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  4. Radiation induced lipid oxidation in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snauwaert, F.; Tobback, P.; Maes, E.; Thyssen, J.

    1977-01-01

    Oxidative rancidity in herring and redfish was studied as a function of the applied irradiation dose, the storage time and storage temperature and the packaging conditions. - Measurements of the TBA (thiobarbituric acid) value and the peroxide value were used to evaluate the degree of oxidation of lipids, and were related with sensory scores. - Especially for the fatty fish species (herring) irradiation accelerated lipid oxidation and induced oxidative rancidity. Irradiation of vacuum-packed herring fillets and subsequent storage at +2 C seems to be an interesting process. For the experiments conducted on a semi-fatty fish (redfish), oxidative rancidity was never the limiting factor for organoleptic acceptability. (orig.) [de

  5. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    of the short-term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. On a large scale, gut denitrification in, for instance, Chironomus plumosus larvae can increase the overall nitrous oxide emission of lake sediment by a factor of eight. We...... screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  6. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  7. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  8. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall fescue leaves and the application of 100 M SNP before arsenic stress resulted ...

  9. Association of Oxidative Stress with Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Castro-Gomes, Vitor; Mohammadzai, Imdadullah; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    When concentrations of both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species exceed the antioxidative capability of an organism, the cells undergo oxidative impairment. Impairments in membrane integrity and lipid and protein oxidation, protein mutilation, DNA damage, and neuronal dysfunction are some of the fundamental consequences of oxidative stress. The purpose of this work was to review the associations between oxidative stress and psychological disorders. The search terms were the following: "oxidative stress and affective disorders," "free radicals and neurodegenerative disorders," "oxidative stress and psychological disorders," "oxidative stress, free radicals, and psychiatric disorders," and "association of oxidative stress." These search terms were used in conjunction with each of the diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and World Health Organization's International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. Genetic, pharmacological, biochemical, and preclinical therapeutic studies, case reports, and clinical trials were selected to explore the molecular aspects of psychological disorders that are associated with oxidative stress. We identified a broad spectrum of 83 degenerative syndromes and psychiatric disorders that were associated with oxidative stress. The multi-dimensional information identified herein supports the role of oxidative stress in various psychiatric disorders. We discuss the results from the perspective of developing novel therapeutic interventions.

  10. Primary and secondary oxidative stress in Bacillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    Coping with oxidative stress originating from oxidizing compounds or reactive oxygen species (ROS), associated with the exposure to agents that cause environmental stresses, is one of the prerequisites for an aerobic lifestyle of Bacillus spp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus and B. anthracis. This

  11. Primary and secondary oxidative stress in Bacillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Coping with oxidative stress originating from oxidizing compounds or reactive oxygen species (ROS), associated with the exposure to agents that cause environmental stresses, is one of the prerequisites for an aerobic lifestyle of Bacillus spp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus and B. anthracis. This

  12. A novel mechanism of oxidative genotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genotoxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established. The underlying mechanism involves oxidation of DNA by ROS. However, we have recently shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, can also cause genomic damage indirectly. Thus, H2O2 at pathologically relevant ...

  13. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... one to four times daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow ...

  14. Assessing the Cost of Helping : The Roles of Body Condition and Oxidative Balance in Seychelles Warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Crommenacker, Janske; Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S.; Rands, Sean A.

    2011-01-01

    In cooperatively breeding species, helping close relatives may provide important fitness benefits. However, helping can be energetically expensive and may result in increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Consequently, an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance can lead to higher oxidative stress

  15. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  16. Electrochemical oxidation of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almon, A.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Both silver catalyzed and direct electrochemical oxidation of organic species are examined in analytical detail. This paper describes the mechanisms, reaction rates, products, intermediates, capabilities, limitations, and optimal reaction conditions of the electrochemical destruction of organic waste. A small bench-top electrocell being tested for the treatment of small quantities of laboratory waste is described. The 200-mL electrochemical cell used has a processing capacity of 50 mL per day, and can treat both radioactive and nonradioactive waste. In the silver catalyzed process, Ag(I) is electrochemically oxidized to Ag(II), which attacks organic species such as tributylphosphate (TBP), tetraphenylborate (TPB), and benzene. In direct electrochemical oxidation, the organic species are destroyed at the surface of the working electrode without the use of silver as an electron transfer agent. This paper focuses on the destruction of tributylphosphate (TBP), although several organic species have been destroyed using this process. The organic species are converted to carbon dioxide, water, and inorganic acids

  17. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  18. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osredkar Joško

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The human organism is exposed to the influence of various forms of stress, either physical, psychological or chemical, which all have in common that they may adversely affect our body. A certain amount of stress is always present and somehow directs, promotes or inhibits the functioning of the human body. Unfortunately, we are now too many and too often exposed to excessive stress, which certainly has adverse consequences. This is especially true for a particular type of stress, called oxidative stress. All aerobic organisms are exposed to this type of stress because they produce energy by using oxygen. For this type of stress you could say that it is rather imperceptibly involved in our lives, as it becomes apparent only at the outbreak of certain diseases. Today we are well aware of the adverse impact of radicals, whose surplus is the main cause of oxidative stress. However, the key problem remains the detection of oxidative stress, which would allow us to undertake timely action and prevent outbreak of many diseases of our time. There are many factors that promote oxidative stress, among them are certainly a fast lifestyle and environmental pollution. The increase in oxidative stress can also trigger intense physical activity that is directly associated with an increased oxygen consumption and the resulting formation of free radicals. Considering generally positive attitude to physical activity, this fact may seem at first glance contradictory, but the finding has been confimed by several studies in active athletes. Training of a top athlete daily demands great physical effort, which is also reflected in the oxidative state of the organism. However, it should be noted that the top athletes in comparison with normal individuals have a different defense system, which can counteract the negative effects of oxidative stress. Quite the opposite is true for irregular or excessive physical activity to which the body is not adapted.

  19. Oxidation reactions of bilirubin in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Hari; Gopinathan, C.

    1990-01-01

    The radical cation of bilirubin (BR) has been tentatively identified as a transient intermediate in the reactions of BR with different oxidizing species such as Br 2 - , I 2 - and CH 3 I . OH. The rate constants for these reactions have been determined as 2.4 x 10 9 , l.0 x 10 9 and 2.7 x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. Biliverdin is likely to be among the stable products formed on oxidation of BR by these oxidizing species. (author)

  20. A novel hydrogen oxidizer amidst the sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Thiomicrospira species are ubiquitously found in various marine environments and appear particularly common in hydrothermal vent systems. Members of this lineage are commonly classified as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Although sequencing of Thiomicrospira crunogena's genome has revealed genes that encode enzymes for hydrogen uptake activity and for hydrogenase maturation and assembly, hydrogen uptake ability has so far not been reported for any Thiomicrospira species. We isolated a Thiomicrospira species (SP-41) from a deep sea hydrothermal vent and demonstrated that it can oxidize hydrogen. We show in vivo hydrogen consumption, hydrogen uptake activity in partially purified protein extracts and transcript abundance of hydrogenases during different growth stages. The ability of this strain to oxidize hydrogen opens up new perspectives with respect to the physiology of Thiomicrospira species that have been detected in hydrothermal vents and that have so far been exclusively associated with sulfur oxidation. PMID:25226028

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Species concept and speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Y. Aldhebiani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Defining and recognizing a species has been a controversial issue for a long time. To determine the variation and the limitation between species, many concepts have been proposed. When a taxonomist study a particular taxa, he/she must adopted a species concept and provide a species limitation to define this taxa. In this paper some of species concepts are discussed starting from the typological species concepts to the phylogenetic concept. Positive and negative aspects of these concepts are represented in addition to their application. Keywords: Species concept, Species limitation, Species, Taxonomy, Classification

  3. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  4. Role of reactive species in the photocatalytic degradation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-06

    Dec 6, 2017 ... Nitrogen doping; photocatalysis; visible light active; reactive species; ... Of a variety of semiconductors, tungsten oxide (WO3) ... sodium chloride (NaCl, Chameleon reagent), sodium nitrate ..... Ammonium. No ion .... produced.

  5. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, S.-W.

    2006-01-01

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems

  6. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  7. Radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, W.G.; Ewart, F.T.; Hobley, J.; Smith, A.J.; Walters, W.S.; Williams, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Work under the Radiolytic Oxidation Contract from 1986 until April 1989 is reported. The effects of alpha- and gamma-irradiation on the chemistries of plutonium, neptunium and technetium, under conditions representative of the near fields of intermediate and high level waste repositories, were investigated. Gamma-radiolysis of Np (IV) results in oxidation in solutions below pH 12. Solutions of Tc (VII) are reduced to Tc (IV) by gamma-irradiation in contact with blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement under an inert atmosphere but not when in contact with pulverized fuel ash/ordinary Portland cement. Tc (IV) is shown to be susceptible to oxidation by the products of the alpha-radiolysis of water. The results of 'overall effects' experiments, which combined representative components of typical ILW or HLW near fields, supported these observations and also showed enhanced plutonium concentrations in alpha-irradiated, HLW simulations. Mathematical models of the behaviour of plutonium and neptunium during gamma-radiolysis have been developed and indicate that oxidation to Pu (VI) is possible at dose rates typical of those expected for HLW. Simulations at ILW dose rates have indicated some effect upon the speciation of neptunium. Laboratory studies of the gamma-irradiation of Np (IV) in bentonite-equilibrated water have also been modelled. Computer code used: PHREEQE, 8 Figs.; 48 Tabs.; 38 refs

  8. Species accounts. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret K. Trani; W. Mark Ford; Brian R., eds. Chapman

    2007-01-01

    Narrative accounts for each species are presented by several authors in a consistent format to convey specific information relative to that mammal. The orders are arranged phylogenetically; families and species are arranged alphabetically to facilitate finding a particular species.

  9. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part I Microstructural investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Piotrowska, Kamila; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    The surface treatment of aluminium alloys under steam containing KMnO4 and HNO3resulted in the formation of an oxide layer having a thickness of up to 825 nm. The use of KMnO4 and HNO3 in the steam resulted in incorporation of the respective chemical species into the oxide layer. Steam treatment ...

  10. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  11. Nutrigenetics and modulation of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Laura A; Badawi, Alaa; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress develops as a result of an imbalance between the production and accumulation of reactive species and the body's ability to manage them using exogenous and endogenous antioxidants. Exogenous antioxidants obtained from the diet, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids, have important roles in preventing and reducing oxidative stress. Individual genetic variation affecting proteins involved in the uptake, utilization and metabolism of these antioxidants may alter their serum levels, exposure to target cells and subsequent contribution to the extent of oxidative stress. Endogenous antioxidants include the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, paraoxanase, and glutathione S-transferase. These enzymes metabolize reactive species and their by-products, reducing oxidative stress. Variation in the genes coding these enzymes may impact their enzymatic antioxidant activity and, thus, the levels of reactive species, oxidative stress, and risk of disease development. Oxidative stress may contribute to the development of chronic disease, including osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Indeed, polymorphisms in most of the genes that code for antioxidant enzymes have been associated with several types of cancer, although inconsistent findings between studies have been reported. These inconsistencies may, in part, be explained by interactions with the environment, such as modification by diet. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies in the field of nutrigenetics, which have examined interactions between diet, genetic variation in antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Agroforestry Species Switchboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt, R.; John, I.; Ordonez, J.

    2016-01-01

    The current version of the Agroforestry Species Switchboard documents the presence of a total of 26,135 plant species (33,813 species including synonyms) across 19 web-based databases. When available, hyperlinks to information on the selected species in particular databases are provided. In total...

  13. Lithium chemistry of lithium doped magnesium oxide catalysts used in the oxidative coupling of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, S.J.; Roos, J.A.; de Bruijn, N.A.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Active sites are created on the surface of a Li/MgO catalyst used for the selective oxidation of methane by the gradual loss of carbon dioxide from surface carbonate species in the presence of oxygen. Decomposition of the carbonate species in the absence of oxygen is detrimental to the activity of

  14. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  15. Nitrous Oxide Emission by Aquatic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    -term metabolic induction of gut denitrification is the preferential production of nitrous oxide rather than dinitrogen. These observations were made in detailed studies on the larvae of the freshwater insects Chironomus plumosus and Ephemera danica which both can be very abundant in lake and stream sediments......, respectively. Aside from these case studies, we screened more than 20 macrofauna species in various aquatic habitats for nitrous oxide production. Filter- and deposit-feeders that ingest large quantities of microorganisms were the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species that do...... not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. With increasing eutrophication, filter- and deposit-feeders often become the dominant feeding guilds of benthic communities. Thus, with increasing nitrate pollution, aquatic macrofauna has the potential to further...

  16. Reactive oxygen species in health and disease : Finding the right balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    When oxygen takes up an electron, reactive oxygen species are formed. These free radicals can react with important molecules in our body (DNA, proteins), just like iron rusts (oxidation). Too many reactive oxygen species, called oxidative stress, result in cellular damage causing either cell death

  17. Thermochromatography study of volatile polonium species in various gas atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Eichler, Robert; Piguet,David; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Phenomena related to the volatilization of polonium and its compounds are critical issues for the safety assessment of the innovative lead–bismuth cooled type of nuclear reactor or accelerator driven systems. The formation and volatilization of different species of polonium and their interaction with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography using carrier gases with varied redox potential. The obtained results show that under inert and reducing conditions in the absence of moisture, elemental polonium is formed. Polonium compounds more volatile than elemental polonium can be formed if traces of moisture are present in both inert and reducing carrier gas. The use of dried oxygen as carrier gas leads to the formation of polonium oxides, which are less volatile than elemental polonium. It was also found that the volatility of polonium oxides increases with increasing oxidation state. In the presence of moisture in an oxidizing carrier gas, species are formed that are more volatile than the oxides and le...

  18. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulard, A.

    2004-06-01

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  19. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  20. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  1. Endangered Species Protection Bulletins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endangered Species Protection Bulletins set forth geographically specific pesticide use limitations for the protection of threatened and endangered (listed) species and their designated critical habitat. Find out how to get and use Bulletins.

  2. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  3. Species diversity modulates predation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratina, P.; Vos, M.; Anholt, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    Predation occurs in a context defined by both prey and non-prey species. At present it is largely unknown how species diversity in general, and species that are not included in a predator's diet in particular, modify predator–prey interactions.Therefore we studied how both the density and diversity

  4. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  5. Impedance analysis of nanostructured iridium oxide electrocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Lervik, Ingrid Anne; Tsypkin, Mikhail; Owe, Lars-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Impedance data were collected for nanostructured iridium oxide (NIROF) at potentials below those at which the oxygen evolution reaction commences. The measurements included thin oxide films covered by a protective Nafion TM layer and thicker composite Nafion TM -oxide electrodes. The time constants for the low-frequency diffusion process were approximately the same for both types of electrodes, indicating diffusion in individual particles in the porous electrode rather than across the film. The diffusion process involves trapping of the diffusion species. The impedance data indicated that there were no significant variations in conductivity of the oxides with potential, as opposed to what appears to be the case for anodically formed iridium oxide films (AIROF). This is interpreted to reflect differences in electronic structure between NIROF and AIROF.

  6. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Tomofuji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress. Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. For instance, previous animal studies suggested that experimental periodontitis induces oxidative damage of the liver and descending aorta by increasing circulating oxidative stress. In addition, it has been revealed that clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis patients showed a significant improvement 2 months after periodontal treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of reactive oxygen metabolites in plasma. Improvement of periodontitis by periodontal treatment could reduce the occurrence of circulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that the increase in circulating oxidative stress following diabetes mellitus and inappropriate nutrition damages periodontal tissues. In such cases, therapeutic approaches to systemic oxidative stress might be necessary to improve periodontal health.

  7. Oxidative shielding and the cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jonathan D; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Stott, Iain; Cant, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction and lifespan are constrained by trade-offs which prevent their simultaneous increase. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that this cost of reproduction is mediated by oxidative stress. However, empirical tests of this theory have yielded equivocal support. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine associations between reproduction and oxidative damage across markers and tissues. We show that oxidative damage is positively associated with reproductive effort across females of various species. Yet paradoxically, categorical comparisons of breeders versus non-breeders reveal that transition to the reproductive state is associated with a step-change reduction in oxidative damage in certain tissues and markers. Developing offspring may be particularly sensitive to harm caused by oxidative damage in mothers. Therefore, such reductions could potentially function to shield reproducing mothers, gametes and developing offspring from oxidative insults that inevitably increase as a consequence of reproductive effort. According to this perspective, we hypothesise that the cost of reproduction is mediated by dual impacts of maternally-derived oxidative damage on mothers and offspring, and that mothers may be selected to diminish such damage. Such oxidative shielding may explain why many existing studies have concluded that reproduction has little or no oxidative cost. Future advance in life-history theory therefore needs to take account of potential transgenerational impacts of the mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  8. Species choice, provenance and species trials among native Brazilian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumond, M A

    1982-01-01

    Six papers from the conference are presented. Drumond, M.A., Potential of species native to the semi-arid tropics, 766-781, (Refs. 18), reports on Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa species, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Spondias tuberosa, Ziziphus joazeiro, Cnidoscolus phyllacanthus, Bursera leptophleos (leptophloeos), Tabebuia impetiginosa, Astronium urundeuva, and Mimosa caesalpinia. Monteiro, R.F.R., Speltz, R.M., Gurgel, J.T. do A.; Silvicultural performance of 24 provenances of Araucaria angustifolia in Parana, 814-824, (Refs. 8). Pires, C.L. da S., Kalil Filho, A.N., Rosa, P.R.F. da, Parente, P.R., Zanatto, A.C.S.; Provenance trials of Cordia alliodora in the State of Sao Paulo, 988-995, (Refs. 9). Nogueira, J.C.B., Siqueira, A.C.M.F., Garrido, M.A.O., Gurgel Garrido, L.M. do A., Rosa, P.R.F., Moraes, J.L. de, Zandarin, M.A., Gurgel Filho, O.A., Trials of some native species in various regions of the State of Sao Paulo, 1051-1063, (Refs. 9) describes Centrolobium tomentosum, Peltophorum dubium, Tabebuia vellosoi, Cariniana legalis, and Balfourodendron riedelianum. Batista, M.P., Borges, J.F., Franco, M.A.B.; Early growth of a native species in comparison with exotics in northeastern Para, Brazil, 1105-1110, (Refs. 3). Jacaranda copaia is compared with Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea various hondurensis, Eucalyptus deglupta, and E. urophylla. Lima, P.C.F., Souza, S.M. de, Drumond, M.A.; Trials of native forest species at Petrolina, Pernambuco, 1139-1148, (Refs. 8), deals with Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Piptadenia obliqua, Pithecellobium foliolosum, Astronium urundeuva, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Cassia excelsa, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Parkia platycephala, Pseudobombax simplicifolium, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Caesalpinia ferrea, and Aspidosperma pyrifolium. 18 references.

  9. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from oxidant-mediated apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Andrea; Zhu Aiping; Sun Kai; Petty, Howard R.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic nanoparticles that de-toxify ROS. In the present study, we directly compare these two classes of catalytic nanoparticles. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles were found to be 16 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.2 nm in diameter, respectively. Using surface plasmon-enhanced microscopy, we find that these nanoparticles associate with cells. Furthermore, cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles demonstrated superoxide dismutase catalytic activity, but did not promote hemolytic or cytolytic pathways in living cells. Importantly, both cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles reduce oxidant-mediated apoptosis in target cells as judged by the activation of caspase 3. The ability to diminish apoptosis may contribute to maintaining healthy tissues.

  10. Separation of chemical species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentzepis, P.M.

    1977-01-01

    Isotopic separation is accomplished by (1) a second photon irradiation step for selective ionization of a first isotopic species and (2) selective precipitation of a generally immiscible liquid from the saturating vapor phase on the ionized species. The first photon corresponds with a sharply defined spectral portion of the irradiation which exclusively excites the first species to a vibrational level. The second photon further excites this species to its ionization level. Selective precipitation is by coulombic attraction between the ionized species and the vapor. The procedure is applicable to any vapor phase ionizable material

  11. Separation of radionuclides from water by magnesium oxide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Chia-Lian; Lo, Jem-Mau; Yeh, Si-Jung

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption by magnesium oxide of more than forty radionuclides in respective ionic species in water was observed. Generally, the radionuclides in di-valent and/or multi-valent cations are favorably adsorbed by magnesium oxide; but not for the those in mono-valent cations. In addition, the adsorption by magnesium oxide was not effective to most of the radionuclides in negative ionic species. From the observations, the adsorption mechanism is more prominently by the ion exchange of the di- or multi-valent cation species with the hydrous magnesium oxide. Separation of the radionuclides related to the corrosion products possibly produced in a nuclear power plant from natural seawater was attempted by the magnesium oxide adsorption method. It should be emphasized that the adsorption method was found to be practical for separating radionuclides from a large quantity of natural seawater with high recovery and high reproducibility. (author)

  12. The oxidation; Okislenie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, V I

    1961-07-01

    In this chapter of book author determine that alkylene tetra hydro-{gamma}-piron, oxidated by potassium permanganate in all cases of passed oxidation gave oxidation products, confirmatory their structure.

  13. Electrochemical redox processes involving soluble cerium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, L.F.; Ponce de León, C.; Walsh, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The relevance of cerium in laboratory and industrial electrochemistry is considered. • The history of fundamental electrochemical studies and applications is considered. • The chemistry, redox thermodynamics and electrode kinetics of cerium are summarised. • The uses of cerium ions in synthesis, energy storage, analysis and environmental treatment are illustrated. • Research needs and development perspectives are discussed. - Abstract: Anodic oxidation of cerous ions and cathodic reduction of ceric ions, in aqueous acidic solutions, play an important role in electrochemical processes at laboratory and industrial scale. Ceric ions, which have been used for oxidation of organic wastes and off-gases in environmental treatment, are a well-established oxidant for indirect organic synthesis and specialised cleaning processes, including oxide film removal from tanks and process pipework in nuclear decontamination. They also provide a classical reagent for chemical analysis in the laboratory. The reversible oxidation of cerous ions is an important reaction in the positive compartment of various redox flow batteries during charge and discharge cycling. A knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the redox reaction is critical to an understanding of the role of cerium redox species in these applications. Suitable choices of electrode material (metal or ceramic; coated or uncoated), geometry/structure (2-or 3-dimensional) and electrolyte flow conditions (hence an acceptable mass transport rate) are critical to achieving effective electrocatalysis, a high performance and a long lifetime. This review considers the electrochemistry of soluble cerium species and their diverse uses in electrochemical technology, especially for redox flow batteries and mediated electrochemical oxidation.

  14. Complexation of Nitrous Oxide by Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Edwin; Neu, Rebecca C.; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated Lewis pairs comprised of a basic yet sterically encumbered phosphine with boron Lewis acids bind nitrous oxide to give intact PNNOB linkages. The synthesis, structure, and bonding of these species are described.

  15. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... ... role in the protection of cell membranes aganist oxidative damage .... Differences were calculated using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) .... via the formation of reactive oxygen species and the perturbation of ...

  16. Salvianolic acid B Relieves Oxidative Stress in Glucose Absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Absorption and Utilization of Mice Fed High-Sugar Diet ... Salvianolic acid B, Blood glucose, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative stress, Sugar diet. ... protein expression in human aortic smooth ... induced by glucose uptake and metabolism [8].

  17. Segregation across the metal/oxide interface occurring during oxidation at high temperatures of diluted iron based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geneve, D.; Rouxel, D.; Weber, B.; Confente, M.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial steels being elaborated in air at high temperature oxidize and cover with a complex oxide layer. The oxidation reaction drastically alters the surface composition. Such modifications have been investigated, in this work, by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) using an original method to characterize the composition of the metal/oxide interfaces. Analysis of the concentration gradients across the interfaces allows to better understand how the alloy elements contribute to the oxidation process. The development of new alloy phases, the interdependencies between elements and the diffusion of different species are discussed considering thermodynamic properties of each element

  18. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  19. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in limb vascular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    and xanthine oxidase and the degree of ROS removal through the antioxidant defense system. The development of cardiovascular disease has been proposed to be closely related to a reduced bioavailability of NO in parallel with an increased presence of ROS. Excessive levels of ROS not only lower...... the bioavailability of NO but may also cause cellular damage in the cardiovascular system. Physical activity has been shown to greatly improve cardiovascular function, in part through improved bioavailability of NO, enhanced endogenous antioxidant defense and a lowering of the expression of ROS forming enzymes...

  20. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khandelia, H.; Loubet, B.; Olžyńska, Agnieszka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2014), s. 639-647 ISSN 1744-683X R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * MARTINI FORCE-FIELD * PHASE-SEPARATION Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.029, year: 2014

  1. Detection of cryptic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockburn, A.F.; Jensen, T.; Seawright, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Morphologically similar cryptic species are common in insects. In Anopheles mosquitoes morphologically described species are complexes of cryptic species. Cryptic species are of great practical importance for two reasons: first, one or more species of the complex might not be a pest and control efforts directed at the complex as a whole would therefore be partly wasted; and second, genetic (and perhaps biological) control strategies directed against one species of the complex would not affect other species of the complex. At least one SIT effort has failed because the released sterile insect were of a different species and therefore did not mate with the wild insects being targeted. We use a multidisciplinary approach for detection of cryptic species complexes, focusing first on identifying variability in wild populations using RFLPs of mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA genes (mtDNA and rDNA); followed by confirmation using a variety of other techniques. For rapid identification of wild individuals of field collections, we use a DNA dot blot assay. DNA probes can be isolated by differential screening, however we are currently focusing on the sequencing of the rDNA extragenic spacers. These regions are repeated several hundred times per genome in mosquitoes and evolve rapidly. Molecular drive tends to keen the individual genes homogeneous within a species. (author)

  2. Detection of cryptic species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockburn, A F; Jensen, T; Seawright, J A [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Medical and Veterinary Entomology Research Lab., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Morphologically similar cryptic species are common in insects. In Anopheles mosquitoes morphologically described species are complexes of cryptic species. Cryptic species are of great practical importance for two reasons: first, one or more species of the complex might not be a pest and control efforts directed at the complex as a whole would therefore be partly wasted; and second, genetic (and perhaps biological) control strategies directed against one species of the complex would not affect other species of the complex. At least one SIT effort has failed because the released sterile insect were of a different species and therefore did not mate with the wild insects being targeted. We use a multidisciplinary approach for detection of cryptic species complexes, focusing first on identifying variability in wild populations using RFLPs of mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA genes (mtDNA and rDNA); followed by confirmation using a variety of other techniques. For rapid identification of wild individuals of field collections, we use a DNA dot blot assay. DNA probes can be isolated by differential screening, however we are currently focusing on the sequencing of the rDNA extragenic spacers. These regions are repeated several hundred times per genome in mosquitoes and evolve rapidly. Molecular drive tends to keen the individual genes homogeneous within a species. (author). 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs.

  3. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    OpenAIRE

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melo...

  4. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  5. Evaluation Of Oxidative Stress And Apoptosis In Breast Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were positively correlated with positive progesterone receptor. In Conclusion; oxidative stress, NO and apoptosis are highly detected in breast cancer tissues especially with advanced grade and stage. Key words: Breast cancer, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), Nitric Oxide (NO), Total Antioxidants

  6. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    followed by its oxidation by diprotonated bromate in a slow step. ... for metal extraction, polymer stabilization and ion ... both oxidant and catalyst in various organic transfor- ... sodium bromate are stable solids and easily handled as ... pared by dissolving KBrO3 (BDH) in water and stan- ..... active species of the reductant.

  7. Quantum Chemical Calculations and Experimental Investigations of Molecular Actinide Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, Attila; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Gibson, John K.; Infante, Ivan; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The available experimental and theoretical information on gaseous actinide oxides covering both the neutral and the ionic species are reviewed. The ground-state electronic structures of the oxides of An = Th-Cm have been obtained by the well-tested SOCASPT2 method, and therefore they are very likely

  8. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic prote...

  9. Oxidative electrochemical aryl C-C coupling of spiropyrans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivashenko, Oleksii; van Herpt, Jochem T.; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and definitive assignment of the species formed upon electrochemical oxidation of nitro-spiropyran (SP) is reported. The oxidative aryl C-C coupling at the indoline moiety of the SP radical cation to form covalent dimers of the ring-closed SP form is demonstrated. The coupling is

  10. OXIDATION OF CYCLIC AMINES BY MOLYBDENUM(II) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    metal is in formal oxidation state +2. Since no reduction can take place without oxidation and vice versa, we can reasonably say the reduction of Mo(II) and W(II) species is accompanied by oxidation of the amine. At this juncture, we should point out that C=N bonds are also known to absorb IR radiation in the same spectral ...

  11. Tritons and tritides as the solute and diffusing species in ceramic tritium breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Intragranular diffusion of tritium is an inherent participant in the process of releasing tritium from lithium-containing ceramics that are used to breed tritium in a fusion reactor. The nature of this transport is reviewed in terms of the understanding established for the mechanism of hydrogen migration in other oxides, namely, that the diffusing species is the proton and that it moves from oxide ion to oxide ion, thereby giving rise to apparent hydroxide migration. Analogously, the triton, transiently bonded to successive oxides and forming successive tritoxides, is taken to be the dominant migrating species in ceramic breeders. In addition, tritide becomes a significant participant at low oxygen activity. The relationship of tritons and tritides as the migrating species to the observed release of both reduced and oxidized forms can be understood in terms of the thermodynamic conditions that prevail. Mechanisms exist that can be proposed to rationalize the participation of these species

  12. Complex defects in the oxidation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCrone, R.K.; Sankaran, S.; Shatynski, S.R.; Colmenares, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    We are reporting EPR results obtained with uranium powder samples fully oxidized in dry air, water vapor, and air/water vapor mixtures. The results reported previously are confirmed and additional paramagnetic centers, associated with chemisorbed species, have been identified. The temperature dependence of the g-value for these centers from room temperature to 10K is also reported

  13. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  14. Birds sacrifice oxidative protection for reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, P; Selman, C; Speakman, [No Value; Verhulst, S; Speakman, John R.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative metabolism has reactive oxygen species (ROS) as unavoidable by-products, and the damage ROS inflicts on DNA, proteins and lipids is considered to be a major agent of senescence. Increasing reproductive effort accelerates senescence, but whether reproductive effort is increased at the

  15. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  16. Eco-friendly Oxidative Iodination of Various Arenes with Sodium Percarbonate as the Oxidantâ€

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Skulski

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six easy laboratory procedures are presented for the oxidative iodination ofvarious aromatics, mostly arenes, with either molecular iodine or potassium iodide (usedas the sources of iodinating species, I or I3 , in the presence of sodium percarbonate(SPC, a stable, cheap, easy to handle, and eco-friendly commercial oxidant.

  17. Oxidative Stress, Prooxidants, and Antioxidants: The Interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Rahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a normal phenomenon in the body. Under normal conditions, the physiologically important intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS are maintained at low levels by various enzyme systems participating in the in vivo redox homeostasis. Therefore, oxidative stress can also be viewed as an imbalance between the prooxidants and antioxidants in the body. For the last two decades, oxidative stress has been one of the most burning topics among the biological researchers all over the world. Several reasons can be assigned to justify its importance: knowledge about reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production and metabolism; identification of biomarkers for oxidative damage; evidence relating manifestation of chronic and some acute health problems to oxidative stress; identification of various dietary antioxidants present in plant foods as bioactive molecules; and so on. This review discusses the importance of oxidative stress in the body growth and development as well as proteomic and genomic evidences of its relationship with disease development, incidence of malignancies and autoimmune disorders, increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases, and an interplay with prooxidants and antioxidants for maintaining a sound health, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue.

  18. Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.R.; Venkataramani, B.

    1988-01-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions on hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), magnetite (MAG), and hydrous thorium oxide (HThO) has been studied as a function of pH. Hydrous oxides have been characterized by their pH-titration curves, intrinsic dissociation constants (pK ai * ) and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). The fraction of protonated surface hydroxyl groups as well as the surface pH (pH surf ) as a function of solution pH have been computed. The distribution of various hydrolyzed species of uranyl ions with solution pH have been compared with uranyl sorption isotherm on these oxides. Sorption edge in all the cases occurs when free hydroxyl groups are available on the surface and pH surf is sufficiently high to favor the formation of dimer-like species on the surface. A new model for the sorption process, called surface hydrolysis model, which explains these and other features of uranyl sorption on hydrous oxides has been proposed. The model visualizes the sorption process as linking of uranyl ions with two adjacent free surface hydroxyl groups without deprotonation (provided the surface pH is high for the hydrolysis of uranyl ions) and formation of dimer-like structures on the surface. The new model has been successfully applied to the present and other available data on uranyl ion sorption on hydrous oxides. (author)

  19. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  20. Occurrence of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with the oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Riis, Bente; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is characterized by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) liberated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We formulated the hypothesis that oxidation...

  1. Chapter 16: Species Diversity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zargaran

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... rarefaction method was recorded in Pardanan, with 28 oak gall wasps species. Furthermore, the highest amount of Gini-Simpson and Shannon entropy index were recorded in Sardasht, while the highest evenness was recorded in Shalmash. Differences in the local distribution of oak species, especially.

  2. The Origin of Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darwin, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In The Origin of Species Darwin outlined his theory of evolution, which proposed that species had been evolving and differentiating over time under the influence of natural selection. On its publication it became hugely influential, bringing about a seismic shift in the scientific view of humanitys

  3. Aquatic species and habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danny C. Lee; James R. Sedell; Bruce E. Rieman; Russell F. Thurow; Jack E. Williams

    1998-01-01

    Continuing human activities threaten the highly prized aquatic resources of the interior Columbia basin. Precipitous declines in native species, particularly Pacific salmon, and a large influx of introduced species have radically altered the composition and distribution of native fishes. Fortunately, areas of relatively high aquatic integrity remain, much of it on...

  4. Support your local species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stärk, Johanna

    Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management. Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby...

  5. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguori I

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Liguori,1 Gennaro Russo,1 Francesco Curcio,1 Giulia Bulli,1 Luisa Aran,1 David Della-Morte,2,3 Gaetano Gargiulo,4 Gianluca Testa,1,5 Francesco Cacciatore,1,6 Domenico Bonaduce,1 Pasquale Abete1 1Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3San Raffaele Roma Open University, Rome, Italy; 4Division of Internal Medicine, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, Salerno, Italy; 5Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy; 6Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Monaldi Hospital, Heart Transplantation Unit, Naples, Italy Abstract: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS are produced by several endogenous and exogenous processes, and their negative effects are neutralized by antioxidant defenses. Oxidative stress occurs from the imbalance between RONS production and these antioxidant defenses. Aging is a process characterized by the progressive loss of tissue and organ function. The oxidative stress theory of aging is based on the hypothesis that age-associated functional losses are due to the accumulation of RONS-induced damages. At the same time, oxidative stress is involved in several age-related conditions (ie, cardiovascular diseases [CVDs], chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer, including sarcopenia and frailty. Different types of oxidative stress biomarkers have been identified and may provide important information about the efficacy of the treatment, guiding the selection of the most effective drugs/dose regimens for patients and, if particularly relevant from a pathophysiological point of view, acting on a specific therapeutic target. Given the important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of many clinical conditions and aging, antioxidant therapy could positively affect the natural history of

  6. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  7. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitrate-rich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and deposit-feeders in eutrophic ecosystems. PMID:19255427

  8. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested...... delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic...... animals is quantitatively important in nitraterich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability...

  9. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær

    2016-01-01

    in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo. We conducted a randomized, double......-blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine.......1% in the placebo group for DNA oxidation and 7.3% in the simvastatin group compared to 3.4% in the placebo group. The differences in biomarkers related to plasma were not statistically significant between the treatments groups, with the exception of total vitamin E levels, which, as expected, were reduced...

  10. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  11. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  12. Pulse radiolysis investigations on oxidation reactions of bilirubin in aqueous solutions (Preprint No. RC-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Hari; Gopinathan, C.

    1988-02-01

    The oxidation of bilirubin in aqueous solutions have been investigated by different oxidizing species such as CH 3 I.OH, Br 2 - and CO 3 - . The rate constant for the oxidation of bilirubin has been determined from the formation kinetics of bilirubin cations. (author). 3 refs

  13. Tin-antimony oxide oxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Frank J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-15

    Tin-antimony oxide catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons have been made by precipitation techniques. The dehydration of the amorphous dried precipitate by calcination at increasingly higher temperatures induces the crystallisation of a rutile-related tin dioxide-type phase and the segregation of antimony oxides which volatilise at elevated temperatures. The rutile-related tin dioxide-type phase contains antimony(V) in the bulk and antimony(III) in the surface. Specific catalytic activity for the oxidative dehydrogenation of butene to butadiene is associated with materials with large concentrations of antimony(III) in the surface.

  14. Plasma and catalyst for the oxidation of NOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Erme, Kalev; Levoll, Erik; Raud, Jüri; Stamate, Eugen

    2018-03-01

    Efficient exhaust gas cleaning from NO x (NO and NO2) by absorption and adsorption based methods requires the oxidation of NO. The application of non-thermal plasma is considered as a promising oxidation method but the oxidation of NO by direct plasma remains limited due to the back-reaction of NO2 to NO mediated by O radicals in plasma. Indirect NO oxidation by plasma produced ozone allows to circumvent the back-reaction and further oxidize NO2 to N2O5 but the slow reaction rate for the latter process limits the efficiency of this process. Present paper gives an overview of the role of metal-oxide catalysts in the improvement of oxidation efficiency for both direct and indirect plasma oxidation of NO x . The plasma produced active oxygen species (O, O3) were shown to play an important role in the reactions taking place on the catalyst surfaces while the exact mechanism and extent of the effect were different for direct and indirect oxidation. In the case of direct plasma oxidation, both short and long lifetime oxygen species could reach the catalyst and participate in the oxidation of NO to NO2. The back-reaction in the plasma phase remained still important factor and limited the effect of catalyst. In the case of indirect oxidation, only ozone could reach the catalyst surface and improve the oxidation of NO2 to N2O5. The effect of catalyst at different experimental conditions was quantitatively described with the aid of simple global chemical kinetic models derived for the NO x oxidation either by plasma or ozone. The models allowed to compare the effect of different catalysts and to analyze the limitations for the efficiency improvement by catalyst.

  15. Extragastric Helicobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Hynes, S.; Wadstrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Helicobacter has expanded at a rapid pace and no fewer than 31 species have been named since the proposal of the genus in 1989. Of these 31 species, 22 are principally associated with extragastric niches and there is increasing interest in the role of these taxa in diseases of humans...... and animals. Substantial evidence attests to certain species playing a role in the pathogenesis of enteric, hepatic and biliary disorders and some taxa demonstrate zoonotic potential. The importance of extragastric Helicobacters is likely to be an important topic for research in the near future. Here...

  16. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant System in Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Andrukhov, Oleh; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease, which is initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently progressed by aberrant host response. It can result in the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and have an influence on systemic health. When periodontitis occurs, reactive oxygen species, which are overproduced mostly by hyperactive neutrophils, could not be balanced by antioxidant defense system and cause tissues damage. This is characterized by increased metabolites of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and protein damage. Local and systemic activities of antioxidants can also be influenced by periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index have been used to evaluate the oxidative stress associated with periodontitis. Studies have confirmed that inflammatory response in periodontitis is associated with an increased local and systemic oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant capacity. Our review focuses on increased oxidative stress in periodontal disease, specifically, on the relationship between the local and systemic biomarkers of oxidative stress and periodontitis and their association with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Also, the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammation, and the effects of periodontal therapy on oxidative stress parameters will be discussed. PMID:29180965

  17. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David William

    2002-01-01

    that of Sb 2 O 3 , which is dominated by Sb 3+ . X-ray diffraction analysis of the 'Sb 2 O 5 ' sample, together with computer modelling studies, have indicated that this sample is in fact an unusual morphology of the β-Sb 2 O 4 phase. A comparison of the reactivity between iron antimonate (Fe:Sb = 1:2) and bismuth molybdate has revealed that the latter is more effective for the selective oxidation reaction due to its higher oxygen mobility and its ability to maintain a higher average surface oxidation state, due to oxygen vacancies being transported into the bulk material. A preliminary investigation into the effect of metal cation substitution within the bulk iron antimonate composition (Fe 1-x A x SbO 4 , where A was cobalt or vanadium, and 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) showed that both the metal and its extent of substitution significantly affects the products formed during reaction. Low levels of cobalt or vanadium substitution (x = 0.2) enhance the selectivity towards acrolein, with the latter also providing a route for the direct conversion of acrolein into acrylic acid when operated within a fixed temperature regime. At high levels of substitution both metals increase the activity of the system and form undesired reaction products. A correlation between metal doping and product distributions has been proposed. Fundamental studies concerning the intermediate species involved during selective propene oxidation on iron antimonate have been carried out using inelastic neutron scattering. The identification of allyl species, by comparison of experimental spectra with those predicted from density functional theory calculations, suggests that the rate-determining step may not be the initial a-hydrogen abstraction to form the allyl, as is often assumed. (author)

  18. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan; Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe 3 ) and oxygen (O 2 ) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H 2 within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO 2 . The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O ads and Pt–(OH) ads ) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed

  19. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  20. The species in primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Biologists of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries all bandied about the term "species," but very rarely actually said what they meant by it. Often, however, one can get inside their thinking by piecing together some of their remarks. One of the most nearly explicit-appropriately, for the man who wrote a book called The Origin of Species - was Charles Darwin: "Practically, when a naturalist can unite two forms together by others having intermediate characters, he treats the one as a variety of the other… He later translated this into evolutionary terms: "Hereafter, we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed, to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations, whereas species were formerly thus connected"(1:484-5.) Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hierarchical species distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefley, Trevor J.; Hooten, Mevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the distribution pattern of a species is important to increase scientific knowledge, inform management decisions, and conserve biodiversity. To infer spatial and temporal patterns, species distribution models have been developed for use with many sampling designs and types of data. Recently, it has been shown that count, presence-absence, and presence-only data can be conceptualized as arising from a point process distribution. Therefore, it is important to understand properties of the point process distribution. We examine how the hierarchical species distribution modeling framework has been used to incorporate a wide array of regression and theory-based components while accounting for the data collection process and making use of auxiliary information. The hierarchical modeling framework allows us to demonstrate how several commonly used species distribution models can be derived from the point process distribution, highlight areas of potential overlap between different models, and suggest areas where further research is needed.

  2. Endangered Species: Pesticide Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to protect threatened and endangered species and their habitats, without placing unnecessary burden on agriculture and pesticide users. Pesticide limitations are developed to ensure safe use of pesticides in order to meet this goal.

  3. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  4. Oxidation films morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paidassi, J.

    1960-01-01

    After studying the oxidation of several pure polyvalent metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, U) and of their oxides at high temperature and atmospheric pressure, the author suggests how to modify the usual representation of the oxide film (a piling of different oxide layers, homogeneous on a micrographic scale with a equi-axial crystallisation, free of mechanical tensions, with flat boundary surfaces) to have it nearer to reality. In this first part, the author exposes the study of the real micrographic structure of the oxidation film and gives examples of precipitation in the oxides during the cooling of the oxidised sample. (author) [fr

  5. New Ir Bis-Carbonyl Precursor for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Daria L. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Beltrán-Suito, Rodrigo [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Thomsen, Julianne M. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Hashmi, Sara M. [Department of Chemical and Environmental; Materna, Kelly L. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Sheehan, Stafford W. [Catalytic Innovations LLC, 70 Crandall; Mercado, Brandon Q. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Brudvig, Gary W. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Crabtree, Robert H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225

    2016-02-05

    This paper introduces IrI(CO)2(pyalc) (pyalc = (2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate) as an atom-efficient precursor for Ir-based homogeneous oxidation catalysis. This compound was chosen to simplify analysis of the water oxidation catalyst species formed by the previously reported Cp*IrIII(pyalc)OH water oxidation precatalyst. Here, we present a comparative study on the chemical and catalytic properties of these two precursors. Previous studies show that oxidative activation of Cp*Ir-based precursors with NaIO4 results in formation of a blue IrIV species. This activation is concomitant with the loss of the placeholder Cp* ligand which oxidatively degrades to form acetic acid, iodate, and other obligatory byproducts. The activation process requires substantial amounts of primary oxidant, and the degradation products complicate analysis of the resulting IrIV species. The species formed from oxidation of the Ir(CO)2(pyalc) precursor, on the other hand, lacks these degradation products (the CO ligands are easily lost upon oxidation) which allows for more detailed examination of the resulting Ir(pyalc) active species both catalytically and spectroscopically, although complete structural analysis is still elusive. Once Ir(CO)2(pyalc) is activated, the system requires acetic acid or acetate to prevent the formation of nanoparticles. Investigation of the activated bis-carbonyl complex also suggests several Ir(pyalc) isomers may exist in solution. By 1H NMR, activated Ir(CO)2(pyalc) has fewer isomers than activated Cp*Ir complexes, allowing for advanced characterization. Future research in this direction is expected to contribute to a better structural understanding of the active species. A diol crystallization agent was needed for the structure determination of 3.

  6. Sub specie aeternitatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioeni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Per delineare il rapporto tra etica ed estetica nell'architettura e rispondere alla domanda principale «che cosa è o dovrebbe essere un buon architetto?», il saggio discute la tesi di Wittgenstein secondo cui «l'opera d'arte è l'oggetto visto sub specie aeternitatis e la vita buona è il mondo visto sub specie aeternitatis. Questa è la connessione tra arte ed etica».

  7. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine.

  8. Laboratory Studies of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Wallington, T. J.; Burkholder, J. B.; Bertman, S. B.; Chen, W.

    2001-12-01

    The oxidation of hydrocarbon species (alkanes, alkenes, halogenated species, and oxygenates of both natural and anthropogenic origin) in the troposphere leads to the generation of numerous potentially harmful secondary pollutants, such as ozone, organic nitrates and acids, and aerosols. These oxidations proceed via the formation of alkoxy radicals, whose complex chemistry controls the ultimate product distributions obtained. Studies of hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms are ongoing at NCAR and Ford, using environmental chamber / FTIR absorption systems. The focus of these studies is often on the product distributions obtained at low temperature; these studies not only provide data of direct relevance to the free/upper troposphere, but also allow for a more fundamental understanding of the alkoxy radical chemistry (eg., from the determination of the Arrhenius parameters for unimolecular processes, and the quantification of the extent of the involvement of chemical activation in the alkoxy radical chemistry). In this paper, data will be presented on some or all of the following topics: kinetics/mechanisms for the reactions of OH with the unsaturated species MPAN, acrolein, and crotonaldehyde; the mechanism for the oxidation of ethyl chloride and ethyl bromide; and the mechanism for the reaction of OH with acetone and acetaldehyde at low temperature. The relevance of the data to various aspects of tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  9. Oxidative Metabolism Genes Are Not Responsive to Oxidative Stress in Rodent Beta Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faer Morrison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of oxidative metabolism genes has been described in the skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic beta cells contain low levels of antioxidant enzymes and are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the effect of hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on a panel of oxidative metabolism genes in a rodent beta cell line. We exposed INS-1 rodent beta cells to low (5.6 mmol/L, ambient (11 mmol/L, and high (28 mmol/L glucose conditions for 48 hours. Increases in oxidative stress were measured using the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine 123. We then measured the expression levels of a panel of 90 oxidative metabolism genes by real-time PCR. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production was evident in INS-1 cells after 48 hours (P<0.05. TLDA analysis revealed a significant (P<0.05 upregulation of 16 of the 90 genes under hyperglycemic conditions, although these expression differences did not reflect differences in ROS. We conclude that although altered glycemia may influence the expression of some oxidative metabolism genes, this effect is probably not mediated by increased ROS production. The alterations to the expression of oxidative metabolism genes previously observed in human diabetic skeletal muscle do not appear to be mirrored in rodent pancreatic beta cells.

  10. Internal fuel pin oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel pin has positioned within it material which will decompose to release an oxidizing agent which will react with the cladding of the pin and form a protective oxide film on the internal surface of the cladding

  11. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  12. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  13. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic...

  14. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  15. Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr - Oxides in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Duprez, D.; Kappenstein, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 3 (2007), s. 1248-1253 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : platinum * cerium oxide * carbonate species Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2007

  16. Universal electrode interface for electrocatalytic oxidation of liquid fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hualing; Qiu, Zhipeng; Wan, Qijin; Wang, Zhijie; Liu, Yi; Yang, Nianjun

    2014-10-22

    Electrocatalytic oxidations of liquid fuels from alcohols, carboxylic acids, and aldehydes were realized on a universal electrode interface. Such an interface was fabricated using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the catalyst support and palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) as the electrocatalysts. The Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite was synthesized using the ethylene glycol reduction method. It was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, voltammetry, and impedance. On the Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite coated electrode, the oxidations of those liquid fuels occur similarly in two steps: the oxidations of freshly chemisorbed species in the forward (positive-potential) scan and then, in the reverse scan (negative-potential), the oxidations of the incompletely oxidized carbonaceous species formed during the forward scan. The oxidation charges were adopted to study their oxidation mechanisms and oxidation efficiencies. The oxidation efficiency follows the order of aldehyde (formaldehyde) > carboxylic acid (formic acid) > alcohols (ethanol > methanol > glycol > propanol). Such a Pd NPs/CNTs nanocomposite coated electrode is thus promising to be applied as the anode for the facilitation of direct fuel cells.

  17. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed......-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) (1) confirmed denitrification as the main NO consumption pathway, with N2O as its major product, (2) showed that denitrification combines one free NO molecule with one NO molecule formed from nitrite to produce N2O, and (3) suggested that NO inhibits N2O reduction....

  18. Fundamental roles of reactive oxygen species and protective mechanisms in the female reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Futoshi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controlled oxidation, such as disulfide bond formation in sperm nuclei and during ovulation, plays a fundamental role in mammalian reproduction. Excess oxidation, however, causes oxidative stress, resulting in the dysfunction of the reproductive process. Antioxidation reactions that reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species are of prime importance in reproductive systems in maintaining the quality of gametes and support reproduction. While anti-oxidative enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, play a central role in eliminating oxidative stress, reduction-oxidation (redox systems, comprised of mainly glutathione and thioredoxin, function to reduce the levels of oxidized molecules. Aldo-keto reductase, using NADPH as an electron donor, detoxifies carbonyl compounds resulting from the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Thus, many antioxidative and redox enzyme genes are expressed and aggressively protect gametes and embryos in reproductive systems.

  19. Mo-V-Te-Nb oxides as catalysts for ethene production by oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center; Meiswinkel, A.; Thaller, C.; Bock, M.; Alvarado, L. [Linde AG, Pullach (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The availability of ethane in shale gas, as well as the interest in valorising previously underutilized carbon feedstocks, makes the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane an attractive alternative to the industrially established processes for production of ethylene. Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed oxide has been chosen as catalyst for the ODH reaction in view of its outstanding ability to activate alkane molecules. Catalytic test results showed that this type of catalyst can selectively oxidize ethane to ethene at moderate temperatures (350-400 C) with minor production of CO{sub x}. The catalytic performance of Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed-oxide is mainly attributable to the crystalline phase 'M1'. Rietveld analysis of the X-Ray diffractograms allowed us to quantify the amount of MoVTeNb oxide that has crystallized as M1. In this way, it was possible to find a linear correlation of the reaction rate with the abundance of M1 in the solid. Therefore, it is clear that for improving the efficiency of MoVTeNb oxide in ODH, the amount of M1 in the catalyst should be maximized. With this purpose, several MoVTeNb oxides were subject to different thermal treatments prior to the catalytic test. Structural changes in the catalyst were monitored by in-situ XRD technique. Under oxidative atmosphere, it was observed a recrystallization of M2 and possibly, amorphous oxide, into M1 phase, leading to correspondingly more active and selective catalysts (selectivities above 95 % for ethane conversions up to 40 % under industrially relevant conditions). The active site of M1 involves V species, likely with redox properties enhanced by the proximity of Mo and Te species, while the function of the crystalline structure itself is to provide the spatial configuration that allows interaction between these species. However, ethene formation rate was observed to be independent of the V content of the samples. The vanadium species exposed at the surface were studied by LEIS and by IR spectroscopy of CO

  20. Antioxidant, antiinflammatory activities and HPLC analysis of South African Salvia species

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kamatou, GGP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available -performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to identify various compounds in the extracts. Betulafolientriol oxide and rosmarinic acid were detected in all the species investigated, and rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, carnosol and oleanolic acid/ursolic acid...

  1. Hydrolysis of Some C,N-Chelated Organotin(IV) Species Used in Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Švec, P.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the reactivity of the selected C, N-chelated organotin (IV) species towards cyclohexene oxide, ethylene carbonate, and CO2. Structure of organotin(IV) hydrolytic products isolated from respective reaction mixtures was described.

  2. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the ...

  3. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  4. Solution species of 239Pu [V] in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, D.; Serne, R.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Information regarding the oxidation states of Pu in environmental samples is needed for estimating its migration through the geologic media. Thermodynamic data were used to develop stability fields for different Pu species. The data indicate that in the Eh-pH range of natural aqueous environments, the dominant species of Pu is likely to be Pu[V] in relatively oxidizing environments and Pu[III] in reducing environments. Because of the lack of methods of determining Pu[V] in environmental samples containing trace concentrations of Pu, Pu[V] has not been previously identified in these samples. Plutonium [VI] is generally assumed to be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments. However, a combination of solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques used in this study show that solutions (> 10 -5 4 M Pu) in equilibrium with 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide contain Pu[V], which is in agreement with the thermodynamic predictions. Although this method could not be used conclusively with the remaining solutions ( -5 4 M Pu) contacting 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide and 239 PuO 2 , the solvent extraction and Eh-pH results are similar for all the samples suggesting the strong possibility that all samples contain Pu[V]. Thus the possibility, ignored in the past, that Pu[V] may be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments should be considered

  5. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Bulgarian species of the genus Senecio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADEZHDA KOSTOVA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Bulgarian species from the genus Senecio were studied phytochemically and/or by GC-MS analysis. Senecivernine-N-oxide was isolated and identified by spectral data for the first time. Different types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity on murine lymphocytes. At a concentration of 100 µg/ml, the alkaloid retroisosenine showed immunosuppressive effect.

  6. Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadota, M; Ohta, K

    1972-01-01

    Ozone is an important constituent of photochemical oxidant smog. This paper reveals the semiquantitative responses of various Japanese woody plant species to ozone (0.25 ppm). Plant species examined in this investigation include four coniferous trees, eleven evergreen broad-leaf trees, and twenty-one deciduous broad-leaf trees or shrubs. Generally, plants having thin leaves were susceptible. The plant species with higher activity of photosynthesis appeared to be more susceptible. As a whole, evergreen broad-leaf trees could be said to be more resistant to ozone than deciduous broad-leaf trees.

  7. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawal HA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humaira Aziz Sawal,1 Kashif Asghar,2 Matthias Bureik,3 Nasir Jalal4 1Healthcare Biotechnology Department, Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, 2Basic Sciences Research, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Health Science Platform, School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; 4Health Science Platform, Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to

  8. Oxidative Stress in BPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Savas

    2009-01-01

    The present study has shown that there were not relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH. Further well designed studies should be planned to find out whether the oxidative stress-related parameters play role in BPH as an interesting pathology in regard of the etiopathogenesis. Keywords: benign prostatic hyperplasia, oxidative stress, prostate

  9. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr 2 O 3 . This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl 2 O 4 . Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr 2 O 3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl 2 O 4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional

  10. Fungal oxidative dissolution of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite and the role of metabolites in manganese oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanzhi; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2013-04-01

    Microbially mediated oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides influences the cycling of metals and remineralization of carbon. Despite the prevalence of Mn(II)-bearing minerals in nature, little is known regarding the ability of microbes to oxidize mineral-hosted Mn(II). Here, we explored oxidation of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite (MnCO3 ) and characteristics of ensuing Mn oxides by six Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi. All fungal species substantially enhanced rhodochrosite dissolution and surface modification. Mineral-hosted Mn(II) was oxidized resulting in formation of Mn(III/IV) oxides that were all similar to δ-MnO2 but varied in morphology and distribution in relation to cellular structures and the MnCO3 surface. For four fungi, Mn(II) oxidation occurred along hyphae, likely mediated by cell wall-associated proteins. For two species, Mn(II) oxidation occurred via reaction with fungal-derived superoxide produced at hyphal tips. This pathway ultimately resulted in structurally unique Mn oxide clusters formed at substantial distances from any cellular structure. Taken together, findings for these two fungi strongly point to a role for fungal-derived organic molecules in Mn(III) complexation and Mn oxide templation. Overall, this study illustrates the importance of fungi in rhodochrosite dissolution, extends the relevance of biogenic superoxide-based Mn(II) oxidation and highlights the potential role of mycogenic exudates in directing mineral precipitation. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Solubility study of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under oxidizing conditions technetium exists as the anionic species TcO 4 - whereas under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Hence, the mobility of Tc(IV) in reducing groundwater may be limited by the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O under these conditions. Due to this fact it is important to investigate the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2 + . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is about (1.49-1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L·d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The

  12. Genomic definition of species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  13. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  14. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  15. Aquatic Nuisance Species Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program located in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the locations where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel

  16. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P. aeruginosa viability increased in a dose- and

  17. Oxidation of Proteins in Plants-Mechanisms and Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Møller, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic....... A view that such modifications could have signalling ramifications is emerging. However, in many cases there is a lack of information as to the effect of oxidation on protein activity or function. Severe protein oxidation is costly to the cell since oxidatively damaged proteins need to be degraded...... of modified proteins by affinity purification. Although there are several technical caveats with such approaches, they have been useful in documenting the extent of oxidative modification of proteins and have highlighted a number of proteins where oxidative modification is critical for protein function...

  18. Measurement of exercise-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James E; Bosch, Jos A; Aldred, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    Vigorous exercise is associated with oxidative stress, a state that involves modifications to bodily molecules due to release of pro-oxidant species. Assessment of such modifications provides non-specific measures of oxidative stress in human tissues and blood, including circulating lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are a very heterogeneous group of white blood cells, consisting of subtypes that have different functions in immunity. Importantly, exercise drastically changes the lymphocyte composition in blood by increasing the numbers of some subsets, while leaving other cells unaffected. This fact may imply that observed changes in oxidative stress markers are confounded by changes in lymphocyte composition. For example, lymphocyte subsets may differ in exposure to oxidative stress because of subset differences in cell division and the acquisition of cytotoxic effector functions. The aim of the present review is to raise awareness of interpretational issues related to the assessment of oxidative stress in lymphocytes with exercise and to address the relevance of lymphocyte subset phenotyping in these contexts.

  19. Electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction by rhenium oxides electrodeposited by pulsed-current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Uscategui, Alejandro; Mosquera, Edgar; Chornik, Boris; Cifuentes, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Rhenium oxides were produced by means of pulsed current electrodeposition over ITO. • The electrocatalytic behavior of rhenium oxides electrodeposited over ITO was studied. • Electrodeposited rhenium oxides showed electrocatalytic behavior increasing the rate of the hydrogen evolution reaction. • The electrocatalysis behavior was explained considering the relative abundance of Re species on the surface of the electrodeposited material. - Abstract: Rhenium oxides are materials of interest for applications in the catalysis of reactions such as those occurring in fuel cells and photoelectrochemical cells. This research work was devoted to the production of rhenium oxide by means of pulsed current electrodeposition for the electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Rhenium oxides were electrodeposited over a transparent conductive oxide substrate (Indium Tin-doped Oxide – ITO) in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. The electrodeposition process allowed the production of rhenium oxides islands (200–600 nm) with the presence of three oxidized rhenium species: Re"I"V associated to ReO_2, Re"V"I associated to ReO_3 and Re"V"I"I associated to H(ReO_4)H_2O. Electrodeposited rhenium oxides showed electrocatalytic behavior over the HER and an increase of one order of magnitude of the exchange current density was observed compared to the reaction taking place on the bare substrate. The electrocatalytic behavior varied with the morphology and relative abundance of oxidized rhenium species in the electrodeposits. Finally, two mechanisms of electrocatalysis were proposed to explain experimental results.

  20. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-07

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed.

  1. Features oxidative processes in sturgeons fish (Acipenseridae (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Symon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To anayze scientific sources on physiological-biochemical pecularities of reducing-oxidizing processes, including peroxide oxidation of lipids and work of the system of antioxidant protection system in sturgeon species (Acipenseridae. The initiation and process of the oxidative stress have been described. The main products of peroxide oxidation of lipids, antioxidants of natural and artificial origin, organs and tissues for the studies of reducing-oxidizing processes have been examined. Findings. The work generalizes the processes of lipid peroxidation. Briefly outlined the main mechanism of action of antioxidant enzymes. Antioxidant defense system plays one of key role in the life of organism due regulating its series of metabolic processes, use of assessing of its state gives an opportunity obtain quantitative information on the progress of these processes. The products of free radical peroxidation (dien conjugates and malonic dialdehyde can also act as a sort of biomarkers of tissue damage, because their content can judge about the intensity of the flow of free radical processes in the various systems in organism. The review contains a description of the peculiarities of the liver and its involvement in lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense system. It is shown the most common antioxidants used in the feeding of sturgeon. Organs and tissues, which should be used for studying the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids in sturgeon species, have been examined. Practical value. The systematized data regarding peroxide oxidation of lipids, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection system allow finding a balance between these processes. The data on antioxidants, which are used in feeds for sturgeon species, will be useful for sturgeon culturists. The array of the generalized information will be important for scientists who study the pecularities of the processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids and antioxidant protection system in

  2. Sputtered indium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillery, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for depositing on a substrate multiple layer films comprising at least one primary layer of a metal oxide and at least one primary layer of a metal other than the metal of the oxide layer. The improvement described here comprises improving the adhesion between the metal oxide and metal layers by depositing between the layers an intermediate metal-containing layer having an affinity for both the metal and metal oxide layers. An article of manufacture is described comprising a nonmetallic substrate, and deposited thereon in any order: a. at least one coating layer of metal; b. at least one coating layer of an oxide of a metal other than the metal of the metal layer; and c. deposited between the metal and metal oxide layers an intermediate metal-containing layer having an affinity for both the metal and metal oxide layers

  3. Soil-to-plant transfer of 99mTc: how to determine Tc-species in uptake and transport processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krijger, G. C.; Van Elswijk, D. A.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.

    1995-01-01

    Selective extraction, filtration and capillary electrophoresis were used to recognize problems dealing with complexation, oxidation and ligand-exchange processes during collection and analysis of Tc-species in xylem exudates, while 99m Tc-citrate was used as a marker complex. Relatively unstable Tc-species were synthesized in xylem exudates. Oxidation of relative unstable Tc-species during the collection of xylem exudates was suggested, requiring new, better procedures to recognize Tc-species representative for the plant interior. (author)

  4. Man as a Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Alan; And Others

    Written in 1964, the document represents experimental material of the Anthropology Curriculum Study Project. The objectives of the project were to discuss the evolution of man as distinguished from the evolution of other species and as related to culture, and to emphasize human diversity. Three brief essays are presented. The first, "The…

  5. Coevolution of Symbiotic Species

    OpenAIRE

    Leok, Boon Tiong Melvin

    1996-01-01

    This paper will consider the coevolution of species which are symbiotic in their interaction. In particular, we shall analyse the interaction of squirrels and oak trees, and develop a mathematical framework for determining the coevolutionary equilibrium for consumption and production patterns.

  6. Species Coexistence in Nitrifying Chemostats: A Model of Microbial Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Dumont

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, the two nitrifying functions (ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB or nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB of a nitrification reactor—operated continuously over 525 days with varying inputs—were assigned using a mathematical modeling approach together with the monitoring of bacterial phylotypes. Based on these theoretical identifications, we develop here a chemostat model that does not explicitly include only the resources’ dynamics (different forms of soluble nitrogen but also explicitly takes into account microbial inter- and intra-species interactions for the four dominant phylotypes detected in the chemostat. A comparison of the models obtained with and without interactions has shown that such interactions permit the coexistence of two competing ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and two competing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in competition for ammonium and nitrite, respectively. These interactions are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of thiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, C L

    2000-01-01

    -molecular-weight thiols such as reduced glutathione (GSH), and sulfur-containing amino acids in proteins, are major targets for HOCl. Radicals have not generally been implicated as intermediates in thiol oxidation by HOCl, though there is considerable literature evidence for the involvement of radicals in the metal ion......-, thermal- or UV light-catalysed decomposition of sulfenyl or sulfonyl chlorides which are postulated intermediates in thiol oxidation. In this study we show that thiyl radicals are generated on reaction of a number of low-molecular-weight thiols with HOCl. With sub-stoichiometric amounts of HOCl, relative...... to the thiol, thiyl radicals are the major species detected by EPR spin trapping. When the HOCl is present in excess over the thiol, additional radicals are detected with compounds which contain amine functions; these additional radicals are assigned to nitrogen-centered species. Evidence is presented...

  8. Oxidative stress resistance in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Leroy G; McKenzie, Rachelle ME; Robles, Antonette; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a black-pigmented, Gram-negative anaerobe, is an important etiologic agent of periodontal disease. The harsh inflammatory condition of the periodontal pocket implies that this organism has properties that will facilitate its ability to respond and adapt to oxidative stress. Because the stress response in the pathogen is a major determinant of its virulence, a comprehensive understanding of its oxidative stress resistance strategy is vital. We discuss multiple mechanisms and systems that clearly work in synergy to defend and protect P. gingivalis against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species. The involvement of multiple hypothetical proteins and/or proteins of unknown function in this process may imply other unique mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22439726

  9. Oxidation of Fe(II) in rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, J D; Whitehead, R F; Kieber, R J; Hardison, D R

    2005-04-15

    Photochemically produced Fe(II) is oxidized within hours under environmentally realistic conditions in rainwater. The diurnal variation between photochemical production and reoxidation of Fe(II) observed in our laboratory accurately mimics the behavior of ferrous iron observed in field studies where the highest concentrations of dissolved Fe(ll) occur in afternoon rain during the period of maximum sunlight intensity followed by gradually decreasing concentrations eventually returning to early morning pre-light values. The experimental work presented here, along with the results of kinetics studies done by others, suggests thatthe primary process responsible for the decline in photochemically produced Fe(II) concentrations is oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is first order with respect to both the concentrations of Fe(II) and H2O2. The second-order rate constant determined for six different authentic rain samples varied over an order of magnitude and was always less than or equal to the rate constant determined for this reaction in simple acidic solutions. Oxidation of photochemically produced ferrous iron by other oxidants including molecular oxygen, ozone, hydroxyl radical, hydroperoxyl/superoxide radical, and hexavalent chromium were found to be insignificant under the conditions present in rainwater. This study shows that Fe(II) occurs as at least two different chemical species in rain; photochemically produced Fe(II) that is oxidized over time periods of hours, and a background Fe(II) that is protected against oxidation, perhaps by organic complexation, and is stable against oxidation for days. Because the rate of oxidation of photochemically produced Fe(II) does not increase with increasing rainwater pH, the speciation of this more labile form of Fe(II) is also not controlled by simple hydrolysis reactions.

  10. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  11. Electrochemical Oxidation of Glycerol Using Gold Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Rozali Othman; Amirah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry, potential linear V and chronocuolometry methods were carried out to gain electrochemical behavior of glycerol at a gold electrode. Potassium hydroxide and sulfuric acid were chosen to be the electrolyte for the electro-oxidation of this organic compound. Besides gold plate electrode, gold composite electrode (Au-PVC) was also used as the working electrode. The Au-PVC composite electrode was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to determine its morphological aspects before and after used in electrochemical oxidation of glycerol. In alkaline solution, the adsorption of hydroxide species onto the surface of both gold plate and composite Au-PVC electrodes occurs at potential around 500 mV vs SCE. However, at gold plate electrode, there was a small, broad peak before the drastic escalation of current densities which indicates the charge transfer of the chemisorbed OH - anion. In acidic media, the gold oxide was formed after potential 1.0 V. From the cyclic voltammogram glycerol undergo oxidation twice in potassium hydroxide at gold plate and Au-PVC composite electrodes, while in sulfuric acid, oxidation reaction happened once for glycerol on the gold plate electrode. Overall, electrochemical oxidation of glycerol was more effective in alkaline media. Tafel graph which plotted from potential linear V method shows that Au-PVC composite electrode is better than gold plate electrode for the electro-oxidation of glycerol in alkaline solution. Electrochemical oxidation of glycerol products as analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) produced several carboxylic acids and phenolic compounds. (author)

  12. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Perez, M.R. Del; Michelin, S.C.; Gisone, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  13. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms in teratogenesis involving reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Peter G.; Bhuller, Yadvinder; Chen, Connie S.; Jeng, Winnie; Kasapinovic, Sonja; Kennedy, Julia C.; Kim, Perry M.; Laposa, Rebecca R.; McCallum, Gordon P.; Nicol, Christopher J.; Parman, Toufan; Wiley, Michael J.; Wong, Andrea W.

    2005-01-01

    Developmental pathologies may result from endogenous or xenobiotic-enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and/or alter signal transduction. This minireview focuses upon several model drugs (phenytoin, thalidomide, methamphetamine), environmental chemicals (benzo[a]pyrene) and gamma irradiation to examine this hypothesis in vivo and in embryo culture using mouse, rat and rabbit models. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) and lipoxygenases bioactivate xenobiotics to free radical intermediates that initiate ROS formation, resulting in oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA. Oxidative DNA damage and embryopathies are reduced in PHS knockout mice, and in mice treated with PHS inhibitors, antioxidative enzymes, antioxidants and free radical trapping agents. Thalidomide causes embryonic DNA oxidation in susceptible (rabbit) but not resistant (mouse) species. Embryopathies are increased in mutant mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), or by glutathione (GSH) depletion, or inhibition of GSH peroxidase or GSH reductase. Inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice are partially protected. Inhibition of Ras or NF-kB pathways reduces embryopathies, implicating ROS-mediated signal transduction. Atm and p53 knockout mice deficient in DNA damage response/repair are more susceptible to xenobiotic or radiation embryopathies, suggesting a teratological role for DNA damage, consistent with enhanced susceptibility to methamphetamine in ogg1 knockout mice with deficient repair of oxidative DNA damage. Even endogenous embryonic oxidative stress carries a risk, since untreated G6PD- or ATM-deficient mice have increased embryopathies. Thus, embryonic processes regulating the balance of ROS formation, oxidative DNA damage and repair, and ROS-mediated signal transduction may be important determinants of teratological risk

  14. Heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by O3-aged black carbon and its dithiothreitol oxidative potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiwei; Li, Qian; Shang, Jing; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiang; Zhu, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Ozone (O3) is an important atmospheric oxidant. Black carbon (BC) particles released into the atmosphere undergo an aging process via O3 oxidation. O3-aged BC particles may change their uptake ability toward trace reducing gases such as SO2 in the atmosphere, leading to different environmental and health effects. In this paper, the heterogeneous reaction process between O3-aged BC and SO2 was explored via in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Combined with ion chromatography (IC), DRIFTS was used to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the sulfate product. The results showed that O3-aged BC had stronger SO2 oxidation ability than fresh BC, and the reactive species/sites generated on the surface had an important role in the oxidation of SO2. Relative humidity or 254nm UV (ultraviolet) light illumination enhanced the oxidation uptake of SO2 on O3-aged BC. The oxidation potentials of the BC particles were detected via dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. The DTT activity over BC was decreased in the process of SO2 reduction, with the consumption of oxidative active sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The influence of ion implantation on the oxidation of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, P.D.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of ion implantation on the oxidation of polycrystalline nickel have been studied for a range of implanted species: viz. He, Li, Ne, Ca, Ti, Ni, Co, Xe, Ce and Bi. The oxides were grown in dry oxygen at 630 0 C and the 16 O(d,p) 17 O nuclear reaction technique used to determine the amount of oxygen taken up. The influence of atomic and ionic size, valency and electronegativity of the implanted impurities was studied as also were the effects of ion bombardment damage and the influence of sputtering during implantation. Atomic size and the annealing of disorder were found to have a marked influence on oxide growth rate. The dependence of oxidation on annealing was further studied by implanting polycrystalline specimens with self ions and observing the oxide growth rate as a function of annealing temperature. A peak in the curve was found at 400 0 C and a similar peak observed at a somewhat higher temperature for oxidised single crystals. It is concluded that the oxidation rate will be influenced by those factors which alter the epitaxial relationship between metal and growing oxide. Such factors include atomic size of the implanted species, surface strain induced by implantation and changes in surface topography as a result of sputtering. In addition a model based on vacancy assisted cation migration is proposed to explain enhanced oxidation observed over a limited temperature range. (author)

  16. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  17. Oxidative stress in organophosphate poisoning: role of standard antidotal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanova, Nela; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Herman, David; Dlabkova, Alzbeta; Jun, Daniel

    2018-08-01

    Despite the main mechanism of organophosphate (OP) toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) being well known over the years, some chronic adverse health effects indicate the involvement of additional pathways. Oxidative stress is among the most intensively studied. Overstimulation of cholinergic and glutamatergic nervous system is followed by intensified generation of reactive species and oxidative damage in many tissues. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in pathophysiology of OP poisoning and the influence of commonly used medical interventions on its levels are discussed. Current standardized therapy of OP intoxications comprises live-saving administration of the anticholinergic drug atropine accompanied by oxime AChE reactivator and diazepam. The capability of these antidotes to ameliorate OP-induced oxidative stress varies between both therapeutic groups and individual medications within the drug class. Regarding oxidative stress, atropine does not seem to have a significant effect on oxidative stress parameters in OP poisoning. In a case of AChE reactivators, pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties could be found. It is assumed that the ability of oximes to trigger oxidative stress is rather associated with their chemical structure than reactivation efficacy. The data indicating the potency of diazepam in preventing OP-induced oxidative stress are not available. Based on current knowledge on the mechanism of OP-mediated oxidative stress, alternative approaches (including antioxidants or multifunctional drugs) in therapy of OP poisoning are under consideration. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  19. Heterogeneous catalysis in the liquid-phase oxidation of olefins--3. The activity of supported vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for the oxidation of cyclohexene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehira, K; Hayakawa, T; Ishikawa, T

    1979-03-01

    The activity of supported vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for the oxidation of cyclohexene to 1-cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide, 2-cyclohexene-1-one, 2-cyclohexene-1-ol, and cyclohexene oxide was due to the interaction between the metal oxides and the carriers. The oxidation reaction was carried out in benzene at 60/sup 0/C for four hours with the binary oxide supported on (GAMMA)-alumina or silica; three series of catalysts were prepared by combining the vanadium and chromium oxide components with alumina hydrate or silica sol by a kneading method. The silica-supported catalysts had the greatest activity, the highest being the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//SiO/sub 2/ system, which lost its activity quickly during the reaction. This was followed in activity by the Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ system, containing the chromium(V) species. The Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system also had high activity and the chromium(V) species. The vanadium and chromium metal ions are probably coordinated tetrahedrally on the support, and these complexes catalyze cyclohexene autoxidation by decomposing 1-cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide.

  20. Positive feedback in species communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes the eventual population densities in a species community depend on the initial densities or the arrival times of species. If arrival times determine species composition, a priority effect has occurred. Priority effects may occur if the species community exhibits alternative stable states

  1. Plant peroxisomes: A nitro-oxidative cocktail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Corpas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although peroxisomes are very simple organelles, research on different species has provided us with an understanding of their importance in terms of cell viability. In addition to the significant role played by plant peroxisomes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS, data gathered over the last two decades show that these organelles are an endogenous source of nitric oxide (NO and related molecules called reactive nitrogen species (RNS. Molecules such as NO and H2O2 act as retrograde signals among the different cellular compartments, thus facilitating integral cellular adaptation to physiological and environmental changes. However, under nitro-oxidative conditions, part of this network can be overloaded, possibly leading to cellular damage and even cell death. This review aims to update our knowledge of the ROS/RNS metabolism, whose important role in plant peroxisomes is still underestimated. However, this pioneering approach, in which key elements such as β-oxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD and NO have been mainly described in relation to plant peroxisomes, could also be used to explore peroxisomes from other organisms.

  2. A Simplified Model for Volatile-N Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine; Glarborg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In solid fuel flames, NO is largely formed from the oxidation of volatile nitrogen compounds such as HCN and NH3. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in these flames, it is necessary to have an adequate model for volatile-N oxidation. Simple global models for oxidation of HCN and NH3 from...... the literature should be used cautiously, since their predictive capabilities are limited, particularly under reducing conditions. Models for HCN/NH3/NO conversion based on the systematic reduction of a detailed chemical kinetic model offer high accuracy but rely on input estimates of combustion intermediates...... for the sub-bituminous and bituminous coals, especially at lower temperatures. The semiempirical correlations for estimating radical concentrations may also be useful in combination with models for other trace species, such as sulfur oxides, organic species, etc....

  3. [Oxidation behavior and kinetics of representative VOCs emitted from petrochemical industry over CuCeOx composite oxides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Wei; Yu, Yan-Ke; Chen, Jin-Sheng; He, Chi

    2013-12-01

    CuCeOx composite catalysts were synthesized via coprecipitation (COP-CuCeO,) and incipient impregnation (IMP-CuCeOx) methods, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by XRD, low-temperature N2 sorption, H2-TPR and O2-TPD. The influences of reactant composition and concentration, reaction space velocity, O2 content, H2O concentration, and catalyst type on the oxidation behaviors of benzene, toluene, and n-hexane emitted from petrochemical industry were systematically investigated. In addition, the related kinetic parameters were model fitted. Compared with IMP-CuCeOx, COP-CuCeOx had well-dispersed active phase, better low-temperature reducibility, and more active surface oxygen species. The increase of reactant concentration was unfavorable for toluene oxidation, while the opposite phenomenon could be observed in n-hexane oxidation. The inlet concentration of benzene was irrelevant to its conversion under high oxidation rate. The introduction of benzene obviously inhibited the oxidation of toluene and n-hexane, while the presence of toluene had a positive effect on beuzene conversion. The presence of n-hexane could promote the oxidation of toluene, while toluene had a negative influence on e-hexane oxidation. Both low space velocity and high oxygen concentration were beneficial for the oxidation process, and the variation of oxygen content had negligible effect on n-hexane and henzene oxidation. The presence of H2O noticeably inhibited the oxidation of toluene, while significantly accelerated the oxidation procedure of henzene and n-hexane. COP-CuCeOx had superior catalytic performance for toluene and benzene oxidation, while IMP-CuCeOx showed higher n-hexane oxidation activity under dry condition. The oxidation behaviors under different conditions could be well fitted and predicted by the pseudo first-order kinetic model.

  4. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Daniel W.; Dalsgaard, Bo; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship betw...... to distributions at the local community level. We finally discuss how our biogeographical species roles may correspond to the stages of the taxon cycle and other prominent theories of species assembly.......Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship...... between species traits and large-scale species distribution patterns in archipelagos, we use a network approach to classify birds as one of four biogeographical species roles: peripherals, connectors, module hubs, and network hubs. These roles are based upon the position of species within the modular...

  5. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  6. Direct oxide reducing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium oxides and magnetic oxides as wastes generated upon direct reduction are subjected to molten salt electrolysis, and reduced metallic calcium and magnesium are separated and recovered. Then calcium and magnesium are used recyclically as the reducing agent upon conducting direct oxide reduction. Even calcium oxides and magnesium oxides, which have high melting points and difficult to be melted usually, can be melted in molten salts of mixed fluorides or chlorides by molten-salt electrolysis. Oxides are decomposed by electrolysis, and oxygen is removed in the form of carbon monoxide, while the reduced metallic calcium and magnesium rise above the molten salts on the side of a cathode, and then separated. Since only carbon monoxide is generated as radioactive wastes upon molten salt electrolysis, the amount of radioactive wastes can be greatly reduced, and the amount of the reducing agent used can also be decreased remarkably. (N.H.)

  7. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  8. Autecology of broadleaved species

    OpenAIRE

    Gonin, Pierre; Larrieu, Laurent; Coello, Jaime; Marty, Pauline; Lestrade , Marine; Becquey, Jacques; Claessens, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Anyone involved in timber production needs some knowledge of autecology. With the renewed interest in hardwoods in the last 20 years, they are increasingly being introduced by planting or encouraged in natural stands. The results in terms of growth have not always met foresters’ expectations, due to technical problems and especially because the species are not always suited to the different sites. While the principle of establishing hardwoods is not in question, it is important to be aware of...

  9. Prior indigenous technological species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary open questions of astrobiology is whether there is extant or extinct life elsewhere the solar system. Implicit in much of this work is that we are looking for microbial or, at best, unintelligent life, even though technological artefacts might be much easier to find. Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) work on searches for alien artefacts in the solar system typically presumes that such artefacts would be of extrasolar origin, even though life is known to have existed in the solar system, on Earth, for eons. But if a prior technological, perhaps spacefaring, species ever arose in the solar system, it might have produced artefacts or other technosignatures that have survived to present day, meaning solar system artefact SETI provides a potential path to resolving astrobiology's question. Here, I discuss the origins and possible locations for technosignatures of such a prior indigenous technological species, which might have arisen on ancient Earth or another body, such as a pre-greenhouse Venus or a wet Mars. In the case of Venus, the arrival of its global greenhouse and potential resurfacing might have erased all evidence of its existence on the Venusian surface. In the case of Earth, erosion and, ultimately, plate tectonics may have erased most such evidence if the species lived Gyr ago. Remaining indigenous technosignatures might be expected to be extremely old, limiting the places they might still be found to beneath the surfaces of Mars and the Moon, or in the outer solar system.

  10. Reactive oxygen species in disease: Rebuttal of a conventional concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vitetta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species has long been proposed as leading to the random deleterious modification of macromolecules (i.e., nucleic acids, proteins with an associated progressive development of the age associated systemic diseases (e.g., diabetes, Parkinson’s disease as well as contributing to the ageing process.   Superoxide anion (hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (peroxynitrite comprise regulated intracellular second messenger pro-oxidant systems, with specific sub-cellular locales of production and are essential for the normal function of the metabolome and cellular electro-physiology.  We have posited that the formation of superoxide anion and its metabolic product hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, do not conditionally lead to random damage of macromolecular species such as nucleic acids or proteins.  Under normal physiological conditions their production is intrinsically regulated that is very much consistent with their second messenger purpose of function.   We further propose that the concept of an orally administered small molecule antioxidant as a therapy to abrogate free radical activity (to control oxidative stress is a chimera.  As such we consider that free radicals are not a major overwhelming player in the development of the chronic diseases or the ageing process.

  11. Review of zircaloy oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, F.C. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Lewis, B.J. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for Zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. The effect of internal clad oxidation due to Zircaloy/UO{sub 2} interaction is also discussed. Low-temperature oxidation of Zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (author)

  12. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  13. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  14. Oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Ferreira, António César Silva; Freitas, Victor De; Silva, Artur M. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present review aims to show the state of the art on the oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines, as well as the methods to monitor, classify and diagnose wine oxidation. Wine oxidation can be divided in enzymatic oxidation and non-enzymatic oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation almost entirely occurs in grape must and is largely correlated with the content of hydroxycinnamates, such as caffeoyltartaric acid and paracoumaroyltartaric acid, and flavan-3-ols. Non-enzymatic oxidation, al...

  15. Isoxazole derivatives as new nitric oxide elicitors in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Oancea

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several 3,5-disubstituted isoxazoles were obtained in good yields by regiospecific 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions between aromatic nitrile oxides, generated in situ from the corresponding hydroxyimidoyl chlorides, with non-symmetrical activated alkynes in the presence of catalytic amounts of copper(I iodide. Effects of 3,5-disubstituted isoxazoles on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation in Arabidopsis tissues was studied using specific diaminofluoresceine dyes as fluorescence indicators.

  16. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  17. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  18. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Moran, J.E.; Blackwood, V.

    2007-01-01

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic 129 I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils

  19. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Potential of One Hundred Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Rehman, Shakila; Gul, Shehnaz; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Zaman, Bakht; da Rocha, Joao B T

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species are produced in biological system because of redox reactions. The imbalance in pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis leads to the production of toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species like hydrogen peroxide, organic peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion and nitric oxide. Inactivation of metabolic enzymes, oxidation of biomolecules and cellular damage are some of the prominent characteristics of reactive species. Similarly, oxidative stress has been associated with more than one hundred (100) pathologies such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, pancreatic and liver diseases, joint disorders, cardiac fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, neurological diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disorder, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease), ageing and cancer etc. The toxicity of reactive species is balanced by the integrated antioxidant systems, which include enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Antioxidant therapies or defenses protect the biological sites by removing or quenching the free radicals (prooxidants). Medicinal plants can not only protect the oxidative damage, but also play a vital role in health maintenance and prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. This review will provide a valuable discussion of one hundred (100) well known medicinal plants, which may add to the optimization of antioxidants rank. Besides, some of the antioxidant evaluation techniques or mechanisms via which medicinal plants act as antioxidants are also described. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Rare earth oxide doping in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The effect on life performance and poisoning with O 2 by doping oxide cathodes with rare earth oxides and pseudo rare earth oxides, notably yttria, is qualitatively explained in terms of electrolysis of BaO during emission of electrons. Doped cathodes show less electrolysis and consume therefore less Ba during life: consequently, doped cathodes have a better life performance. However, the lower Ba-production makes doped cathodes more sensitive to oxygen poisoning. The experimentally found relation between conductivity and yttria concentration was the motive to propose a new model for the crystal imperfections in BaO. In this new imperfection model most Y 3+ -ions will combine with barium vacancies, therefore, the increase of the conductivity is modest and also the effect on the position of the Fermi level is modest. By assuming a combination of bulk and surface conductivity, the agreement between experiment and theory can be improved further

  1. Plants as indicators of photochemical oxidants in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Plant indicators have been important in identifying the photochemical oxidant problem in the USA since the 1940's. They continue to serve as an inexpensive means of detecting oxidants in the atmosphere and determining the geographical extent and frequency of occurrence of oxidants. Plant indicators are particularly useful for land-use planning and in the evaluation of air pollution effects on agriculture, forestry, and native vegetation. Plant indicators are not satisfactory substitutes for chemical monitoring of the atmosphere because their responses lack specificity and are affected by climatic, edaphic, and cultural factors, as well as the concentration and frequency of occurrence of oxidants. Because they integrate many environmental variables, plant indicators may be valuable models for the response of other species but only to the extent that they respond to oxidants in the same manner as these other species. The four most important factors for the successful use of plant indicators are: genetic uniformity of plant material; standardization of cultural conditions; standardization of procedures for scoring foliar symptoms; and uniformity of climatic and edaphic factors among study sites. The species used most frequently as indicators of oxidants in the US have been Bel W-3 tobacco and Pinto bean for 0/sub 3/ and petunia for peroxyacyl nitrate. 41 references, 1 table.

  2. Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Moran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%, grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05% than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%. This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32– or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus. Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in

  3. Pulse radiolysis study on oxidation reactions of gallic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwibedy, P.; Dey, G.R.; Naik, D.B.; Kishore, Kamal

    1998-01-01

    Reactions of OH . /O - and other oxidising radicals viz. N 3 . , Br 2 .- , Cl 2 .- with gallic acid (GA) have been studied at various pHs. At pH 6.8, OH . radicals react with GA giving an adduct which in turn reacts with the parent GA to give a dimeric species. At pH 9.7, the initial OH adduct formed is able to oxidize GA to give a semi-oxidised species. At pH 12 and ∼ 13.6, OH . /O .- radicals directly bring about oxidation of GA. (author)

  4. Facile N...N coupling of manganese(V) imido species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Ho, Chi-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2007-01-31

    (Salen)manganese(V) nitrido species are activated by electrophiles such as trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) or trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to produce N2. Mechanistic studies suggest that the manganese(V) nitrido species first react with TFAA or TFA to produce an imido species, which then undergoes N...N coupling. It is proposed that the resulting manganese(III) mu-diazene species decomposes via internal redox to give N2 and manganese(II). The manganese(II) species is then rapidly oxidized by manganese(V) imide to give manganese(III) and CF3CONH2 (for TFAA) or NH3 (for TFA).

  5. Estimating Effects of Species Interactions on Populations of Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Tobias; Bühler, Christoph; Amrhein, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    Global change causes community composition to change considerably through time, with ever-new combinations of interacting species. To study the consequences of newly established species interactions, one available source of data could be observational surveys from biodiversity monitoring. However, approaches using observational data would need to account for niche differences between species and for imperfect detection of individuals. To estimate population sizes of interacting species, we extended N-mixture models that were developed to estimate true population sizes in single species. Simulations revealed that our model is able to disentangle direct effects of dominant on subordinate species from indirect effects of dominant species on detection probability of subordinate species. For illustration, we applied our model to data from a Swiss amphibian monitoring program and showed that sizes of expanding water frog populations were negatively related to population sizes of endangered yellow-bellied toads and common midwife toads and partly of natterjack toads. Unlike other studies that analyzed presence and absence of species, our model suggests that the spread of water frogs in Central Europe is one of the reasons for the decline of endangered toad species. Thus, studying population impacts of dominant species on population sizes of endangered species using data from biodiversity monitoring programs should help to inform conservation policy and to decide whether competing species should be subject to population management.

  6. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  7. Enzymatic oxidation of mercury vapor by erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbach, S; Clarkson, T W

    1978-01-01

    The formation of glutathione radicals, the evolution of nascent oxygen or the peroxidatic reaction with catalase complex I are considered as possible mechanisms for the oxidation of mercury vapor by red blood cells. To select among these, the uptake of atomic mercury by erythrocytes from different species was studied and related to their various activities of catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (glutathione:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.9). A slow and continuouus infusion of diluted H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was used to maintain steady concentrations of complex I. 1% red cell suspensions were found most suitable showing high rates of Hg uptake and yielding still enough cells for subsequent determinations. The results indicate that the oxidation of mercury depends upon the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-generation rate and upon the specific acticity of red-cell catalase. The oxidation occurred in a range of the catalase-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ reaction where the evolution of oxygen could be excluded. Compounds reacting with complex I were shown to be effective inhibitors of the mercury uptake. GSH-peroxidase did not participate in the oxidation but rather, was found to inhibit it by competing with catalase for hydrogen peroxide. These findings support the view that elemental mercury is oxidized in erythrocytes by a peroxidatic reaction with complex I only.

  8. Molybdenum, molybdenum oxides, and their electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Viswanathan S; Lee, Chi-Woo

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of molybdenum and its oxides, both in bulk and thin film dimensions, are critical because of their widespread applications in steels, electrocatalysts, electrochromic materials, batteries, sensors, and solar cells. An important area of current interest is electrodeposited CIGS-based solar cells where a molybdenum/glass electrode forms the back contact. Surprisingly, the basic electrochemistry of molybdenum and its oxides has not been reviewed with due attention. In this Review, we assess the scattered information. The potential and pH dependent active, passive, and transpassive behaviors of molybdenum in aqueous media are explained. The major surface oxide species observed, reversible redox transitions of the surface oxides, pseudocapacitance and catalytic reduction are discussed along with carefully conducted experimental results on a typical molybdenum glass back contact employed in CIGS-based solar cells. The applications of molybdenum oxides and the electrodeposition of molybdenum are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Transformation of a Cp*-iridium(III) precatalyst for water oxidation when exposed to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Bortolini, Olga; Bucci, Alberto; Savini, Arianna; Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-03-17

    The reaction of [Cp*Ir(bzpy)NO3 ] (1; bzpy=2-benzoylpyridine, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl anion), a competent water-oxidation catalyst, with several oxidants (H2 O2 , NaIO4 , cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN)) was studied to intercept and characterize possible intermediates of the oxidative transformation. NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS techniques provided evidence for the formation of many species that all had the intact Ir-bzpy moiety and a gradually more oxidized Cp* ligand. Initially, an oxygen atom is trapped in between two carbon atoms of Cp* and iridium, which gives an oxygen-Ir coordinated epoxide, whereas the remaining three carbon atoms of Cp* are involved in a η(3) interaction with iridium (2 a). Formal addition of H2 O to 2 a or H2 O2 to 1 leads to 2 b, in which a double MeCOH functionalization of Cp* is present with one MeCOH engaged in an interaction with iridium. The structure of 2 b was unambiguously determined in the solid state and in solution by X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Further oxidation led to the opening of Cp* and transformation of the diol into a diketone with one carbonyl coordinated at the metal (2 c). A η(3) interaction between the three non-oxygenated carbons of "ex-Cp*" and iridium is also present in both 2 b and 2 c. Isolated 2 b and mixtures of 2 a-c species were tested in water-oxidation catalysis by using CAN as sacrificial oxidant. They showed substantially the same activity than 1 (turnover frequency values ranged from 9 to 14 min(-1) ). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawal, Humaira Aziz; Asghar, Kashif; Bureik, Matthias; Jalal, Nasir

    2017-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells) that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to pursue this field of science.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  12. CHROMOSOMES OF WOODY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio R Daviña

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of nine subtropical woody species collected in Argentina and Paraguay are reported. The counts tor Coutarea hexandra (2n=52, Inga vera subsp. affinis 2n=26 (Fabaceae and Chorisia speciosa 2n=86 (Bombacaceae are reported for the first time. The chromosome number given for Inga semialata 2n=52 is a new cytotype different from the previously reported. Somatic chromosome numbers of the other taxa studied are: Sesbania punicea 2n=12, S. virgata 2n=12 and Pilocarpus pennatifolius 2n=44 from Argentina

  13. Bacterial Electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Ranran

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), a model strain of electrochemically active bacteria, can transfer electrons from cell to extracellular electron acceptors including Fe(III) (hydro)oxides. It has been reported that several redox species such as cytochromes in membranes and flavins assist...... in the electron transport (ET) processes. However, the oxidization of metal compounds was barely described. Here we report electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] oxidation by MR-1. K4[Fe(CN)6] is a redox inorganic compound and shows a reversible redox process on bare glassy carbon (GCE). This is reflected by a pair...

  14. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    of Pt, were characterized by AFM spectroscopy which indicated that Pt crystallizes preferentially onto previously formed Bi particles. The issue of Bi leaching (dissolution) from PtBi catalysts, and their catalytic effect alongside the HCOOH oxidation is rather unresolved. In order to control Bi....... Catalysts prepared in this way exhibit about 10 times higher activity for formic acid oxidation in comparison to pure Pt, as revealed both by potentiodynamic and quasy-potentiostatic measurements. This high activity is the result of well-balanced ensemble effect induced by Bi-oxide species interrupting Pt...

  15. Oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Claudio A M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Leal, Daniela B R; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Rezer, João F P; de Bairros, André Valle; Jaques, Jeandre Augusto Dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is defined as an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and the capacity of antioxidant defenses. The objective of this work was to investigate OS and antioxidant capacity in pregnant women. Parameters of the oxidative status and antioxidant capacity in serum and whole blood were evaluated in thirty-nine women with normal pregnancy. The assessment of antioxidants indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities (P0.05) in protein carbonylation. This study demonstrates that there is a change in the pro-oxidant and antioxidant defenses associated with body and circulation changes that are inherent to the pregnancy process.

  16. Sucrose tricarboxylate by sonocatalysed TEMPO-mediated oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, S; Thomazeau, C; Joannard, D; Trombotto, S; Descotes, G; Bouchu, A; Queneau, Y

    2000-06-16

    Oxidation of sucrose by the NaOCl/TEMPO system provided sucrose tricarboxylate without the addition of sodium bromide as co-catalyst when high-frequency (500 kHz) ultrasound was applied, in contrast to very limited conversion without sonication. In the presence of sodium bromide, sonication also caused acceleration of the oxidation. The rate increase due to sonication of the oxidant system prior to sucrose addition suggests that ultrasound acts at the level of the formation of the nitrosonium ion, the active oxidising species in the catalytic cycle.

  17. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  18. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  19. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  20. A new automated colorimetric method for measuring total oxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Ozcan

    2005-12-01

    To develop a new, colorimetric and automated method for measuring total oxidation status (TOS). The assay is based on the oxidation of ferrous ion to ferric ion in the presence of various oxidant species in acidic medium and the measurement of the ferric ion by xylenol orange. The oxidation reaction of the assay was enhanced and precipitation of proteins was prevented. In addition, autoxidation of ferrous ion present in the reagent was prevented during storage. The method was applied to an automated analyzer, which was calibrated with hydrogen peroxide and the analytical performance characteristics of the assay were determined. There were important correlations with hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide solutions (r=0.99, Ptotal antioxidant capacity (TAC) (r=-0.66 Ptotal oxidant status.

  1. Evaluation of oxidative stress in hunting dogs during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, A; Luchetti, E; Cardini, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a point that can exceed antioxidant defenses, to cause oxidative stress. The aim of our trials was to evaluate oxidative stress and recovery times in trained dogs during two different hunting exercises, with reactive oxygen metabolites-derivatives (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests. A group of nine privately owned Italian hounds were included. A 20-min aerobic exercise and a 4-h aerobic exercise, after 30 days of rest, were performed by the dogs. Our results show an oxidative stress after exercise due to both the high concentration of oxidants (d-ROMs) and the low level of antioxidant power (BAP). Besides, the recovery time is faster after the 4-h aerobic exercise than the 20-min aerobic exercise. Oxidative stress monitoring during dogs exercise could become an interesting aid to establish ideal adaptation to training. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of five Veronica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, U Sebnem; Saracoglu, Iclal; Inoue, Makoto; Ogihara, Yukio

    2002-04-01

    Biological activities of five Veronica species (Scrophulariaceae), V. cymbalaria, V. hederifolia, V. pectinata var. glandulosa, V. persica and V. polita were studied for their anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Their methanol extracts showed both the inhibitory activity of nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and cytotoxic activity against KB epidermoid carcinoma and B16 melanoma. When the methanol extracts were fractionated between water and chloroform, water fractions significantly inhibited NO production without any cytotoxicity, while chloroform fractions showed cytotoxicity dose-dependently. When the radical scavenging activity was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), water fractions of the five Veronica species scavenged free radicals effectively, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of this species on NO production was due to their radical scavenging activity. On the other hand, chloroform fractions of Veronica species except for V. cymbalaria showed similar cytotoxic activity against KB and B16 melanoma cells.

  3. Non-ammonium reduced nitrogen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dod, R.L.; Gundel, L.A.; Benner, W.H.; Novakov, T.

    1983-08-01

    The traditional belief that ambient aerosol particles contain nitrogen predominantly in the form of inorganic ionic species such as NH/sub 4//sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ was challenged about 10 years ago by results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis (ESCA) of California aerosol particles. A significant fraction (approx. 50%) of the reduced nitrogen was observed to have an oxidation state more reduced than ammonium, characteristic of organic nitrogen species. We have used a recently developed thermal evolved gas analysis method (NO/sub x/) in conjunction with ESCA to confirm the existence of these species in aerosol particles collected in both the United States and Europe. The agreement of EGA and ESCA analyses indicates that these species are found not only on the surface but also throughout the particles. 9 references, 6 figures.

  4. Protection of naturally occurring antioxidants against oxidative damages to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongping; Zhang Zhaoxia; Hao Shumei; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side

    2006-01-01

    One of the most compelling theories explaining age-related deterioration is the free radical theory of aging. It has been shown that reactive oxygen species are involved in oxidative damages to biomolecules and this is related to a number of diseases. Proteins, the second most abundant components of cells (next to water by weight), are now increasingly recognized as major biological targets of oxidative damages. Convincing evidences have indicated that damages to protein have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, and aging. Antioxidant has been the subject of great attention because they are known to lower the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (HCAs) are antioxidants abundant in tea, red wine, fruits, beverages and various medicinal plants. Results showed that they exhibit remarkable activity for scavenging oxidizing radicals and triplet states. The protective effects of four kinds of HCAs on oxidative damages to lysozyme were investigated in our lab. Protein damages induced by two different paradigms: riboflavin-sensitized photooxidation and hydroxyl ( . OH)-mediated oxidation, were investigated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. HCAs were found to inhibit the cross-linking of protein induced by riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. HCAs also exhibited protection effect on lysozyme damage induced by γ-ray irradiation. The rate constants for quenching triplet state of riboflavin by lysozyme and HCAs were obtained using laser flash photolysis. The protective mechanism was proposed based on the dynamic study. HCAs were found to protect protein against oxidation by scavenging oxidizing species and repairing the damaged protein. (authors)

  5. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  7. Save Our Species: Protecting Endangered Species from Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This full-size poster profiles 11 wildlife species that are endangered. Color illustrations of animals and plants are accompanied by narrative describing their habitats and reasons for endangerment. The reverse side of the poster contains information on the Endangered Species Act, why protecting endangered and threatened species is important, how…

  8. Engineering complex oxide interfaces for oxide electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    A complex interplay of physics and chemistry in transition metal oxides determines their electronic, magnetic, and ferroic properties enabling a wide range of applications of these materials. BiFeO_3, a canonical multiferroic system exhibits the interesting feature of enhanced conductivity on

  9. Fiber type-specific nitric oxide protects oxidative myofibers against cachectic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengli Yu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative skeletal muscles are more resistant than glycolytic muscles to cachexia caused by chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism for the protection associated with oxidative phenotype remains elusive. We hypothesized that differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO determine the fiber type susceptibility. Here, we show that intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS in mice resulted in higher level of ROS and greater expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiqitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx/atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1, in glycolytic white vastus lateralis muscle than in oxidative soleus muscle. By contrast, NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNos and antioxidant gene expression were greatly enhanced in oxidative, but not in glycolytic muscles, suggesting that NO mediates protection against muscle wasting. NO donors enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and blocked cytokine/endotoxin-induced MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression in cultured myoblasts and in skeletal muscle in vivo. Our studies reveal a novel protective mechanism in oxidative myofibers mediated by enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and suggest a significant value of enhanced NO signaling as a new therapeutic strategy for cachexia.

  10. Solubility of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 .nH 2 O. The solubility of Tc(IV) is used as a source term in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2+ . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is about (1.49∼1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L.d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide decreases with the increase of pH at pH 10 and is pH independent in the range 2 -8 to 10 -9 mol/L at 2 3 2- concentration. These data could be used to estimate the Tc(IV) solubility for cases where solubility limits transport of technetium in reducing environments of high-level waste repositories. (authors)

  11. Glancing angle x-ray studies of oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    High brightness synchrotron radiation incident at glancing angles has been used to study inhibiting species present in low concentrations in oxide films on aluminum. Glancing incident angle fluorescence measurements give surface-sensitive information on the valence state of elements from the shape of the x-ray absorption edge. Angle-resolved measurements show the depth distribution of the species present. 15 refs., 4 figs

  12. 13 reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nathan Cobley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The human brain consumes 20% of the total basal oxygen (O2 budget to support ATP intensive neuronal activity. Without sufficient O2 to support ATP demands, neuronal activity fails, such that, even transient ischemia is neurodegenerative. While the essentiality of O2 to brain function is clear, how oxidative stress causes neurodegeneration is ambiguous. Ambiguity exists because many of the reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress remain obscure. Many are erroneously understood as the deleterious result of adventitious O2 derived free radical and non-radical species generation. To understand how many reasons underpin oxidative stress, one must first re-cast free radical and non-radical species in a positive light because their deliberate generation enables the brain to achieve critical functions (e.g. synaptic plasticity through redox signalling (i.e. positive functionality. Using free radicals and non-radical derivatives to signal sensitises the brain to oxidative stress when redox signalling goes awry (i.e. negative functionality. To advance mechanistic understanding, we rationalise 13 reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress. Key reasons include inter alia unsaturated lipid enrichment, mitochondria, calcium, glutamate, modest antioxidant defence, redox active transition metals and neurotransmitter auto-oxidation. We review RNA oxidation as an underappreciated cause of oxidative stress. The complex interplay between each reason dictates neuronal susceptibility to oxidative stress in a dynamic context and neural identity dependent manner. Our discourse sets the stage for investigators to interrogate the biochemical basis of oxidative stress in the brain in health and disease.

  13. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  14. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C. Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of oxidative stress in melanoma development, we speculated that this increased susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress (and greater reliance on p16 for suppression of ROS may explain why genetic compromise of p16 is more commonly associated with predisposition to melanoma rather than other cancers. Here we show that the presence of melanin accounts for this differential oxidative stress in normal and p16-depleted melanocytes. Thus the presence of melanin in the skin appears to be a double-edged sword: it protects melanocytes as well as neighboring keratinocytes in the skin through its capacity to absorb UV radiation, but its synthesis in melanocytes results in higher levels of intracellular ROS that may increase melanoma susceptibility.

  15. New species of Malaysian ferns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1962-01-01

    The present paper includes descriptions of several new species of ferns found among recent collections from various parts of Malaysia; also two new combinations of names of species which are of interest on account of their taxonomic history.

  16. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  17. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol developed for soluble chemicals (OPPTS 850.4200) to determine if such an approach might be useful for screening engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and whether there were differences in response across a range of commercially important plant species to two common metal oxide ENMs. Eight of 10 species responded to nTiO2, and 5 species responded to nCeO2. Overall, it appeared that early root growth may be a more sensitive indicator of potential effects from ENM exposure than germination. The observed effects did not always relate to the exposure concentration, indicating that mass-based concentration may not fully explain developmental effects of these two ENMs. The results suggest that nTiO2 and nCeO2 have different effects on early plant growth of agronomic species, which may alter the timing of specific developmental events during their life cycle. In addition, standard germination tests, which are commonly used for toxicity screening of new materials, may not detect the subtle but potentially more important changes associated with early growth and development in terrestrial plants. Engineered nanoparticles (ENMs) have been recognized as valuable components of new technologies and are current

  18. 17O NMR investigation of oxidative degradation in polymers under γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALAM, TODD M.; CELINA, MATHIAS C.; ASSINK, ROGER A.; CLOUGH, ROGER LEE; GILLEN, KENNETH T.

    2000-01-01

    The γ-irradiated-oxidation of pentacontane (C 50 H 102 ) and the polymer polyisoprene was investigated as a function of oxidation level using 17 O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by using 17 O labeled O 2 gas during the γ-irradiation process, details about the oxidative degradation mechanisms can be directly obtained from the analysis of the 17 O NMR spectra. Production of carboxylic acids is the primary oxygen-containing functionality during the oxidation of pentacontane, while ethers and alcohols are the dominant oxidation product observed for polyisoprene. The formation of ester species during the oxidation process is very minor for both materials, with water also being produced in significant amounts during the radiolytic oxidation of polyisoprene. The ability to focus on the oxidative component of the degradation process using 17 O NMR spectroscopy demonstrates the selectivity of this technique over more conventional approaches

  19. Dyslipidaemia & oxidative stress in patients of psoriasis: Emerging cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Asha

    2017-01-01

    >Results: The mean levels of atherogenic lipids [total cholesterol (PInterpretation & conclusions: The study results suggest that LDL oxidation and reactive oxygen species in addition to inflammatory markers may play a pivotal role in inducing atherosclerosis in patients of psoriasis.

  20. Theoretical predictions of arsenic and selenium species under atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan-Pendergast, M.T.; Przybylek, M.; Lindblad, M.; Wilcox, J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    Thermochemical properties of arsenic and selenium species thought to be released into the atmosphere during the coal combustion were examined using ab initio methods. At various levels of theory, calculated geometries and vibrational frequencies of the species were compared with experimental data, where available. Through a comparison of equilibrium constants for a series of gaseous arsenic and selenium oxidation reactions involving OH and HO{sub 2}, five thermodynamically favored reactions were found. In addition, it was determined that all favored reactions were more likely to go to completion tinder tropospheric, rather than stratospheric, conditions.

  1. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. New Malesian species of Viscaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barlow, Bryan A.

    1996-01-01

    Three new Malesian species of Viscaceae are described. Ginalloa flagellaris Barlow is distinguished as a species from New Guinea and New Britain, previously included within G. arnottiana Korthals. Viscum exile Barlow is recognized as a new species endemic to Celebes, related to V. ovalifolium.

  4. Lichen species preference by reindeer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holleman, D F; Luick, J R

    1977-08-01

    The preference by reindeer for five species of lichens commonly found on Central Alaska rangelands was tested under controlled laboratory conditions. Results indicate that reindeer are strongly selective species in their lichen grazing habits. The five tested species ranged as follows in order of decreasing acceptibility: Caldonia alpestris, C. rangiferina, Stereocaulon paschale, Cetraria richardsonii, and Peltigera aphthosa.

  5. 75 FR 78974 - Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ...-XA086 Endangered Species AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) and the regulations governing the taking, importing, and exporting of endangered and threatened species (50 CFR 222-226). Permit...

  6. California Endangered Species Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Los Angeles.

    This document was developed in response to California Senate Bill No. 885, "The Endangered Species Education Project," that called for a statewide program in which schools adopt a local endangered species, research past and current efforts to preserve the species' habitat, develop and implement an action plan to educate the community…

  7. 76 FR 2348 - Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    .... 15596] Endangered Species AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... requested permit has been issued under the authority of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA... endangered and threatened species (50 CFR parts 222-226). The North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher has been...

  8. Detection and Characterization of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Biological Systems by Monitoring Species-Specific Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Micael; Zielonka, Jacek; Karoui, Hakim; Sikora, Adam; Michalski, Radosław; Podsiadły, Radosław; Lopez, Marcos; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Ouari, Olivier

    2018-05-20

    Since the discovery of the superoxide dismutase enzyme, the generation and fate of short-lived oxidizing, nitrosating, nitrating, and halogenating species in biological systems has been of great interest. Despite the significance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in numerous diseases and intracellular signaling, the rigorous detection of ROS and RNS has remained a challenge. Recent Advances: Chemical characterization of the reactions of selected ROS and RNS with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin traps and fluorescent probes led to the establishment of species-specific products, which can be used for specific detection of several forms of ROS and RNS in cell-free systems and in cultured cells in vitro and in animals in vivo. Profiling oxidation products from the ROS and RNS probes provides a rigorous method for detection of those species in biological systems. Formation and detection of species-specific products from the probes enables accurate characterization of the oxidative environment in cells. Measurement of the total signal (fluorescence, chemiluminescence, etc.) intensity does not allow for identification of the ROS/RNS formed. It is critical to identify the products formed by using chromatographic or other rigorous techniques. Product analyses should be accompanied by monitoring of the intracellular probe level, another factor controlling the yield of the product(s) formed. More work is required to characterize the chemical reactivity of the ROS/RNS probes, and to develop new probes/detection approaches enabling real-time, selective monitoring of the specific products formed from the probes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1416-1432.

  9. Electrosmog and species conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: abalmorimartinez@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Despite the widespread use of wireless telephone networks around the world, authorities and researchers have paid little attention to the potential harmful effects of mobile phone radiation on wildlife. This paper briefly reviews the available scientific information on this topic and recommends further studies and specific lines of research to confirm or refute the experimental results to date. Controls must be introduced and technology rendered safe for the environment, particularly, threatened species. - Highlights: • Studies have shown effects in both animals and plants. • Two thirds of the studies reported ecological effects. • There is little research in this area and further research is needed. • The technology must be safe. • Controls should be introduced to mitigate the possible effects.

  10. Management of invasive species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper Sølver; Jensen, Frank

    impact of the establishment of this invasive species is a substantial increase in the number of allergy cases, which we use as a measure of the physical damage. As valuation methods, we use both the cost-of-illness method and the benefit transfer method to quantify the total gross benefits of the two...... policy actions. Based on the idea of an invasion function, we identify the total and average net benefit under both prevention and mitigation. For both policy actions, the total and average net benefits are significantly positive irrespective of the valuation method used; therefore, both prevention...... and mitigation are beneficial policy actions. However, the total and average net benefits under mitigation are larger than the benefits under prevention, implying that the former policy action is more beneficial. Despite this result, we conclude that prevention, not mitigation, shall be used because...

  11. Prices and species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes

    of biodiversity and the appropriate incorporation in stochastic fron-tier models to achieve more realistic measures of production efficiency. We use the empirical example of tobacco production drawing from as well as affecting species diversity in the surrounding forests. We apply a shadow profit distance......In recent decades a significant amount of literature has been produced concerned with establishing a link between production efficiency and environmental efficiency with respect to quantitative modelling. This has been mainly addressed by focusing on the incorporation of undesirable outputs...... or the incorporation of environmentally det-rimental inputs. However, while the debate with respect to linear programming based DEA modelling is already at an advanced stage the corresponding one with respect to stochastic frontier modelling still needs considerable efforts. This contribution fo-cuses on the case...

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Dostert, Catherine; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    T cells are a central component of defenses against pathogens and tumors. Their effector functions are sustained by specific metabolic changes that occur upon activation, and these have been the focus of renewed interest. Energy production inevitably generates unwanted products, namely reactive...... and transcription factors, influencing the outcome of the T cell response. We discuss here how ROS can directly fine-tune metabolism and effector functions of T cells....... oxygen species (ROS), which have long been known to trigger cell death. However, there is now evidence that ROS also act as intracellular signaling molecules both in steady-state and upon antigen recognition. The levels and localization of ROS contribute to the redox modeling of effector proteins...

  13. Oxidation of uraninite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of uraninite and pitchblende annealed at 1200 degrees C in H 2 , and untreated pitchblende were sequentially oxidized in air at 180-190 degrees C, 230 degrees C, and 300 degrees C. Uraninite and untreated pitchblende oxidized to the U 4 O 9 -type oxide, and their x-ray symmetry remained isometric up to 300 degrees C. Reduced pitchblende, after oxidation to UO 2+x and U 4 O 9 -type oxides, transformed into α-U 3 O 8 at 300 degrees C. Two major mechanisms control uraninite and untreated pitchblende stability during oxidation: 1. Th and/or lanthanide elements maintain charge balance and block oxygen interstitials near impurity cations; 2. the uraninite structure saturates with respect to excess and radiation-induced oxygen interstitials. Untreated pitchblende during oxidation behaved similarly to irradiated UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel; whereas, reduced pitchblende resembled non-irradiated UO 2 . An analysis of the data in the literature, as well as our own efforts (XRD, EMPA, SEM, AEM) to identify U 3 O 7 in samples form Cigar Lake, Canada, failed to provide conclusive evidence of the natural occurrence of tetragonal αU 3 O 7 . Most probably, reported occurrences of U 3 O 7 are mixtures of isometric uraninites of slightly different compositions, 45 refs

  14. Stages of polymer transformation during remote plasma oxidation (RPO) at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, P.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2018-04-01

    The interaction of cold temperature plasma sources with materials can be separated into two types: ‘direct’ and ‘remote’ treatments. Compared to the ‘direct’ treatment which involves energetic charged species along with short-lived, strongly oxidative neutral species, ‘remote’ treatment by the long-lived weakly oxidative species is less invasive and better for producing uniformly treated surfaces. In this paper, we examine the prototypical case of remote plasma oxidation (RPO) of polymer materials by employing a surface micro-discharge (in a N2/O2 mixture environment) treatment on polystyrene. Using material characterization techniques including real-time ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the time evolution of polymer film thickness, refractive index, surface, and bulk chemical composition were evaluated. These measurements revealed three consecutive stages of polymer transformation, i.e. surface adsorption and oxidation, bulk film permeation and thickness expansion followed by the material removal as a result of RPO. By correlating the observed film thickness changes with simultaneously obtained chemical information, we found that the three stages were due to the three effects of weakly oxidative species on polymers: (1) surface oxidation and nitrate (R-ONO2) chemisorption, (2) bulk oxidation, and (3) etching. Our results demonstrate that surface adsorption and oxidation, bulk oxidation, and etching can all happen during one continuous plasma treatment. We show that surface nitrate is only adsorbed on the top few nanometers of the polymer surface. The polymer film expansion also provided evidence for the diffusion and reaction of long-lived plasma species in the polymer bulk. Besides, we found that the remote plasma etched surface was relatively rich in O-C=O (ester or carboxylic acid). These findings clarify the roles of long-lived weakly oxidative plasma species on polymers and advance

  15. Impact of environmental chemistry on mycogenic Mn oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Farfan, G. A.; Post, A.; Post, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestrial environments and their presence can have broad environmental consequences. In particular, Mn oxides scavenge nutrients and metals, degrade complex organics, and oxidize a variety of inorganic contaminants. The "reactivity" of Mn oxides, however, is highly dependent upon crystallite size, composition, and structure, which are largely determined by environmental factors such as solution chemistry. It is has been suggested that most Mn oxides in terrestrial and aquatic environments are formed by microbial activity; indeed, a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi have been isolated and their mineral byproducts are consistent with those observed in natural systems. Previous studies showed that Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi produce highly-disordered, nanocrystalline Mn oxides that are structurally similar to synthetic δ-MnO2 or natural vernadite. Unlike related studies with Mn-oxidizing bacteria, Mn oxides produced by these fungi did not "age" or transform to more crystalline mineral phases with time. We hypothesize that fungal growth conditions, in particular the low concentration of cations, are inhibiting secondary mineral formation. The overall goal of this research is to examine the structure and speciation of fungally-precipitated Mn oxides with respect to fungal species, time, and concentration of soluble Mn(II), Na, and Ca - three environmentally relevant cations that promote the transformation of δ-MnO2 to more crystalline mineral phases such as feitknechtite, birnessite, or ranciéite. For this study, we examined the Mn oxides formed by different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (Pyrenochaeta sp., Stagonospora sp., Plectosphaerella cucumerina., and Acremonium strictum). Isolates were grown for 8 or 16 days in a nutrient lean media consisting of yeast extract, trace elements and 0.2 mM MnCl2 supplemented with varying concentrations of Na, Ca, or Mn(II) compounds. The

  16. Viewing oxidative stress through the lens of oxidative signalling rather than damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Ruban, Alexander V; Noctor, Graham

    2017-03-07

    Concepts of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and animals have shifted in recent years from focusing on oxidative damage effects to the current view of ROS as universal signalling metabolites. Rather than having two opposing activities, i.e. damage and signalling, the emerging concept is that all types of oxidative modification/damage are involved in signalling, not least in the induction of repair processes. Examining the multifaceted roles of ROS as crucial cellular signals, we highlight as an example the loss of photosystem II function called photoinhibition, where photoprotection has classically been conflated with oxidative damage. © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society and distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence 4.0 (CC BY).

  17. When do oxide precipitates form during consolidation of oxide dispersion strengthened steels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, A., E-mail: alexis.deschamps@grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); De Geuser, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Malaplate, J.; Sornin, D. [DEN, DANS, DMN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-12-15

    The processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels involves ball milling, where the oxide forming species are driven in solid solution. Precipitation of the nanometre-scale oxides occurs during subsequent annealing and consolidation. This paper reports in-situ Small-Angle X-ray Scattering measurements of the formation of these precipitates during heating of cold-compressed as-milled powders. Clusters are already initially present, and precipitation starts at 300 °C. The maximum precipitate density is achieved at 600 °C, followed by very slow coarsening at higher temperature. These results open the way to understand the coupled evolution of precipitation and crystalline defects during heating and consolidation of ODS steels.

  18. Influence of oxidative stress on disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is ever increasing data indicating the vmast contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, and others. Thus, in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis the primary role is held by reactive oxygen species that are synthetized by endothelial cells of arterial blood vessels, leukocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, native particles of lipoproteins of small density become atherogenic through oxidation caused by reactive oxygen species. The oxidation of small-density lipoproteins stimulates the inflammatory process, and it in turn steps up adhesion and the inflow of monocytes and affects the synthesis and release of numerous proinflammatory cytokines involved in the further course of the process. One of the reasons for the development of arterial hypertension is the simultaneous activation of NAD(PH oxidase and 12/15-lipoxygenase, since it results in the stepped up production of reactive oxygen species. These stimulate the production of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which lead to vascular remodelling and to increased apoptosis of heart muscle cells. Stepped up apoptosis is linked with myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathies and the development of heart failure. The sensitivity of β-cells of the endocrine part of the pancreas to reactive oxygen species favor the naturally low concentrations of the collectors of free radicals in them, as well as an increase in the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, glucosis and lipids that induce a reduction in the mass and function of β-cells. Hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus causes tissue damage through non-enzyme glycosylation of intracellular and extracellular proteins, which results in: reduced enzyme activity, damaged nucleic acid, disrupted natural decomposition of proteins, and activation of cytotoxic pathways. These processes are the basis of the pathogenesis of numerous

  19. An Efficient Glycoblotting-Based Analysis of Oxidized Lipids in Liposomes and a Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Takayuki; Hinou, Hiroshi; Takeda, Seiji; Chiba, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Hui, Shu-Ping

    2017-10-05

    Although widely occurring lipid oxidation, which is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS), produces a variety of oxidized lipids, practical methods to efficiently analyze oxidized lipids remain elusive. Herein, it is shown that the glycoblotting platform can be used to analyze oxidized lipids. Analysis is based on the principle that lipid aldehydes, one of the oxidized lipid species, can be captured selectively, enriched, and detected. Moreover, 3-methyl-1-p-tolyltriazene (MTT) methylates phosphoric and carboxylic acids, and this MTT-mediated methylation is, in combination with conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, an effective method for the structural analysis of oxidized lipids. By using three classes of standards, liposomes, and a lipoprotein, it is demonstrated that glycoblotting represents a powerful approach for focused lipidomics, even in complex macromolecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Recovery of vanadium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, C.P.; Clark, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the recovery of vanadium oxide from molten metal. The invention provides a method for recovering vanadium oxide from molten metal, which includes passing oxygen and at least one coolant gas or shroud into the molten metal by way of at least one elongate lance. The invention also provides an arrangement for the recovery of vanadium oxide from molten metal, which includes at least one elongate lance extending into the molten metal. The lance is provided with at least one elongate bore extending therethrough. Means are provided to allow at least oxygen and at least one coolant gas to pass through the lance and into the molten metal

  1. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause. OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants. ROS are a double-edged sword – they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophsiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathoysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal

  2. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  3. Oxidative stress in ageing of hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a major role in the ageing process. Reactive oxygen species are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage cellular structural membranes, lipids, proteins, and DNA. The body possesses endogenous defence mechanisms, such as antioxidative enzymes and non-enzymatic antioxidative molecules, protecting it from free radicals by reducing and neutralizing them. With age, the production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defence mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to the progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the ageing phenotype. Ageing of hair manifests as decrease of melanocyte function or graying, and decrease in hair production or alopecia. There is circumstantial evidence that oxidative stress may be a pivotal mechanism contributing to hair graying and hair loss. New insights into the role and prevention of oxidative stress could open new strategies for intervention and reversal of the hair graying process and age-dependent alopecia.

  4. Introduced species as evolutionary traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Sherman, P.W.; Blossey, B.; Runge, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species can alter environments in such a way that normal behavioural decision-making rules of native species are no longer adaptive. The evolutionary trap concept provides a useful framework for predicting and managing the impact of harmful invasive species. We discuss how native species can respond to changes in their selective regime via evolution or learning. We also propose novel management strategies to promote the long-term co-existence of native and introduced species in cases where the eradication of the latter is either economically or biologically unrealistic.

  5. Insular species swarm goes underground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Enghoff, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Cylindroiulus Verhoeff, 1894, C. julesvernei and C. oromii, are described from the subterranean ecosystem of Madeira Island, Portugal. Species are illustrated with photographs and diagrammatic drawings. The new species belong to the Cylindroiulus madeirae......-group, an insular species swarm distributed in the archipelagos of Madeira and the Canary Islands. We discuss the differences between the new species and their relatives and present information on the subterranean environment of Madeira. An updated overview of the subterranean biodiversity of millipedes...

  6. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    OpenAIRE

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS produ...

  7. Investigation of uranium molecular species using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curreli, Davide [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    2017-07-12

    The goal of this project is to investigate the dynamic evolution of uranium oxide (UOx) molecular species in a rapidly cooling low-temperature plasma using a coupled experimental and modeling approach. Our purpose is to develop quantitative constraints on the UOx phase chemistry under physical conditions similar to that of a nuclear fireball at the time of debris condensation. This work is motivated by a need to better understand the factors controlling uranium chemical fractionation in post-detonation nuclear debris.

  8. On the Design of Oxide Films, Nanomaterials, and Heterostructures for Solar Water Oxidation Photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronawitter, Coleman Xaver

    , which describes the methodologies to combine the unique and complimentary functional properties of dissimilar oxides to optimize the water photo-oxidation process Experimental results based on an iron(III) oxide-tungsten(VI) oxide system show enhancements associated with the heterostructure, which may indicate the presence of unexpected minority carrier dynamics, as observed additionally by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Next, a new conceptual framework for the design of solar water oxidation photoelectrodes based on the spatially inhomogeneous doping of wide-bandgap metal oxide nanostructures is introduced and experimentally verified. It is found that optical absorption and electronic conduction can be decoupled and optimized by spatially segregating the functional impurity species that facilitate their associated physical processes. In the final chapters of this dissertation the electronic structures of key oxide-oxide interfaces, relevant to the operation of efficient photoanodes, are examined using synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy. These studies indicate that the interfacial regions of electrodes possess distinct electronic structures, which deviate in terms of orbital character and occupancy from those of their constituent bulk oxides. These observations inform methodology to address certain operational deficiencies associated with the use of metal oxides for solar energy conversion applications.

  9. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  10. The naked mole-rat response to oxidative stress: just deal with it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Andziak, Blazej; Yang, Ting; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2013-10-20

    The oxidative stress theory of aging has been the most widely accepted theory of aging providing insights into why we age and die for over 50 years, despite mounting evidence from a multitude of species indicating that there is no direct relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and longevity. Here we explore how different species, including the longest lived rodent, the naked mole-rat, have defied the most predominant aging theory. In the case of extremely long-lived naked mole-rat, levels of ROS production are found to be similar to mice, antioxidant defenses unexceptional, and even under constitutive conditions, naked mole-rats combine a pro-oxidant intracellular milieu with high, steady state levels of oxidative damage. Clearly, naked mole-rats can tolerate this level of oxidative stress and must have mechanisms in place to prevent its translation into potentially lethal diseases. In addition to the naked mole-rat, other species from across the phylogenetic spectrum and even certain mouse strains do not support this theory. Moreover, overexpressing or knocking down antioxidant levels alters levels of oxidative damage and even cancer incidence, but does not modulate lifespan. Perhaps, it is not oxidative stress that modulates healthspan and longevity, but other cytoprotective mechanisms that allow animals to deal with high levels of oxidative damage and stress, and nevertheless live long, relatively healthy lifespans. Studying these mechanisms in uniquely long-lived species, like the naked mole-rat, may help us tease out the key contributors to aging and longevity.

  11. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkal, B.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Gultekin, F.A. [Department of General Surgery, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Guven, B. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Turkcu, U.O. [Mugla School of Health Sciences, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla (Turkey); Bektas, S. [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Can, M. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2013-09-27

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  12. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkal, B.H.; Gultekin, F.A.; Guven, B.; Turkcu, U.O.; Bektas, S.; Can, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage

  13. Electrochemical treatment of an oxide material, application to superconductors, and obtained superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, J.C.; Pouchard, M.; Wattiaux, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention describes the electrochemical treatment of a superconductor oxide so as to modify its stoichiometry. These materials comprise in their anionic lattice oxygenated and hydrogenated species. These treated materials are prepared by an electrochemical process in which the oxide is an electrode in a liquid electrolysis. 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. The bioavailability of four zinc oxide sources and zinc sulphate in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, T.; Diepen, van J.T.M.; Bikker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element for all farm animal species. It is commonly included in animal diets as zinc oxide, zinc sulphate or organically bound zinc. Umicore Zinc Chemicals developed zinc oxide products with different mean particle sizes. Umicore Zinc Chemicals requested Wageningen UR

  15. The role of adsorbates in the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on noble and transition metal electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooys, de A.C.A.; Koper, M.T.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Veen, van J.A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The activity for ammonia oxidation and the intermediates formed during the reaction have been studied on platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, copper, silver and gold electrodes. The activity in the selective oxidation to N-2 is related directly to the nature of the species at the

  16. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  17. The kinetics of nonequilibrium chain plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deminskii, M.A.; Potapkin, B.V.; Rusanov, V.D.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of low-impurity components in air mixtures under heterogeneous conditions was studied. The principal kinetic features of the process were determined on the basis of theoretical analysis of plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media. The analysis also showed that low concentrations of impurities in liquid aerosol particles can be efficiently oxidized via a chain process induced by reactive species formed in the gas

  18. Effects of pH on uranium uptake and oxidative stress responses induced in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Saenen, Eline; Horemans, Nele; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Biermans, Geert; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (U) causes oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown at pH 5.5. However, U speciation and its toxicity strongly depend on environmental parameters, for example pH. It is unknown how different U species determine U uptake and translocation within plants and how they might affect the oxidative defense mechanisms of these plants. The present study analyzed U uptake and oxidative stress-related responses in A. thaliana (Columbia ecotype) under contrasted U chemical speciation ...

  19. The bioavailability of four zinc oxide sources and zinc sulphate in broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Veldkamp, T.; Diepen, van, J.T.M.; Bikker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element for all farm animal species. It is commonly included in animal diets as zinc oxide, zinc sulphate or organically bound zinc. Umicore Zinc Chemicals developed zinc oxide products with different mean particle sizes. Umicore Zinc Chemicals requested Wageningen UR Livestock Research to determine the bioavailability of four zinc oxide sources and zinc sulphate in broiler chickens. A precise estimate of the bioavailability of zinc sources is required both for fulf...

  20. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...