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Sample records for akv murine leukemia

  1. Germ-line reinsertions of AKR murine leukemia virus genomes in Akv-1 congenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, W P; Kozak, C A

    1980-08-01

    Congenic mouse strains NIH,Akv-1 and NIH,Akv-2 carry the two high ecotropic virus-inducing loci of the AKR mouse on the NIH Swiss genetic background. Progeny tests of animals in three separate congenic families show that both Avk-1 and Akv-2 are stably transmitted as classical mendelian loci in these mice. However, during the process of inbreeding, additional chromosomal viral loci were detected in several NIH.Akv-1 sublines. These loci appeared only in the progeny of virus-positive females. They segregate with mendelian ratios, are unlinked to markers on chromsome 7 near Akv-1, and are phenotypically expressed as high-virus-inducing loci. The generation of new loci for viurs induction, no doubt resulting from the rare germ-line reintegration of the endogenous ectropic provirus, represents a unique form of gene duplication and rearrangement.

  2. Akv murine leukemia virus enhances bone tumorigenesis in hMT-c-fos-LTR transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jörg; Krump-Konvalinkova, Vera; Luz, Arne;

    1995-01-01

    hMt-c-fos-LTR transgenic mice (U. Rüther, D. Komitowski, F. R. Schubert, and E. F. Wagner. Oncogene 4, 861–865, 1989) developed bone sarcomas in 20% (3/15) of females at 448 ± 25 days and in 8% (1/12) of males at 523 days. After infection of newborns with Akv, an infectious retrovirus derived fro...

  3. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra;

    2007-01-01

    leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...... to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential...

  4. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...... receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns...

  5. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral enhancer strength

  6. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D;

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared...

  7. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...

  8. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral recombination occurs frequently during reverse transcription of the dimeric RNA genome. By a forced recombination approach based on the transduction of Akv murine leukemia virus vectors harboring a primer binding site knockout mutation and the entire 5' untranslated region, we studied ...

  9. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...... retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown...

  10. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  11. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  12. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  13. Novel transforming genes in murine myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.S. Joosten (Marieke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLeukemia is characterised by an accumulation in the bone marrow of non-functional blood cells arrested at a particular stage of differentiation. In the process of normal hematopoiesis, errors may occur as the result of mutations in the DNA of hematopoietic precursor cells. These genetic

  14. Integration of murine leukemia virus DNA depends on mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, T.; Reynolds, T. C.; Yu, G.; Brown, P O

    1993-01-01

    In synchronized rat or mouse cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), integration of viral DNA and production of viral proteins occur only after the cells traverse mitosis. Integration is blocked when cells are prevented from progressing through mitosis. Viral nucleoprotein complexes isolated from arrested cells contain full-length viral DNA and can integrate this viral DNA in vitro, showing that the block to integration in arrested cells is not due to a lack of mature integra...

  15. Chimeras of receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus/feline leukemia virus B and amphotropic murine leukemia virus reveal different modes of receptor recognition by retrovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Johann, Stephen V; van Zeijl, Marja;

    1995-01-01

    Glvr1 encodes the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related gene Glvr2 encodes the human receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (A-MLVs). The two proteins are 62% identical in their amino acid sequences and are p......Glvr1 encodes the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related gene Glvr2 encodes the human receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (A-MLVs). The two proteins are 62% identical in their amino acid sequences...

  16. Consistent deregulation of gene expression between human and murine MLL-rearrangement leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zejuan; Luo, Roger T.; Mi, Shuangli; Sun, Miao; Ping CHEN; Bao, Jingyue; Neilly, Mary Beth; Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Johnson, Deborah S.; Wang, Lili; Lavau, Catherine; Zhang, Yanming; Tseng, Charles; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Important biological and pathological properties are often conserved across species. Although several mouse leukemia models have been well established, the genes deregulated in both human and murine leukemia cells have not been studied systematically. We performed a serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) analysis on gene expression in both human and murine MLL-ELL or MLL-ENL leukemia cells, and identified 88 genes that appeared to be significantly deregulated in both types of leukemia cell...

  17. Macropinocytosis is the Entry Mechanism of Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutical schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that Murine Leukemia Virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped with the......, or NIH-3T3 cells knocked-down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional...... amphotropic (expands the host range to many mammalian cells) envelope protein gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid-filled vacuoles (up to 10 μm) following collapse of cell surface protrusions and membrane scission. We use drugs or introduction of mutant proteins...

  18. Expression of heterologous genes from an IRES translational cassette in replication competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, M L;

    1999-01-01

    of spliced env mRNA for the SL3-3 derived vector relative to the Akv derived vectors, seemingly contributing to its low replication capacity. The EGFP expressing Akv-MLV was genetically stable for multiple rounds of infection; marker-cassette deletion revertants appeared after several replication rounds...

  19. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  20. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Duch, Mogens R.;

    2003-01-01

    ) and the neomycin phosphotransferase II (Neo) selection marker from the same transcript. Envelope expression was achieved by inserting an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) between the neo and the env genes. We found the structure of the linker between the IRES element and env to be critical for sufficient...

  2. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

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    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  3. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  4. The target cell of transformation is distinct from the leukemia stem cell in murine CALM/AF10 leukemia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S; Krause, A; Vosberg, S; Herold, T; Ksienzyk, B; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Tizazu, B; Chopra, M; Graf, A; Krebs, S; Blum, H; Greif, P A; Vetter, A; Metzeler, K; Rothenberg-Thurley, M; Schneider, M R; Dahlhoff, M; Spiekermann, K; Zimber-Strobl, U; Wolf, E; Bohlander, S K

    2016-05-01

    The CALM/AF10 fusion gene is found in various hematological malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and malignant lymphoma. We have previously identified the leukemia stem cell (LSC) in a CALM/AF10-driven murine bone marrow transplant AML model as B220+ lymphoid cells with B-cell characteristics. To identify the target cell for leukemic transformation or 'cell of origin of leukemia' (COL) in non-disturbed steady-state hematopoiesis, we inserted the CALM/AF10 fusion gene preceded by a loxP-flanked transcriptional stop cassette into the Rosa26 locus. Vav-Cre-induced panhematopoietic expression of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene led to acute leukemia with a median latency of 12 months. Mice expressing CALM/AF10 in the B-lymphoid compartment using Mb1-Cre or CD19-Cre inducer lines did not develop leukemia. Leukemias had a predominantly myeloid phenotype but showed coexpression of the B-cell marker B220, and had clonal B-cell receptor rearrangements. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified an average of two to three additional mutations per leukemia, including activating mutations in known oncogenes such as FLT3 and PTPN11. Our results show that the COL for CALM/AF10 leukemia is a stem or early progenitor cell and not a cell of B-cell lineage with a phenotype similar to that of the LSC in CALM/AF10+ leukemia. PMID:26686248

  5. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, R. W.; Hopkins, N; Fleissner, E

    1980-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three of four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identic...

  6. Common proviral integration region on mouse chromosome 7 in lymphomas and myelogenous leukemias induced by Friend murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, J.; Kozak, C

    1986-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) induces a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms 2 to 12 months after inoculation into newborn mice. These neoplasms are clonal or oligoclonal and contain a small number of F-MuLV insertions in high-molecular-weight DNA. To investigate whether different tumors have proviral insertions in the same region, a provirus-cellular DNA junction fragment from an F-MuLV-induced myelogenous leukemia was cloned in lambda gtWES, and a portion of the flanking cellular DNA ...

  7. Redistribution and modulation of Gross murine leukemia virus antigens induced by specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioachim, H L; Sabbath, M

    1979-01-01

    Gross murine leukemia virus (G-MuLV)-induced rat leukemia cells in tissue culture replicate G-MuLV, express strong virus-associated membrane antigenicity, and are consistently killed by specific antibodies and complement in cytotoxicity tests. To explore the effect of specific antibodies, rat anti-G-MuLV antisera were added to the cultures of leukemia cells for variable periods of time. Redistribution of virus particles as well as of membrane virus antigens in the form of polar patches and caps was observed by electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Substantial decreases in cytotoxicity indexes accompanied these changes. The antigen modulation induced by anti-G-MuLV antibodies in vitro paralleled similar changes obtained in vivo by transplanttion of leukemia cells in rats with high anti-G-MuLV antibody titers. The importance of antigen modulation in this system resides in its direct relationship with the malignant potential of the leukemia cells.

  8. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A;

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in undiff...

  9. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S;

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The t...

  10. Transgene stability for three replication-competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, Maria L; Hansen, Bettina Dencker;

    2004-01-01

    cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  11. Formation of infectious hybrid virions with gibbon ape leukemia virus and human T-cell leukemia virus retroviral envelope glycoproteins and the gag and pol proteins of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    C. Wilson; Reitz, M S; Okayama, H; Eiden, M V

    1989-01-01

    The gibbon ape leukemia virus, SEATO strain, and human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoproteins can be functionally assembled with a Moloney murine leukemia virus core into infectious particles. The envelope-host cell receptor interaction is the major determinant of the host cell specificity for these hybrid virions.

  12. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

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    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  13. Isolation of paralysis-inducing murine leukemia viruses from Friend virus passaged in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, K; Furuta, T

    1984-01-01

    Four clones of murine leukemia viruses (PVC-111, PVC-211, PVC-321, and PVC-441) were isolated from a paralyzed Fischer rat which had been infected with rat-passaged Friend leukemia virus. PVC-211 and PVC-321 viruses induced hind leg paralysis in rats and killed them within 1 month, and PVC-441 did so within 2 months after infection, whereas PVC-111 did not within 4 months. PVC-321 and PVC-441 but not PVC-111 virus grew well in brain and spinal cord media. The viral antigens were found often i...

  14. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  15. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Y.; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-01-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly,...

  16. Role of immunity in age-related resistance to paralysis after murine leukemia virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P M; Robbins, D S; Morse, H C

    1984-01-01

    Resistance to the paralytic effects of a wild mouse (Cas-Br-M) murine leukemia virus infection develops with age and is complete by 10 days of age in susceptible NFS mice. The possibility that cell-mediated immunity plays a significant role in this resistance was suggested by the observation that treatment of 10-day-old mice with antithymocyte serum rendered them susceptible to paralysis. By comparison, mice rendered incapable of generating a humoral immune response by treatment from birth to...

  17. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  18. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, R.W. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY); Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  19. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R W; Hopkins, N; Fleissner, E

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three of four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral DNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded GIX cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  20. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi-Ling Chan; Hon-Yan Yip; Nai-Ki Mak; Kwok-Nam Leung

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2,D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(5):335-342.

  1. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  2. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  3. Genetic mapping of the ecotropic virus-inducing locus Akv-2 of the AKR mouse

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A combination of somatic cell hybridization and standard mendelian breeding techniques was used to map the AKR ecotropic virus inducibility locus Akv-2 to the centromeric end of chromosome 16. This assignment of Akv-2 further emphasizes the endogenous ecotropic retroviruses are inserted at multiple sites in mouse chromosomes.

  4. Emodin Induces Apoptotic Death in Murine Myelomonocytic Leukemia WEHI-3 Cells In Vitro and Enhances Phagocytosis in Leukemia Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chang Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emodin is one of major compounds in rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L., a plant used as herbal medicine in Chinese population. Although many reports have shown that emodin exhibits anticancer activity in many tumor cell types, there is no available information addressing emodin-affected apoptotic responses in the murine leukemia cell line (WEHI-3 and modulation of the immune response in leukemia mice. We investigated that emodin induced cytotoxic effects in vitro and affected WEHI-3 cells in vivo. This study showed that emodin decreased viability and induced DNA fragmentation in WEHI-3 cells. Cells after exposure to emodin for 24 h have shown chromatin condensation and DNA damage. Emodin stimulated the productions of ROS and Ca2+ and reduced the level of ΔΨm by flow cytometry. Our results from Western blotting suggest that emodin triggered apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, caspase cascade-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways. In in vivo study, emodin enhanced the levels of B cells and monocytes, and it also reduced the weights of liver and spleen compared with leukemia mice. Emodin promoted phagocytic activity by monocytes and macrophages in comparison to the leukemia mice group. In conclusions, emodin induced apoptotic death in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells and enhanced phagocytosis in the leukemia animal model.

  5. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  6. Gamma radiation induced leukemia in ICRC strain of mice: a murine model closely simulating human disease for experimental chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S; Vaidya, S; Nerurkar, V; Soman, C

    1997-06-01

    We report here a murine model of transplantable lymphoblastic leukemia closely simulating human disease in albino mice of ICRC strain. Both male and female mice of this strain developed leukemia with high incidence (approximately 70%) following whole body exposure to 60Co Gamma Rays (Dose: 1.5 Gray/Week x4). The latent period for development of leukemia was six months. In the leukemic mice there is marked leucocytosis with presence of lymphoblasts in peripheral blood. These blasts infiltrate various organs like liver, spleen, kidney, lymph nodes, testes and brain, Neoplastic cells are T lymphoblasts expressing weak Thy 1.2 membrane antigen and found sensitive to anticancer drugs. Salient features of the murine model are described.

  7. Detection of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Prostate Biopsy Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the association of Xenotropic murine leukemia virus related virus (XMRV) infection with prostate cancer and compare it with benign prostate hyperplasia. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology and Molecular Pathology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2012. Methodology: XMRV was screened in 50 prostate cancer and 50 benign prostatic hyperplasia biopsies using conventional end-point PCR. Other studied variables were family history of prostate cancer, patients age and Gleason score. Results: XMRV was detected in 4 (8%) of the 50 prostate cancer biopsy specimens compared to none in biopsies with benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, there was no significant statistical association of XMRV infection with the other variables. Conclusion: A low frequency of XMRV infection was found in this case-control study. Men, who harbor XMRV infection, may be at increased risk of prostate cancer but this needs to be investigated further at a larger scale. (author)

  8. p12 tethers the murine leukemia virus pre-integration complex to mitotic chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Elis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The p12 protein of the murine leukemia virus (MLV is a constituent of the pre-integration complex (PIC but its function in this complex remains unknown. We developed an imaging system to monitor MLV PIC trafficking in live cells. This allowed the visualization of PIC docking to mitotic chromosomes and its release upon exit from mitosis. Docking occurred concomitantly with nuclear envelope breakdown and was impaired for PICs of viruses with lethal p12 mutations. Insertion of a heterologous chromatin binding module into p12 of one of these mutants restored PICs attachment to the chromosomes and partially rescued virus replication. Capsid dissociated from wild type PICs in mitotic cells but remained associated with PICs harboring tethering-negative p12 mutants. Altogether, these results explain, in part, MLV restriction to dividing cells and reveal a role for p12 as a factor that tethers MLV PIC to mitotic chromosomes.

  9. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  10. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:26328471

  11. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianhar, Hanhan, E-mail: liadewi@chem.itb.ac.id; Syah, Yana Maolana, E-mail: liadewi@chem.itb.ac.id; Mujahidin, Didin, E-mail: liadewi@chem.itb.ac.id; Hakim, Euis Holisotan, E-mail: liadewi@chem.itb.ac.id; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi, E-mail: liadewi@chem.itb.ac.id [Natural Product Chemistry Research Group, Organic Chemistry Division, Program Study of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganeca 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR ({sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC{sub 50} value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  12. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianhar, Hanhan; Syah, Yana Maolana; Mujahidin, Didin; Hakim, Euis Holisotan; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC50 value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  13. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC50 value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively

  14. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Debrecen); (NCI); (Florida); (Suan Sunandha)

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  15. Protection against retroviral diseases after vaccination is conferred by interference to superinfection with attenuated murine leukemia viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Corbin, A.; Sitbon, M.

    1993-01-01

    Cell cultures expressing a retroviral envelope are relatively resistant to superinfection by retroviruses which bear envelopes using the same receptor. We tested whether this phenomenon, known as interference to superinfection, might confer protection against retroviral diseases. Newborn mice first inoculated with the attenuated strain B3 of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) were protected against severe early hemolytic anemia and nonacute anemiant erythroleukemia induced by the virulent ...

  16. Sodium-Dependent myo-Inositol Transporter 1 Is a Cellular Receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Susan R Ross; Stocking, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. T...

  17. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1999-01-01

    -impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...

  18. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morishita, Ryo [CellFree Sciences Co. Ltd., Ehime University, Venture Business Laboratory, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Matsunaga, Satoko [Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodaki, Tsutomu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ryo, Akihide [Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Nagata, Takashi, E-mail: nagatat@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Katahira, Masato, E-mail: katahira@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, JST, 5-3 Yonban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8666 (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR

  19. Antileukemic effect of zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier in WEHI-3B cell-induced murine leukemia model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman HS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1–3 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Chee Wun How,2 Nazariah Allaudin Zeenathul,1,2 Max Stanley Chartrand,4 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,2,5 Sheau Wei Tan,2 Hemn Hassan Othman,1,3 Zahra Ajdari,6 Farideh Namvar,7 Palanisamy Arulselvan,2 Sharida Fakurazi,2,5 Parvaneh Mehrbod,2 Nasibeh Daneshvar,2 Hasina Begum2 1Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimany, Sulaimany City, Northern Iraq; 4DigiCare Behavioral Research, Casa Grande, AZ, USA; 5Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 6Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 7Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products (INTROP, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Cancer nanotherapy is progressing rapidly with the introduction of many innovative drug delivery systems to replace conventional therapy. Although the antitumor activity of zerumbone (ZER has been reported, there has been no information available on the effect of ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC (ZER-NLC on murine leukemia cells. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of ZER-NLC on murine leukemia induced with WEHI-3B cells were investigated. The results from 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, Hoechst 33342, Annexin V, cell cycle, and caspase activity assays showed that the growth of leukemia cells in vitro was inhibited by ZER-NLC. In addition, outcomes of histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analyses revealed that the number of leukemia cells in the spleen of BALB/c leukemia mice significantly decreased after 4 weeks of oral treatment with various doses of ZER-NLC. Western blotting and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays confirmed the antileukemia effects

  20. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  1. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  2. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-03-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly, within this region there are two key basic amino acids, Arg-83 and Arg-95, that are essential for receptor binding and may interact with a negatively charged residue(s) or with the pi electrons of the aromatic ring on a hydrophobic residue(s) in the basic amino acid transporter protein that is the Mo-MLV ecotropic receptor. Finally, we showed that outside the minimal receptor-binding region at amino acids 2 to 8, there is a region that is essential for postbinding fusion events. PMID:9032341

  3. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses TREX Components for Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshie Sakuma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1 pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  4. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus (XMRV) and the Safety of the Blood Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew D; Cohn, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006, a new virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), was discovered in a cohort of U.S. men with prostate cancer. Soon after this initial finding, XMRV was also detected in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The blood community, which is highly sensitive to the threat of emerging infectious diseases since the HIV/AIDS crisis, recommended indefinite deferral of all blood donors with a history of CFS. As XMRV research progressed, conflicting results emerged regarding the importance of this virus in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer and/or CFS. Molecular biologists traced the development of XMRV to a recombination event in a laboratory mouse that likely occurred circa 1993. The virus was propagated via cell lines derived from a tumor present in this mouse and spread through contamination of laboratory samples. Well-controlled experiments showed that detection of XMRV was due to contaminated samples and was not a marker of or a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS. This paper traces the development of XMRV in the prostate and CFS scientific communities and explores the effect it had on the blood community. PMID:27358491

  5. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

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    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  6. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  7. Therapeutic effect of 5-FC on YCD modified murine P388 leukemia in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Li-min; JIANG Qian-li; WANG Jian-min; HU Xiao-xia; ZHOU Hong; ZHANG Yu-sheng; JIANG Shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of a novel suicide gene system, yeast cytosine deaminase (YCD)/5-Fluorocytosine(5-FC), on P388/DBA murine leukemia model. Methods: P388-YCD-eGFP clone was selected after retrovirus transduction by limited dilution. P388-eGFP and wild type (wt) P388 cells were used as controls. (1) Tumorigenesis study: DBA mice were inoculated intravenously with P388-YCD-eGFP, P388-eGFP or wt P388 cells at a dosage of 5×106 per mouse (n=5). (2) Therapeutic effect study of 5-FC: After inoculation with P388-YCD-eGFP, P388-eGFP or wt P388 cells (n=5), 5-FC was administered at a dosage of 5 μmol/d in each mouse for 2 weeks. 20 μmol/d 5-FC were administered on the 8th day in case 5 μmol/d did not work. The percentage of eGFP+ cells was detected by flow cytometry, frozen section or HE section. Results: Mice in YCD, eGFP and wt P388 group developed leukemia and survived (8.0±1.0) d, (7.6±0.89) d and (7.8±1.64) d (P>0.05), respectively. After being treated with 5-FC for 2 weeks, mice in YCD and eGFP+ groups survived (13.2±1.79) d and (8.4±0.58) d (P<0.05). When 20 μmol/d 5-FC was administered, the percentage of eGFP+ cells dropped from 21.9%±16.09% to 5.4%±5.6%, as well detected by FACS within 24h after treatment. Conclusion: 5-FC can eliminate YCD gene modified cells in vivo when cells are inoculated intravenously. YCD is an efficient suicide gene system in vivo.

  8. Effects of tacrolimus on infection of Friend murine leukemia virus to Fv-4 gene heterozygous mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-min ZHANG; Bao-feng YANG; Hong-xi GU; Xiao-bei CHEN; Zhao-hua ZHONG; Zhi CHENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tacrolimus (FK506) on the infection of Friend murine leukemia virus (Friend MuLV) in vivo. METHODS: Three kinds of mice were used including Friend MuLV-sensitive BALB/c mice, Friend MuLV-resistant Fv-4 gene-homozygous mice (Fv-4 mice), and Friend MuLV-resistant Fv-4 gene-heterozygous mice (Fl mice). Tacrolimus was administrated ip to those mice in every 2 d. Those treated mice were inoculated ip with Friend MuLV once on d 3. The symptoms and viral proliferations in those mice were observed to recognize the Friend MuLV infection. The expression and genotype of Fv-4 gene that resistant against the infection of Friend MuLV were analyzed to confirm the genomic background and related mechanism of the resistance. RESULTS:BALB/c mice and Fl mice, but not Fv-4 mice, appeared obvious early death, spleenomegaly, and viral proliferation after both treatments of viral inoculation and tacrolimus administration, whereas the expression and genotype of Fv-4 gene was not changed in F1 mice and Fv-4 mice with treatment of tacrolimus. Compared to the virusinoculated control, the Friend MuLV-sensitivity of tacrolimus-treated BALB/c mice and the Friend MuLV-resistance of tacrolimus-treated Fv-4 mice were the same as the controls, but only Fl mice became the symptoms and viral proliferation after both treatments. It suggested the Friend MuLV-resistant Fl mice could be converted to be Friend MuLV-sensitive by treatment of tacrolimus, and this conversion was not depended on the expression and genotype of Fv-4 gene. CONCLUSION: Tacrolimus could not inhibit the infection of Friend MuLV in all mice, furthermore,it could enhance the infection of Friend MuLV in F1 mice. The enhancement may be related to the immunosuppressive effect of tacrolimus.

  9. Germline transgenesis and insertional mutagenesis in Schistosoma mansoni mediated by murine leukemia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    Full Text Available Functional studies will facilitate characterization of role and essentiality of newly available genome sequences of the human schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, S. japonicum and S. haematobium. To develop transgenesis as a functional approach for these pathogens, we previously demonstrated that pseudotyped murine leukemia virus (MLV can transduce schistosomes leading to chromosomal integration of reporter transgenes and short hairpin RNA cassettes. Here we investigated vertical transmission of transgenes through the developmental cycle of S. mansoni after introducing transgenes into eggs. Although MLV infection of schistosome eggs from mouse livers was efficient in terms of snail infectivity, >10-fold higher transgene copy numbers were detected in cercariae derived from in vitro laid eggs (IVLE. After infecting snails with miracidia from eggs transduced by MLV, sequencing of genomic DNA from cercariae released from the snails also revealed the presence of transgenes, demonstrating that transgenes had been transmitted through the asexual developmental cycle, and thereby confirming germline transgenesis. High-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA from schistosome populations exposed to MLV mapped widespread and random insertion of transgenes throughout the genome, along each of the autosomes and sex chromosomes, validating the utility of this approach for insertional mutagenesis. In addition, the germline-transmitted transgene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase rescued cultured schistosomules from toxicity of the antibiotic G418, and PCR analysis of eggs resulting from sexual reproduction of the transgenic worms in mice confirmed that retroviral transgenes were transmitted to the next (F1 generation. These findings provide the first description of wide-scale, random insertional mutagenesis of chromosomes and of germline transmission of a transgene in schistosomes. Transgenic lines of schistosomes expressing antibiotic resistance could advance

  10. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), 5' leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3' LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5' LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3' LTR. There is a 5' splice site in the 5' leader sequence and a 3' splice site at the 3' end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  11. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

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    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. RESULTS: All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  12. An Aromatic Side Chain Is Required at Residue 8 of SU for Fusion of Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhaohui; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2004-01-01

    The surface glycoprotein (SU) of most gammaretroviruses contains a conserved histidine at its amino terminus. In ecotropic murine leukemia virus SU, replacement of histidine 8 with arginine (H8R) or deletion of H8 (H8del) abolishes infection and cell-cell fusion but has no effect on binding to the cellular receptor. We report here that an aromatic ring side chain is essential to the function of residue 8. The size of the aromatic ring appears to be important, as does its ability to form a hyd...

  13. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-01-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matr...

  14. Specific Cleavages by RNase H Facilitate Initiation of Plus-Strand RNA Synthesis by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Zhang, Miaohua; Champoux, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful generation, extension, and removal of the plus-strand primer is integral to reverse transcription. For Moloney murine leukemia virus, primer removal at the RNA/DNA junction leaves the 3′ terminus of the plus-strand primer abutting the downstream plus-strand DNA, but this 3′ terminus is not efficiently reutilized for another round of extension. The RNase H cleavage to create the plus-strand primer might similarly result in the 3′ terminus of this primer abutting downstream RNA, yet ...

  15. Role of the Cytoplasmic Tail of Ecotropic Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Env Protein in Fusion Pore Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Melikyan, Grigory B.; Markosyan, Ruben M.; Brener, Sofya A.; Rozenberg, Yanina; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2000-01-01

    Fusion between cells expressing envelope protein (Env) of Moloney murine leukemia virus and target cells were studied by use of video fluorescence microscopy and electrical capacitance measurements. When the full-length 632-amino-acid residue Env was expressed, fusion did not occur at all for 3T3 cells as target and only somewhat for XC6 cells. Expression of Env 616*—a construct of Env with the last 16 amino acid residues (617 to 632; the R peptide) deleted from its C terminus to match the pr...

  16. Molecular cloning of osteoma-inducing replication-competent murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Behnisch, Werner; Schmidt, Jörg;

    1992-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of two replication-competent osteoma-inducing murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock (M. P. Finkel, C. A. Reilly, Jr., B. O. Biskis, and I. L. Greco, p. 353-366, in C. H. G. Price and F. G. M. Ross, ed., Bone--Certain Aspects of Neoplasia, 1973......). Like the original RFB osteoma virus stock, viruses derived from the molecular RFB clones induced multiple osteomas in mice of the CBA/Ca strain. The cloned RFB viruses were indistinguishable by restriction enzyme analysis and by nucleotide sequence analysis of their long-terminal-repeat regions...

  17. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the murine leukemia virus p30 Capsid protein

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dai-Tze; Aiyer, Sriram; Villanueva, Rodrigo A.; Roth, Monica J

    2013-01-01

    Retroviral vectors derived from the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) are widely used as the starting material in the development of vectors for gene therapy and critical in answering questions relating to viral pathogenesis. The p30 capsid (CA) is the major viral core protein and an internal group antigen in MuLV. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for quantitation of MuLV infectious particles with p30 CA core antigen protein. The ELISA was...

  18. Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  19. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV

  1. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakoki, Katsura [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Urology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kamiyama, Haruka [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naoki [Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Microbiology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Matsuyama, Toshifumi [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kubo, Yoshinao, E-mail: yoshinao@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  2. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of a new Amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV-1313

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    Wang Mingwu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLV-A's are naturally occurring, exogenously acquired gammaretroviruses that are indigenous to the Southern California wild mice. These viruses replicate in a wide range of cell types including human cells in vitro and they can cause both hematological and neurological disorders in feral as well as in the inbred laboratory mice. Since MuLV-A's also exhibit discrete interference and neutralization properties, the envelope proteins of these viruses have been extremely useful for studying virus-host cell interactions and as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes into a variety of hosts including human cells. However, the genomic structure of any of the several known MuLV-A's has not been established and the evolutionary relationship of amphotropic retroviruses to the numerous exogenous or endogenous MuLV strains remains elusive. Herein we present a complete genetic structure of a novel amphotropic virus designated MuLV-1313 and demonstrate that this retrovirus together with other MuLV-A's belongs to a distinct molecular, biological and phylogenetic class among the MuLV strains isolated from a large number of the laboratory inbred or feral mice. Results The host range of MuLV-1313 is similar to the previously isolated MuLV-A's except that this virus replicates efficiently in mammalian as well as in chicken cells. Compared to ENV proteins of other MuLV-A's (4070A, 1504A and 10A-1, the gp70 protein of MuLV-1313 exhibits differences in its signal peptides and the proline-rich hinge regions. However, the MuLV-1313 envelope protein is totally unrelated to those present in a broad range of murine retroviruses that have been isolated from various inbred and feral mice globally. Genetic analysis of the entire MuLV-1313 genome by dot plot analyses, which compares each nucleotide of one genome with the corresponding nucleotide of another, revealed that the genome of this virus, with the exception

  3. The kissing-loop motif is a preferred site of 5' leader recombination during replication of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Mikkelsen, J G; Schmidt, J;

    1999-01-01

    A panel of mouse T-cell lymphomas induced by SL3-3 murine leukemia virus (MLV) and three primer binding site mutants thereof (A. H. Lund, J. Schmidt, A. Luz, A. B. Sorensen, M. Duch, and F. S. Pedersen, J. Virol. 73:6117-6122, 1999) were analyzed for the occurrence of recombination between...

  4. Mutational analysis of the putative receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein gp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, B R; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    2000-07-20

    The entry of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to murine cells is mediated by the binding of its envelope glycoprotein gp70 to its receptor, the cationic amino acid transporter MCAT-1. The binding property of the envelope protein lies mainly in the N-terminal half of the protein. To identify essential residues involved in the binding of gp70 to its receptor, we have mutated amino acids within the putative receptor-binding domain of MoMuLV gp70. Changes in the residues P94 and W100 resulted in lower viral titers in comparison to the wild-type virions. Single, double, or triple point mutations involving the residue W100 make the envelope protein severely defective in binding to its receptor. Binding studies and cell fusion experiments with murine XC cells suggested that the residue W100 might play an important role in the process of infection by making contact between gp70 and its receptor. PMID:10891411

  5. Folic acid metabolism in Rauscher murine leukemia and effect of methotrexate on the blood picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi,Hirokuni

    1974-10-01

    Full Text Available Folic acid contents of plasma, whole blood, liver and spleen in Rauscher leukemic mice were estimated. Plasma and liver folate in the leukemic mice was lower than that of normal mice, suggesting that folic acid was deficient in Rauscher leukemia. Folic acid contents in whole blood and spleen were even higher in the leukemic mice than those in normal mice. Clearance study by injecting folic acid intravenously into leukemic mice showed faster disappearance of folic acid from the circulating blood, suggesting that folic acid demand of Rauscher leukemia is increased. Methotrexate administered shortly after inoculation of the virus did not prevent Rauscher leukemia. But anemia, reticulocytosis and erythroblastosis, which are commonly seen 3-4 weeks later in leukemic controls, were not marked as compared with controls. It can be concluded that the requirement of folic acid is greater in Rauscher leukemia than in controls, and methotrexate is effective for preventing hematological changes commonly seen in this type of leukemias.

  6. Atomic resolution structure of Moloney murine leukemia virus matrix protein and its relationship to other retroviral matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Nico; Harlos, Karl; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David; Fry, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Matrix proteins associated with the viral membrane are important in the formation of the viral particle and in virus maturation. The 1.0 A crystal structure of the ecotropic Gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) matrix protein reveals the conserved topology of other retroviral matrix proteins, despite undetectable sequence similarity. The N terminus (normally myristylated) is exposed and adjacent to a basic surface patch, features likely to contribute to membrane binding. The four proteins in the asymmetric unit make varied contacts. The M-MuLV matrix structure is intermediate, between those of the lentiviruses and other retroviruses. The protein fold appears to be maintained, in part, by the conservation of side chain packing, which may provide a useful tool for searching for weak distant similarities in proteins. PMID:12467570

  7. Mutations of the kissing-loop dimerization sequence influence the site specificity of murine leukemia virus recombination in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    2000-01-01

    The genetic information of retroviruses is retained within a dimeric RNA genome held together by intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions near the 5' ends. Coencapsidation of retrovirus-derived RNA molecules allows frequent template switching of the virus-encoded reverse transcriptase during DNA...... synthesis in newly infected cells. We have previously shown that template shifts within the 5' leader of murine leukemia viruses occur preferentially within the kissing stem-loop motif, a cis element crucial for in vitro RNA dimer formation. By use of a forced recombination approach based on single...... specificity of recombination within the highly structured 5' leader region. In addition, we find that an intact kissing-loop sequence favors optimal RNA encapsidation and vector transduction. Our data are consistent with the kissing-loop dimerization model and suggest that a direct intermolecular RNA...

  8. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mai

    Full Text Available Murine leukemia virus (MLV-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1 enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  9. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  10. Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Masetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia.

  11. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of murine myeloid leukemia (ML) by FISH of peripheral blood smear using probe of PU. 1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Ban Nobuhiko; Ishida Yuka; Ohmachi Yasushi; Tsuji Satsuki; Kanda Reiko; Shimada Yoshiya

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Murine myeloid leukemia (ML) provides a good animal model to study the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia in humans. This disease has been cytogenetically characterized by a partial deletion of chromosome 2 with G-banding. For the rapid diagnosis of ML, this study reports a FISH method using spleen cells and peripheral blood smears from ML mice exposed to gamma rays and neutrons with PU.1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor, as a probe. Results Among mice that were tent...

  12. Immunomodulatory and Antioxidant Effects of Purple Sweet Potato Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Virus-Induced Murine Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Baek, Sun Jung; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2015-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of a dietary supplement of purple sweet potato extract (PSPE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient mice were investigated. Mice were divided into six groups: normal control, infected control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection), positive control (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of red ginseng 300 mg/kg), purple sweet potato water extract (PSPWE) (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of PSPE 300 mg/kg), PSP10EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 10% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg), and PSP80EE (LP-BM5 MuLV infection+dietary supplement of 80% ethanol PSPE 300 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of PSPE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and attenuated the suppression of T- and B-cell proliferation and T helper 1/T helper 2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mice. Dietary supplement of PSPE increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The data suggest that PSPE may ameliorate immune dysfunction due to LP-BM5 MuLV infection by modulating antioxidant defense systems. PMID:26076116

  13. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-11-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  14. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N.; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications.

  15. PCR and serology find no association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satterfield Brent C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a retrovirus implicated in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Press releases have suggested that it could contribute to autism spectrum disorder (ASD. In this study we used two PCR assays and one antibody assay to screen 25 blood samples from autistic children born to mothers with CFS and from 20 mixed controls including family members of the children assayed, people with fibromyalgia and people with chronic Lyme disease. Using a real-time PCR assay, we screened an additional 48 South Carolina autism disorder samples, 96 Italian ASD samples, 61 South Carolina ASD samples and 184 healthy controls. Despite having the ability to detect low copy number XMRV DNA in a large background of cellular DNA, none of the PCR assays found any evidence of XMRV infection in blood cells from patients or controls. Further, no anti-XMRV antibodies were detected, ruling out possible low level or abortive infections in blood or in other reservoirs. These results imply that XMRV is not associated with autism.

  16. The "putative" leucine zipper region of murine leukemia virus transmembrane protein (P15e) is essential for viral infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdale, E E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-06-01

    In order to determine the role of the putative leucine zipper region of murine leukemia virus (MLV) transmembrane protein p15E, nine mutations in this region were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. None of these mutations affected the expression or transport of the envelope protein or incorporation into virions. The mutants were analyzed for their ability to infect NIH3T3 cells and to induce cell fusion in a rat XC cell fusion assay. Mutations removing the charge of the hydrophilic residues reduced infectivity in NIH3T3 cells but had either no effect or a minor effect on envelope-induced XC cell fusion. Six mutations of hydrophobic residues of the putative leucine zipper region were constructed; four completely abolished the ability to infect NIH3T3 cells and these mutant envelopes were also unable to induce cell fusion in the XC cell fusion assay. These data demonstrate the absolute requirement for the putative leucine zipper region for both fusion and infection of MLV. PMID:8659102

  17. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-07-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and two regions predicted to form beta strands. The second set of mutations was created within hydrophobic residues to test for the production of virus particles lacking envelope proteins, with the speculation of an involvement of the membrane-spanning region of the envelope protein in incorporation into virus particles. We have found that mutation of the N-terminal polybasic region redirected virus assembly to the cytoplasm, and we show that tryptophan residues may also play a significant role in the intracellular transport of the matrix protein. In total, 21 mutants of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein were produced, but we did not observe any mutant virus particles lacking the envelope glycoproteins, suggesting that a direct interaction between the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and envelope proteins either may not exist or may occur through multiple redundant interactions. PMID:9188629

  18. Immunoprophylactic potential of wheat grass extract on benzene-induced leukemia: An in vivo study on murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelofar Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Wheat grass (Triticum aestivum is a gift of nature given to mankind. A number of scientific research on wheatgrass establishes its anticancer and antioxidant potential. Current work was focused to determine antileukemic effect of wheat grass. Materials and Methods: The commercial wheatgrass powder was extracted with 95% of methanol. Methanol extract of wheat grass was studied for acute oral toxicity as per revised Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Guidelines number 423. Leukemia was successfully induced in Wister rats by intravenous injection of benzene. The blood was collected and analyzed for hematological parameters. Phagocytotic activity of the extract was determined. Results : Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids, phenolics, carbohydrates, and amino acids. From acute toxicity studies, it was found that the methanol extract of wheatgrass was safe up to a dose level of 2000 mg/kg of body weight. Outcomes of hematological parameters in various experimental groups of murine model demonstrated antileukemic effect of extract. Methanol extract of wheatgrass aroused the process of phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans and also demonstrated a significant chemotactic activity at all tested concentrations. Conclusion: In the current work, methanol extract of wheat grass demonstrated antileukemic potential that might be due to the presence of flavonoids and polyphenolics in it. Further isolation, structural characterization of active constituents is necessary to extrapolate the mechanism of action.

  19. Fidelity of target site duplication and sequence preference during integration of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanggu Kim

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV is a new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The causal relationship of XMRV infection to human disease and the mechanism of pathogenicity have not been established. During retrovirus replication, integration of the cDNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cell chromosome is an essential step and involves coordinated joining of the two ends of the linear viral DNA into staggered sites on target DNA. Correct integration produces proviruses that are flanked by a short direct repeat, which varies from 4 to 6 bp among the retroviruses but is invariant for each particular retrovirus. Uncoordinated joining of the two viral DNA ends into target DNA can cause insertions, deletions, or other genomic alterations at the integration site. To determine the fidelity of XMRV integration, cells infected with XMRV were clonally expanded and DNA sequences at the viral-host DNA junctions were determined and analyzed. We found that a majority of the provirus ends were correctly processed and flanked by a 4-bp direct repeat of host DNA. A weak consensus sequence was also detected at the XMRV integration sites. We conclude that integration of XMRV DNA involves a coordinated joining of two viral DNA ends that are spaced 4 bp apart on the target DNA and proceeds with high fidelity.

  20. Sodium-Dependent myo-Inositol Transporter 1 Is a Cellular Receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 Murine Leukemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Ross, Susan R.; Stocking, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. To delineate the molecular mechanisms of its restricted host range and its high fusogenic potential, we initiated studies to characterize the cell surface protein that mediates M813 infection. Screening of the T31 mouse-hamster radiation hybrid panel for M813 infectivity localized the receptor gene to the distal end of mouse chromosome 16. Expression of one of the likely candidate genes (slc5a3) within this region in human cells conferred susceptibility to both M813 infection and M813-induced fusogenicity. slc5a3 encodes sodium myo-inositol transporter 1 (SMIT1), thus adding another sodium-dependent transporter to the growing list of proteins used by MuLVs for cell entry. Characterization of SMIT1 orthologues in different species identified several amino acid variations within two extracellular loops that may restrict susceptibility to M813 infection. PMID:12719585

  1. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the murine leukemia virus p30 capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Tze; Aiyer, Sriram; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Roth, Monica J

    2013-11-01

    Retroviral vectors derived from the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) are widely used as the starting material in the development of vectors for gene therapy and critical in answering questions relating to viral pathogenesis. The p30 capsid (CA) is the major viral core protein and an internal group antigen in MuLV. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for quantitation of MuLV infectious particles with p30 CA core antigen protein. The ELISA was developed using several goat-polyclonal serum against MuLV p30 generated by the NCI as primary antibody and a rat-monoclonal antibody to CA available from ATCC. The MuLV p30 CA antigen was standardized against recombinant MuLV p30 CA expressed from bacteria. The assay is sensitive, accurate and linear within a defined concentration range of CA. Comparison with different MuLV quantitative methods including reporter gene transfer, reverse transcriptase activity assay, and viral RNA quantitative PCR, showed this ELISA protocol to be highly quantifiable within defined ranges, which can be correlated with infectious viral titer. PMID:23810854

  2. Sodium-dependent myo-inositol transporter 1 is a cellular receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Ross, Susan R; Stocking, Carol

    2003-05-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. To delineate the molecular mechanisms of its restricted host range and its high fusogenic potential, we initiated studies to characterize the cell surface protein that mediates M813 infection. Screening of the T31 mouse-hamster radiation hybrid panel for M813 infectivity localized the receptor gene to the distal end of mouse chromosome 16. Expression of one of the likely candidate genes (slc5a3) within this region in human cells conferred susceptibility to both M813 infection and M813-induced fusogenicity. slc5a3 encodes sodium myo-inositol transporter 1 (SMIT1), thus adding another sodium-dependent transporter to the growing list of proteins used by MuLVs for cell entry. Characterization of SMIT1 orthologues in different species identified several amino acid variations within two extracellular loops that may restrict susceptibility to M813 infection.

  3. A Study on Uptake and Localization of Merocyanine 540 (MC540) in Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Chen; N. H. Cheung; S. C. Chen; M. C. Fung; W. N. Leung; N. K. Mak

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular localization of merocyanine 540 (MC540), a photosensitizer commonly used in the photo-inactivation of leukemia cells, was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found for the first time that MC540 not only localized in the plasma membrane but also in the cytoplasm and the nuclear membrane of the murine myeloid leukemia M1 and WEHI 3B (JCS) cells. Exposure of MC540 treated leukemia cells to light under conditions that could cause photobleaching did not cause the redistribution of cell-bound MC540. Rapid localization of MC540 in the cytoplasm was observed 5 minutes after exposure of leukemia cell to MC540, indicating that MC540 could promptly be internalized by these two leukemia cell lines. In contrast, localization of MC540 was limited only to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. These results suggest that the binding pattern of MC540 is cell type dependent and may be related to the efficacy of photosenitization in photodynamic therapy.

  4. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  5. Characterisation of the Leukemic Stem Cell in a Murine Model of CALM/AF10 Positive Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated, that an acute leukemia with a predominantly myeloid phenotype can be propagated by a progenitor with lymphoid characteristics in a mouse model of the t(10;11) (p13;q14) translocation. Mice transplanted with bone marrow retrovirally engineered to express the leukemia specific CALM/AF10 fusion gene consistently developed an acute leukemia with a short latency. The leukemia showed characteristic myeloid features such as the presence of myeloid marker positive cells infilt...

  6. The immunological effect of 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA treatment on murine T-cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    8-Methoxyproralen (8-MOP) plus long-wavelength UV radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) have been used to treat various diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, systemic scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis and rejection of heart transplants. However, the immunological mechanism of this treatment remains unknown. In this report, we investigated the effect of 8-MOP/UVA on the modulation of the immunogenicity of a T-cell leukemia cell line (RL ''male'' 1 cells). The results demonstrated that the stimulator function of the in vitro 8-MOP/UVA-treated RL ''male'' 1 cells was enhanced in both RL ''male'' 1-specific allogeneic and syngeneic immune responses. Furthermore, the enhancement of the immunogenicity of the 8-MOP/UVA-treated RL ''male'' 1 cells was found to be strongly associated with the increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on these 8-MOP/UVA-treated tumor cells. Therefore, our findings suggested that the alteration of the expression of the immune-related cell surface molecules might be an important effect of 8-MOP/UVA treatment on the elevation of the immunogenicity of the 8-MOP/UVA-treated tumor cells. (Author)

  7. Benzoyl peroxide increases UVA-induced plasma membrane damage and lipid oxidation in murine leukemia L1210 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbotson, S H; Lambert, C R; Moran, M N; Lynch, M C; Kochevar, I E

    1998-01-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation induces oxidative stress and cell damage. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether ultraviolet A-induced cell injury was amplified by the presence of a non-ultraviolet A absorbing molecule capable of generating free radicals. Benzoyl peroxide was used as a lipid soluble potential radical-generating agent. Plasma membrane permeability assessed by trypan blue uptake was used to measure cell damage in murine leukemia L1210 cells. Cells were irradiated with a pulsed Nd/YAG laser at 355 nm using 0-160 J per cm2. The ratio of the fluence-response slope in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.3 +/- 2.6. Benzoyl peroxide alone or benzoyl peroxide added after irradiation did not cause increased trypan blue uptake. The ratio of the fluence-response slopes in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.7 +/- 1.4 when cells were irradiated (0-43 J per cm2) with a xenon lamp, filtered to remove wavelengths butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E, and trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative. Lipid oxidation, assessed as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was significantly increased in samples irradiated with ultraviolet A in the presence of benzoyl peroxide at fluences >34 J per cm2. The increased trypan blue uptake and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene. These results suggest that agents not absorbing ultraviolet A radiation may enhance ultraviolet A-initiated oxidative stress in cells. PMID:9424093

  8. 新型人类逆转录病毒XMRV研究进展%Research Progress in Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus A New Human Retrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 杨军; 张苏展; Samson A Chow; 沈肖曹; 张哲; 邓刚; 王丹; 叶剑; 沈学彬; 苏锟楷; 陈欢

    2011-01-01

    异嗜性鼠白血病病毒相关病毒(xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus,XMRV)是迄今发现的第一种可以感染人类的γ逆转录病毒.XMRV最初于2006年在RNaseL基因缺陷型的前列腺癌组织中首次被鉴定,其序列与鼠科白血病病毒(murine leukemia virus,MLV)十分相似.目前,北美、欧洲和亚洲的多个研究机构在人类前列腺癌和慢性疲劳综合征(chronic fatigue syndrome,CFS)患者中检测到XMRV.但不同研究间结果差异很大,XMRV感染与人类疾病之间的相关性尚不明确.该文综述了目前XMRV的相关研究进展,包括与人类疾病的关系、XMRV的基本特征、病理生理学可能的机制等方面,并就今后研究趋势和注意问题进行了讨论.%Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a new gammaretrovirus that can infect humans. Retroviruses are enveloped, positive-sense RNA viruses that are associated with many diseases, such as neoplasias, immunodeficiencies, and neurological disorders. XMRV was originally identified in prostate cancer patients with a deficiency in the antiviral enzyme Rnase L in 2006. The genome of XMRV is closely related to xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV). Recently, several independent groups have detected XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome patients, but the results vary greatly. The link between XMRV and human diseases has not been established. This paper presents and summarizes in detail the characteristics of XMRV, association of XMRV with human diseases, and potential mechanisms of XMRV pathophysiology. We also discuss the future research direction, such as the establishment of standard operation procedure and epidemiologic evidence of an association of XMRV with human diseases in large-scale studies.

  9. Wild mouse ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection of inbred mice: dual-tropic virus expression precedes the onset of paralysis and lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P M; Davidson, W F; Ruscetti, S K; Chused, T M; Morse, H C

    1981-01-01

    NFS/N mice inoculated at birth with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus (Cas-Br-MuLV) obtained from wild mice developed hind limb paralysis beginning at 7 weeks of age and nonthymic lymphomas beginning at more than 20 weeks of age. Studies of 1- to 7-week-old Cas-Br-M MuLV-infected mice showed the following: (i) a marked increase in nonecotropic MuLV-related antigens on spleen cells but not thymocytes beginning at 2 weeks; (ii) the appearance of dual-tropic mink cell focus-forming (MCF) MuLV-r...

  10. Thymoquinone inhibits murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landa Zeenelabdin Ali Salim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymoquinone is an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa (Black Seed. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic effects of thymoquinone on WEHI-3 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cytotoxic effect of thymoquinone was assessed using an MTT assay, while the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone on murine WEHI-3 cell growth was due to the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by chromatin condensation dye, Hoechst 33342 and acridine orange/propidium iodide fluorescent staining. In addition, Annexin V staining for early apoptosis was performed using flowcytometric analysis. Apoptosis was found to be associated with the cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Expression of Bax, Bcl2 and HSP 70 proteins were observed by western blotting. The effects of thymoquinone on BALB/c mice injected with WEHI-3 cells were indicated by the decrease in the body, spleen and liver weights of the animal, as compared to the control. CONCLUSION: Thymoquinone promoted natural killer cell activities. This compound showed high toxicity against WEHI-3 cell line which was confirmed by an increase of the early apoptosis, followed by up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2, and down-regulation of the apoptotic protein, Bax. On the other hand, high reduction of the spleen and liver weight, and significant histopathology study of spleen and liver confirmed that thymoquinone inhibited WEHI-3 growth in the BALB/c mice. Results from this study highlight the potential of thymoquinone to be developed as an anti-leukemic agent.

  11. In vitro detection of mdr1 mRNA in murine leukemia cells with {sup 111}In-labeled oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Jingming; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Biotracer Medicine (Nuclear Medicine), Kanazawa (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro [Kanazawa University, Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa (Japan); Matsushita, Ryo [Kanazawa University, Laboratory for Development of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan); Nomura, Masaaki [Kanazawa University Hospital, Hospital Pharmacy, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    The feasibility of intracellular mdr1 mRNA expression detection with radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) was investigated in the murine leukemia cell line, P388/S, and its subclonal, adriamycin-resistant cell line, P388/R. The expression level of mdr1 mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Existence of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon was assessed via cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (MIBI), a known substrate for P-glycoprotein. A 15-mer phosphorothioate antisense ODN complementary to the sequences located at -1 to 14 of mdr1 mRNA and its corresponding sense ODN were conjugated with the cyclic anhydride of diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (cDTPA) via an amino group linked to the terminal phosphate at the 5' end at pH 8-9. The DTPA-ODN complexes at concentrations of 0.1-17.4 {mu}Mwere reacted with {sup 111}InCl{sub 3} at pH 5 for 1 h. The hybridization affinity of labeled ODN was evaluated with size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography following incubation with the complementary sequence. Cellular uptake of labeled ODN was examined in vitro. Furthermore, enhancing effects of synthetic lipid carriers (Transfast) on transmembrane delivery of ODN were assessed. P388/R cells displayed intense mdr1 mRNA expression in comparison with P388/S cells. {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake in P388/S cells was higher than that in P388/R cells. Specific radioactivity up to 1,634 MBq/nmol was achieved via elevation of added radioactivity relative to ODN molar amount. The hybridization affinity of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN was preserved at approximately 85% irrespective of specific activity. Cellular uptake of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN did not differ from that of sense {sup 111}In-ODN in either P388/S cells or P388/R cells. However, lipid carrier incorporation significantly increased transmembrane delivery of {sup 111}In-ODN; moreover, specific uptake of antisense {sup 111}In-ODN was demonstrated in P388/R

  12. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of murine myeloid leukemia (ML by FISH of peripheral blood smear using probe of PU. 1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ban Nobuhiko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine myeloid leukemia (ML provides a good animal model to study the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia in humans. This disease has been cytogenetically characterized by a partial deletion of chromosome 2 with G-banding. For the rapid diagnosis of ML, this study reports a FISH method using spleen cells and peripheral blood smears from ML mice exposed to gamma rays and neutrons with PU.1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor, as a probe. Results Among mice that were tentatively diagnosed with ML by clinical findings and blood smear examination, 85% carried spleen cells showing the loss of PU.1 although the frequency of these abnormal cells varied among individuals. Mice with very low frequencies of cells showing the loss of one copy of PU.1 (one-PU.1 frequency were later diagnosed pathologically not with ML but with blastic or eosinophilic leukemia. Some neutron-irradiated mice had cells showing translocated PU.1, although no pathological features differentiated these ML mice from ML mice expressing the simple loss of PU.1. The one-PU.1 frequency can be detected from spleen metaphase cells, spleen interphase cells, and blood smears. There was a good correlation between the one-PU.1 frequency in spleen metaphase cells and that in spleen interphase cells (r = 0.96 and between one-PU.1 frequency in spleen interphase cells and that in blood cells (r = 0.83. Conclusion The FISH method was capable of detecting aberration of copy number of the PU.1 gene on murine chromosome 2, and using a peripheral blood smear is more practical and less invasive than conventional pathological diagnosis or the cytogenetic examination of spleen cells.

  13. Safrole suppresses murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vivo, and stimulates macrophage phagocytosis and natural killer cell cytotoxicity in leukemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chun-Shu; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chung, Hsiung-Kwang; Yu, Chien-Chih; Wu, Chih-Chung; Ho, Heng-Chien; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-11-01

    Many anticancer drugs are obtained from phytochemicals and natural products. However, some phytochemicals have mutagenic effects. Safrole, a component of Piper betle inflorescence, has been reported to be a carcinogen. We have previously reported that safrole induced apoptosis in human oral cancer cells in vitro and inhibited the human oral tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Until now, there is no information addressing if safrole promotes immune responses in vivo. To evaluate whether safrole modulated immune function, BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with murine myelomonocytic WEHI-3 leukemia cells to establish leukemia and then were treated with or without safrole at 4 and 16 mg/kg. Animals were sacrificed after 2 weeks post-treatment with safrole for examining the immune cell populations, phagocytosis of macrophages and the natural killer (NK) cells' cytotoxicity. Results indicated that safrole increased the body weight, and decreased the weights of spleen and liver in leukemic mice. Furthermore, safrole promoted the activities of macrophages phagocytosis and NK cells' cytotoxicity in leukemic mice when compared with untreated leukemic mice. After determining the cell marker population, we found that safrole promoted the levels of CD3 (T cells), CD19 (B cells) and Mac-3 (macrophages), but it did not affect CD11b (monocytes) in leukemic mice. In conclusion, safrole altered the immune modulation and inhibited the leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vivo.

  14. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but not 177Lu is effective treatment in a syngeneic murine leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie J Orozco

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11 targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8 ± 21.2 and 156 ± 14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2 ± 9.5 and 199 ± 11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model.

  15. Pronounced hypoxia in models of murine and human leukemia: high efficacy of hypoxia-activated prodrug PR-104.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Benito

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that interactions between leukemia cells and the bone marrow (BM microenvironment promote leukemia cell survival and confer resistance to anti-leukemic drugs. There is evidence that BM microenvironment contains hypoxic areas that confer survival advantage to hematopoietic cells. In the present study we investigated whether hypoxia in leukemic BM contributes to the protective role of the BM microenvironment. We observed a marked expansion of hypoxic BM areas in immunodeficient mice engrafted with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. Consistent with this finding, we found that hypoxia promotes chemoresistance in various ALL derived cell lines. These findings suggest to employ hypoxia-activated prodrugs to eliminate leukemia cells within hypoxic niches. Using several xenograft models, we demonstrated that administration of the hypoxia-activated dinitrobenzamide mustard, PR-104 prolonged survival and decreased leukemia burden of immune-deficient mice injected with primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Together, these findings strongly suggest that targeting hypoxia in leukemic BM is feasible and may significantly improve leukemia therapy.

  16. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations.

  17. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations. PMID:27578986

  18. Extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd influences murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vivo as well as promoting T- and B-cell proliferation in leukemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Chung; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Mau-Hva; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Jing-Pin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-01-01

    Medicinal plants and herbs are widely used in the treatment of various types of cancer in Taiwan, China and many other countries. Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW) has been known as a traditional Chinese medicine for a long time, and possesses various bioactivities and anticancer activity. There is no available information on the effects of HDW extracts in leukemic mice and on immune responses in vivo. In this study, we established murine WEHI-3 leukemia in BALB/c mice and hypothesized that an aqueous HDW extract might have antileukemia effects on leukemic animals in vivo. The major characteristic of leukemic mice was an enlarged spleen after intraperitoneal injection with WEHI-3 cells. HDW extract reduced the weights of spleen and liver, but had no significant effect on body weight in WEHI-3 leukemic mice. HDW extract increased the percentage of CD11b cell surface marker (monocytes), but it reduced the percentage of CD3 (T-cell) and CD19 (B-cell) markers. However, HDW extract did not affect the level of Mac-3 and there was no influence on phagocytosis by macrophages from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the peritoneal cavity in leukemic mice. The isolated splenocytes from HDW extract-treated leukemic mice demonstrated an increase of T- and B-cell proliferation in vivo. Based on these results, HDW extract would appear to have antileukemia activity in WEHI-3 cell-induced leukemia in vivo. PMID:21709007

  19. Fbxl10 overexpression in murine hematopoietic stem cells induces leukemia involving metabolic activation and upregulation of Nsg2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueda, Takeshi; Nagamachi, Akiko; Takubo, Keiyo;

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported deficiency for Samd9L, which was cloned as a candidate gene for -7/7q- syndrome, accelerated leukemia cooperatively with enhanced expression of a histone demethylase F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 10 (Fbxl10, also known as Jhdm1b, Kdm2b, and Ndy1). To further...... investigate the role of Fbxl10 in leukemogenesis, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress Fbxl10 in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Interestingly, Fbxl10 Tg mice developed myeloid or B-lymphoid leukemia with complete penetrance. HSCs from the Tg mice exhibited an accelerated G0/G1 to S transition....... These findings define Fbxl10 as a bona fide oncogene, whose deregulated expression contributes to the development of leukemia involving metabolic proliferative advantage and Nsg2-mediated impaired differentiation....

  20. Effect of multidrug resistance gene-1(mdr1) overexpression on in-vitro uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-sestaMIBI in murine L1210 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Sang Woo; Kang, Do Young; Sohn, Snag Kyun; Lee, Jong Kee; Jun, Soo Han; Lee, Kyu Bo [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To determine whether {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI is recognized by the multidrug resistant P-glycoprotein (Pgp), we have measured quantitatively {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake in cancer cells. The effects of various Pgp reversing agents on cellular {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake were also investigated in the presence of multidrug resistance gene-1 (mdr 1 gene) overexpression. We measured percentage uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI at different incubation temperatures both in mdr1 positive and negative cells. The effects of verapamil, cyclosporin, and dipyridamole on cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI were also evaluated with or without overexpression of mdr1 gene in cultured murine leukemia L1210 cells. The mdr1 gene expressing cell lines were effectively induced in in vitro with continuous application of low-dose adriamycin or vincristine. Cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was higher in mdr1 negative L1210 cells than those of mdr1 positive cells, and higher when incubated in 37 .deg. C than 4 .deg. C. In the presence of verapamil, cyclosporin or dipyridamole, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI uptake was increased upto 604% in mdr1 positive cells. Cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI is lower in leukemia cells over-expressing mdr1 gene, and MDR-reversing agents increase cellular uptake. These results suggest the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used for characterizing Pgp expression and developing MDR-reversing agents in vitro.

  1. Novel quinazolinone MJ-29 triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress and intrinsic apoptosis in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells and inhibits leukemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Cheng Lu

    Full Text Available The present study was to explore the biological responses of the newly compound, MJ-29 in murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and in vivo fates. We focused on the in vitro effects of MJ-29 on ER stress and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic death in WEHI-3 cells, and to hypothesize that MJ-29 might fully impair the orthotopic leukemic mice. Our results indicated that a concentration-dependent decrease of cell viability was shown in MJ-29-treated cells. DNA content was examined utilizing flow cytometry, whereas apoptotic populations were determined using annexin V/PI, DAPI staining and TUNEL assay. Increasing vital factors of mitochondrial dysfunction by MJ-29 were further investigated. Thus, MJ-29-provaked apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells is mediated through the intrinsic pathway. Importantly, intracellular Ca(2+ release and ER stress-associated signaling also contributed to MJ-29-triggered cell apoptosis. We found that MJ-29 stimulated the protein levels of calpain 1, CHOP and p-eIF2α pathways in WEHI-3 cells. In in vivo experiments, intraperitoneal administration of MJ-29 significantly improved the total survival rate, enhanced body weight and attenuated enlarged spleen and liver tissues in leukemic mice. The infiltration of immature myeloblastic cells into splenic red pulp was reduced in MJ-29-treated leukemic mice. Moreover, MJ-29 increased the differentiations of T and B cells but decreased that of macrophages and monocytes. Additionally, MJ-29-stimulated immune responses might be involved in anti-leukemic activity in vivo. Based on these observations, MJ-29 suppresses WEHI-3 cells in vitro and in vivo, and it is proposed that this potent and selective agent could be a new chemotherapeutic candidate for anti-leukemia in the future.

  2. The secondary structure of the R region of a murine leukemia virus is important for stimulation of long terminal repeat-driven gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupelli, L; Okenquist, S A; Trubetskoy, A; Lenz, J

    1998-10-01

    In addition to their role in reverse transcription, the R-region sequences of some retroviruses affect viral transcription. The first 28 nucleotides of the R region within the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine type C retrovirus SL3 were predicted to form a stem-loop structure. We tested whether this structure affected the transcriptional activity of the viral LTR. Mutations that altered either side of the stem and thus disrupted base pairing were generated. These decreased the level of expression of a reporter gene under the control of viral LTR sequences about 5-fold in transient expression assays and 10-fold in cells stably transformed with the LTR-reporter plasmids. We also generated a compensatory mutant in which both the ascending and descending sides of the stem were mutated such that the nucleotide sequence was different but the predicted secondary structure was maintained. Most of the activity of the wild-type SL3 element was restored in this mutant. Thus, the stem-loop structure was important for the maximum activity of the SL3 LTR. Primer extension analysis indicated that the stem-loop structure affected the levels of cytoplasmic RNA. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that deletion of the R region had a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Thus, the main effect of the R-region element was on one or more steps that occurred after the template was transcribed by RNA polymerase. This finding implied that the main function of the R-region element involved RNA processing. R-region sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or mouse mammary tumor virus could not replace the SL3 element. R-region sequences from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus partially substituted for the SL3 sequences. R-region sequences from Moloney murine leukemia virus or feline leukemia virus did function in place of the SL3 element. Thus, the R region element appears to be a general feature of the mammalian type C genus of

  3. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  4. 薯蓣丸对Friend白血病病毒感染小鼠免疫功能的影响%Effect of Shuyu Wan on Immunity of Murine AIDS Induced by Friend Murine Leukemia Virus in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任周新; 许前磊; 李青雅; 左刚

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨薯蓣丸对Friend病毒模型小鼠免疫功能的影响.方法:Friend病毒攻击小鼠,同时施用不同剂量的薯蓣丸进行干预,连续用药3周.取血,处死动物,称取脾脏,酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA法)检测血浆中白细胞介素-2(IL-2),γ-干扰素(IFN-γ),IL-6含量;流式细胞术检测CD4+T,CD8+T细胞百分率.另外,复制环磷酰胺小鼠模型,连续用药5d.观察薯蓣丸对小鼠血液中红细胞数量、白细胞数量、血红蛋白含量的影响.结果:与Friend模型组比较,给药后动物的体重、脾脏质量、脾指数及IL-2,IFN-γ,IL-6含量和CD4 +T,CD8+T细胞百分率均没有显著性差异.与环磷酰胺模型组比较,薯蓣丸能够增加血液中红细胞数量、白细胞数量、血红蛋白含量(P<0.05).结论:薯蓣丸对Friend病毒感染小鼠的免疫功能没有明显的影响.薯蓣丸的刺激红细胞、白细胞生成作用对HIV感染患者有益但促进Friend病毒感染小鼠的病理进程.提示,具有红细胞、白细胞生成作用的中药复方抗HIV的研究,不适宜选择Friend病毒感染模型.%Objective:To observe the effect of Shuyu Wan on the immunity of murine AIDS (MAIDS) induced by the Friend murine leukemia virus ( FLV). Method: Experimental model was established by inoculated intraperitoneally(ip) with FLV in mice. Meanwhile, treatment groups were intragastric administrated with Shuyu Wan. Three weeks later, blood was withdrawn to assay interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon (IFN ) -y and IL-6 by enzyme linked immunosortent assay ( ELISA). Percentage of cluster of differentiation 4 + (CD4 + )T lymphocyte and CD8*T lymphocyte were determined by flow cytometry. In addition, some mice were injected cyclophosphamide (CTX)and given Shuyu Wan for 5 days, then, leucocytes, hemoglobins, and erythrocytes were dectected. Result: FLV model group showed no evident differences to the treatment groups. But compared with CTX group, the amount of leucocytes, hemoglobins, and

  5. Inclusion of Moloney murine leukemia virus elements upstream of the transgene cassette in an E1-deleted adenovirus leads to an unusual genomic integration in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classically, the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs) are considered necessary but not sufficient for retroviral integration. Recently, we reported that inclusion of these and additional elements from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) facilitated transgene integration, without retroviral integrase, when placed in an adenoviral context (AdLTR-luc vector) (Nat. Biotech. 18 (2000), 176; Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 300 (2003), 115). To help understand this nonhomologous DNA recombination event, we constructed another vector, AdELP-luc, with 2.7 kb of MoMLV elements identically placed into an E1-deleted adenovirus type 5 backbone upstream of a luciferase cDNA reporter gene. Unlike AdLTR-luc, no MoMLV elements were placed downstream of the expression cassette. AdELP-luc readily infected epithelial cells in vitro. Southern hybridizations with DNA from cloned cells showed that disruption of the MoMLV sequences occurred. One cell clone, grown in vitro without any special selection medium for 9 months, exhibited stable vector integration and luciferase activity. Importantly, both Southern hybridization and FISH analyses showed that in addition to the MoMLV elements and expression cassette, substantial adenoviral sequence downstream of the luciferase cDNA was genomically integrated. These results suggest that the 2.7 kb of MoMLV sequence included in AdELP-luc have cis-acting functions and mediates an unusual integration event

  6. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca2+ depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol

  7. The effects on the expression of β-lactamase by targeted insertion of a Kirsten murine leukemia virus variant into the coding region of the gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product of this plasmid gene protects bacteria from the antibiotic, ampicillin. When the Kirsten murine leukemia virus variant DNA (MuLV-K-Vd) was inserted into the Pst 1 site of the β-lactamase gene, the transformed bacteria (E. coli, DH5) were resistant to ampicillin. The purpose of this study is to explain the presence of a functional β-lactamase gene with additional nucleotides inserted into the coding region of the gene. The recombinant plasmid codes for a functional β-lactamase. Northern blot analysis of RNA using a 32P-labelled 16mer oligonucleotide as a probe revealed the β-lactamase transcript from the recombinant plasmid to be shorter than the transcript from the wild-type β-lactamase gene. Also, greater levels of β-lactamase mRNA were present in cells containing the recombinant plasmid compared to those containing the wild-type plasmid. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the 3' end of MuLV-K-Vd insert contains sequences of β-lactamase. Nucleic acid sequencing substantiated the hybridization data that β-lactamase sequences are present in the 3' end of MuLV-K-Vd. However, exact sequence homology is not evident

  8. The effects on the expression of. beta. -lactamase by targeted insertion of a Kirsten murine leukemia virus variant into the coding region of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias-Ferrao, V.P.T.

    1988-01-01

    The product of this plasmid gene protects bacteria from the antibiotic, ampicillin. When the Kirsten murine leukemia virus variant DNA (MuLV-K-Vd) was inserted into the Pst 1 site of the {beta}-lactamase gene, the transformed bacteria (E. coli, DH5) were resistant to ampicillin. The purpose of this study is to explain the presence of a functional {beta}-lactamase gene with additional nucleotides inserted into the coding region of the gene. The recombinant plasmid codes for a functional {beta}-lactamase. Northern blot analysis of RNA using a {sup 32}P-labelled 16{sup mer} oligonucleotide as a probe revealed the {beta}-lactamase transcript from the recombinant plasmid to be shorter than the transcript from the wild-type {beta}-lactamase gene. Also, greater levels of {beta}-lactamase mRNA were present in cells containing the recombinant plasmid compared to those containing the wild-type plasmid. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the 3{prime} end of MuLV-K-Vd insert contains sequences of {beta}-lactamase. Nucleic acid sequencing substantiated the hybridization data that {beta}-lactamase sequences are present in the 3{prime} end of MuLV-K-Vd. However, exact sequence homology is not evident.

  9. Electron spin resonance studies on intact cells and isolated lipid droplets from fatty acid-modified L1210 murine leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, I; Burns, C P; Spector, A A

    1982-07-01

    It has been suggested that the formation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets may produce an artifact and be responsible for the differences in membrane physical properties detected in lipid-modified cells using fluorescence polarization or spin label probes. To investigate this, the electron spin resonance spectra of lipid droplets isolated from the cytoplasm of L1210 leukemia cells were compared with spectra obtained from the intact cell. Mice bearing the L1210 leukemia were fed diets containing either 16% sunflower oil or 16% coconut oil in order to modify the fatty acid composition of the tumor. A microsome-rich fraction prepared from L1210 cells grown in animals fed the sunflower oil-rich diet contained more polyenoic fatty acids (52 versus 29%), while microsomes from L1210 cells grown in animals fed the coconut oil-rich diets contained more monoenoic fatty acids (37 versus 12%). The order parameter calculated for lipid droplets labeled with the 5-nitroxystearic acid spin probe was only about one-half that of intact cells, whereas it was similar to that obtained for pure triolein droplets suspended in buffer. Order parameters of the inner hyperfine splittings calculated from the spectra of cells grown in the sunflower oil-fed animals [0.543 +/- 0.001 (S.E.)] were lower than those from the cells grown in animals fed the coconut oil diets (0.555 +/- 0.002) (p less than 0.005). In contrast, the order parameters of the lipid droplets isolated from the cells grown in animals fed sunflower oil (0.303 +/- 0.029) or coconut oil (0.295 +/- 0.021) were not significantly different, indicating that motion of a spin label probe in the highly fluid cytoplasmic lipid droplets is not affected by these types of modifications in cellular fatty acid composition. Therefore, the electron spin resonance changes that are observed in the intact cells cannot be due to localization of the probe in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. These results support the conclusion that the electron spin

  10. IL-35 mitigates murine acute graft-versus-host disease with retention of graft-versus-leukemia effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Wu, Y; Wang, Y; Cai, Y; Hu, B; Bao, G; Fang, H; Zhao, L; Ma, S; Cheng, Q; Song, Y; Liu, Y; Zhu, Z; Chang, H; Yu, X; Sun, A; Zhang, Y; Vignali, D A A; Wu, D; Liu, H

    2015-04-01

    IL-35 is a newly discovered inhibitory cytokine secreted by regulatory T cells (Tregs) and may have therapeutic potential in several inflammatory disorders. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and caused by donor T cells and inflammatory cytokines. The role of IL-35 in aGVHD is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that IL-35 overexpression suppresses CD4(+) effector T-cell activation, leading to a reduction in alloreactive T-cell responses and aGVHD severity. It also leads to the expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the aGVHD target organs. Furthermore, IL-35 overexpression results in a selective decrease in the frequency of Th1 cells and an increase of IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells in aGVHD target tissues. Serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-22 and IL-23 decrease and IL-10 increases in response to IL-35. Most importantly, IL-35 preserves graft-versus-leukemia effect. Finally, aGVHD grade 2-4 patients have decreased serum IL-35 levels comparing with time-matched patients with aGVHD grade 0-1. Our findings indicate that IL-35 has an important role in reducing aGVHD through promoting the expansion of Tregs and repressing Th1 responses, and should be investigated as the therapeutic strategy for aGVHD.

  11. Tissue distribution and timing of appearance of polytropic envelope recombinants during infection with SL3-3 murine leukemia virus or its weakly pathogenic SL3DeltaMyb5 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulli, K; Lobelle-Rich, P A; Trubetskoy, A; Lenz, J; Levy, L S

    2001-01-01

    A time course analysis was performed to identify the sites of formation and timing of appearance of polytropic recombinant viruses following infection of NIH/Swiss mice with the murine retrovirus SL3-3 murine leukemia virus (SL3) or with a weakly pathogenic mutant termed SL3DeltaMyb5. The results indicated that (i) polytropic recombinant viruses occur initially in the thymus of SL3-infected animals, (ii) the timing of appearance of polytropic recombinants in bone marrow is not consistent with their participation in the previously reported formation of transplantable tumor-forming cells at 3 to 4 week postinoculation, and (iii) the efficient generation of recombinant virus is correlated with efficient tumor induction.

  12. Tissue Distribution and Timing of Appearance of Polytropic Envelope Recombinants during Infection with SL3-3 Murine Leukemia Virus or Its Weakly Pathogenic SL3ΔMyb5 Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulli, Karen; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A.; Trubetskoy, Alla; Lenz, Jack; Levy, Laura S.

    2001-01-01

    A time course analysis was performed to identify the sites of formation and timing of appearance of polytropic recombinant viruses following infection of NIH/Swiss mice with the murine retrovirus SL3-3 murine leukemia virus (SL3) or with a weakly pathogenic mutant termed SL3ΔMyb5. The results indicated that (i) polytropic recombinant viruses occur initially in the thymus of SL3-infected animals, (ii) the timing of appearance of polytropic recombinants in bone marrow is not consistent with their participation in the previously reported formation of transplantable tumor-forming cells at 3 to 4 week postinoculation, and (iii) the efficient generation of recombinant virus is correlated with efficient tumor induction. PMID:11119621

  13. High Expression of Human Homologue of Murine Double Minute 4 and the Short Splicing Variant, HDM4-S, in Bone Marrow in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xin; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Zhang, Yu Helen; You, M James; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E

    2016-08-01

    The human homologue of murine double minute 2 (HDM2) and HDM4 negatively regulate p53. HDM4 has not been assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the expression of HDM4 and the short splicing variant, HDM4-S, in bone marrow samples obtained from 85 and 23 patients with AML and MDS, respectively, and 18 negative tumor staging bone marrow samples (used as the control). Immunohistochemical staining showed that HDM4 was overexpressed in 78 AML cases (92%) and 12 MDS cases (52%) compared with 1 stressed bone marrow sample (6%). Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 8 AML and 11 low-grade (LG)-MDS cases confirmed that HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression were also elevated in all AML cases. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression was elevated in 3 (27%) and 10 (91%) LG-MDS cases, respectively. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA levels were higher in those with AML than in those with LG-MDS. In leukemia cell lines, HEL and U937 predominantly expressed HDM4-S. In contrast, NALM6 expressed HDM4 and HDM4-S. Downregulation of HDM4 expression by treatment with small interfering RNA in NALM6 and HEL cells induced p21 expression but not increased apoptotic activity. Our results indicate that HDM4 is a potential therapeutic target in patients with AML or MDS. PMID:27155969

  14. In vitro and in vivo studies of the antineoplastic activity of copper (II) compounds against human leukemia THP-1 and murine melanoma B16-F10 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Layla J H; Bull, Érika S; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Azeredo, Nathalia F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Freitas, William R; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Lemos, Luciana S; Jerdy, Hassan; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2016-11-10

    We investigated the antineoplastic activities of a previously reported copper (II) coordination compound, [Cu(BMPA)Cl2]CH3OH (1), and a new compound, [Cu(HBPA)Cl2]H2O (2), where BMPA is bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine and HBPA is (2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, using various cellular models of human leukemia (THP-1, U937, HL60, Molt-4, JURKAT) and human colon cancer (COLO 205), as well as a murine highly metastatic melanoma (B16-F10) cell line. Compound (2) was characterized using several physical and chemical techniques, including X-ray diffraction studies. The IC50 values of the copper coordination complexes in the human leukemia cell lines ranged from 87.63 ± 1.02 to ≥400 μM at high cell concentrations and from 19.17 ± 1.06 to 97.67 ± 1.23 μM at low cell concentrations. Both compounds induced cell death, which was determined by cell cycle analyses and phosphatidylserine exposure studies. THP-1 cells released cytochrome c to the cytoplasm 12 h after treatment with 400 μM of compound (2). To evaluate the apoptosis pathway induced by compound (2), we measured the activities of initiator caspases 8 and 9 and executioner caspases 3 and 6. The results were suggestive of the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. To investigate the activities of the compounds in vivo, we selected two sensitive cell lines from leukemia (THP-1) and solid tumor (B16-F10) lineages. BALB/c nude bearing THP-1 tumors treated with 12 mg·kg(-1) of compound (2) showed a 92.4% inhibition of tumor growth compared with the control group.

  15. Identification and cloning of a novel isoform of mouse secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, mSLPI-beta, overexpressed in murine leukemias and a highly liver metastatic tumor, IMC-HA1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, M; Arakawa, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-01-01

    Several genes showing transcriptional alteration in a highly liver metastatic murine carcinoma cell line, IMC-HA1, were identified by mRNA differential display system. Among them, a gene identical to mSLPI was isolated as mSLPI-alpha and -beta. They were produced through an alternative splicing. Their full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and their expression in various murine tumors and normal tissues was analysed. The deduced translation product of mSLPI-alpha showed 59% identity to hSLPI. Although mSLPI-beta had the same 103-amino-acid sequence from the carboxyl terminus, the amino terminus showed hydrophilicity opposite mSLPI-alpha or hSLPI. The mSLPI-alpha was expressed ubiquitously in various tumor cell lines. Interestingly, however, mSLPI-beta expression was only observed in P388 and L1210 leukemias and IMC-HA1 cells, and in lower amounts in three normal tissues (thymus, lung and spleen), suggesting that mSLPI, and in particular the unusual splicing product, mSLPI-beta, plays a specific role in these cells, including malignant processes of tumor cells.

  16. Regulation of B cell linker protein transcription by PU.1 and Spi-B in murine B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li S; Sokalski, Kristen M; Hotke, Kathryn; Christie, Darah A; Zarnett, Oren; Piskorz, Jan; Thillainadesan, Gobi; Torchia, Joseph; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2012-10-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is frequently associated with mutations or chromosomal translocations of genes encoding transcription factors. Conditional deletion of genes encoding the E26-transformation-specific transcription factors, PU.1 and Spi-B, in B cells (ΔPB mice) leads to B-ALL in mice at 100% incidence rate and with a median survival of 21 wk. We hypothesized that PU.1 and Spi-B may redundantly activate transcription of genes encoding tumor suppressors in the B cell lineage. Characterization of aging ΔPB mice showed that leukemia cells expressing IL-7R were found in enlarged thymuses. IL-7R-expressing B-ALL cells grew in culture in response to IL-7 and could be maintained as cell lines. Cultured ΔPB cells expressed reduced levels of B cell linker protein (BLNK), a known tumor suppressor gene, compared with controls. The Blnk promoter contained a predicted PU.1 and/or Spi-B binding site that was required for promoter activity and occupied by PU.1 and/or Spi-B as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Restoration of BLNK expression in cultured ΔPB cells opposed IL-7-dependent proliferation and induced early apoptosis. We conclude that the tumor suppressor BLNK is a target of transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B in the B cell lineage.

  17. 异嗜性小鼠白血病病毒相关病毒研究现状及展望%Development History and Research Actuality of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莎娜; 陆颖; 王海平; 王全立

    2012-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), the first gamma retrovirus known to infect humans, was firstly identified in prostate cancer patients. More and more researches suggest that it may be closely related to prostatic cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The present paper as a review will focus on biological characters of XMRV which we have known, epidemiology characteristics and research prospects.%异嗜性小鼠白血病病毒相关病毒(XMRV)是第一个能够感染人类的γ逆转录病毒,该病毒最早在前列腺癌患者体内被发现.越来越多的研究提示,XMRV可能与前列腺癌和慢性疲劳综合征密切相关.我们就已知的XMRV的生物学特征、流行病学特征及研究展望做简要综述.

  18. Characterization of the methotrexate transport pathway in murine L1210 leukemia cells: Involvement of a membrane receptor and a cytosolic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioiodinated photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, Nα-(4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methyl-pteroyl)-Nε-(4-azidosalicylyl)-L-lysine (APA-ASA-Lys), was recently used to identify the plasma membrane derived binding protein involved in the transport of this folate antagonist into murine L1210 cells. The labeled protein has an apparent molecular weight of 46K-48K when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but no such labeling occurs in a methotrexate transport-defective cell line (L1210/R81). Labeling of the total cytosolic protein from disrupted cells, followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography, showed, among other proteins, a 21K band, corresponding to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), in both the parent and R81 cells and a 38K band only in the parent cells. However, when whole cells were UV irradiated at various times at 37 degree C following addition of radiolabeled APA-ASA-Lys, the 38K protein and DHFR were the only cytosolic proteins labeled in the parent cells, while the intact R81 cells showed no labeled cytosolic protein, since the photoprobe is not transported. Further, when the parent cells were treated with a pulse of radiolabeled photoprobe, followed by UV irradiation at different times at 37 degree C, the probe appeared sequentially on the 48K membrane protein and both the 38K cytosolic protein and dihydrofolate reductase. A 48K protein could be detected in both parent L1210 cells and the R81 cells on Western blots using antisera to a membrane folate binding protein from human placenta. These results suggest a vectorial transport of APA-ASA-Lys or methotrexate and reduced folate coenzymes into murine L1210 cells mediated by a 48K integral membrane protein and a 38K cytosolic or peripheral membrane protein. The 38K protein may help in the trafficking of reduced folate coenzymes, shuttling them to various cytosolic targets

  19. PML-RARα co-operates with Sox4 in acute myeloid leukemia development in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Omidvar, Nader; Maunakea, Mei Lin; Jones, Letetia; Sevcikova, Sabina; Yin, Bin; Himmel, Karen L.; Tennant, Thelma R.; Le Beau, Michelle M; Largaespada, David A.; Kogan, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha gene. To identify co-operating pathways to leukemogenesis, we crossed MRP8-PML/RARA transgenic mice with BXH-2 mice which harbor an endogenous murine leukemia virus that causes acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately half of the leukemias that arose in this cross showed features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. We identified 22 proviral insertion sites in acute promyelocytic-l...

  20. A fiber-modified adenoviral vector interacts with immunoevasion molecules of the B7 family at the surface of murine leukemia cells derived from dormant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogée Sophie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor cells can escape the immune system by overexpressing molecules of the B7 family, e.g. B7-H1 (PD-L1 or CD86, which suppresses the anti-tumor T-cell responses through binding to the PD-1 receptor, and similarly for B7.1 (CD80, through binding to CTLA-4. Moreover, direct interactions between B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules are also likely to participate in the immunoevasion mechanism. In this study, we used a mouse model of tumor dormancy, DA1-3b leukemia cells. We previously showed that a minor population of DA1-3b cells persists in equilibrium with the immune system for long periods of time, and that the levels of surface expression of B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules correlates with the dormancy time. We found that leukemia cells DA1-3b/d365 cells, which derived from long-term dormant tumors and overexpressed B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules, were highly permissive to Ad5FB4, a human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vector pseudotyped with chimeric human-bovine fibers. Both B7-H1 and B7.1 were required for Ad5FB4-cell binding and entry, since (i siRNA silencing of one or the other B7 gene transcript resulted in a net decrease in the cell binding and Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365; and (ii plasmid-directed expression of B7.1 and B7-H1 proteins conferred to Ad5FB4-refractory human cells a full permissiveness to this vector. Binding data and flow cytometry analysis suggested that B7.1 and B7-H1 molecules played different roles in Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365, with B7.1 involved in cell attachment of Ad5FB4, and B7-H1 in Ad5FB4 internalization. BRET analysis showed that B7.1 and B7-H1 formed heterodimeric complexes at the cell surface, and that Ad5FB4 penton, the viral capsomere carrying the fiber projection, could negatively interfere with the formation of B7.1/B7-H1 heterodimers, or modify their conformation. As interactors of B7-H1/B7.1 molecules, Ad5FB4 particles and/or their penton capsomeres represent potential therapeutic agents

  1. α-Phellandrene alters expression of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle, and apoptosis in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chang, Shu-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-08-01

    α-phellandrene (α-PA) is a cyclic monoterpene, present in natural plants such as Schinus molle L. α-PA promotes immune responses in mice in vivo. However, there is no available information on whether α-PA affects gene expression in leukemia cells. The present study determined effects of α-PA on expression levels of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptotic cell death in mouse leukemia WEHI-3 cells. WEHI-3 cells were treated with 10 μM α-PA for 24 h, cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted, and gene expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray. Results indicated that α-PA up-regulated 10 genes 4-fold, 13 by over 3-fold and 175 by over 2-fold; 21 genes were down-regulated by over 4-fold, 26 genes by over 3-fold and expression of 204 genes was altered by at leas 2-fold compared with the untreated control cells. DNA damage-associated genes such as DNA damage-inducer transcript 4 and DNA fragmentation factor were up-regulated by 4-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; cell-cycle check point genes such as cyclin G2 and cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor 2D and IA (p21) were up-regulated by over 3-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; apoptosis-associated genes such as BCL2/adenovirus EIB interacting protein 3, XIAP-associated factor 1, BCL2 modifying factor, caspase-8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator were over 2-fold up-regulated. Furthermore, DNA damage-associated gene TATA box binding protein was over 4-fold down-regulated, and D19Ertd652c (DNA segment) over 2-fold down-regulated; cell cycle-associated gene cyclin E2 was over 2-fold down-regulated; apoptosis associated gene growth arrest-specific 5 was over 9-fold down-regulated, Gm5426 (ATP synthase) was over 3-fold down-regulated, and death box polypeptide 33 was over 2-fold down-regulated. Based on these observations, α-PA altered gene expression in WEHI-3 cells in vitro. PMID:25075043

  2. Synergistic Activity of Deguelin and Fludarabine in Cells from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients and in the New Zealand Black Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolleda, Nerea; Losada-Fernandez, Ignacio; Perez-Chacon, Gema; Castejon, Raquel; Rosado, Silvia; Morado, Marta; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria Teresa; Martinez, Andrea; Vargas-Nuñez, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, and despite the improvement achieved by therapeutic regimes developed over the last years still a subset of patients face a rather poor prognosis and will eventually relapse and become refractory to therapy. The natural rotenoid deguelin has been shown to induce apoptosis in several cancer cells and cell lines, including primary human CLL cells, and to act as a chemopreventive agent in animal models of induced carcinogenesis. In this work, we show that deguelin induces apoptosis in vitro in primary human CLL cells and in CLL-like cells from the New Zealand Black (NZB) mouse strain. In both of them, deguelin dowregulates AKT, NFκB and several downstream antiapoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP, BCL2, BCL-XL and survivin), activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Moreover, deguelin inhibits stromal cell-mediated c-Myc upregulation and resistance to fludarabine, increasing fludarabine induced DNA damage. We further show that deguelin has activity in vivo against NZB CLL-like cells in an experimental model of CLL in young NZB mice transplanted with spleen cells from aged NZB mice with lymphoproliferation. Moreover, the combination of deguelin and fludarabine in this model prolonged the survival of transplanted mice at doses of both compounds that were ineffective when administered individually. These results suggest deguelin could have potential for the treatment of human CLL. PMID:27101369

  3. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  4. Construction of recombinants between molecular clones of murine retrovirus MCF 247 and Akv: determinant of an in vitro host range property that maps in the long terminal repeat.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, C A; Wozney, J; Chatis, P A; Hopkins, N.; Hartley, J W

    1985-01-01

    The leukemogenic mink cell focus-forming (MCF) retroviruses such as MCF 247 have biological properties distinct from those of their ecotropic progenitors. Nucleotide sequences encoding portions of gp70, Prp15E, and the long terminal repeat differ between the two types of viruses. To investigate the role of each of these genetic elements in determining the biological properties of MCF viruses, we prepared infectious molecular clones of MCF 247 and generated a set of recombinants between these ...

  5. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  7. Congenital Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Aishwarya; Talukdar, Sewali; Das, Smita; Gogoi, Pabitra Kumar; Das, Damodar; Bhattacharya, Jina

    2013-01-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare but a well-documented disease in which leukemic process is detected at birth or very shortly thereafter (Philip McCoy and Roy Overton, Commun Clin Cytom 22:85–88, 1995). These leukemias represent approximately 0.8 % of all childhood leukemias. We present a case of congenital acute myeloid leukemia manifesting from the very first day of birth. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was suspected by the presence of blasts in the peripheral blood smear and was confirme...

  8. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna Mallya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with leukemia may show involvement of the skin. This skin involvement can be due to infiltration of skin by leukemic cells or it may be a part of nonspecific cutaneous manifestations. Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leucocytes or their precursors into the skin resulting in extensive clinical manifestations. Described mostly in acute myeloid leukemia and acute myelocytic monocytic leukemia, it is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia and is seen mostly during the blast crises. Its presence signals poor prognosis.

  9. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  10. Adult Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Lyall K.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past several years, advances have been made in the classification, diagnosis and therapy of the adult leukemias. The overall prognosis and quality of life have improved greatly, especially for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemias. Some of the advances are described in this article. The importance of the clinical, laboratory and diagnostic tests for acute, chronic granulocytic and chronic lymphocytic leukemia are stressed. The therapy and prognosis for patients with the vari...

  11. Integrase protein of murine leukemia viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wen K.; Ch ang, Lan-Yang; Sundseth, R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, Den-Mei (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The defined mapping of the MuLV integrase in previous work (10,11) has made it possible for us to design and construct molecular clones for expression of this protein in bacteria and thus easily obtain specific antisera. Our repeated inability to isolate the antigenic MuLV virion p46 protein without the use of a denaturing reagent, although preventing us from carrying out the contemplated enzymological studies, would imply that the integration function of MuLV is more stringently controlled at the virion structure level than is that of avian retroviruses. Thus, gene transfer and therapy procedures would be safer to the recipient by using the MuLV retroviral vector than the avian retroviral vector, since p46 is less likely than p32 to be aberrantly released to cause genomic damage to the cell. The apparent cytotoxity of transfection with mammalian expression vectors carrying the integrase gene is not unexpected in situations where a high level of this protein is expressed and accumulated in the nucleus. The apparently incidental emergence of neoplastic phenotypes in some stably transfected cells would cause genomic instability and gene rearrangement of the oncogenic components. This possibility is particularly noteworthy for endogenous retroviral gene elements, in which the control of integrase gene expression and function may not be as stringent as in the infectious MuLVs. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  13. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  14. DNA extraction columns contaminated with murine sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Erlwein

    Full Text Available Sequences of the novel gammaretrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV have been described in human prostate cancer tissue, although the amounts of DNA are low. Furthermore, XMRV sequences and polytropic (p murine leukemia viruses (MLVs have been reported in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. In assessing the prevalence of XMRV in prostate cancer tissue samples we discovered that eluates from naïve DNA purification columns, when subjected to PCR with primers designed to detect genomic mouse DNA contamination, occasionally gave rise to amplification products. Further PCR analysis, using primers to detect XMRV, revealed sequences derived from XMRV and pMLVs from mouse and human DNA and DNA of unspecified origin. Thus, DNA purification columns can present problems when used to detect minute amounts of DNA targets by highly sensitive amplification techniques.

  15. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; ZHANG Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-ju; Kim, Yong-Mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase i...

  16. Understanding Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a second cancer, including melanoma, sarcoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, basal cell cancer, squamous cell skin cancer or myeloma. {{ See your primary care doctor to keep up with other healthcare needs. Understanding Leukemia I page 21 {{ Talk with family and friends about how ...

  17. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  18. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  19. Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) detected by ETV6/RUNX1 FISH screening in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Ribeiro Ney Garcia; Alejandro Mauricio Arancibia; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Marcelo Gerardin Poirot Land; Maria Luiza Macedo Silva

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that usually define high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia are the t(9;22)/ breakpoint cluster region protein-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, hypodiploid with < 44 chromosomes and 11q23/ myeloid/lymphoid leukemia gene rearrangements. The spectrum of acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic abnormalities is nevertheless rapidly expanding. Therefore, newly described chromosomal aberrations are likely to have an impact on clinical care in the near future. R...

  20. E2a/Pbx1 Induces the Rapid Proliferation of Stem Cell Factor-Dependent Murine Pro-T Cells That Cause Acute T-Lymphoid or Myeloid Leukemias in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sykes, David B.; Kamps, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    Oncoprotein E2a/Pbx1 is produced by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. E2a/Pbx1 blocks differentiation of primary myeloid progenitors but, paradoxically, induces apoptosis in established pre-B-cell lines, and no transforming function of E2a/Pbx1 has been reported in cultured lymphoid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that E2a/Pbx1 induces immortal proliferation of stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent pro-T thymocytes by a mechanism dependent upon bo...

  1. Leukemia revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  2. Leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately

  3. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  4. Kelainan Hemostasis pada Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelly Dia Rofinda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Leukemia adalah penyakit keganasan pada jaringan hematopoietik yang ditandai denganpenggantian elemen sumsum tulang normal oleh sel darah abnormal atau sel leukemik. Salah satu manifestasi klinisdari leukemia adalah perdarahan yang disebabkan oleh berbagai kelainan hemostasis.Kelainan hemostasis yang dapat terjadi pada leukemia berupa trombositopenia, disfungsi trombosit,koagulasi intravaskuler diseminata, defek protein koagulasi, fibrinolisis primer dan trombosis. Patogenesis danpatofosiologi kelainan hemostasis pada leukemia tersebut terjadi dengan berbagai mekanisme.Kata kunci: leukemia, kelainan hemostasisAbstractBackground: AbstractLeukemia is a malignancy of hematopoietic tissue which is characterized bysubstituted of bone marrow element with abnormal blood cell or leukemic cell. One of clinical manifestation ofleukemia is bleeding that is caused by several hemostasis disorders.Hemostasis disorders in leukemia such asthrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulation protein defect, primaryfibrinolysis and thrombosis. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of thus hemostasis disorders in leukemia occur withdifferent mechanism.Keywords: leukemia, hemostasis disorder

  5. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  6. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  7. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  10. Study for Interrelationship Between Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two different strains of human herpes simplex virus type 2(HHSV-2)and /or murine leukemia virus(MLV)were inoculated into newborn mice.In mice of mixed infection with MLV plus HHSV-2(333) or MLV plus HHSV-2(Wu)incidences of leukemia were respectively 79.16% and 75.00%,and in those inoculated with MLV alone were 41.02% and 44.74% in the experiment for 3 months.The differences of incidences between the two conditions were highly significant(p<0.01).On the contrary,no leukemia was detected in mice that were inoculated with HHSV-2(333) or HHSV-2(Wu)alone and in controls.Leukemia developing time of mice infected with two viruses was earlier than with MLV alone.It is obvious that the induction of murine leukemia resulted from infection of MLV and was independent of HHSV-2(333) and HHSV-2(Wu).Both risen incidences and shortened latencies of murine leukemia were in close relationship with infection of HHSV-2(333) and HHSV-2(Wu).

  11. Distribution of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen in nonhematopoietic tissues

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), as defined by J-5 murine monoclonal antibodies, was detected on renal tubular and glomerular cells from fetal and adult donors by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. CALLA could also be detected on epithelial cells of the fetal small intestine and on myoepithelial cells of adult breast but not on myoepithelial cells of the salivary gland. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of immunoprecipitated 125I-l...

  12. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  13. Forced Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 Confers Resistance of Pro-B Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia to Gleevec Treatment▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Tracy C.; Chavarria-Smith, Joseph E.; Huang, Dan; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding c-ABL, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase, is involved in a chromosomal translocation resulting in expression of a BCR-Abl fusion protein that causes most chronic myelogenous and some acute lymphocytic leukemias (CML and ALL) in humans. The Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) expresses an alternative form of c-Abl, v-Abl, that transforms murine pro-B cells, resulting in acute leukemia and providing an experimental model for human disease. Gleevec (STI571) inhibits the ...

  14. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  15. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kalal Iravathy Goud; Seetha Dayakar; Prasad, S. V. S. S.; Koteshwar N Rao; Amina Shaik; S Vanjakshi

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, coomonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21) of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23) of chromoso...

  16. Steroid resistance in leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Darshan S; Kumar, Raj

    2013-01-01

    There are several types of leukemia which are characterized by the abnormal growth of cells from the myeloid or lymphoid lineage. Because of their lympholytic actions, glucocorticoids (GCs) are included in many therapeutic regimens for the treatment of various forms of leukemia. Although a significant number of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients respond well to GC treatment during initial phases; prolonged treatments sometimes results in steroid-resistance. The exact mechanism of this resi...

  17. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  18. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red blood cells, or platelets. Hybrid or mixed lineage leukemia: In these rare leukemias, the cells have ... from too many white blood cells in the lungs), and an enlarged spleen and lymph nodes. Last Medical Review: ... Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

  19. Congenital Leukemia Initially Presenting with Leukemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Sezgin Evim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital leukemia represents less than 1% of childhood leukemia. Its prognosis is poor. Myeloid form is the most common type, and leukemia cutis has been observed in 25-30% of the patients. These skin lesions are defined as ‘blueberry muffin’ type which are blue-violaceous and usually multiple and diffuse nodules. Case Report: She had diffuse blue-violaceous nodules since birth. She hospitalized due to sepsis for 35 days. She was referred to our center with the suspicion of immune deficiency. The initial physical findings were severe pallor, diffuse blue-violaceous subcutanose nodules and hepatosplenomegaly. The leucocyte count was found 363 000/mm3. Acute monositer leukemia (AML-M5 was determined with morphologic and flow cytometric evaluation of the peripheral blood. Conclusion: Congenital leukemia must be thought in differential diagnosis from other underlying disease presenting with blueberry muffin skin lesions. (Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2012; 10: 103-6

  20. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  1. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    OpenAIRE

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires...

  2. Collateral methotrexate resistance in cisplatin-selected murine leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to anticancer drugs is a major cause of failure of many therapeutic protocols. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The exact mechanism depends upon the drug of interest as well as the tumor type treated. While studying a cell line selected for its resistance to cisplatin we noted that the cells expressed a >25,000-fold collateral resistance to methotrexate. Given the magnitude of this resistance we elected to investigate this intriguing collateral resistance. From a series of investigations we have identified an alteration in a membrane protein of the resistant cell as compared to the sensitive cells that could be the primary mechanism of resistance. Our studies reviewed here indicate decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein (molecular mass = 66 in the resistant cells, which results in little or no transfer of methotrexate from the medium into the cell. Since this is a relatively novel function for tyrosine phosphorylation, this information may provide insight into possible pharmacological approaches to modify therapeutic regimens by analyzing the status of this protein in tumor samples for a better survival of the cancer patients.

  3. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  4. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Cancer Statistics: Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... living with leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  6. Simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay for human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed to determine detergent-extracted human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens. In the assay, 96-well microtiter plates are coated with human leukemia cell membrane antigens containing a T cell leukemia or a non-T cell leukemia antigen in the presence of a detergent, and treated with 1.6% bovine serum albumin solution. The coated antigens were reacted with an appropriate murine monoclonal antibody (mAb). The bound mAb is determined by a second reaction with 125I-labeled F(ab')2 of goat anti-mouse Ig. The best antigen dose-dependent antibody binding results were obtained using the plates coated with antigens in the presence of taurocholate. In addition, the usefulness of the present assay with taurocholate during the purification of the antigens was demonstrated. (Auth.)

  7. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  8. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  10. Extended minus-strand DNA as template for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer in recombinational rescue of primer binding site-modified retroviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Dybkaer, K;

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated recombinational rescue of primer binding site (PBS)-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors involving initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and template switching during cDNA synthesis to obtain PBS complementarity in second-strand transfer of...... mutated PBS during minus-strand synthesis, and subsequent second-strand transfer mediated by the R-U5 complementarity of the plus strand and the extended minus-strand DNA acceptor template. Mechanisms for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer and its possible role in retrovirus replication and evolution...

  11. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  12. Stages of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  13. Chemical exposure and leukemia clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper draws attention to the heterogeneous distribution of leukemia in childhood and in adults. The topic of cluster reports and generalized clustering is addressed. These issues are applied to what is known of the risk factor for both adult and childhood leukemia. Finally, the significance of parental occupational exposure and childhood leukemia is covered. (author). 23 refs

  14. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was re...

  16. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Classified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also form the basis for treating these leukemias. Markers on the leukemia cells If the leukemia cells ... no signs or symptoms of the disease. A molecular complete remission means there is no evidence of ...

  17. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  19. The PML domain of PML-RARα blocks senescence to promote leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Katharina; Wodrich, Harald; Haschke, Alexander; Ocampo, Corinne; Harder, Lena; Gieseke, Friederike; Pollmann, Annika; Dierck, Kevin; Prall, Sebastian; Staege, Hannah; Ma, Hui; Horstmann, Martin A; Evans, Ronald M; Sternsdorf, Thomas

    2014-08-19

    In most acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cases, translocons produce a promyelocytic leukemia protein-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) fusion gene. Although expression of the human PML fusion in mice promotes leukemia, its efficiency is rather low. Unexpectedly, we find that simply replacing the human PML fusion with its mouse counterpart results in a murine PML-RARα (mPR) hybrid protein that is transformed into a significantly more leukemogenic oncoprotein. Using this more potent isoform, we show that mPR promotes immortalization by preventing cellular senescence, impeding up-regulation of both the p21 and p19(ARF) cell-cycle regulators. This induction coincides with a loss of the cancer-associated ATRX/Daxx-histone H3.3 predisposition complex and suggests inhibition of senescence as a targetable mechanism in APL therapy. PMID:25092303

  20. The PML domain of PML–RARα blocks senescence to promote leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Katharina; Wodrich, Harald; Haschke, Alexander; Ocampo, Corinne; Harder, Lena; Gieseke, Friederike; Pollmann, Annika; Dierck, Kevin; Prall, Sebastian; Staege, Hannah; Ma, Hui; Horstmann, Martin A.; Evans, Ronald M.; Sternsdorf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In most acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cases, translocons produce a promyelocytic leukemia protein–retinoic acid receptor α (PML–RARα) fusion gene. Although expression of the human PML fusion in mice promotes leukemia, its efficiency is rather low. Unexpectedly, we find that simply replacing the human PML fusion with its mouse counterpart results in a murine PML–RARα (mPR) hybrid protein that is transformed into a significantly more leukemogenic oncoprotein. Using this more potent isoform, we show that mPR promotes immortalization by preventing cellular senescence, impeding up-regulation of both the p21 and p19ARF cell-cycle regulators. This induction coincides with a loss of the cancer-associated ATRX/Daxx–histone H3.3 predisposition complex and suggests inhibition of senescence as a targetable mechanism in APL therapy. PMID:25092303

  1. Sox4 is a key oncogenic target in C/EBPα mutant acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Amabile, Giovanni; Yang, Henry; Staber, Philipp B; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Diruscio, Annalisa; Welner, Robert S; Ebralidze, Alexander; Zhang, Junyan; Levantini, Elena; Lefebvre, Véronique; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Nerlov, Claus; Cammenga, Jörg; Saez, Borja; Scadden, David T; Bonifer, Constanze; Ye, Min; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-11-11

    Mutation or epigenetic silencing of the transcription factor C/EBPα is observed in ∼10% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In both cases, a common global gene expression profile is observed, but downstream targets relevant for leukemogenesis are not known. Here, we identify Sox4 as a direct target of C/EBPα whereby its expression is inversely correlated with C/EBPα activity. Downregulation of Sox4 abrogated increased self-renewal of leukemic cells and restored their differentiation. Gene expression profiles of leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) from both Sox4 overexpression and murine C/EBPα mutant AML models clustered together but differed from other types of AML. Our data demonstrate that Sox4 overexpression resulting from C/EBPα inactivation contributes to the development of leukemia with a distinct LIC phenotype.

  2. Regulating the leukemia stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are responsible for sustaining and propagating malignant disease, and, as such, are promising targets for therapy. Studies of human LSCs have served an important role in defining the major tenets of the cancer stem cell model, which center on the frequencies of cancer stem cells, their potential hierarchical organization, and their degree of maturation. LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have recently been studied using mouse syngeneic models of leukemia induced b...

  3. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    OpenAIRE

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  4. INDUCTION OF IMMUNE RESPONSE BY IL-6 GENE-MODIFIED LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Xuetao; Ge Lingfu; Ju Dian Wen; Yu Yizhi; Tao Qun; Zhang Weiping

    1998-01-01

    Human IL-6 gene was transduced into FBL-3murine erythroleukemia cells in vitro by calcium phosphate co-participation. After selection in the presence of G418, limiting dilution and biological activity assay, G418resistant clone that secreted the highest level of IL-6(225.6 U/ml) was selected out of 24 IL-6-secreting clones.The FBL-3 cells secreting the highest level of IL-6 (FBL-3-IL-6) showed decreased growth potential and clonogenicity in vitro. Inhibition of cell growth and clone formation was found to be closely related to the level of IL-6 secretion. FBL-3-IL-6 cells grew more slowly than wild-type FBL-3 leukemia cells and FBL-3 cells secreting lower level of IL-6 (21.3 U/ml) when inoculated s.c. into C57BL/6 mice. The mice inoculated with FBL-3-IL-6 cells showed prolonged survival period than those inoculated with control leukemia cells. Increased cytotoxic activities of splenic NK and CTL were found in mice inoculated with FBL-3-IL-6 cells. The secretions of IL-2, TNF and GM-CSF from murine splenocytes were also found to be greatly elevated after the inoculation of FBL-3-IL-6leukemia cells. These data suggested that transduction of IL-6 gene into FBL-3 cells magnificently decreased the tumorigenicity and increased the immunogenicity of the leukemia cells, could induce specific and nonspecific antitumor immune responses. IL-6 gene-modified leukemia cells might be of great interests to be used as vaccine for the treatment of leukemia.

  5. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Plasma cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gertz, Moria A.; Buadi, Francis K.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and sple...

  7. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  8. Molecular genetics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Gale, Robert Peter; Xiao, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    According to the 2008 World Health Organization classification, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia are rare diseases. The remarkable progress in our understanding of the molecular genetics of myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms has made it clear that there are some specific genetic abnormalities in these 3 rare diseases. At the same time, there is considerable overlap among these disord...

  9. Overview on available animal models for application in leukemia research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term ''leukemia'' encompasses a group of diseases with a variable clinical and pathological presentation. Its cellular origin, its biology and the underlying molecular genetic alterations determine the very variable and individual disease phenotype. The focus of this review is to discuss the most important guidelines to be taken into account when we aim at developing an ''ideal'' animal model to study leukemia. The animal model should mimic all the clinical, histological and molecular genetic characteristics of the human phenotype and should be applicable as a clinically predictive model. It should achieve all the requirements to be used as a standardized model adaptive to basic research as well as to pharmaceutical practice. Furthermore it should fulfill all the criteria to investigate environmental risk factors, the role of genomic mutations and be applicable for therapeutic testing. These constraints limit the usefulness of some existing animal models, which are however very valuable for basic research. Hence in this review we will primarily focus on genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to study the most frequent types of childhood leukemia. GEMMs are robust models with relatively low site specific variability and which can, with the help of the latest gene modulating tools be adapted to individual clinical and research questions. Moreover they offer the possibility to restrict oncogene expression to a defined target population and regulate its expression level as well as its timely activity. Until recently it was only possible in individual cases to develop a murin model, which fulfills the above mentioned requirements. Hence the development of new regulatory elements to control targeted oncogene expression should be priority. Tightly controlled and cell specific oncogene expression can then be combined with a knock-in approach and will depict a robust murine model, which enables almost physiologic oncogene

  10. High frequency of transmission of murine AIDS virus in C57BL/10 mice via mother's milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Y; Suzuki, K; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1992-01-01

    Maternal transmission of a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) mixture named LP-BM5 MuLV, which is knwon to induce murine AIDS (MAIDS), was investigated. Adult female C57BL/10 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with LP-BM5 MuLV. When the virus-inoculated female mice developed splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy, they were mated with normal C57BL/10 male mice. Of 56 offspring born to MAIDS mothers, 14 appeared to develop MAIDS, as assessed by the occurrence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy as well ...

  11. Polarized secretion of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernallis Ann B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The direction of cytokine secretion from polarized cells determines the cytokine's cellular targets. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF belongs to the interleukin-6 (IL-6 family of cytokines and signals through LIFR/gp130. Three factors which may regulate the direction of LIF secretion were studied: the site of stimulation, signal peptides, and expression levels. Stimulation with IL-1β is known to promote IL-6 secretion from the stimulated membrane (apical or basolateral in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2. Since LIF is related to IL-6, LIF secretion was also tested in Caco-2 following IL-1β stimulation. Signal peptides may influence the trafficking of LIF. Two isoforms of murine LIF, LIF-M and LIF-D, encode different signal peptides which have been associated with different locations of the mature protein in fibroblasts. To determine the effect of the signal peptides on LIF secretion, secretion levels were compared in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK clones which expressed murine LIF-M or LIF-D or human LIF under the control of an inducible promoter. Low and high levels of LIF expression were also compared since saturation of the apical or basolateral route would reveal specific transporters for LIF. Results When Caco-2 was grown on permeable supports, LIF was secreted constitutively with around 40% secreted into the apical chamber. Stimulation with IL-1β increased LIF production. After treating the apical surface with IL-1β, the percentage secreted apically remained similar to the untreated, whereas, when the cells were stimulated at the basolateral surface only 20% was secreted apically. In MDCK cells, an endogenous LIF-like protein was detected entirely in the apical compartment. The two mLIF isoforms showed no difference in their secretion patterns in MDCK. Interestingly, about 70% of murine and human LIF was secreted apically from MDCK over a 400-fold range of expression levels within clones and a 200

  12. Aleukemic leukemia cutis in a patient with Philadelphia chromosome-positive biphenotypic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Hashino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Hiroe; Izumiyama, Koh; Yonezumi, Masakatsu; Chiba, Koji; Kondo, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Imamura, Masahiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is a rare condition characterized by the invasion of leukemic blasts into the skin before their appearance in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia, especially the myelomonocytic and monocytic types of acute myeloblastic leukemia. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with aleukemic leukemia cutis who developed Philadelphia-positive acute leukemia 1 month after skin involvement. Leukemic cells expressed both myeloi...

  13. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Removal of LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor) results in increased vitamin A (retinol) metabolism to 4-oxoretinol in embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Michelle A.; Chen, Anne C.; Shaun D Roman; Derguini, Fadila; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoids, vitamin A (retinol) and its metabolic derivatives, are required for normal vertebrate development. In murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, which remain undifferentiated when cultured in the presence of LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor), little metabolism of exogenously added retinol takes place. After LIF removal, ES cells metabolize exogenously added retinol to 4-hydroxyretinol and 4-oxoretinol and concomitantly differentiate. The conversion of retinol to 4-oxoretinol is a high-capaci...

  15. The European LeukemiaNet: achievements and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hehlmann, R.; Grimwade, D; Simonsson, B.; Apperley, J.; Baccarani, M.; Barbui, T.; Barosi, G.; Bassan, R; Bene, M C; U. Berger; Buchner, T.; Burnett, A.; Cross, N. C.; Witte, T.J. de; Dohner, H.

    2011-01-01

    The only way to cure leukemia is by cooperative research. To optimize research, the European LeukemiaNet integrates 105 national leukemia trial groups and networks, 105 interdisciplinary partner groups and about 1,000 leukemia specialists from 175 institutions. They care for tens of thousands of leukemia patients in 33 countries across Europe. Their ultimate goal is to cure leukemia. Since its inception in 2002, the European LeukemiaNet has steadily expanded and has unified leukemia research ...

  16. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Childhood Leukemia and Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpaslan Türkkan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the relationship between very low frequency electromagnetic fields, originating from high voltage powerlines, and childhood leukemia was evaluated. Electromagnetic fields have biological effects. Whole populations are effected by different levels of electromagnetic fields but children are more sensible. In urban areas high voltage powerlines are the main sources of electromagnetic fields. The relation of electromagnetic fields due to high voltage powerlines and leukemia with consideration of dose-response and distance is investigated in several studies. There are different opinions on the effects of electromagnetic fields on general health. The relation between electromagnetic fields and childhood leukemia must be considered separately. Although there is no limit value, it is generally accepted that exposure to 0.4 µT and over doubles the risk of leukemia in children 15 years and younger. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 137-41

  18. ADULT T CELL LEUKEMIA LYMPHOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Neely, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL) is a CD4+ lymphoproliferative malignancy resulting from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV1) infection. It includes differing clinical forms classified as smoldering, chronic, lymphomatous, and acute ATLL. The Tax protein of HTLV-1 has been implicated as a viral oncoprotein which enhances virus replication and alters cellular gene expression, including activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kB), to result in lymphoid transformation. Chemotherapy f...

  19. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M;

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  20. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Molecular diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalal Iravathy Goud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene at chromosome band 11q23 is commonly involved in reciprocal translocations that is detected in acute leukemia. The MLL gene, coomonly known as mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid lymphoid leukemia, has been independently identified and cloned from the 11q23 breakpoint of acute leukemia. We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose cells had shown reciprocal translocation between short arm (p21 of chromosome 2 and long arm (q23 of chromosome number 11 [t(2;11 (p21;q23] by cytogenetic analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH was also performed for reconfirmation with a probe for MLL which showed split signals, hybridizing to both the derivative 2 and 11 chromosomes. Our study confirmed FISH as the most suitable assay for detecting MLL rearrangements because of its sensitivity and speed. It recommended that FISH should be used as complementary to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In conclusion, evaluation of the t(2;11(p21;q23 was done by molecular clarification and flow cytometry.

  2. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  3. Molecular characterization of RadLV (radiation leukemia virus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a course of a fractionated whole-body x-irradiation, a high percentage of C57BL/Ka mice develop thymic lymphomas. Radiation leukemia virus (RadLV) can be consistently isolated from these tumors. RadLV can induce identical lymphomas in unirradiated C57BL/Ka mice, and its role as the etiologic agent of these malignancies has been clearly documented. In order to characterize the viral genome at the molecular level, the unintegrated DNA intermediates of several RadLV isolates were prepared. Several different protocols were developed to optimize the yield and quality of restriction endonucleases, and cloned into a bacteriophage vector using recombinant DNA technology. RadLV is a general term used to describe a number of lymphomagenic viruses isolated from (1) primary radiation-induced lymphomas, (2) virus-induced lymphomas, and (3) established cell lines. The RadLV viruses replicate preferentially in the thymus and cause thymic lymphomas. Non-thymotropic, non-oncogenic, fibrotropic viruses can also be isolated from C57BL/Ka mice. Thus, a spectrum of biological activities can be seen among the C57BL/Ka mouse retroviruses. This dissertation reports the molecular cloning of three of the RadLV viruses. They are: (1) RadLV/VL3 and (2) RadLV/RL10, both lymphomagenic viruses, and (3) RadLV/RL15, a non-oncogenic isolate. The generation of restriction maps from both the cloned DNAs and the unintegrated viral DNA intermediates is described. These maps are compared with those of other C57BL/Ka murine retroviruses, and with published maps of other murine leukemia viruses

  4. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Susan R Ross

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was indepe...

  5. Pharmacologic blockade of JAK1/JAK2 reduces GvHD and preserves the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebok Choi

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that interferon gamma receptor deficient (IFNγR-/- allogeneic donor T cells result in significantly less graft-versus-host disease (GvHD than wild-type (WT T cells, while maintaining an anti-leukemia or graft-versus-leukemia (GvL effect after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. We demonstrated that IFNγR signaling regulates alloreactive T cell trafficking to GvHD target organs through expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in alloreactive T cells. Since IFNγR signaling is mediated via JAK1/JAK2, we tested the effect of JAK1/JAK2 inhibition on GvHD. While we demonstrated that pharmacologic blockade of JAK1/JAK2 in WT T cells using the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, INCB018424 (Ruxolitinib, resulted in a similar effect to IFNγR-/- T cells both in vitro (reduction of CXCR3 expression in T cells and in vivo (mitigation of GvHD after allo-HSCT, it remains to be determined if in vivo administration of INCB018424 will result in preservation of GvL while reducing GvHD. Here, we report that INCB018424 reduces GvHD and preserves the beneficial GvL effect in two different murine MHC-mismatched allo-HSCT models and using two different murine leukemia models (lymphoid leukemia and myeloid leukemia. In addition, prolonged administration of INCB018424 further improves survival after allo-HSCT and is superior to other JAK1/JAK2 inhibitors, such as TG101348 or AZD1480. These data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of JAK1/JAK2 might be a promising therapeutic approach to achieve the beneficial anti-leukemia effect and overcome HLA-barriers in allo-HSCT. It might also be exploited in other diseases besides GvHD, such as organ transplant rejection, chronic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune diseases.

  6. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  9. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  13. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  16. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  17. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  1. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  3. Atomic Bomb and Leukemia : II. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Masao; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Matsuo, Tatsuki

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for CML in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic for atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. In the distribution of AML subtypes of FAR classification, there was no M3 cases in 1Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells...

  4. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  5. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hwa Jang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30% had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70% had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  6. Polyradiculoneuritis revealing an acute monoblastic leukemia 5

    OpenAIRE

    Wafa Allam; Hassan Errihani; Yahya Hsaini

    2010-01-01

    Acute polyradiculoneuritis has been frequently reported in association with malignant disorders, especially those of the lymphoid system. To date, there have been no reported cases of acute monoblastic leukemia associated with this polyradiculopathy. The authors tell us about a very rare case of leukemia presenting as acute monoblastic leukemia 5 (AML5) in a 28 years old patient from Morroco

  7. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  9. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweet K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kendra Sweet,1 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz,1 Ling Zhang21Malignant Hematology, 2Hematopathology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1 inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia.Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia, bosutinib, treatment options

  10. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. RUNX1–ETO induces a type I interferon response which negatively effects t(8;21)-induced increased self-renewal and leukemia development

    OpenAIRE

    DeKelver, Russell C.; Lewin, Benjamin; Weng, Stephanie; Yan, Ming; Biggs, Joseph; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2013-01-01

    The 8;21 translocation is the most common chromosomal aberration occurring in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This translocation causes expression of the RUNX1–ETO (AML1–ETO) fusion protein, which cooperates with additional mutations in leukemia development. We report here that interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes are a group of genes consistently up-regulated by RUNX1–ETO in both human and murine models. RUNX1–ETO-induced up-regulation of IFN-stimulated genes occurs primarily via type I...

  13. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  15. Bullous leukemia cutis mimicking facial cellulitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldato, Luciana de Sales; Britto, Juliana de Sousa; Niero-Melo, Ligia; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2016-01-01

    Bullous leukemia cutis is an uncommon clinical manifestation of cutaneous infiltration by leukemic cells, from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We present the case of a 67-year-old, female, chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient. She was taking chlorambucil and developed facial edema with erythema and warmth, misjudged as facial cellulitis. Two days later, she developed bullous lesions in the arms, legs, neck and face. The histopathology of facial and bullous lesions confirmed leukemia cutis. All lesions disappeared following the administration of rituximab combined with cycles of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. Although soft tissue infections are common complications in patients undergoing chemotherapy, leukemia cutis can also resemble cellulitis. PMID:27192532

  16. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  17. Association of leukemia with radium groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure, including the ingestion of radium, has been causally associated with leukemia in man. Groundwater samples from 27 counties on or near Florida phosphate lands were found to exceed 5 pCi/L total radium in 12.4% of measurements. The incidence of leukemia was greater in those counties with high levels of radium contamination (greater than 10% of the samples contaminated) than in those with low levels of contamination. Rank correlation coefficients of .56 and .45 were observed between the radium contamination level and the incidence of total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. The standardized incidence density ratio for those in high-contamination counties was 1.5 for total leukemia and 2.0 for acute myeloid leukemia. Further investigation is necessary, however, before a causal relationship between groundwater radium content and human leukemia can be established

  18. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Ross, Susan R.

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was independent of viral gene expression, because it occurred after treatment of MMTV with ultraviolet light or 2,2′-dithiodipyridine and in azidothymidine-treated mice. Nuclear extracts prepared from the lymphocytes of MMTV-injected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice showed increased nuclear factor κB activity. Additionally, the MMTV- and Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins coimmunoprecipitated with TLR4 when expressed in 293T cells. The MMTV receptor failed to coimmunoprecipitate with TLR4, suggesting that MMTV/TLR4 interaction is independent of virus attachment and fusion. These results identify retroviral proteins that interact with a mammalian toll receptor and show that direct activation by such viruses may initiate in vivo infection pathways. PMID:11854525

  19. Very late recurrences of leukemia: why does leukemia awake after many years of dormancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Uberti, Joseph P; Schiffer, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    We report a heterogeneous group of very late recurrences of leukemia occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment including 2 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) which recurred after more than 20 years of remission, 2 cases of donor cell leukemia which developed more than 10 years after allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapsing 13 and 17 years after allograft. Case descriptions are followed by a discussion regarding possible mechanisms leading to leukemia recurrence and a review of the literature.

  20. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Acute progression of BCR-FGFR1 induced murine B-lympho/myeloproliferative disorder suggests involvement of lineages at the pro-B cell stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqiang Ren

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of FGFR1, through rearrangement with various dimerization domains, leads to atypical myeloproliferative disorders where, although T cell lymphoma are common, the BCR-FGFR1 chimeric kinase results in CML-like leukemia. As with the human disease, mouse bone marrow transduction/transplantation with BCR-FGFR1 leads to CML-like myeloproliferation as well as B-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The murine disease described in this report is virtually identical to the human disease in that both showed bi-lineage involvement of myeloid and B-cells, splenomegaly, leukocytosis and bone marrow hypercellularity. A CD19(+ IgM(- CD43(+ immunophenotype was seen both in primary tumors and two cell lines derived from these tumors. In all primary tumors, subpopulations of these CD19(+ IgM(- CD43(+ were also either B220(+ or B220(-, suggesting a block in differentiation at the pro-B cell stage. The B220(- phenotype was retained in one of the cell lines while the other was B220(+. When the two cell lines were transplanted into syngeneic mice, all animals developed the same B-lymphoblastic leukemia within 2-weeks. Thus, the murine model described here closely mimics the human disease with bilineage myeloid and B-cell leukemia/lymphoma which provides a representative model to investigate therapeutic intervention and a better understanding of the etiology of the disease.

  4. A major binding protein for leukemia inhibitory factor in normal mouse serum: identification as a soluble form of the cellular receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, M. J.; Cross, B. A.; Metcalf, D; Ward, L. D.; Simpson, R. J.; Nicola, N A

    1992-01-01

    A protein that specifically binds leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been isolated from normal mouse serum by using four successive fractionation steps: chromatography on a LIF affinity matrix, anion-exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, and preparative native gel electrophoresis. The purified LIF-binding protein (LBP) is a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa that specifically binds 125I-labeled murine LIF with an affinity comparable to that of the low-a...

  5. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  8. Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21 detected by ETV6/RUNX1 FISH screening in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ribeiro Ney Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome abnormalities that usually define high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia are the t(9;22/ breakpoint cluster region protein-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, hypodiploid with < 44 chromosomes and 11q23/ myeloid/lymphoid leukemia gene rearrangements. The spectrum of acute lymphoblastic leukemia genetic abnormalities is nevertheless rapidly expanding. Therefore, newly described chromosomal aberrations are likely to have an impact on clinical care in the near future. Recently, the rare intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 started to be considered a high-risk chromosomal abnormality. It occurs in approximately 2-5% of pediatric patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This abnormality is associated with a poor outcome. Hence, an accurate detection of this abnormality is expected to become very important in the choice of appropriate therapy. In this work the clinical and molecular cytogenetic evaluation by fluorescence in situ hybridization of a child with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting the rare intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 is described.

  9. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  10. Identification of murine complement receptor type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fingeroth, J D; Benedict, M A; Levy, D.N.; Strominger, J L

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit antiserum reactive with the human complement component C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (complement receptor type 2, CR2) immunoprecipitates a Mr 155,000 murine B-cell surface antigen. The apparent molecular weight and cellular distribution of this murine antigen are similar to those of human CR2. Cells expressing the murine protein bind sheep erythrocytes coated with antibody and murine C1-C3d but do not bind Epstein-Barr virus at all. The monospecific antiserum to human CR2 together...

  11. A dominantly acting murine allele of Mcm4 causes chromosomal abnormalities and promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N Bagley

    Full Text Available Here we report the isolation of a murine model for heritable T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL called Spontaneous dominant leukemia (Sdl. Sdl heterozygous mice develop disease with a short latency and high penetrance, while mice homozygous for the mutation die early during embryonic development. Sdl mice exhibit an increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes, and T-ALLs from Sdl mice harbor small amplifications and deletions, including activating deletions at the Notch1 locus. Using exome sequencing it was determined that Sdl mice harbor a spontaneously acquired mutation in Mcm4 (Mcm4(D573H. MCM4 is part of the heterohexameric complex of MCM2-7 that is important for licensing of DNA origins prior to S phase and also serves as the core of the replicative helicase that unwinds DNA at replication forks. Previous studies in murine models have discovered that genetic reductions of MCM complex levels promote tumor formation by causing genomic instability. However, Sdl mice possess normal levels of Mcms, and there is no evidence for loss-of-heterozygosity at the Mcm4 locus in Sdl leukemias. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the Sdl mutation produces a biologically inactive helicase. Together, these data support a model in which chromosomal abnormalities in Sdl mice result from the ability of MCM4(D573H to incorporate into MCM complexes and render them inactive. Our studies indicate that dominantly acting alleles of MCMs can be compatible with viability but have dramatic oncogenic consequences by causing chromosomal abnormalities.

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  14. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  15. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Wouters, Bas; Balastik, Martin; Shapiro-Koss, Clara; Zhang, Hong; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Radomska, Hanna S; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Amabile, Giovanni; Ye, Min; Zhang, Junyan; Lowers, Irene; Avellino, Roberto; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Tenen, Daniel G

    2012-12-01

    C/EBPs are a family of transcription factors that regulate growth control and differentiation of various tissues. We found that C/EBPγ is highly upregulated in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples characterized by C/EBPα hypermethylation/silencing. Similarly, C/EBPγ was upregulated in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking C/EBPα, as C/EBPα mediates C/EBPγ suppression. Studies in myeloid cells demonstrated that CEBPG overexpression blocked neutrophilic differentiation. Further, downregulation of Cebpg in murine Cebpa-deficient stem/progenitor cells or in human CEBPA-silenced AML samples restored granulocytic differentiation. In addition, treatment of these leukemias with demethylating agents restored the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ balance and upregulated the expression of myeloid differentiation markers. Our results indicate that C/EBPγ mediates the myeloid differentiation arrest induced by C/EBPα deficiency and that targeting the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ axis rescues neutrophilic differentiation in this unique subset of AMLs.

  16. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  17. Mechanisms of mixed-lineage leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Muntean, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the genetic determinants of leukemia have translated to better treatment options and improved survival of patients with acute myeloid and acute lymphoid leukemia. However, some leukemias, such as those bearing 11q23 (MLL) translocations, result in aggressive diseases with a relatively poor prognosis, despite improved treatments such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This article will briefly review the functions and regulation of wild-type...

  18. Profile of imatinib in pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael J BurkeDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplantation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Using targeted therapy for treatment of cancer has become the paradigm to which clinical trials aspire. Imatinib, the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, was the first of its kind to specifically target and inhibit the underlying Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ oncogene found to be driving chronic myeloid leukemia in adults, and has since become standard of care for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in children. Imatinib, with its ability to target Ph+ leukemia, has been successfully incorporated into the treatment of not only pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia but also Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With the incorporation of imatinib into combination chemotherapy for pediatric Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, current survival rates are far higher than at any other time for this once dreadful disease. With more children today receiving treatment with imatinib for either chronic myeloid leukemia or Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, knowledge is accumulating surrounding the short-term and long-term toxicities observed in children, adolescents, and young adults treated with this TKI. In summary, the TKI imatinib has made a historic impact in the treatment of pediatric Ph+ leukemias, transforming what were once very high-risk diseases with considerable morbidity and mortality into ones that are now very treatable but with a new awareness surrounding the long-term toxicities that may come with this price for cure.Keywords: imatinib, leukemia, lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, pediatric

  19. Extramedullary leukemia in children presenting with proptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Naik Milind; Honavar Santosh G; Vemuganti Geeta K; Murthy Ramesh; Reddy Vijayanand

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background We highlight the orbital manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia and the role of peripheral blood smear in the diagnosis of these cases. A total of 12 patients who presented with proptosis and were subsequently diagnosed to have acute myeloid leukemia based on incision biopsy or peripheral blood smear were included in the study. Results A retrospective review of all cases of acute myeloid leukemia presenting to the Orbital clinic was performed. The age at presentation, ge...

  20. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel da Rocha Paiva Maia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS : A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors “childhood leukemia” and “infection” and later searching for the words “childhood leukemia” and “maternal infection or disease” or “breastfeeding” or “daycare attendance” or “vaccination” resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ≤ 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers’ or infants’ to infections (or proxy of infection, and risk of leukemia. RESULTS : Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori . CONCLUSIONS : Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology.

  2. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  3. Murine Typhus and Febrile Illness, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Mark D.; Murdoch, David R.; Rozmajzl, Patrick J.; Basnyat, Buddha; Woods, Christopher W.; Richards, Allen L.; Belbase, Ram Hari; Hammer, David A.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Reller, L. Barth

    2008-01-01

    Murine typhus was diagnosed by PCR in 50 (7%) of 756 adults with febrile illness seeking treatment at Patan Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. Of patients with murine typhus, 64% were women, 86% were residents of Kathmandu, and 90% were unwell during the winter. No characteristics clearly distinguished typhus patients from those with blood culture–positive enteric fever.

  4. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  5. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  6. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  8. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  9. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  10. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studying the leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or spinal fluid, doctors can determine the type of leukemia a child has. This is important because treatment varies among different types ... blood or bone marrow, doctors can tell whether the Philadelphia chromosome is ...

  11. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben;

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  12. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  13. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C;

    2002-01-01

    Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether t......RNA primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven by...... cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus...

  14. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. The expression and clinical significance of survivin gene in leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of survivin in leukemia and the prognostic significance in acute leukemia(AL). Methods The expression of survivin mRNA was measured in 105 AL and 21 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients with semi-quantity reverse transcription (RT)-PCR.15 adults were tested as normal

  16. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga, E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  17. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  19. Biomarkers of leukemia risk: benzene as a model.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, M.T.; Zhang, L

    1998-01-01

    Although relatively rare, leukemias place a considerable financial burden on society and cause psychologic trauma to many families. Leukemia is the most common cancer in children. The causes of leukemia in adults and children are largely unknown, but occupational and environmental factors are strongly suspected. Genetic predisposition may also play a major role. Our aim is to use molecular epidemiology and toxicology to find the cause of leukemia and develop biomarkers of leukemia risk. We ha...

  20. A mixture of amino acids and other small molecules present in the serum suppresses the growth of murine and human tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsár, Gyula; Gaál, Dezső; Kulcsár, Péter I; Schulcz, Ákos; Czömpöly, Tamás

    2013-03-01

    Previously we have hypothesized that the small molecules which are selectively accumulated in cancer cells might participate in a non-immunological antitumor surveillance mechanism. We demonstrated earlier that a mixture of experimentally selected substances ("active mixture", AM: L-arginine, L-histidine, L-methionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, L-ascorbate, D-biotin, pyridoxine, riboflavin, adenine, L(-)malate) possesses a selective toxic effect in vitro on a variety of tumor cell lines, and we have shown that the AM selectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro. To explore the in vivo significance of our earlier findings we examined the antitumor effect of AM in Colon 26 murine colorectal adenocarcinoma, B16 murine melanoma, MXT murine mammary carcinoma, S180 murine sarcoma, P388 murine lymphoid leukemia, HL-60 human promyeloid leukemia, PC-3 human prostate carcinoma, and HT-29 human colon carcinoma tumor models. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with AM inhibited the growth of the tumors investigated, with an inhibitory effect ranging from 40 to 69%. The AM had a comparable antitumor effect with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in the Colon-26 tumor model, and combined treatment with AM and 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin resulted in an enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effect. The AM induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway and induced G1 arrest in PC-3 cells and increased the number of apoptotic cells in PC-3 xenografts. These findings suggest that the AM might offer an interesting perspective in the treatment of cancer and in combination with other treatments may offer hope for a more effective cancer therapy.

  1. Stoichiometry of Murine Leukemia Virus Envelope Protein-Mediated Fusion and Its Neutralization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Wu; Silver, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins (Envs) of retroviruses form trimers that mediate fusion between viral and cellular membranes and are the targets for neutralizing antibodies. Understanding in detail how Env trimers mediate membrane fusion, and how antibodies interfere with this process, is a fundamental problem in biology with practical implications for the development of antiviral drugs and vaccines. We investigated the stoichiometry of Env-mediated fusion and its inhibition by antibody by inserting a...

  2. Abelson murine leukemia virus P120: identification and characterization of tyrosine phosphorylation sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, F H; Oroszlan, S; Stephenson, J R

    1982-01-01

    Tryptic peptides containing two major in vivo P120gag-abl tyrosine phosphorylation acceptor sites were identified, phosphorylated in vitro, and purified to homogeneity. The tyrosine site in peptide a is localized at a position six residues distal to its trypsin cleavage site, whereas the tyrosine acceptor site in peptide b is at residue seven. A third peptide, c, contains an amino-terminal phosphotyrosine residue: phosphorylation of this latter peptide only occurs to a significant extent in v...

  3. Antitumor effect of humus extract on murine transplantable L1210 leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus that found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms have been present. In the present study, humus extract exhibited antitumor effect on L1210 tumor development in isogeneic DBA/2 mice with the delay of tumor formation and a significant smaller tumor mass that infer a significant increase of life span of mice. The antitumor effect was not due to direct killing of L1210 or induction of apoptosis in tumor cells by humus extract.

  4. Extramedullary leukemia in children presenting with proptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Milind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We highlight the orbital manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia and the role of peripheral blood smear in the diagnosis of these cases. A total of 12 patients who presented with proptosis and were subsequently diagnosed to have acute myeloid leukemia based on incision biopsy or peripheral blood smear were included in the study. Results A retrospective review of all cases of acute myeloid leukemia presenting to the Orbital clinic was performed. The age at presentation, gender, presenting features, duration of symptoms and fundus features were noted. In addition the temporal relationship of the orbital disease to the diagnosis of leukemia, laterality, location of the orbital mass, imaging features and the diagnostic tools used to diagnose leukemia were noted. The median age at presentation was 6 years. The male: female ratio was 0.7:1. None of these patients had been diagnosed earlier as having acute myeloid leukemia. The presenting features included proptosis in all patients, orbital mass in 5 (41.7%, visual symptoms in 2 (16.7% and subconjunctival hemorrhage in one patient (8.3%. A diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was established by incision biopsy in 4 patients, subsequently confirmed by peripheral blood smear testing and bone marrow biopsy in 2 patients which revealed the presence of systemic involvement. Imprint smears of the biopsy identified blasts in 2 of 4 cases. In 8 patients presenting with ocular manifestations, diagnosis was established by peripheral blood smear examination alone which revealed a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusion A peripheral blood smear should be performed in all cases of sudden onset proptosis or an orbital mass in children and young adults along with an orbital biopsy. It can always be complemented with a bone marrow biopsy especially in cases of aleukemic leukemia or when the blood smear is inconclusive.

  5. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyya, Pritish K

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and ...

  6. Ginsenoside Rh2 Mitigates Pediatric Leukemia Through Suppression of Bcl-2 in Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoru Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a severe malignant cancer worldwide, in both adult and pediatric patients. Since bone marrow cell transplantation is seriously limited by the availability of the immune-paired donor sources, the therapy for pediatric leukemia remains challenging. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2 is a well-characterized component in red ginseng, and has established therapeutic effects for different diseases, although whether GRh2 may have a therapeutic effect on pediatric leukemia has not been investigated. Methods: We examined the effects of GRh2 on the survival of mice in an acute leukemia model. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the cell viability of leukemia cell lines in vitro, using a CCK-8 assay and an MTT assay. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the apoptosis of leukemia cell lines in vitro, by flow cytometry. We analyzed the levels of Bcl-2 and microRNA-21 (miR-21 in GRh2-treated leukemia cells. Prediction of binding between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of Bcl-2 mRNA was performed by a bioinformatics algorithm and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. Results: GRh2 significantly prolonged the survival of mice with pediatric leukemia. GRh2 significantly decreased the viability of leukemia cells in vitro, through induction of apoptosis. GRh2 significantly decreased the levels of an anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in leukemia cells, possibly through induction of miR-21, which suppressed the translation of Bcl-2 mRNA via 3'-UTR binding. Conclusion: GRh2 may be an effective treatment for pediatric leukemia, and GRh2 may induce apoptosis of leukemia cells through miR-21-modulated suppression of Bcl-2.

  7. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  12. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluid (CSF, the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord) for examination in a lab. Flow cytometry tests. Using markers on leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or CSF, doctors can determine the type ...

  14. Bagging Support Vector Machines for Leukemia Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokmen Zararsiz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is one of the most common cancer type, and its diagnosis and classification is becoming increasingly complex and important. Here, we used a gene expression dataset and adapted bagging support vector machines (bSVM for leukemia classification. bSVM trains each SVM seperately using bootstrap technique, then aggregates the performances of each SVM by majority voting. bSVM showed accuracy between 87.5% - 92.5%, area under ROC curve between 98.0% - 99.2%, F-measure between 90.5% - 92.7% and outperformed single SVM and other classification methods. We also compared our results with other study results which used the same dataset for leukemia classification. Experimental results revealed that bSVM showed the best performance and can be used as a biomarker for the diagnose of leukemia disease.

  15. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  16. RNAi Screening of Leukemia Cells Using Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anupriya; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    RNAi-mediated screening has been an integral tool for biological discovery for the past 15 years. A variety of approaches have been employed for implementation of this technique, including pooled, depletion/enrichment screening with lentiviral shRNAs, and segregated screening of panels of individual siRNAs. The latter approach of siRNA panel screening requires efficient methods for transfection of siRNAs into the target cells. In the case of suspension leukemia cell lines and primary cells, many of the conventional transfection techniques using liposomal or calcium phosphate-mediated transfection provide very low efficiency. In this case, electroporation is the only transfection technique offering high efficiency transfection of siRNAs into the target leukemia cells. Here, we describe methods for optimization and implementation of siRNA electroporation into leukemia cell lines and primary patient specimens, and we further offer suggested electroporation settings for some commonly used leukemia cell lines. PMID:27581286

  17. Viewpoints on the proinflammation state of leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Kefu; MA Xiaotong

    2003-01-01

    Proinflammation represents a pathophysiological state on the early stage of a number of diseases, especially the infectious and immunological ones. In recent years, proinflammation has attracted much attention, and the term "proinflammation factors" appears frequently in the literature. While investigating leukemia and leukemic cells from the angle of "proinflammation state", we got some intriguing findings, e.g. we detected the significantly elevated expression of proinflammation factor IL-18 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and specific tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). The increased MMP may play a role in the aggressiveness of myeloid leukemic cells, and be associated with a poor prognosis. This phenomenon reflects an ignored aspect of leukemia. Investigations from the angle of "proinflammation state" have broaden the fields of tumor and leukemia study.

  18. Proceedings of the symposium on leukemia clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clusters of leukemia in populations living in specific locations in various countries have been examined by scientific and medical experts for many years. In general, the reason for the existence of these clusters is unknown. The recent discovery of a small cluster of leukemias among children who were born in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in England has stimulated wide interest in the possible occurrence of clusters of leukemia around nuclear facilities. The purpose of this symposium was to present scientific evidence concerning the existence of leukemia clusters in the population, to discuss possible causes for these clusters and to suggest directions for future research. Distinguished speakers from Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and the U.S.A. participated in this symposium. (author)

  19. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  20. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... acute lymphocytic leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  1. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  2. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  3. Dental Treatment in Patients with Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Zimmermann; Maria Inês Meurer; Liliane Janete Grando; Joanita Ângela Gonzaga Del Moral; Inês Beatriz da Silva Rath; Silvia Schaefer Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Dental treatment of patients with leukemia should be planned on the basis of antineoplastic therapy which can be chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Many are the oral manifestations presented by these patients, arising from leukemia and/or treatment. In addition, performing dental procedures at different stages of treatment (before, during, or after) must follow certain protocols in relation to the haematological indices of patients, aimed at maintaining...

  4. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pilar González-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS and tumor flare reaction (TFR, that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies.

  5. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  7. Early childhood leukemia incidence trends in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Rejane de Souza; Santos, Marceli de Oliveira; de Camargo, Beatriz; Oliveira, Julio Fernando Pinto; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2016-03-01

    Incidence rates of childhood leukemia vary between different regions of the world. The objective of this study was to test possible trends in incidence rate of early childhood leukemia (children leukemia was 61 per million. The AAIR for acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) was 44 per million and nonlymphoid acute leukemia (NLAL) was 14 per million. The median ALL/NLAL ratio was 3.0, suggesting higher incidence rate of NLAL in these settings. The joinpoint analysis demonstrated increased leukemia incidence rate in João Pessoa (AAPC = 20; 95% CI: 3.5, 39.4) and Salvador (AAPC = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.0, 16.9), respectively, whereas incidence rate in São Paulo PBCR decreased (AAPC = -4.02%; 95% CI: -6.1%, -1.9%). Correlation between ALL AAIR and selected variables of socioeconomic (SES) factors was not observed. Increased AAIR regionally overtime was observed. However, the interpretation for such phenomenon should be cautious because it might reflect the access to health care, diagnosis procedures, and improvement of PBCR´s quality. The observed trend supports the necessity of further ecological studies. PMID:26925506

  8. Sensitivity of PCR assays for murine gammaretroviruses and mouse contamination in human blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Gammaretroviruses related to murine leukemia virus (MLV have variously been reported to be present or absent in blood from chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME patients and healthy controls. Using subjects from New York State, we have investigated by PCR methods whether MLV-related sequences can be identified in nucleic acids isolated from whole blood or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or following PBMC culture. We have also passaged the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP following incubation with plasma from patients and controls and assayed nucleic acids for viral sequences. We have used 15 sets of primers that can effectively amplify conserved regions of murine endogenous and exogenous retrovirus sequences. We demonstrate that our PCR assays for MLV-related gag sequences and for mouse DNA contamination are extremely sensitive. While we have identified MLV-like gag sequences following PCR on human DNA preparations, we are unable to conclude that these sequences originated in the blood samples.

  9. cDNA Cloning, Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Expression and Characterization of Porcine Leukemia Inhibitory Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Molecular cloning of the porcine leukemia inhibitor factor(pLIF) has not been reported. A full-length cDNA encoding pLIF was cloned, expressed and characterized. The full-length porcine LIF cDNA encodes a 202 amino acid protein that has an 84% sequence identity to mouse LIF and 86% sequence identity to human LIF. The deduced amino acid sequence of a pLIF protein contains six conserved consensus N-linked glycosylation sites and six cysteine groups to form potential disulfide bonds. The pLIF was expressed in E coli, as a mature form, and in CHO cells as a secreted form. Both the forms of the recombinant pLIFs can maintain murine embryonic stem cells in an undifferentiated state in a culture. The recombinant pLIFs will be useful in establishing a long-term culture of stable pluripotent porcine embryonic stem cells for further manipulation.

  10. Infection of xenotransplanted human cell lines by murine retroviruses: A lesson brought back to light by XMRV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Anne Hempel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection of xenotransplanted human cells by xenotropic retroviruses is a known phenomenon in the scientific literature, with examples cited since the early 1970’s. However, arguably, until recently, the importance of this phenomenon had not been largely recognized. The emergence and subsequent debunking of Xenotropic Murine leukemia virus-Related Virus (XMRV as a cell culture contaminant as opposed to a potential pathogen in several human diseases, notably prostate cancer and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, highlighted a potential problem of murine endogenous gammaretroviruses infecting commonly used human cell lines. Subsequent to the discovery of XMRV, many additional cell lines that underwent xenotransplantation in mice have been shown to harbor murine gammaretroviruses. Such retroviral infection poses the threat of not only confounding experiments performed in these cell lines via virus-induced changes in cellular behavior but also the potential infection of other cell lines cultured in the same laboratory. Thus, the possibility of xenotropic retroviral infection of cell lines may warrant additional precautions, such as periodic testing for retroviral sequences in cell lines cultured in the laboratory.

  11. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  12. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ... cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Most cases occur in Japan and the Caribbean area. This disease is not ...

  14. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  15. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can chronic myelomonocytic leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic myelomonocytic leukemia? Some cases ... the instructions for nearly everything our cells do. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  16. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can chronic myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic myeloid leukemia? Normal human ... genes, the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  17. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can chronic lymphocytic leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia? The exact ... genes -- the instructions for how our cells function. We look like our parents because they are the ...

  18. Mouse Lymphoblastic Leukemias Induced by Aberrant Prdm14 Expression Demonstrate Widespread Copy Number Alterations Also Found in Human ALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant expression and activation of oncogenes in somatic cells has been associated with cancer initiation. Required for reacquisition of pluripotency in the developing germ cell, PRDM14 initiates lymphoblastic leukemia when misexpressed in murine bone marrow. Activation of pluripotency in somatic cells can lead to aneuploidy and copy number alterations during iPS cell generation, and we hypothesized that PRDM14-induced lymphoblastic leukemias would demonstrate significant chromosomal damage. High-resolution oligo array comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated infrequent aneuploidy but frequent amplification and deletion, with amplifications occurring in a 5:1 ratio with deletions. Many deletions (i.e., Cdkn2a, Ebf1, Pax5, Ikzf1) involved B-cell development genes and tumor suppressor genes, recapitulating deletions occurring in human leukemia. Pathways opposing senescence were frequently deactivated via Cdkn2a deletion or Tbx2 amplification, with corollary gene expression. Additionally, gene expression studies of abnormal pre-leukemic B-precursors showed downregulation of genes involved in chromosomal stability (i.e., Xrcc6) and failure to upregulate DNA repair pathways. We propose a model of leukemogenesis, triggered by pluripotency genes like Prdm14, which involves ongoing DNA damage and failure to activate non-homologous end-joining secondary to aberrant gene expression

  19. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Study on blocking the leukemia immune escape after BMT by Fas-Fas ligand pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡中波; 邹萍; 李爱香; 张友山; 王良利; 刘凌波

    2004-01-01

    Background To investigate if bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) transducted with murine soluble Fas gene (sFas) using adenovirus vector could block the immune escape of leukemia cells eliminate the residual leukemia cells and reduce their relapse.Methods The recombinant adenovirus vector with murine sFas, adsFas, and the control vector adEGFP were constructed using homologous recombination between two plasmids in Escherichia coli. BMT was carried out after the BMMCs were infected with Adenoviruses. The mice models of leukemia/lymphoma were constructed by inoculating female C57BL/6 mice (H-2b) with 105 EL4 cells/mouse through caudal vein. Donors of bone marrow grafts were syngeneic male mice. BMMCs were infected with AdsFas or AdEGFP 24 hours before (Group D or E). The following three groups were simultaneously used: Group A, no BMMCs transplanted; Group B, transplanted with BMMCs not infected with adenoviruses; Group C, only transfusing EL4 cells, neither irradiation nor BMT. The hematopoietic reconstitution, generation of leukemia/lymphoma and the survival rate were observed in all groups after BMT.Results The adenovirus vectors were successfully constructed. The titre of virus after purification was up to 2.5×1011pfu/ml. Spleen indices examined 11 days after BMT were not obviously different among Group B, D and E (P>0.05), but indices in Group A were significantly lower than those in the latter three groups (P<0.01). Counts of leukocytes and platelets on +30 day showed mice were reconstituted satisfactorily in Group B and D, but very low in Group C and E. The Y-chromosomes existed 2 months after BMT and examination of bone marrow cytology showed that Group B and D were almost normal, but Group C and E had plenty of lymphoblast-like tumor cells. Tumors were obviously observed in the mice of Group C and E by histopathological examination, but the mice in Group B and D were normal. The survival rates were 0 (0/4) in Group A

  1. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein induces acquired resistance to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Xiang Peng; Amit K. Tiwari; Hsiang-Chun Wu; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib,a breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI),has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).However,development of multidrug resistance(MDR) limits the use of imatinib.In the present study,we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of cellular resistance to imatinib in CML.Therefore,we established an imatinib-resistant human CML cell line (K562-imatinib) through a stepwise selection process.While characterizing the phenotype of these cells,we found that K562-imatinib cells were 124.6-fold more resistant to imatinib than parental K562 cells.In addition,these cells were cross-resistant to second- and third-generation BCR-ABL TKIs.Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) demonstrated that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA levels were increased in K562-imatinib cells.In addition,accumulation of [14C]6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was decreased,whereas the ATP-dependent efflux of [14C] 6-MP and [3H]methotrexate transport were increased in K562-imatinib cells.These data suggest that the overexpression of P-gp may play a crucial role in acquired resistance to imatinib in CML K562-imatinib cells.

  2. Activity of ladanein on leukemia cell lines and its occurrence in Marrubium vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Racha; Joha, Sami; Cheok, Meyling; Roumy, Vincent; Idziorek, Thierry; Preudhomme, Claude; Quesnel, Bruno; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François; Hennebelle, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Three methoxylated flavones isolated from Marrubium peregrinum - ladanein, scutellarein-5,7,4'-trimethyl ether, and scutellarein-5,6,7,4'-tetramethyl ether - were assayed for their cytotoxicity towards a recently developed dasatinib-resistant murine leukemia cell line (DA1-3b/M2 (BCR-ABL)), together with the structurally related non-methylated flavone scutellarein. The most active compound, ladanein, was looked for in 20 common Lamiaceae species by a quick HPLC screening. Among the possible positive results, the most interesting source was found to be Marrubium vulgare, which led to the isolation and identification of ladanein for the first time in this species. Ladanein also displayed moderate (20-40 microM) activities against K562, K562R (imatinib-resistant), and 697 human leukemia cell lines but was toxic neither to MOLM13 nor to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This work provides a common natural source for the hemi-synthesis of future ladanein-derived flavones and the study of their antileukemic activity. PMID:19644796

  3. Immunoprevention of x-ray-induced leukemias in the C57BL mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt to prevent irradiation-induced thymic lymphomas in C57BL mice was made by inducing active immunity to endogenous type-C virus with inactivated Rauscher murine leukemia virus (MuLV) or inactivated Gross MuLV or by transferring passive immunity to endogenous type-C virus with goat anti-Gross-MuLV IgG. Control groups received the following immunogen or treatment: inactivated simian sarcoma virus, complete Freund's adjuvant, normal goat IgG, and diluent, in both irradiated and nonirradiated C57BL mice. Active immunity to the 70,000 molecular weight glycoprotein AKR-gp70 by immunization with Rauscher MuLV and passive immunity to AKR-gp70 by passive transfer of goat anti-Gross-MuLV IgG was measurable throughout some of the latent period of tumor development; in these two groups a significant reduction in tumor incidence was observed, as compared to the other experimental and control groups. Thus, the present findings support the concept of a type-C virus etiology of irradiation-induced leukemias and demonstrate the applicability of immunologic techniques directed against the endogenous type-C virus in the prevention of this disease

  4. Impact of MLL5 expression on decitabine efficacy and DNA methylation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Haiyang; Damm, Frederik; Yap, Damian; Schwarzer, Adrian; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Lübbert, Michael; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Geffers, Robert; Aparicio, Samuel; Humphries, R Keith; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Hypomethylating agents are widely used in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, it is not well understood why only some patients respond to hypomethylating agents. We found previously that the effect of decitabine on hematopoietic stem cell viability differed between Mll5 wild-type and null cells. We, therefore, investigated the role of MLL5 expression levels on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were treated with decitabine. MLL5 above the median expression level predicted longer overall survival independent of DNMT3A mutation status in bivariate analysis (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 292 vs. 167 days; P=0.026). In patients who received three or more courses decitabine, high MLL5 expression and wild-type DNMT3A independently predicted improved overall survival (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 468 vs. 243 days; P=0.012). In transformed murine cells, loss of Mll5 was associated with resistance to low-dose decitabine, less global DNA methylation in promoter regions, and reduced DNA demethylation upon decitabine treatment. Together, these data support our clinical observation of improved outcome in decitabine-treated patients who express MLL5 at high levels, and suggest a mechanistic role of MLL5 in the regulation of DNA methylation.

  5. Activity of ladanein on leukemia cell lines and its occurrence in Marrubium vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Racha; Joha, Sami; Cheok, Meyling; Roumy, Vincent; Idziorek, Thierry; Preudhomme, Claude; Quesnel, Bruno; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François; Hennebelle, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Three methoxylated flavones isolated from Marrubium peregrinum - ladanein, scutellarein-5,7,4'-trimethyl ether, and scutellarein-5,6,7,4'-tetramethyl ether - were assayed for their cytotoxicity towards a recently developed dasatinib-resistant murine leukemia cell line (DA1-3b/M2 (BCR-ABL)), together with the structurally related non-methylated flavone scutellarein. The most active compound, ladanein, was looked for in 20 common Lamiaceae species by a quick HPLC screening. Among the possible positive results, the most interesting source was found to be Marrubium vulgare, which led to the isolation and identification of ladanein for the first time in this species. Ladanein also displayed moderate (20-40 microM) activities against K562, K562R (imatinib-resistant), and 697 human leukemia cell lines but was toxic neither to MOLM13 nor to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This work provides a common natural source for the hemi-synthesis of future ladanein-derived flavones and the study of their antileukemic activity.

  6. The genetic signature of acute leukemia in infacy

    OpenAIRE

    Chantrain, Christophe; Poirel, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Infant leukemia is a rare malignant disease with clinical and biological features distinct from older children. It is characterized by a high incidence of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement and a poor outcome despite intensive chemotherapy. Recent genetic studies argue in favor of a unique biology of infant acute leukemia. This review describes the specific genetic signature of infant leukemia. It discusses the important insights it provides into the understanding of leukemogenes...

  7. Treating refractory leukemias in childhood, role of clofarabine

    OpenAIRE

    Harned, Theresa M.; Gaynon, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 4000 children and adolescents under the age of 20 years develop acute leukemia per year in the US. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite impressive improvements in outcome, relapsed ALL is the fourth most common pediatric malignancy. Therapy for relapsed ALL remains unsatisfactory, and the majority of relapse patients still succumb to leukemia. Between one-third and one-half of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) relapse, and ...

  8. A new 2-aminosteroid induces cellular differentiation and upregulates the expression of MafB and Egr-1 genes respectively in HL-60 and K562 leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qun; LI Qiong; YUAN Lin-bo; HE Jun

    2005-01-01

    Background In previous work, we suggested that some 2-aminosteroids inhibited proliferation and induced differentiation of both human and murine leukemia cells. Here, we reported the actions of another new 2-aminosteroid designated as H89712 on human leukemia cells. Methods Cell colony counting and MTT assay were used to determine proliferation. Cell morphology, histochemical staining, UV detection and cytometry were used to determine differentiation. RT-PCR was used to detect gene expression. Standard statistical method was used to analyze data.Results H89712 inhibited proliferation of HL-60 leukemia cells and the inhibition percentage in MTT assay was 18% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 65% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L, respectively. The inhibition for HL-60 in colony assay was 23% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 96% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L, respectively. H89712 also induced HL-60 cells toward macrophage-like differentiation. It was verified by flow cytometry that the percentage of positive CD14 expression in differentiated HL-60 cells was about 9 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 20 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively, and this action involved upregulation of MafB gene in HL-60 leukemia cells. On the other hand, H89712 inhibited proliferation of K562 leukemia cells and the inhibition of K562 leukemia cells in MTT assay was shown by 34% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 88% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. The inhibition of K562 leukemia cells in colony assay was 53% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 100% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. H89712 also induced K562 cells toward erythroid-like differentiation and it was verified by flow cytometry that the percentage of positive CD71 expression in differentiated K562 cells was about 9 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 16 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. This action

  9. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-06-10

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdc(scid) and Il2rg(null) alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation.

  10. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  11. Rosacea-Like Leukemia Cutis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Manzano, Mariana; Ramírez García, Lilliana; Sánchez Pont, Julio E; Velázquez Mañana, Ana I; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2016-08-01

    Leukemia cutis describes the infiltration and dissemination of neoplastic leukemic cells into the epidermis, dermis, or subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Depending on the type of leukemia, a wide range of clinical and histopathological findings may be encountered. This report describes a patient with a rosacea-like eruption as a unique clinical presentation of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. PMID:27043335

  12. 42 CFR 81.24 - Guidelines for leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for leukemia. 81.24 Section 81.24 Public... RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING PROBABILITY OF CAUSATION UNDER THE ENERGY... Causation § 81.24 Guidelines for leukemia. (a) For claims involving leukemia, DOL will calculate one or...

  13. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  14. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  15. Rearrangement of endogenous ecotropic proviral gene and interleukin-3 gene in radiation-induced myeloid leukemias of RFM/Un mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the consideration that RFM/Un mice harbor on their chromosome 5 an ecotropic provirus locus for producing murine leukemia viruses (e-MuLV) and that interleukin-3 (IL-3) plays important roles in the growth and differentiation regulation of hematopoietic cells, particularly the myeloid lineages, they have examined radiation-induced myeloid leukemias of these mice for possible alterations in these two genes. Southern gel blot in combination with restriction enzyme analyses were performed with the use of an ecotropic env-specific sequence and an IL-3 cDNA clone as molecular probes. It was found that the transplantable Upton myeloid leukemia line has lost the chromosome 5 (germline) provirus and, instead, contains at least 4 copies of e-MuLV proviral sequences that have been acquired apparently by somatic re-integration. DNA preparations from 4 leukemic spleens of X-irradiated RFM/Un male mice, diagnosed histologically to have developed myeloid leukemias, were therefore examined; all four showed no loss of the germline e-MuLV copy and two of the four contained additional somatically re-integrated e-MuLV proviruses

  16. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Nucleophosmin 1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin1 is a multifunctional protein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm in some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Mutated Nucleophosmin1 expresses aberrantly in the cytoplasm of the cell and transports from nucleolus to the cytoplasm. It is diagnosed by immunohistochemical techniques, flow cytometry assay and mutational analysis.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Nucleophosmin1 mutation on the clinical presentations, prognosis, diagnosis and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Thirteen articles were extracted from PubMed, Google scholar and Scopus in which the Nucleophosmin1 mutation correlated with gingival hyperplasia, high white blood cell count, lymphadenopathy, high platelet count and other signs and symptoms of myelomonocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemias. This mutation is a provisional entity in the classification of acute myeloid leukemia, which influences on the prognosis, clinical course and the treatment of some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Nucleophosmin1 mutation has favorable prognostic value in the absence of other concomitant mutations.

  18. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Tariq I; Radich, Jerald P; Deininger, Michael W; Apperley, Jane F; Hughes, Timothy P; Harrison, Christine J; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q

    2016-05-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people's lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  19. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Mouse Af9 Is a Controller of Embryo Patterning, Like Mll, Whose Human Homologue Fuses with AF9 after Chromosomal Translocation in Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Emma C.; Appert, Alexandre; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Pannell, Richard; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Rabbitts, Terence H.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation t(9;11)(p22;q23) in acute myeloid leukemia fuses the MLL and AF9 genes. We have inactivated the murine homologue of AF9 to elucidate its normal role. No effect on hematopoiesis was observed in mice with a null mutation of Af9. However, an Af9 null mutation caused perinatal lethality, and homozygous mice exhibited anomalies of the axial skeleton. Both the cervical and thoracic regions were affected by anterior homeotic transformation. Strikingly, mice lacking function...

  1. Leukemia inhibitory factor enhances endometrial stromal cell decidualization in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Lin Shuya

    Full Text Available Adequate differentiation or decidualization of endometrial stromal cells (ESC is critical for successful pregnancy in humans and rodents. Here, we investigated the role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF in human and murine decidualization. Ex vivo human (H ESC decidualization was induced by estrogen (E, 10(-8 M plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 10(-7 M. Exogenous LIF (≥50 ng/ml induced STAT3 phosphorylation in non-decidualized and decidualized HESC and enhanced E+MPA-induced decidualization (measured by PRL secretion, P100 pg/mg G-CSF, IL6, IL8, and MCP1. Decidualized HESC secreted IL6, IL8, IL15 and MCP1. LIF (50 ng/ml up-regulated IL6 and IL15 (P<0.05 secretion in decidualized HESC compared to 0.5 ng/ml LIF. In murine endometrium, LIF and LIFR immunolocalized to decidualized stromal cells on day 5 of gestation (day 0 = day of plug detection. Western blotting confirmed that LIF and the LIFR were up-regulated in intra-implantation sites compared to inter-implantation sites on Day 5 of gestation. To determine the role of LIF during in vivo murine decidualization, intra-peritoneal injections of a long-acting LIF antagonist (PEGLA; 900 or 1200 µg were given just post-attachment, during the initiation of decidualization on day 4. PEGLA treatment reduced implantation site decidual area (P<0.05 and desmin staining immuno-intensity (P<0.05 compared to control on day 6 of gestation. This study demonstrated that LIF was an important regulator of decidualization in humans and mice and data provides insight into the processes underlying decidualization, which are important for understanding implantation and placentation.

  2. Murine Typhus in Child, Yucatan, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E.; Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E.; Uicab, Justo Eduardo Sulú

    2009-01-01

    A case of murine typhus in Yucatan was diagnosed in a child with nonspecific signs and symptoms. The finding of Rickettsia typhi increases the number of Rickettsia species identified in Yucatan and shows that studies are needed to determine the prevalence and incidence of rickettsioses in Mexico.

  3. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  4. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue an

  5. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  6. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  7. Plumbagin Modulates Leukemia Cell Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Gaascht

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plumbagin is a plant naphtoquinone exerting anti-cancer properties including apoptotic cell death induction and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The aim of this study was to elucidate parameters explaining the differential leukemia cell sensitivity towards this compound. Among several leukemia cell lines, U937 monocytic leukemia cells appeared more sensitive to plumbagin treatment in terms of cytotoxicity and level of apoptotic cell death compared to more resistant Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells. Moreover, U937 cells exhibited a ten-fold higher ROS production compared to Raji. Neither differential incorporation, nor efflux of plumbagin was detected. Pre-treatment with thiol-containing antioxidants prevented ROS production and subsequent induction of cell death by apoptosis whereas non-thiol-containing antioxidants remained ineffective in both cellular models. We conclude that the anticancer potential of plumbagin is driven by pro-oxidant activities related to the cellular thiolstat.

  8. Marijuana Smoking in Patients With Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Sara; Yacoub, Abraham; Cheema, Asima; Rihana, Nancy; Russo, Robin; Velez, Ana Paula; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Sandin, Ramon L; Bohra, Chandrashekar; Gajanan, Ganesh; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, marijuana (cannabis) is a widely used drug. The incidence of marijuana smoking is increasing and is second only to tobacco as the most widely smoked substance in the general population. It is also the second most commonly used recreational drug after alcohol. Some adverse effects of marijuana smoking have been documented; however, the number of studies on the pulmonary effects of marijuana in individuals with leukemia is limited. In our case series, we report on 2 men with acute myeloid leukemia with miliary nodular lung patterns on computed tomography of the chest due to heavy marijuana use. We also report on 2 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia who had a history of smoking marijuana and then developed lung opacities consistent with mold infection. PMID:27556668

  9. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  12. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish K Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and less commonly lymphoid. Association between CLL and myeloid malignancies (CML, acute myeloid leukemia and MDS, myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. In literature documenting CLL and CML in same patients, occur either simultaneously or CML is preceded by CLL.

  13. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  17. P-GLYCOPROTEIN QUANTITATION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mali in Nikougoftar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistance(MDR is a major problem in the treatment of cancer and hemalological malignancies. This resistance is multi factorial and is the result of decreased intra cellular drug accumulation. This is partly due to the presence of a 170KD intra membranous protein termed P-glycoprotein(P-gp that is an energy-dependent efflux pump which has increased expression on drug-resistance cells. In this study we identified the presence of P-gp by staining with Fluorescent Iso Thio Cyanate (FITC conjugated anti P-gp in acute leukemia patients and flow cytometry in addition to performing immunophenotype analysis and French, American British (FAB classification. Results revealed that one fifth of leuke¬mic patients expressed P-gp and this phenotype was more prevalent in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia(AUL and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML than in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia(ALL. Other findings showed a logical rela¬tionship between this phenotype and age groups. There was not any association between P-gp+ phenotype and FAB and Immunophenotyping sub classification, but there was a linear relationship between CD34 and CD7 expression and P-gp+ phenotype. The accumulation of P-gp molecule that was stated as Mean Fluores¬cence Intensity (MFI on the blasts1 membrane of AUL and AML patients showed marked increase in comparison to ALL. Furthermore MFI in P-gp+ relapsed patients was much more than P-gp+ pretreatment patients.

  18. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  19. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Lowenberg; T. Pabst; E. Vellenga; W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten; C. Graux; A. Ferrant; P. Sonneveld; B.J. Biemond; A. Gratwohl; G.E. de Greef; L.F. Verdonck; M.R. Schaafsma; M. Gregor; M. Theobald; U. Schanz; J. Maertens; G.J. Ossenkoppele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  20. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  1. Neuropsychological Functioning in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb, Roger N.; Regan, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological functioning of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent central-nervous-system prophylactic treatment. Findings replicated past research in showing survivors perform poorly on visual-motor integration tasks and develop a Nonverbal Learning Disability. Findings offer recommendations for future research and…

  2. TARGETED NANOPARTICLES FOR PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyaz eBasha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The two major forms of leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML account for about one third of the malignancies diagnosed in children. Despite the marked successes in ALL and AML treatment, concerns remain regarding the occurrence of resistant disease in subsets of patients the residual effects of therapy that often persist for decades beyond the cessation of treatment. Therefore, new approaches are needed to reduce or to avoid off target toxicities, associated with chemotherapy and their long term residual effects. Recently, nanotechnology has been employed to enhance cancer therapy, via improving the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of anti-cancer agents. While in the last several years, numerous review articles appeared detailing the size, composition, assembly and performance evaluation of different types of drug carrying nanoparticles, the description and evaluation of lipoprotein based drug carriers have been conspicuously absent from most of these major reviews. The current review focuses on such information regarding nanoparticles with an emphasis on high density lipoprotein (HDL-based drug delivery systems to examine their potential role(s in the enhanced treatment of children with leukemia.

  3. Trisomy 8 in leukemia: A GCRI experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal R Bakshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trisomy of chromosome 8 is frequently reported in myeloid lineage disorders and also detected in lymphoid neoplasms as well as solid tumors suggesting its role in neoplastic progression in general. It is likely to be a disease-modulating secondary event with underlying cryptic aberrations as it has been frequently reported in addition to known abnormalities contributing to clinical heterogeneity and modifying prognosis. Here, we share our findings of trisomy 8 in leukemia patients referred for diagnostic and prognostic cytogenetic assessment. Total 60 cases of trisomy 8, as a sole anomaly or in addition to other chromosomal aberrations, were reported (January 2005-September 2008. Unstimulated bone marrow or blood samples were cultured, followed by GTG banding and karyotyping as per the ISCN 2005. Patients with +8 were chronic myeloid leukemia (CML (36, acute myeloid leukemia (AML (17, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (7. In 7 patients, trisomy 8 was the sole anomaly, whereas in 6 patients +8 was in addition to normal clone, in 47 patients, the +8 was in addition to t(9;22, t(15;17, and others, including 3 with tetrasomy 8. Only one patient showed constitutional +8. The present study will form the basis of further cumulative studies to correlate potential differential effects of various karyotypic anomalies on disease progression and survival following a therapeutic regime. To unravel the role of extra 8 chromosome, constitutional chromosomal analysis and uniparental disomy will be considered.

  4. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Pession

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as in myeloid disorders. As the only new antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent to enter clinical use in the last 10 years, clofarabine was approved as an orphan drug with the primary indication of use in pediatric patients. Toxicity has been tolerable in a heavily pretreated patient population, and clofarabine has been demonstrated to be safe, both as a single agent and in combination therapies. Liver dysfunction has been the most frequently observed adverse event, but this is generally reversible. Numerous Phase I and II trials have recently been conducted, and are still ongoing in an effort to find the optimal role for clofarabine in various treatment strategies. Concomitant use of clofarabine, cytarabine, and etoposide was confirmed to be safe and effective in two independent trials. Based on the promising results when used as a salvage regimen, clofarabine is now being investigated for its potential to become part of frontline protocols.Keywords: clofarabine, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

  5. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  6. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  7. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  8. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN.

  9. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  12. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  15. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    OpenAIRE

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testi...

  16. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  17. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  18. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  19. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 Unclassified Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Lymphoid htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Lymphoid.bed ...

  9. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The.... Product: Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. Field Test Locations: Alabama,...

  10. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia...

  11. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  14. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  15. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  16. [Cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations in myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Myeloid leukemia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. Cytogenetic studies have revealed specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as translocations, and inversions. Fusion proteins derived from these abnormalities were identified in various subtypes of leukemia. Because most of these fusion proteins were not sufficient to induce leukemia by themselves in mouse models, additional oncogenic events have been thought to be necessary for leukemogenesis. Recently, a hypothesis called "two-hit model" for leukemia has been proposed. Two broad classes of mutations that proliferative or survival advantage of hematopoietic progenitors and impaired differentiation are required for inducing leukemia. In this article, we summarize some typical chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations associated with myeloid leukemia on the basis of this hypothesis.

  17. Therapy Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(8;16) Mimicking Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chharchhodawala, Taher; Gajendra, Smeeta; Tiwari, Priya; Gogia, Ajay; Gupta, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;16)(p11;q13) is a distinct clinical and morphological entity with poor prognosis, which is characterized by a high frequency of extramedullary involvement, most commonly leukemia cutis; association with therapy related AML; frequent coagulopathy and morphologic features overlapping acute promyelocytic leukemia(APL). Herein, we present a case of 47 year-old post-menopausal woman developing secondary AML with t(8;16)(p11;q13) after 1 year of completion of therapy for breast carcinoma. Blasts were granulated with few showing clefted nucleus resembling promyelocytes and immnuophenotyping showed high side scatter with MPO positivity and CD 34 and HLA-DR negativity. In view of promyelocyte like morphology and immunophenotyping of blasts, possibility of APL was considered but, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for PML-RARα fusion transcript came out to be negative. Conventional cytogenetics showed t(8;16)(p11;q13). So, we should keep possibility of t(8;16) (p11;q13) in therapy related acute myeloid leukemia in patient showing clinical and morphological features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:27408347

  18. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  19. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in pathways that are required for normal hematopoiesis. This thesis describes target genes of the mutated transcription factor PML-RAR , which is expressed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. APL...

  20. Evolution of ibrutinib resistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    OpenAIRE

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Burger, Jan A.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia, mostly arising in patients over the age of 50. The disease has been treated with chemo-immunotherapies with varying outcomes, depending on the genetic make-up of the tumor cells. Recently, a promising new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, has been developed, which resulted in successful responses in clinical trials, even for the most aggressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia types. The crucial current questions include how long diseas...

  1. Experiences of Mothers on Parenting Children with Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sheryl Jyothi Cornelio; Nayak, Baby S; Anice George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Childhood cancer is the leading cause of death among children. Leukemia is one of the most common childhood cancers. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of mothers on parenting children with leukemia. Materials and Methods: A qualitative approach with phenomenological design was used. To collect depth information from the mothers of children with leukemia, purposive sampling technique was adopted. Data were collected from ten mothers. Se...

  2. Induction of T-cell immunity against leukemia by dendritic cells pulsed with total RNA isolated from leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧; 尤胜国; 葛薇; 马双; 马楠; 赵春华

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and efficacy of eliciting leukemia-specific T-cell responses in syngeneic mice in vitro and in vivo using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with total RNA from leukemia cells.Methods DCs generated from bone marrow culture in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines were pulsed with cellular total RNA isolated from cultured L615 cells by cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). T-cell responses were evaluated by in vitro proliferation, and cytotoxicity assay. And in vivo immune protection and proghosis of mice with leukemia were studied.Conclusions These data support the use of DCs/RNA vaccine as a feasible and effective route to elicit leukemia immunity against unidentified leukemia-associated antigens for treatment of leukemia-bearing animals.

  3. Acute myelogenous leukemia and acute leukemic appendicitis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po-Jen Hsiao; Shih-Ming Kuo; Jia-Hong Chen; Hsuen-Fu Lin; Pau-Ling Chu; Shih-Hua Lin; Ching-Liang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can involve the gastrointestinal tract but rarely involves the appendix.We report a male patient who had 1 year partial remission from AML and who presented with apparent acute appendicitis as the initial manifestation of leukemia relapse. Pathological findings of the appendix revealed transmural infiltrates of myeloblasts, whichindicated a diagnosis of leukemia. Unfortunately, the patient died from progression of the disease on the 19th d after admission. Although leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is uncommon, patients with leukemia relapse can present with symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis.

  4. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of down syndrome individual with leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Williams, B.J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zupursky, A.; Doyle, J. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jacobs, P.A. [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom); Shugar, A.L.; Soukup, S.W. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients, with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for chromosomally normal children. Furthermore, one type of leukemia, called {open_quotes}transient leukemia{close_quotes} (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown, but we and others have hypothesized that it may be influenced by the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 55 individuals consisting of 17 cases with TL, 7 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia subtype M7 (ANLL-M7, or acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, postulated to be related to TL), and 31 cases of other forms of leukemia. Analysis of these cases suggests differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. Specifically, the TL and ANLL-M7 cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e., mosaic trisomies, rings, and/or isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Additionally, genetic mapping studies suggest an increase in the frequency of disomic homozygosity, especially in proximal 21q, in DS individuals with TL and ANLL-M7. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Osteoporosis after treatment for childhood lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have compared the CT bone density of 34 survivors of cute lymphoblastic leukemia with that of a matched control group of 34 subjects who underwent CT examination because of trauma. The leukemia survivors had significantly lower bone density than controls (8% lower, P < .002). This decrease was unrelated to age, duration of chemotherapy, or time off therapy. All patients had received maintenance therapy with methotrexate. To determine the effect of methotrexate on bone density during growth, longitudinal CT measurements were obtained in rabbits following administration of methotrexate (1.5 mg/kg/wk) from 2 weeks of age until the time of skeletal maturity. CT measurements showed no significant difference between methotrexate-treated and control rabbits

  6. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  7. Photodynamic therapy of different photosensitizers in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sujuan; Zhang, Zhenxi; Jiang, Dazong

    2002-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a cancer treatment using a photosensitizer and visible light has been applied to treatment of blood cancer-leukemia. The effect of PDT may be modulated by the leukemia cell type; the photosensitizer's type, dose, dose rate changes; the incubation time; the light wavelength, dosage, dose rate change; the conjugation of photosensitizers to variety subcellular target: cell membrane, mitochondia, lipoprotein or liposome; the addition of chemotherapeutic agents et al. Many reports in the current literature are confusing and often apparently contradictory. In this article, we have attempted to conduct and present a comprehensive review of this rapidly expanding novel field in a range of photosensitizers. Cell types, photosensitizers, treatment conditions and mechanism of PDT are considered. Nonetheless, there is ample ground for optimism, and such knowledge as we already have should effectively underpin the clinical research that is ongoing.

  8. [Treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucsi, Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western countries. The abnormal B lymphocytes progress into the blood and infiltrate the bone marrow, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. CLL is a disease of the adults and older individuals who often have coexisting conditions. It usually progresses slowly, but in patients who need treatment, CLL eventually returns. For relapsed, refractory patients treatment options are limited. The only curative treatment is bone marrow transplantation. However, the new, alternative therapeutics show superior efficacy in CLL than standard regimens. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important therapeutic aspects of CLL and to give an insight into the novel treatment options. PMID:27275639

  9. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  10. Criteria and Classification of Hybrid Acute Leukemia in 72 Acute Leukemias Based Mainly on Flow Cytometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Sadao; Nomoto, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Souichi; Shinada, Shoji; Shibata, Akira

    1991-01-01

    Phenotypes of leukemic cells can be determined through dual staining with pairs of FITC-labeled and PE-labeled monoclonal antibodies using a laser flow cytometer. Hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) was diagnosed when leukemic cells expressed 2 or more lymphoid markers and at least on myeloid marker simultaneously. Based on this criteria, nineteen out of 72 cases with untreated acute leukemia were diagnosed as HAL, 15 of 29 (51%) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 4 of 43 (9%) patients wi...

  11. TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Baccarani; Fausto Castagnetti; Gabriele Gugliotta; Francesca Palandri; Gianantonio Rosti

    2014-01-01

    The first treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) included spleen x-radiation and conventional drugs, mainly Busulfan and Hydroxyurea. This therapy improved the quality of life during the chronic phase of the disease, without preventing nor significantly delaying the progression towards advanced phases. The introduction of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) marked the first important breakthrough in the evolution of CML treatment, because about 50% of the eligible patients wer...

  12. Treatment Recommendations for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Baccarani, Michele; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Palandri, Francesca; Rosti, Gianantonio

    2014-01-01

    The first treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) included spleen x-radiation and conventional drugs, mainly Busulfan and Hydroxyurea. This therapy improved the quality of life during the chronic phase of the disease, without preventing nor significantly delaying the progression towards advanced phases. The introduction of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) marked the first important breakthrough in the evolution of CML treatment, because about 50% of the eligible patients wer...

  13. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Ross L; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J; Willis, Stephanie G; Kim T. Nguyen; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (A...

  14. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  15. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Masetti, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity i...

  16. Systemic mastocytosis with associated acute myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhrebker, Leah; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a condition associated with a clonal neoplastic proliferation of mast cells. Approximately 40% of patients with SM present with an associated clonal hematological non–mast cell lineage disorder. Patients presenting with SM–acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have the worst prognosis. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with SM-AML. After initial treatment with a standard regimen of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)/idarubicin, her bone marrow showed re...

  17. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  18. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Nitin; O’Brien, Susan

    2013-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell survival. Many kinases in the BCR signaling pathway are currently being studied as potential therapeutic targets. These include Lyn, Syk, PI3 and Bruton tyrosine (BTK). Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is a novel first-in-class selective inhibitor of BTK. Preclinical evidence suggests that ibrutinib inhibits CLL cell survival and proliferation. In addition, it also affects CLL cell migration and homing. Early clinic...

  19. The Application of Spectral Karyotyping in Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Wanming Da; Xiaoping Han

    2006-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping (SKY) is a novel cytogenetic technique, which has been developed to unambiguously display and identify all 24 human chromosomes at one time without previous knowledge of any abnormalities involved. SKY can discern aberrations that fail to be easily detected by conventional banding techniques and by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Therefore SKY is highly accurate, highly sensitive, and highly prognostic. In this report the featurese and application of SKY in studies of leukemia are reviewed.

  20. Induction of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haojian; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder derived from a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), harboring Philadelphia chromosome (Ph chromosome). Formation of the Ph chromosome is caused by a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22 t(9;22)(q34;q11), resulting in a fusion protein known as BCR-ABL which has constitutive tyrosine kinase activity and promotes the proliferation of leukemia cells via multiple mechanisms. Studies on CML have led to the identification of the first cancer-associated chromosomal abnormality and the subsequent development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit BCR-ABL kinase activity in CML. It has become clear that leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in CML are insensitive to inhibition by TKIs, and eradication of LSCs appears to be difficult. Therefore, some of the major issues in current CML therapy are to understand the biology of LSCs and to investigate why LSCs are insensitive to TKIs for developing curative therapeutic strategies. In this regard, application of mouse models recapitulating human CML disease will be critical. In this chapter, we describe methods for induction of CML in mice with BCR-ABL. PMID:27581135

  1. Advances in Stem Cell Therapy for Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong; Qu, Qi; Liu, Liming; Wu, Depei

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the most effective post remission treatment for leukemia, resulting in lower relapse rates than alternative therapies. However, it is limited by the lack of suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donors and high rates of transplant-related morbidity and mortality. Cord blood transplantation (CBT) and haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT) expand the potential donor pool but are also associated with major complications. Co-infusion of third-party donor stem cells with a CBT/haplo-SCT, which is called "dual transplantation," has been reported to improve the outcome of HSCT by accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution and reducing the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In addition, infusion of HLA-mismatched donor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized donor peripheral blood stem cells after chemotherapy, the so called "microtransplantation", has been shown to promote the graft-versus-leukemia effect and hasten hematopoietic recovery without amplifying GVHD. Herein, we review recent advances in stem cell therapy for leukemia with a specific focus on dual transplantation and microtransplantation.

  2. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia.

  3. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Th Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25, 1.55) (using 2,785 cases and 3,635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases and 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases and 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases and 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases and 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases and 2,655 controls), respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants' exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate the associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood.

  4. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  5. Overview on available animal models for application in leukemia research; Uebersicht ueber vorhandene Tiermodelle, die fuer die Leukaemieforschung angewandt werden koennten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkhardt, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, I.; Cobaleda, C.; Hauer, J.

    2015-01-15

    The term ''leukemia'' encompasses a group of diseases with a variable clinical and pathological presentation. Its cellular origin, its biology and the underlying molecular genetic alterations determine the very variable and individual disease phenotype. The focus of this review is to discuss the most important guidelines to be taken into account when we aim at developing an ''ideal'' animal model to study leukemia. The animal model should mimic all the clinical, histological and molecular genetic characteristics of the human phenotype and should be applicable as a clinically predictive model. It should achieve all the requirements to be used as a standardized model adaptive to basic research as well as to pharmaceutical practice. Furthermore it should fulfill all the criteria to investigate environmental risk factors, the role of genomic mutations and be applicable for therapeutic testing. These constraints limit the usefulness of some existing animal models, which are however very valuable for basic research. Hence in this review we will primarily focus on genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to study the most frequent types of childhood leukemia. GEMMs are robust models with relatively low site specific variability and which can, with the help of the latest gene modulating tools be adapted to individual clinical and research questions. Moreover they offer the possibility to restrict oncogene expression to a defined target population and regulate its expression level as well as its timely activity. Until recently it was only possible in individual cases to develop a murin model, which fulfills the above mentioned requirements. Hence the development of new regulatory elements to control targeted oncogene expression should be priority. Tightly controlled and cell specific oncogene expression can then be combined with a knock-in approach and will depict a robust murine model, which enables almost physiologic oncogene

  6. Leukemia Mediated Endothelial Cell Activation Modulates Leukemia Cell Susceptibility to Chemotherapy through a Positive Feedback Loop Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pezeshkian

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the chances of achieving disease-free survival are low. Studies have demonstrated a supportive role of endothelial cells (ECs in normal hematopoiesis. Here we show that similar intercellular relationships exist in leukemia. We demonstrate that leukemia cells themselves initiate these interactions by directly modulating the behavior of resting ECs through the induction of EC activation. In this inflammatory state, activated ECs induce the adhesion of a sub-set of leukemia cells through the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These adherent leukemia cells are sequestered in a quiescent state and are unaffected by chemotherapy. The ability of adherent cells to later detach and again become proliferative following exposure to chemotherapy suggests a role of this process in relapse. Interestingly, differing leukemia subtypes modulate this process to varying degrees, which may explain the varied response of AML patients to chemotherapy and relapse rates. Finally, because leukemia cells themselves induce EC activation, we postulate a positive-feedback loop in leukemia that exists to support the growth and relapse of the disease. Together, the data defines a new mechanism describing how ECs and leukemia cells interact during leukemogenesis, which could be used to develop novel treatments for those with AML.

  7. Significant differences in integration sites of Moloney murine leukemia virus/Moloney murine sarcoma virus retroviral vector carrying recombinant coagulation factor IX in two human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho-Fernandes, Andrielle; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Abraham, Kuruvilla Joseph; de Freitas, Marcela Cristina Corrêa; da Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales; Picanço-Castro, Virginia; de Sousa Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-05-01

    Ligation-mediated-PCR was performed followed by the mapping of 177 and 150 integration sites from HepG2 and Hek293 transduced with chimera vector carrying recombinant human Factor IX (rhFIX) cDNA, respectively. The sequences were analyzed for chromosome preference, CpG, transcription start site (TSS), repetitive elements, fragile sites and target genes. In HepG2, rhFIX was had an increased preference for chromosomes 6 and 17; the median distance to the nearest CpG islands was 15,240 base pairs and 37 % of the integrations occurred in RefSeq genes. In Hek293, rhFIX had an increased preference for chromosome 5; the median distance to the nearest CpG islands was 209,100 base pairs and 74 % of the integrations occurred in RefSeq genes. The integrations in both cell lines were distant from the TSS. The integration patterns associated with this vector are different in each cell line. PMID:25650340

  8. Combination angiostatin and endostatin gene transfer induces synergistic antiangiogenic activity in vitro and antitumor efficacy in leukemia and solid tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scappaticci, F A; Smith, R; Pathak, A; Schloss, D; Lum, B; Cao, Y; Johnson, F; Engleman, E G; Nolan, G P

    2001-02-01

    Angiostatin and endostatin are potent endothelial cell growth inhibitors that have been shown to inhibit angiogenesis in vivo and tumor growth in mice. However, tumor shrinkage requires chronic delivery of large doses of these proteins. Here we report synergistic antitumor activity and survival of animals when these factors are delivered in combination to tumors by retroviral gene transfer. We have demonstrated this efficacy in both murine leukemia and melanoma models. Complete loss of tumorigenicity was seen in 40% of the animals receiving tumors transduced by the combination of angiostatin and endostatin in the leukemia model. The synergy was also demonstrated in vitro on human umbilical vein endothelial cell differentiation and this antiangiogenic activity may suggest a mechanism for the antitumor activity in vivo. These findings imply separate pathways by which angiostatin and endostatin mediate their antiangiogenic effects. Together, these data suggest that a combination of antiangiogenic factors delivered by retroviral gene transfer may produce synergistic antitumor effects in both leukemia and solid tumors, thus avoiding long-term administration of recombinant proteins. The data also suggest that novel combinations of antiangiogenic factors delivered into tumors require further investigation as therapeutic modalities. PMID:11237675

  9. Murine erythrocytes contain high levels of lysophospholipase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Roelofsen, B.; Sanderink, G.; Middelkoop, E.; Hamer, R.

    1984-01-01

    Murine erythrocytes were found to be unique in the high levels of lysophospholipase activity in the cytosol of these cells. The specific activity of the enzyme in the cytosol of the murine cells is 10-times higher than in the cytosol of rabbit erythrocytes and approximately three orders of magnitude

  10. ENHANCED ANTITUMOR EFFECTS OF SUICIDE GENE THERAPY BY SIMULTANEOUS TRANSFER OF GMCSF GENE IN LEUKEMIA-BEARING MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Dianwen; Cao Xuetao; Yu Yizhi; Tao Qun; Wang Baomei; Wan Tao

    1998-01-01

    In the present report, antitumor effect of combined transfer of suicide gene and cytokine gene was studied.Adenovirus engineered to express E. Coli. Cytosine deaminase (AdCD) and/or adenovirus engineered toexpress murine granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor (AdGMCSF) were used for the treatment of leukemia-bearing mice. The mice were inoculated s.c. With FBL-3 erythroleukemia cells and 3days later received intratumoral injection of AdCD in the presence or absence of AdGMCSF followed by intraperitoneal 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) treatment. The results demonstrated that mice received combined therapy of AdCD/5FC and AdGMCSF developed tumors most slowly and survived much longer when compared with mice treated with AdCD/5FC alone, AdGMCSF alone, AdlacZ/5FC or PBS. Combined transfer of CD gene and GM-CSF gene achieved higher specific CTL activity than control therapies. Pathological examination illustrated that the tumor mass showed obvious necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration in mice after combined therapy. The results demonstrated that combined transfer of suicide gene and cytokine gene could synergistically inhibit the growth of leukemia in mice and induce antitumor immunity of the host. The combination therapy might be a potential approach for cancer gene therapy.

  11. Characterization of the genome-wide TLX1 binding profile in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinck, K; Van Loocke, W; Van der Meulen, J; Van de Walle, I; Ongenaert, M; Rondou, P; Wallaert, A; de Bock, C E; Van Roy, N; Poppe, B; Cools, J; Soulier, J; Taghon, T; Speleman, F; Van Vlierberghe, P

    2015-12-01

    The TLX1 transcription factor is critically involved in the multi-step pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and often cooperates with NOTCH1 activation during malignant T-cell transformation. However, the exact molecular mechanism by which these T-cell specific oncogenes cooperate during transformation remains to be established. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to establish the genome-wide binding pattern of TLX1 in human T-ALL. This integrative genomics approach showed that ectopic TLX1 expression drives repression of T cell-specific enhancers and mediates an unexpected transcriptional antagonism with NOTCH1 at critical target genes, including IL7R and NOTCH3. These phenomena coordinately trigger a TLX1-driven pre-leukemic phenotype in human thymic precursor cells, reminiscent of the thymus regression observed in murine TLX1 tumor models, and create a strong genetic pressure for acquiring activating NOTCH1 mutations as a prerequisite for full leukemic transformation. In conclusion, our results uncover a functional antagonism between cooperative oncogenes during the earliest phases of tumor development and provide novel insights in the multi-step pathogenesis of TLX1-driven human leukemia. PMID:26108691

  12. Anti-Melanogenic Property of Geoditin A in Murine B16 Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Tao Che

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Geoditin A, an isomalabaricane triterpene isolated from marine sponge Geodia japonica, has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in leukemia HL60 cells and human colon HT29 cancer cells through an oxidative stress, a process also interfering with normal melanogenesis in pigment cells. Treatment of murine melanoma B16 cells with geoditin A decreased expression of melanogenic proteins and cell melanogenesis which was aggravated with adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536, indicating melanogenic inhibition was mediated through a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway. Immunofluorescence microscopy and glycosylation studies revealed abnormal glycosylation patterns of melanogenic proteins (tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1, and a co-localization of tyrosinase with calnexin (CNX and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1, implicating a post-translational modification in the ER and a degradation of tyrosinase in the lysosome. Taken together, potent anti-melanogenic property and the relatively low cytotoxicity of geoditin A have demonstrated its therapeutic potential as a skin lightening agent.

  13. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  14. Metabolic alterations and drug sensitivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistant leukemia cells with a FLT3/ITD mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amin; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Liu, Kaiyan; Zhan, Guilian; Liu, Daolu; Wen, Shijun; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Peng; Hu, Yumin

    2016-07-28

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the juxtamembrane region of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) receptor is a common type of mutation in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and patient response to FLT3 inhibitors appears to be transient due to the emergence of drug resistance. We established two sorafenib-resistant cell lines carrying FLT3/ITD mutations, including the murine BaF3/ITD-R and human MV4-11-R cell lines. Gene expression profile analysis of the resistant and parental cells suggests that the highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes are related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Both murine and human resistant cell lines display a longer doubling time, along with a significant inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and substantial upregulation of glycolysis. The sorafenib-resistant cells exhibit increased expression of a majority of glycolytic enzymes, including hexokinase 2, which is also highly expressed in the mitochondrial fraction and is associated with resistance to apoptotic cell death. The sorafenib-resistant cells are collaterally sensitive to a number of glycolytic inhibitors including 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate propylester. Our study reveals a metabolic signature of sorafenib-resistant cells and suggests that glycolytic inhibition may override such resistance and warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:27132990

  15. Splenectomy normalizes hematocrit in murine polycythemia vera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Rung Mo

    Full Text Available Splenic enlargement (splenomegaly develops in numerous disease states, although a specific pathogenic role for the spleen has rarely been described. In polycythemia vera (PV, an activating mutation in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2(V617 induces splenomegaly and an increase in hematocrit. Splenectomy is sparingly performed in patients with PV, however, due to surgical complications. Thus, the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of human PV remains unknown. We specifically tested the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of PV by performing either sham (SH or splenectomy (SPL surgeries in a murine model of JAK2(V617F-driven PV. Compared to SH-operated mice, which rapidly develop high hematocrits after JAK2(V617F transplantation, SPL mice completely fail to develop this phenotype. Disease burden (JAK2(V617 is equivalent in the bone marrow of SH and SPL mice, however, and both groups develop fibrosis and osteosclerosis. If SPL is performed after PV is established, hematocrit rapidly declines to normal even though myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis again develop independently in the bone marrow. In contrast, SPL only blunts hematocrit elevation in secondary, erythropoietin-induced polycythemia. We conclude that the spleen is required for an elevated hematocrit in murine, JAK2(V617F-driven PV, and propose that this phenotype of PV may require a specific interaction between mutant cells and the spleen.

  16. Murine Typhus: Clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Peniche Lara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE Rickettsia typhi is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against R. typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of Rickettsia typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi.

  17. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (Pbenzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  18. The molecular basis of familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther-Swanepoel, Dalemari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia is only just starting to be recognized. This perspective article by Drs. Crowther-Swanepoel and Houlston provides an up-to-date review the molecular epidemiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, with emphasis on the integration of biology and genomics. See related paper on page 647.

  19. JAK kinase inhibitors for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Degryse, Sandrine; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have identified activating mutations in components of the interleukin-7 receptor complex (IL7R, JAK1, and JAK3). It will be of interest to investigate both JAK1 and JAK3 kinase inhibitors as targeted agents for these leukemias.

  20. Unraveling Glucocorticoid Resistance In MLLrearranged Infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.P. Hagelstein (Jill)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In the Netherlands, approximately 650 children aged between 0 and 18 years are diagnosed with cancer every year, including ~120 patients suffering from leukemia. Leukemia (Greek for leukos - white, and haima for blood) is a type of cancer characterized by an abnormal in

  1. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in path

  2. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  3. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  4. Tax fingerprint in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbachi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Fujikawa et al demonstrate that the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax induces an epigenetic-dependent global modification of host gene expression in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL). Hence, the fingerprint of Tax is all over ATL and this may be used for finally capturing ATL. PMID:27056993

  5. MicroRNA miR-125b causes leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Marina; Harris, Marian H; Zhou, Beiyan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNA miR-125b has been implicated in several kinds of leukemia. The chromosomal translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) found in patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia leads to an overexpression of miR-125b of up to 90-fold normal. Moreover, miR-125b is also up-regulated in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the t(11;14)(q24;q32) translocation. To decipher the presumed oncogenic mechanism of miR-125b, we used transplantation experiments in mice. All mice transplanted with fetal liver cells ectopically expressing miR-125b showed an increase in white blood cell count, in particular in neutrophils and monocytes, associated with a macrocytic anemia. Among these mice, half died of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or a myeloproliferative neoplasm, suggesting an important role for miR-125b in early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, coexpression of miR-125b and the BCR-ABL fusion gene in transplanted cells accelerated the development of leukemia in mice, compared with control mice expressing only BCR-ABL, suggesting that miR-125b confers a proliferative advantage to the leukemic cells. Thus, we show that overexpression of miR-125b is sufficient both to shorten the latency of BCR-ABL-induced leukemia and to independently induce leukemia in a mouse model.

  6. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  7. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  8. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  9. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Peran Dokter Gigi Dalam Mendeteksi Dini Leukemia Melalui Manifestasinya Di Rongga Mulut (Laporan Kasus)

    OpenAIRE

    Nelmi Wahyuni Srg

    2008-01-01

    Leukemia adalah keganasan perdarahan yang berkembang di dalam sumsum tulang. Penyakit ini menimbulkan manifestasi oral yang sering terjadi pada tahap awal perkembangan penyakit. Banyak laporan kasus yang membuktikan bahwa manifestasi oral leukemia berfungsi sebagai indikator untuk mendiagnosa leukemia. Dengan demikian, dokter gigi memiliki peranan yang penting dalam mendeteksi dini leukemia. Skripsi ini melaporkan suatu kasus hiperplasia gingiva disertai perdarahan oral yang disebabkan ol...

  11. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  12. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  13. High-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  14. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  15. Validation and structural characterization of the LEDGF/p75-MLL interface as a new target for the treatment of MLL-dependent leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermáková, Kateřina; Tesina, Petr; Demeulemeester, Jonas; El Ashkar, Sara; Méreau, Hélène; Schwaller, Juerg; Rezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Vaclav; De Rijck, Jan

    2014-09-15

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion-driven acute leukemias represent a genetically distinct subset of leukemias with poor prognosis. MLL forms a ternary complex with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) and MENIN. LEDGF/p75, a chromatin reader recognizing H3K36me3 marks, contributes to the association of the MLL multiprotein complex to chromatin. Formation of this complex is critical for the development of MLL leukemia. Available X-ray data represent only a partial structure of the LEDGF/p75-MLL-MENIN complex. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified an additional LEDGF/p75-MLL interface, which overlaps with the binding site of known LEDGF/p75 interactors-HIV-1 integrase, PogZ, and JPO2. Binding of these proteins or MLL to LEDGF/p75 is mutually exclusive. The resolved structure, as well as mutational analysis, shows that the interaction is primarily sustained via two aromatic residues of MLL (F148 and F151). Colony-forming assays in MLL-AF9(+) leukemic cells expressing MLL interaction-defective LEDGF/p75 mutants revealed that this interaction is essential for transformation. Finally, we show that the clonogenic growth of primary murine MLL-AF9-expressing leukemic blasts is selectively impaired upon overexpression of a LEDGF/p75-binding cyclic peptide CP65, originally developed to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. The newly defined protein-protein interface therefore represents a new target for the development of therapeutics against LEDGF/p75-dependent MLL fusion-driven leukemic disorders. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5139-51. ©2014 AACR.

  16. Immunological Analyses of Leukemia Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Kazuhito; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the intracellular localization and expression levels of specific proteins in CML Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) have been evaluated by fluorescence immunohistochemistry (FIHC). More recently, Duolink(®) in situ PLA technology has opened up a new and more quantitative way to evaluate signal transduction, posttranslational modification, and protein-protein interaction at the single-stem-cell level. This novel methodology, which employs two antibody-based probes, has already increased our understanding of the biology of the rare CML LSC population. In the future, the use of this approach may contribute to the development of novel therapeutics aimed at eradicating CML LSCs in CML patients. PMID:27581137

  17. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  18. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles with admixture of larger polymorphonuclears (myeloblasts/myelocytes, eosinophils with double nuclei, and larger phagocytic cells confirmed the diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML.

  19. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Sebastian; Dengjel, Jörn; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is driven by the oncogenic fusion kinase Bcr-Abl, which organizes its own signaling network with various proteins. These proteins, their interactions, and their role in relevant signaling pathways can be analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches in various models systems, e.g., in cell culture models. In this chapter, we describe in detail immunoprecipitations and quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of components of the Bcr-Abl signaling pathway in the human CML cell line K562. PMID:27581145

  20. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Heterohybridoma for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.Victoria Chanu and M. Ayub Ali

    Full Text Available Hybridoma technology described by kohler and Milstein produce only mouse immunoglobulins. Such immunoglobulins have limited use due to its negative side effects such as the recipient’s immune response. The production of a non murine monoclonal antibody to combat the problems of murine monoclonal antibody is again difficult due to the lack of a suitable myeloma cell line. Heterohybridoma formed by the fusion of lymphocyte of one species with the myeloma cell of a different species is the solution, which can be used for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(8.000: 390-392

  2. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  3. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  4. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  5. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  7. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia Presenting as Mediastinal Mass-2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Rig; Kotwal, Jyoti; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Ahmed, Rehan; Sharma, Ajay; Singh, Jasjit

    2016-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia symbolizes a very small subset of acute leukemia that simply cannot be allocated as lymphoid or myeloid lineage. The 2008 World Health Organisation classification established stringent standard for diagnosis of mixed phenotype acute leukemia, accentuating myeloperoxidase for myeloid lineage, cytoplasmic CD3 for T lineage and CD19 with other B markers for B lineage obligation. Mixed phenotype leukemia is rare and 3-5 % of acute leukmias of all age groups, is associated with poor outcome with overall survival of 18 months. We wish to present two cases of mixed phenotypic acute leukemia who presented with mediastinal masses, were suspected to be T cell lymphoma/leukemia clinically and radiologically. In one case, tissue diagnosis was given as lymphoma for which treatment was given. These cases show that patients diagnosed as lymphoma on histopathology can be cases of mixed phenotype acute leukemia and varying specific treatment protocols and follow up are required. Awareness of these entities will help in proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27408360

  9. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of neonatal leukemia in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Suellen Valadares; Andrade, Francianne; Magalhães, Isis Q; Costa, Imaruí; Silva, Denise Bousfield; D'Andrea, Maria Lydia; Pinheiro, Vitória P; Lee, Maria Lucia M; Werneck, Fernando; Emerenciano, Mariana; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2015-04-01

    The clinical and molecular findings of 77 cases of neonatal leukemia (NL) and 380 of infant leukemia (IL) were selected to distinguish features between NL and IL. Somatic gene mutations associated with acute leukemia including FLT3, RAS and PTPN11 were revisited. There were 42 cases of congenital leukemia associated with Down syndrome (DS) and 39 of these cases presented features of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7. Twenty-seven of the DS cases underwent spontaneous remission and were reclassified as a transient myeloproliferative disorder. GATA1 mutations were found in 70% of these cases. In non-DS, frequent abnormalities were MLL rearrangements, mainly MLL-AFF1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL-MLLT3 in AML. The FLT3 mutation was not found, while RAS (n = 4) and PTPN11 (n = 2) mutations were identified and reported for the first time in NL. There was substantial evidence to support that somatic abnormalities occur in utero. Thus, congenital leukemia is a good model for understanding leukemogenesis.

  10. A population-based study of large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M V; Hook, C C; Call, T G; Go, R S

    2016-01-01

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disorder of cytotoxic cells. T-cell LGL (T-LGL) leukemia is characterized by accumulation of cytotoxic T cells in blood and infiltration of the bone marrow, liver or spleen. Population-based studies have not been reported in LGL leukemia. We present clinical characteristics, natural history and risk factors for poor survival in patients with LGL leukemia using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) and the United States National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). LGL leukemia is an extremely rare disease with the incidence of 0.2 cases per 1 000 000 individuals. The median age at diagnosis was 66.5 years with females likely to be diagnosed at 3 years earlier compared with males. Analysis of patient-level data using NCDB (n=978) showed that 45% patients with T-LGL leukemia required some form of systemic treatment at the time of diagnosis. T-LGL leukemia patients have reduced survival compared with general population, with a median overall survival of 9 years. Multivariate analysis showed that age >60 years at the time of diagnosis and the presence of significant comorbidities were independent predictors of poor survival. PMID:27494824

  11. Leukemia stem cells in drug resistance and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Chao-hua; ZHANG Qiu-ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the central role of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in drug resistance and metastasis, aiming to provide key insights into leukemogenic pathology and developing novel therapeutic strategies against the relapse of leukemia.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies reported in PubMed using the key terms "tumor-initiating cells", "leukemia stem cells", "drug resistance" and "metastasis".Study selection Relevant articles on studies of leukemia stem cells were selected.Results Increasing numbers of studies have suggested the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and maintenance of cancer, especially in leukemia. This review has summarized the origin, characteristics, isolation and identification of LSCs. It highlights the crucial role of LSCs in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia by illustrating possible mechanisms and aims to provide novel therapeutic strategies for LSCs-targeted treatment.Conclusion LSCs play a crucial role in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia and new promising LSCs-targeted therapies warrant investigation in both experimental models and clinical practice.

  12. Vorinostat, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  14. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  15. Nanomedicine approaches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Andra-Sorina; Nagy-Simon, Timea; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion

    2016-09-28

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the malignancy with the highest incidence amongst children (26% of all cancer cases), being surpassed only by the cancers of the brain and of the nervous system. The most recent research on ALL is focusing on new molecular therapies, like targeting specific biological structures in key points in the cell cycle, or using selective inhibitors for transmembranary proteins involved in cell signalling, and even aiming cell surface receptors with specifically designed antibodies for active targeting. Nanomedicine approaches, especially by the use of nanoparticle-based compounds for the delivery of drugs, cancer diagnosis or therapeutics may represent new and modern ways in the near future anti-cancer therapies. This review offers an overview on the recent role of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as resulting from a thorough literature survey. A short introduction on the basics of ALL is presented followed by the description of the conventional methods used in the ALL detection and treatment. We follow our discussion by introducing some of the general nano-strategies used for cancer detection and treatment. The detailed role of organic and inorganic nanoparticles in ALL applications is further presented, with a special focus on gold nanoparticle-based nanocarriers of antileukemic drugs. PMID:27460684

  16. Radiological terrorism and estimate leukemia incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological dispersal devices (RDD) are widely used as a terrorist tool leading to major environmental and public health concerns. This work is focused on simulating a dispersive scenario where an amount of most common radionuclide for this purpose is released. In order to estimate the total effective dose from such release, an affected urban area was chosen as a potential public mass concentration during World Cup in 2014 and Olympics in 2016 in Rio de Janeiro. Specialized simulation software called HotSpot Health Physics Code using a semi-empirical Gaussian model, was used to simulate dispersion of Cs-137 following detonation of a RDD. The simulation was designed to determine dose curves as a function of distance from the hot site. Additionally, it was determined the relative risk of leukemia incidence as well as statistical correlation between malignancies and exposure to radiation, based on probability of causation calculations. Results was suggestive that exists dependence on age at exposure time and the probability of leukemia development. This study emphasizes the importance of fast response, using a user-friendly computational method that may help, at first sight, to guide the response from the basic actions to the complete decision making process looking after health effects on public and environmental detriment. (author)

  17. ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION FOR CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Laurenti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Even if Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL often has an indolent behavior with good responsiveness to cytoreductive treatment, about 20% of the patients, so called "poor-risk" patients, show an aggressive course and die within a few years despite early intensive therapies. Criteria for poor-risk disease according to the European Bone Marrow Transplantation (EBMT CLL Transplant Consensus are: purine analogue refractoriness, early relapse after purine analogue combination therapy, CLL with p53 lesion requiring treatment. Allogeneic transplant has potential curative role in CLL, however burden with very  high transplant related mortality (TRM rates of 38-50%: A major advance in reducing the short-term morbidity and mortality of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT has been the introduction of non-myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC regimens to allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells. There is no doubt that the crucial therapeutic principle of allo-SCT in CLL is graft versus leukemia (GVL activity. The major complications of allogeneic SCT in CLL are: chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD affecting quality of life, high graft rejection and infection rates rates correlated with preexisting immunosuppression. Disease relapse remains the major cause of failure after RIC allo-HCT in CLL patients. Sensitive minimal residual disease (MRD quantification has strong prognostic impact after transplant.

  18. Key Data Elements in Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Julian; Holz, Christian; Neuhaus, Phillip; Bernardi, Massimo; Boehm, Alexandra; Ganser, Arnold; Gore, Steven; Heaney, Mark; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Krug, Utz; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Smith, Alexandra; Weltermann, Ansgar; de Witte, Theo; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Dugas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Data standards consisting of key data elements for clinical routine and trial documentation harmonize documentation within and across different health care institutions making documentation more efficient and improving scientific data analysis. This work focusses on the field of myeloid leukemia (ML), where a semantic core of common data elements (CDEs) in routine and trial documentation is established by automatic UMLS-based form analysis of existing documentation models. These CDEs (n = 227) were initially reviewed and commented by leukemia experts before they were systematically surveyed by an international voting process through seven hematologists of four countries. The total agreement score was 86%. 116 elements (51%) of these share an agreement score of 100%. This work generated CDEs with language-independent semantic codes and international clinical expert review to build a first approach towards an international data standard for ML. A first version of the CDE list is implemented in the data standard Operational Data Model and additional other data formats for reuse in different medical information systems. PMID:27577388

  19. Radiological terrorism and estimate leukemia incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint' Yves, Thalis Leon de Avila [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maia, Arlei; Andrade, Edson R. de [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEX), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radiological dispersal devices (RDD) are widely used as a terrorist tool leading to major environmental and public health concerns. This work is focused on simulating a dispersive scenario where an amount of most common radionuclide for this purpose is released. In order to estimate the total effective dose from such release, an affected urban area was chosen as a potential public mass concentration during World Cup in 2014 and Olympics in 2016 in Rio de Janeiro. Specialized simulation software called HotSpot Health Physics Code using a semi-empirical Gaussian model, was used to simulate dispersion of Cs-137 following detonation of a RDD. The simulation was designed to determine dose curves as a function of distance from the hot site. Additionally, it was determined the relative risk of leukemia incidence as well as statistical correlation between malignancies and exposure to radiation, based on probability of causation calculations. Results was suggestive that exists dependence on age at exposure time and the probability of leukemia development. This study emphasizes the importance of fast response, using a user-friendly computational method that may help, at first sight, to guide the response from the basic actions to the complete decision making process looking after health effects on public and environmental detriment. (author)

  20. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic