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Sample records for airway resistance maneuver

  1. [The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy].

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    Umutoglu, Tarik; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Daskaya, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Erdogan; Cakir, Erkan; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded. Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p0.05). Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (ptriple airway maneuvers (p>0.05). All airway supporting maneuvers improved glottic view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy; however head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers were found to be the most effective maneuvers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutoglu, Tarik; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Bakan, Mefkur; Topuz, Ufuk; Daskaya, Hayrettin; Ozturk, Erdogan; Cakir, Erkan; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded. Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p0.05). Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (ptriple airway maneuvers (p>0.05). All airway supporting maneuvers improved glottic view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy; however head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers were found to be the most effective maneuvers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view in pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscopy

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    Tarik Umutoglu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:Flexible fiber optic bronchoscopy is a valuable intervention for evaluation and management of respiratory diseases in both infants, pediatric and adult patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the airway supporting maneuvers on glottis view during pediatric flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy.MATERIALS AND METHODS:In this randomized, controlled, crossover study; patients aged between 0 and 15 years who underwent flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy procedure having American Society of Anesthesiologists I---II risk score were included. Patients having risk of difficult intubation, intubated or patients with tracheostomy, and patients with reduced neck mobility or having cautions for neck mobility were excluded from this study. After obtaining best glottic view at the neutral position, patients were positioned jaw trust with open mouth, jaw trust with teeth prottution, head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers and best glottis scores were recorded.RESULTS:Total of 121 pediatric patients, 57 girls and 64 boys, were included in this study. Both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers improved the glottis view compared with neutral position (p 0.05. Head tilt chin lift and triple airway maneuvers improved glottis view when compared with both jaw trust with open mouth and jaw trust with teeth prottution maneuvers and neutral position (p 0.05.

  4. Importance of back blow maneuvers in a 6 month old patient with sudden upper airway obstruction

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    Pinar Gencpinar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body aspiration in children under four years old is one of the most frequently observed reasons for accident related deaths. It is more common in this age group due to inadequate swallowing functions and exploration of objects with the mouth. The most frequently encountered foreign bodies are food and toy parts. Life threatening complete laryngeal obstruction is rarely observed. Dyspnea, hypersalivation, cough and cyanosis can be seen. The basic and life-saving treatment approach is complete removal of foreign body maneuvers in the sudden onset of total obstruction. Here we report a six-month old male, who ingested a foreign body and was treated with back blow maneuvers successfully. In this case we emphasized the importance of back blow maneuvers. Keywords: Upper airway obstruction, Child, Back blows maneuvers

  5. [Evaluation of upper airway and surrounding structures in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using cephalometry combined with Muller's maneuver].

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    Zhao, Yan-hui; Zhu, Min; Lu, Xiao-feng; Sun, Hong-xia; Nie, Ping; Xu, Xiao-long; Tao, Li

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the upper airway and surrounding structures under intraluminal pressure using cephalometry combined with Muller's maneuver in obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients with different severity. Thirty-nine male patients were enrolled in our department during June 2011 to February 2012. Polysomnography (PSG) and anthropometric measurements data were recorded prior to the study. The lateral cephalograms of each patient were obtained during both the end-expiration phase and Muller's maneuver phase. The patients enrolled were classified into 3 groups according to the results of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), including mild group (n=11), moderate group (n=14), and severe group (n=14). Craniofacial and upper airway structures were measured in lateral cephalometry by application of Cassos 2001 computed aided measurement software before and after the patients practicing Muller's maneuver. The data was analysed using SAS 9.13 software package. Muller's maneuver had a great influence on the upper airway and surrounding tissue, including increased thickness of the uvula, reduction in the anteroposterior dimension of retropalatal and increased vertical distance of the hyoid bone to the mandible in all groups (PCephalometry combined with Muller's maneuver can display how the intraluminal pressure function on the upper airway and surrounding tissues, and they also can distinguish some minor differences of the upper airway in patients with different security. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (11140902001).

  6. Plethysmographic measurements of specific airway resistance in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Nielsen, Kim G

    2005-01-01

    Validated methods for lung function measurements in young children are lacking. Plethysmographic measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) provides such a method applicable from 2 years of age. sRaw gauges airway resistance from the measurements of the pressure changes driving the airflow ...

  7. Plethysmographic measurements of specific airway resistance in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Nielsen, Kim G

    2005-01-01

    Validated methods for lung function measurements in young children are lacking. Plethysmographic measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) provides such a method applicable from 2 years of age. sRaw gauges airway resistance from the measurements of the pressure changes driving the airflow...

  8. Airway resistance at maximum inhalation as a marker of asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness

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    O'Connor George T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthmatics exhibit reduced airway dilation at maximal inspiration, likely due to structural differences in airway walls and/or functional differences in airway smooth muscle, factors that may also increase airway responsiveness to bronchoconstricting stimuli. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the minimal airway resistance achievable during a maximal inspiration (Rmin is abnormally elevated in subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods The Rmin was measured in 34 nonasthmatic and 35 asthmatic subjects using forced oscillations at 8 Hz. Rmin and spirometric indices were measured before and after bronchodilation (albuterol and bronchoconstriction (methacholine. A preliminary study of 84 healthy subjects first established height dependence of baseline Rmin values. Results Asthmatics had a higher baseline Rmin % predicted than nonasthmatic subjects (134 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 19 % predicted, p = 0.0004. Sensitivity-specificity analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that baseline Rmin was able to identify subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 min % predicted, FEV1 % predicted, and FEF25-75 % predicted, respectively. Also, 80% of the subjects with baseline Rmin min > 145% predicted had hyperresponsive airways, regardless of clinical classification as asthmatic or nonasthmatic. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline Rmin, a measurement that is easier to perform than spirometry, performs as well as or better than standard spirometric indices in distinguishing subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness from those without hyperresponsive airways. The relationship of baseline Rmin to asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness likely reflects a causal relation between conditions that stiffen airway walls and hyperresponsiveness. In conjunction with symptom history, Rmin could provide a clinically useful tool for assessing asthma and monitoring response to treatment.

  9. A passive quantitative measurement of airway resistance using depth data.

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    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Bulach, Christoph; Ku, David N; Anderson, Larry J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. RSV often causes increased airway resistance, clinically detected as wheezing by chest auscultation. In this disease, expiratory flows are significantly reduced due to the high resistance in patient's airway passages. A quantitative method for measuring resistance can have a great benefit to diagnosis and management of children with RSV infections as well as with other lung diseases. Airway resistance is defined as the lung pressure divided by the airflow. In this paper, we propose a method to quantify resistance through a simple, non-contact measurement of chest volume that can act as a surrogate measure of the lung pressure and volumetric airflow. We used depth data collected by a Microsoft Kinect camera for the measurement of the lung volume over time. In our experimentation, breathing through a number of plastic straws induced different airway resistances. For a standard spirometry test, our volume/flow estimation using Kinect showed strong correlation with the flow data collected by a commercially-available spirometer (five subjects, each performing 20 breathing trials, correlation coefficient = 0.88, with 95% confidence interval). As the number of straws decreased, emulating a higher airway obstruction, our algorithm was sufficient to distinguish between several levels of airway resistance.

  10. Awake measures of nasal resistance and upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep.

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    Masdeu, Maria J; Seelall, Vijay; Patel, Amit V; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M

    2011-02-15

    Since on CPAP, the nose is the primary determinant of upper airway resistance, we assess utility of noninvasive measures of nasal resistance during wakefulness as a predictor of directly assessed upper airway resistance on CPAP during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Patients with complaints of snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were recruited. 14 subjects underwent daytime evaluations including clinical assessment, subjective questionnaires to assess nasal symptoms and evaluation of nasal resistance with acoustic rhinometry (AR) and active anterior rhinomanometry (RM) in the sitting and supine positions. Patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography on optimal CPAP with measurements of supraglottic pressure to evaluate upper airway resistance. Comparisons were made between nasal resistance using AR and RM during wakefulness, and between AR and RM awake and upper airway resistance during sleep. Our study shows that measures of awake nasal resistance using AR and RM had little or no correlation to each other in the sitting position, whereas there was significant but weak correlation in the supine position. Upper airway resistance measured while on CPAP during sleep did not show significant relationships to any of the awake measures of nasal resistance (AR or RM). Awake measurements of nasal resistance do not seem to be predictive of upper airway resistance during sleep on CPAP.

  11. Modelling nasal high flow therapy effects on upper airway resistance and resistive work of breathing.

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    Adams, Cletus F; Geoghegan, Patrick H; Spence, Callum J; Jermy, Mark C

    2018-04-07

    The goal of this paper is to quantify upper airway resistance with and without nasal high flow (NHF) therapy. For adults, NHF therapy feeds 30-60 L/min of warm humidified air into the nose through short cannulas which do not seal the nostril. NHF therapy has been reported to increase airway pressure, increase tidal volume (V t ) and decrease respiratory rate (RR), but it is unclear how these findings affect the work done to overcome airway resistance to air flow during expiration. Also, there is little information on how the choice of nasal cannula size may affect work of breathing. In this paper, estimates of airway resistance without and with different NHF flow (applied via different cannula sizes) were made. The breathing efforts required to overcome airway resistance under these conditions were quantified. NHF was applied via three different cannula sizes to a 3-D printed human upper airway. Pressure drop and flow rate were measured and used to estimate inspiratory and expiratory upper airway resistances. The resistance information was used to compute the muscular work required to overcome the resistance of the upper airway to flow. NHF raises expiratory resistance relative to spontaneous breathing if the breathing pattern does not change but reduces work of breathing if peak expiratory flow falls. Of the cannula sizes used, the large cannula produced the greatest resistance and the small cannula produced the least. The work required to cause tracheal flow through the upper airway was reduced if the RR and minute volume are reduced by NHF. NHF has been observed to do so in COPD patients (Bräunlich et al., 2013). A reduction in I:E ratio due to therapy was found to reduce work of breathing if the peak inspiratory flow is less than the flow below which no inspiratory effort is required to overcome upper airway resistance. NHF raises expiratory resistance but it can reduce the work required to overcome upper airway resistance via a fall in inspiratory work of

  12. Cold air challenge and specific airway resistance in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Bisgaard, Hans

    2005-01-01

    prognosis in preschool children. Cold air challenge and plethysmographic measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) are feasible candidate methods for diagnosis, clinical monitoring and research during this critical period of lung growth and development. Methodology and practical aspects of cold air...... challenge and assessment of sRaw in preschool children are reviewed. Reference values are provided for sRaw and have allowed discrimination between health and respiratory disease, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be determined with acceptable repeatability...

  13. [Inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise and simulated airway obstruction].

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    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can develop during simulated airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SM) and scalene (SC). 8 healthy untrained subjects participated in this study. To identify signs of inspiratory muscles fatigue development electromyographic activity of D, PS, SCM and SC was recorded during 5-min exercise with loaded breathing (40 cm H2O/L · s(-1)). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. Maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 12% after exercise test compared with control, whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM and SC during post-exercise Muller's maneuver was significantly greater than in pre-exercise test in all subjects. The extent ofinspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of PS, SCM and SC.fc of D was not changed. Diaphragm is more resistantto fatigue during obstructive breathing compared with PS, SCM and SC. The data suggest that the reduction of maximum inspiratory pressure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also caused primarily by the weakening of the accessory muscles, while the weakness of the diaphragm may occur in the later stages of the disease. The functional failure of accessory muscles is an additional factor, which, along with the additional breathing resistance increases the load on the diaphragm, promoting its fatigue and reduced respiratory reserve.

  14. Hypersomnolence, insomnia and the pathophysiology of upper airway resistance syndrome.

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    Gold, Avram R; Gold, Morris S; Harris, Keith W; Espeleta, Vidal J; Amin, Mohammad M; Broderick, Joan E

    2008-08-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) is merely an extension of the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea (OSA/H) to less severe pharyngeal collapse during sleep, we compared the severity of hypersomnolence and the prevalence of insomnia in UARS patients to the patterns observed for OSA/H patients. Our goal was to determine whether the severity of hypersomnolence and the prevalence of insomnia observed in UARS patients could have been predicted from the patterns observed among OSA/H patients. We performed a retrospective study of a large consecutive patient series evaluated at an academic sleep disorders center, including 220 OSA/H patients and 137 UARS patients. Patients had no other sleep-related diagnosis and underwent an initial evaluation that included a measure of hypersomnolence [a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT); 95%] or insomnia questionnaire (87%). Patients were characterized by anthropometric data, polysomnographic descriptive measures of sleep, MSLT data and insomnia questionnaire data. Severity of hypersomnolence decreased over the continuum from severe to mild OSA/H. A model fit to the OSA/H patients to predict severity of hypersomnolence significantly underestimated hypersomnolence in UARS patients, which was comparable in severity to that of patients with mild OSA/H. The frequency of sleep-onset insomnia increased over the continuum from severe to mild OSA/H and increased further in UARS. UARS is, in some respects, an extension of OSA/H to less severe pharyngeal collapse, but this does not adequately account for the symptom profile of patients with UARS. A physical model is proposed to account for the excess somnolence in UARS relative to expectations and the increasing frequency of sleep-onset insomnia along the continuum from severe OSA/H to UARS.

  15. Orofacial-cervical alterations in individuals with upper airway resistance syndrome

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    Pedro Wey Barbosa de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Studies that assess the upper airways in sleep-related breathing disorders have been performed only in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome who seek medical attention. Therefore, in addition to the need for population studies, there are no data on the orofacial-cervical physical examination in subjects with upper airway resistance syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To compare the orofacial-cervical examination between volunteers with upper airway resistance syndrome and without sleep-related breathing disorders. METHODS: Through questionnaires, physical measurements, polysomnography, and otorhinolaryngological evaluation, this study compared the orofacial-cervical physical examination, through a systematic analysis of the facial skeleton, mouth, throat, and nose, between volunteers with upper airway resistance syndrome and volunteers without sleep-related breathing disorders in a representative sample of the adult population of the city of São Paulo. RESULTS: There were 1042 volunteers evaluated; 49 subjects (5% were excluded as they did not undergo otorhinolaryngological evaluation, 381 (36% had apnea-hypopnea index > 5 events/hour, and 131 (13% had oxyhemoglobin saturation < 90%. Among the remaining 481 subjects (46%, 30 (3% met the criteria for the upper airway resistance syndrome definition and 53 (5% met the control group criteria. At the clinical evaluation of nasal symptoms, the upper airway resistance syndrome group had more oropharyngeal dryness (17% vs. 29.6%; p = 0.025 and septal deviation grades 1-3 (49.1% vs. 57.7%; p = 0.025 when compared to controls. In the logistic regression model, it was found that individuals from the upper airway resistance syndrome group had 15.6-fold higher chance of having nose alterations, 11.2-fold higher chance of being hypertensive, and 7.6-fold higher chance of complaining of oropharyngeal dryness when compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: Systematic evaluation of the facial

  16. Movement of the human upper airway during inspiration with and without inspiratory resistive loading.

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    Cheng, S; Butler, J E; Gandevia, S C; Bilston, L E

    2011-01-01

    The electromyographic (EMG) activity of human upper airway muscles, particularly the genioglossus, has been widely measured, but the relationship between EMG activity and physical movement of the airway muscles remains unclear. We aimed to measure the motion of the soft tissues surrounding the airway during normal and loaded inspiration on the basis of the hypothesis that this motion would be affected by the addition of resistance to breathing during inspiration. Tagged MR imaging of seven healthy subjects was performed in a 3-T scanner. Tagged 8.6-mm-spaced grids were used, and complementary spatial modulation of magnetization images were acquired beginning ∼200 ms before inspiratory airflow. Deformation of tag line intersections was measured. The genioglossus moved anteriorly during normal and loaded inspiration, with less movement during loaded inspiration. The motion of tissues at the anterior border of the upper airway was nonuniform, with larger motions inferiorly. At the level of the soft palate, the lateral dimension of the airway decreased significantly during loaded inspiration (-0.15 ± 0.09 and -0.48 ± 0.09 mm during unloaded and loaded inspiration, respectively, P < 0.05). When resistance to inspiratory flow was added, genioglossus motion and lateral dimensions of the airway at the level of the soft palate decreased. Our results suggest that genioglossus motion begins early to dilate the airway prior to airflow and that inspiratory loading reduces the anterior motion of the genioglossus and increases the collapse of the lateral airway walls at the level of the soft palate.

  17. Management of Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Ranjan Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : This disorder, also known by terms such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, upper airway sleep disorder and snoring. Snoring has also been identified as a possible risk factor for hyper tension, ischemic heart disease and stroke. The role of dentistry in sleep disorders is becoming more significant, especially in co- managing patients with simple snoring and mild to moderate OSA. The practicing dental professional has the opportunity to assist patients at a variety of levels, starting with the recognition of a sleep -related disorder, referring patients to a physician for evaluation and assisting in the management of sleep disorders. The first and simplest option would be behaviour modification, followed by insertion of oral devices suited to the patient, especially in those with mild to moderate OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and surgic al options are chosen for patients with moderate to severe OSA.

  18. Treatment of upper airway resistance syndrome in adults: Where do we stand?

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    Luciana B.M. de Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the available literature regarding Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS treatment. Methods: Keywords “Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome,” “Sleep-related Breathing Disorder treatment,” “Obstructive Sleep Apnea treatment” and “flow limitation and sleep” were used in main databases. Results: We found 27 articles describing UARS treatment. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP has been the mainstay therapy prescribed but with limited effectiveness. Studies about surgical treatments had methodological limitations. Oral appliances seem to be effective but their efficacy is not yet established. Conclusion: Randomized controlled trials with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up are important to establish UARS treatment options.

  19. Specific airway resistance, interrupter resistance, and respiratory impedance in healthy children aged 2-7 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1998-01-01

    resistance (sRaw) by a modified procedure method in the whole body plethysmograph. Measurements were attempted in 151 children and were successfully obtained in 121 children with a mean (SD) age of 5.3 (1.5) years; no measurements were possible in 30 children (mean age 3 (0.9) years). The repeatability...... with age, height, and weight was found for Rint, Zrs, and Rrs5. Xrs5 was positively correlated to age and body size. The mean values of Rint, Rrs5, Xrs5, and Zrs in children younger and older than 5 years were 1.04, 1.38, -0.5, and 1.48 kPa x L(-1) x s and 0.9, 1.18, -0.37, and 1.23 kPa x L(-1) x s......We report data on respiratory function in healthy children aged 2-7 years in whom we measured respiratory resistance by the interrupter technique (Rint); total respiratory impedance (Zrs), respiratory resistance (Rrs), and reactance (Xrs) by the impulse oscillation technique; and specific airway...

  20. Lung compliance, airway resistance, and work of breathing in children after inhalation injury.

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    Mlcak, R; Cortiella, J; Desai, M; Herndon, D

    1997-01-01

    Pathophysiologic changes associated with inhalation injury make mechanical ventilation in children a challenge. Decreased lung compliance and increased airway resistance after inhalation injury may lead to elevated airway pressures and barotrauma. Previous studies have shown significant decreases in the incidence of pneumonia and death in adult patients with inhalation injury treated with high-frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) as compared with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV). No studies to date have compared lung compliance, airway resistance, or work of breathing in children being treated with HFPV versus CMV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung compliance, airway resistance, and work of breathing in pediatric patients with inhalation injury who required mechanical ventilation. Ten children with bronchoscopically identified inhalation injury requiring mechanical ventilation were studied. Five children received CMV and five children received HFPV. All patients were treated according to our standard inhalation injury protocol. Based on our data and patient population, children receiving ventilation with the HFPV have a significant decrease in the work of breathing as compared with CMV.

  1. Using Drugs to Probe the Variability of Trans-Epithelial Airway Resistance.

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    Kendra Tosoni

    Full Text Available Precision medicine aims to combat the variability of the therapeutic response to a given medicine by delivering the right medicine to the right patient. However, the application of precision medicine is predicated on a prior quantitation of the variance of the reference range of normality. Airway pathophysiology provides a good example due to a very variable first line of defence against airborne assault. Humans differ in their susceptibility to inhaled pollutants and pathogens in part due to the magnitude of trans-epithelial resistance that determines the degree of epithelial penetration to the submucosal space. This initial 'set-point' may drive a sentinel event in airway disease pathogenesis. Epithelia differentiated in vitro from airway biopsies are commonly used to model trans-epithelial resistance but the 'reference range of normality' remains problematic. We investigated the range of electrophysiological characteristics of human airway epithelia grown at air-liquid interface in vitro from healthy volunteers focusing on the inter- and intra-subject variability both at baseline and after sequential exposure to drugs modulating ion transport.Brushed nasal airway epithelial cells were differentiated at air-liquid interface generating 137 pseudostratified ciliated epithelia from 18 donors. A positively-skewed baseline range exists for trans-epithelial resistance (Min/Max: 309/2963 Ω·cm2, trans-epithelial voltage (-62.3/-1.8 mV and calculated equivalent current (-125.0/-3.2 μA/cm2; all non-normal, P<0.001. A minority of healthy humans manifest a dramatic amiloride sensitivity to voltage and trans-epithelial resistance that is further discriminated by prior modulation of cAMP-stimulated chloride transport.Healthy epithelia show log-order differences in their ion transport characteristics, likely reflective of their initial set-points of basal trans-epithelial resistance and sodium transport. Our data may guide the choice of the background set

  2. Treatment resistant adolescent depression with upper airway resistance syndrome treated with rapid palatal expansion: a case report

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    Miller Paul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of treatment-resistant depression in which the patient was evaluated for sleep disordered breathing as the cause and in which rapid palatal expansion to permanently treat the sleep disordered breathing produced a prolonged symptom-free period off medication. Case presentation An 18-year-old Caucasian man presented to our sleep disorders center with chronic severe depression that was no longer responsive to medication but that had recently responded to electroconvulsive therapy. Ancillary, persistent symptoms included mild insomnia, moderate to severe fatigue, mild sleepiness and severe anxiety treated with medication. Our patient had no history of snoring or witnessed apnea, but polysomnography was consistent with upper airway resistance syndrome. Although our patient did not have an orthodontic indication for rapid palatal expansion, rapid palatal expansion was performed as a treatment of his upper airway resistance syndrome. Following rapid palatal expansion, our patient experienced a marked improvement of his sleep quality, anxiety, fatigue and sleepiness. His improvement has been maintained off all psychotropic medication and his depression has remained in remission for approximately two years following his electroconvulsive therapy. Conclusions This case report introduces the possibility that unrecognized sleep disordered breathing may play a role in adolescent treatment-resistant depression. The symptoms of upper airway resistance syndrome are non-specific enough that every adolescent with depression, even those responding to medication, may have underlying sleep disordered breathing. In such patients, rapid palatal expansion, by widening the upper airway and improving airflow during sleep, may produce a prolonged improvement of symptoms and a tapering of medication. Psychiatrists treating adolescents may benefit from having another treatment option for

  3. Measurement of the specific airway resistance by plethysmography in young children accompanied by an adult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a procedure for measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) by whole body plethysmography in young awake children accompanied by an adult. sRaw was measured by a single-step procedure, omitting the measurement of the thoracic gas volume. The frequency.......8) yrs), for whom measurements made only in the presence of an accompanying adult, the CV was 8.5%. No measurements could be obtained in 22 children (17%) (mean age 2.8 (0.5) yrs). Measurements exhibited a significant frequency dependency, and electronic BTPS compensation substantially overestimated SRaw....... In conclusion, the use of electronic compensation for simulating body temperature, atmospheric pressure and saturation with water vapour introduces a bias that affects the accuracy of the estimate of specific airway resistance. Nevertheless, plethysmographic measurements with and without an accompanying adult...

  4. Measurement of the specific airway resistance by plethysmography in young children accompanied by an adult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    dependency of sRaw was investigated and the accuracy of simulating body temperature, atmospheric pressure and saturation with water vapour (BTPS) conditions by electronic compensation was assessed. One hundred and thirty one children with asthma were studied. In 57 children (mean (SD) age 5.6 (1.8) yrs) who....... In conclusion, the use of electronic compensation for simulating body temperature, atmospheric pressure and saturation with water vapour introduces a bias that affects the accuracy of the estimate of specific airway resistance. Nevertheless, plethysmographic measurements with and without an accompanying adult......The purpose of this study was to evaluate a procedure for measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) by whole body plethysmography in young awake children accompanied by an adult. sRaw was measured by a single-step procedure, omitting the measurement of the thoracic gas volume. The frequency...

  5. Epley maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repositioning maneuvers; CRP; Benign positional vertigo - Epley; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - Epley; BPPV - Epley; BPV - Epley ... Orvidas L, et al. Clinical practice guideline: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol: Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl ...

  6. Effects of cigarette smoke and chronic hypoxia on airways remodeling and resistance. Clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    Olea, Elena; Prieto-Lloret, Jesús; Gonzalez-Martin, Carmen; Vega Agapito, Victoria; Gonzalez-Obeso, Elvira; Agapito, Teresa; Obeso, Ana; González, Constancio

    2011-01-01

    Previously we have reported that association of cigarette smoke (CS) and chronic hypoxia (CH) interact positively to physiopathologically remodel pulmonary circulation. In present study we have exposed guinea pigs to CS smoke (four cigarettes/day; 3 months; CS) and to chronic hypoxia (12% O2, 15 days; CH) alone or in combination (CSCH animals) and evaluated airways remodeling and resistance assessed as Penh (enhance pause). We measured Penh while animals breathe air, 10% O2 and 5% CO2 and fou...

  7. Dynamics of Voluntary Cough Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naire, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Voluntary cough maneuvers are characterized by transient peak expiratory flows (PEF) exceeding the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. In some cases, these flows can be well in excess of the MEFV, generally referred to as supramaximal flows. Understanding the flow-structure interaction involved in these maneuvers is the main goal of this work. We present a simple theoretical model for investigating the dynamics of voluntary cough and forced expiratory maneuvers. The core modeling idea is based on a 1-D model of high Reynolds number flow through flexible-walled tubes. The model incorporates key ingredients involved in these maneuvers: the expiratory effort generated by the abdominal and expiratory muscles, the glottis and the flexibility and compliance of the lung airways. Variations in these allow investigation of the expiratory flows generated by a variety of single cough maneuvers. The model successfully reproduces PEF which is shown to depend on the cough generation protocol, the glottis reopening time and the compliance of the airways. The particular highlight is in simulating supramaximal PEF for very compliant tubes. The flow-structure interaction mechanisms behind these are discussed. The wave speed theory of flow limitation is used to characterize the PEF. Existing hypotheses of the origin of PEF, from cough and forced expiration experiments, are also tested using this model.

  8. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. Methods: This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% < 50% of predicted, together with a high RV/TLC ratio. Nonspecific lung disease (NLD) was characterized by TLC within the predicted range and no obstruction. Combined lung disease (CLD) was characterized by reduced TLC and findings indicative of airflow obstruction. Clinical diagnoses were based on clinical suspicion, a respiratory questionnaire, and the review of tests of interest. Results: We included 300 patients in the study, of whom 108 (36%) were diagnosed with RLD. In addition, 120 (40%) and 72 (24%) were diagnosed with OLD/CLD and NLD, respectively. Among the latter, 24 (33%) were clinically diagnosed with OLD. In this sample, 151 patients (50.3%) were obese, and obesity was associated with all patterns of lung disease. Conclusions: Measuring lung volumes and airway resistance is often necessary in order to provide an appropriate characterization of the pattern of lung disease in patients presenting with a spirometry pattern suggestive of restriction. Airflow obstruction is common in such cases. PMID:27812633

  9. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% espirometria não têm CPT reduzida. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT espirometria. A obstrução ao fluxo aéreo é comum nesses casos.

  10. A new approach in the diagnosis of upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS): PAP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köktürk, Oğuz; Baha, Ayşe; Kanbay, Asiye

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) is characterized by repeated number of arousals at night, and excessive daytime sleepiness or somnolence (EDS). It is often missed in classical polysomnographic diagnostic approaches and misdiagnosed as simple snoring or idiopathic hypersomnia, thereby is often left untreated. We propose that positive airway pressure (PAP), which has shown to be effective against UARS, can be used as a diagnostic tool as well. The study designed to test whether patients with high titration pressures can be diagnosed for UARS, and whether this pressure can be used as the treatment pressure in UARS. This study is a retrospective cohort study. The patients with the following selection criteria: apnea hypopnea index (AHI) 20, excessive daytime sleepiness or somnolence (EDS) without nocturnal oxygen desaturation levels were included to the study. After diagnostic polysomnography (PSG), PAP titrarion was applied to diagnose and treatment. Fourteen (%46.7) of the patients were male, 16 (%53.3) were female, with a mean age of 46.4 ± 9.9 and mean body mass index (BMI) of 26 ± 3.3. The patiens had a mean Epworth sleepiness scale 15.3 ± 3.9, mean AHI: 2.3 ± 1.4 and average RERA: 26.1 ± 4.9. The mean CPAP titration pressure was 7.1 ± 1.1 cmH2O. In the light of current findings, during PAP titration patients required high pressures is the evidence of increased upper airway resistance in UARS. Using the from therapy to diagnosis protocol, the PAP protocol determines the individual therapeutic pressures needed by patients. Following up the clinical outcomes of these patients under the PAP treatment, and including a larger cohort will contribute greatly to treating this syndrome, defined as one of the "unresolved problems in years".

  11. Oral contraceptive pills decrease pulmonary airway resistance in healthy north Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Shraddha; Singh, Uma; Verma, Pratima

    2011-02-01

    Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are hormonal pills used by females to prevent conception; they are a combination of estrogen and progestin. There is, however, compelling evidence that throughout the reproductive life of a woman, her airways are subject to the influence of the cyclical variations in sex hormones which occur in relation to circadian rhythms. The present study has been designed to investigate the effects of OCPs on airway resistance in terms of spirometric parameters in OCP users and nonusers. A total of 100 women (age: 20-40 years) ware selected for the present study. The subjects were provided with a one-month supply of OCPs. The constituents per tablet of MALA-N used were levonorgestrel 0.15 mg and ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), forced expiratory flow in expiring 25-75% air (FEF 25-75), forced expiratory volume percentage in one second (FEV1% or FEV1/FVC), forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were recorded. In our study, the FEF 25-75and PEFR increased significantly in OCP users, showing that these hormone pills decrease the resistance offered by small bronchioles.

  12. Suction/Inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver : a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Froehlich, Johannes M; Wälti, Stephan; Roos, Justus E; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus; von Weymarn, Constantin; Czell, David; Goyen, Matthias; Reischauer, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. • Suction/Inspiration against resistance is promising to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery. • Patients potentially suffering pulmonary embolism are able to follow suction/inspiration against resistance. • Contrast density after suction is superior in comparison to other breathing maneuvers.

  13. Electrically-activated dilator muscles reduce pharyngeal resistance in anaesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, H; Odeh, M; Schnall, R P; Gavriely, N; Oliven, A

    1995-09-01

    There is current controversy as to whether electrical stimulation of upper airway musculature can be used us a beneficial treatment modality in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Increased upper airway (UAW) muscle activity decreases UAW resistance (Ruaw) in isolated UAW of dogs. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of UAW muscle contraction on UAW patency in anaesthetized dogs in vivo breathing spontaneously through partially and completely obstructed UAW. Airflow and supraglottic pressure were measured to obtain Ruaw. Ruaw could be regulated by inhalation of a rubber balloon implanted transcutaneously in the pharyngeal submucosa to produce partial or complete obstruction. Wire electrodes were implanted bilaterally into the genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), sternothyroid (ST), and sternohyoid (SH) muscles for electrical stimulation (ES), and into the alae nasi for electromyographic (EMG) recording. Three levels of electrical stimulation were delivered to each muscle before and during partial or complete UAW obstruction. Genioglossus and geniohyoid stimulation both resulted in a significant reduction in Ruaw, which was most pronounced during partial obstruction, reducing Ruaw from 54 +/- 11 to 14 +/- 3 and from 74 +/- 12 to 31 +/- 5 cmH2O.L-1.s, respectively. At low voltage, stimulation of the genioglossus was more effective than stimulation of the geniohyoid in reducing Ruaw. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of the genioglossus but not of the geniohyoid released total obstruction. In contrast, electrical stimulation of the sternohyoid and sternothyroid produced no significant change in Ruaw. These findings demonstrate that selective UAW dilatory muscle contraction in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized dogs reduces Ruaw in the presence of UAW obstruction and releases UAW occlusion, with the genioglossus being the most effective muscle. This favours further attempts to investigate the benefits of electrical stimulation of selected

  14. Suction/inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver: a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Weymarn, Constantin von; Goyen, Matthias; Waelti, Stephan; Roos, Justus E.; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus; Czell, David; Reischauer, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. (orig.)

  15. Suction/inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver: a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Weymarn, Constantin von; Goyen, Matthias [Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Waelti, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Meissnitzer, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Czell, David [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Neurology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Reischauer, Carolin [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. (orig.)

  16. Effect of hypercapnia on upper airway resistance and collapsibility in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliven, A; Odeh, M; Gavriely, N

    1989-01-01

    The upper airway (UAW) is intrinsically unstable and susceptible to collapse when the negative inspiratory intraluminal pressure exceeds the stabilizing forces which prevent obstruction. In the present study we evaluated mechanisms by which UAW patency is maintained in the presence of increased inspiratory flows when respiration is stimulated. In seven anesthetized dogs breathing spontaneously through a low tracheostomy, the UAW was isolated by a second tracheostomy directed rostrally. UAW pressure-flow relationship and stability against collapse were evaluated during steady flow in the inspiratory direction while the animals were breathing 100% O2 or a hypercapnic gas mixture. The pressure-flow curves of the isolated UAW demonstrated the characteristic pattern of collapsible tubes. Steady state hypercapnia resulted in lower UAW resistance during both inspiration and expiration. UAW resistance decreased linearly as PCO2 and ventilation increased over the course of CO2 rebreathing. In addition, during hypercapnia the critical negative intraluminal pressure required to induce UAW collapse and obstruction increased from -4.3 +/- 0.9 to -8.5 +/- 1.5 SE cm H2O (p less than 0.01), indicating increased stability of the UAW. Since hypercapnia is known to stimulate UAW muscles, our findings suggest that increased UAW muscle activity improves UAW patency both by decreasing their resistance to airflow, and by increasing UAW walls rigidity and stability against collapse.

  17. Airway Management in a Patient With Tracheal Disruption due to Penetrating Neck Trauma With Hollow Point Ammunition: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela M; Hill, James L; Zagorski, Dave J; McClain, Joseph M; Maronian, Nicole C

    2018-05-01

    Rapid sequence induction and intubation was performed for a patient in respiratory distress after a gunshot wound to the neck. Resistance was noted distal to vocal cords. With a bronchoscope unavailable, the endotracheal tube was advanced with a corkscrew maneuver. Subcutaneous emphysema had developed. The endotracheal tube was advanced into the right mainstem with adequate ventilation. Imaging illustrated tracheoesophageal injury. The patient was emergently explored. An intraluminal bullet was removed, lateral wall tracheal defect was repaired, and a tracheostomy was placed. The intubating provider should secure the airway by the method they are most comfortable, have high suspicion of airway injury, and prepare to manage airway disruption.

  18. Pressão expiratória positiva nas vias aéreas não reproduz as respostas de frequência cardíaca à manobra de Valsalva em homens jovens saudáveis Expiratory positive airway pressure does not reproduce heart rate responses to Valsalva maneuver in healthy young men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Gracindo Pissinato

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A pressão expiratória positiva nas vias aéreas (EPAP é um recurso terapêutico que compreende uma inspiração seguida de expiração contra resistência. Sua aplicação promove ajustes no sistema cardiovascular, de maneira similar ao observado durante a manobra de Valsalva (MV. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a resposta da frequência cardíaca (FC à MV e às diferentes formas de aplicação de EPAP a fim de identificar se e em qual condição esta técnica reproduz a resposta da FC observada na MV, em homens jovens aparentemente saudáveis. Foram estudados 10 sujeitos (24±3 anos; 25±3 kg/m² que realizaram os procedimentos de MV e EPAP, aleatoriamente em dias diferentes. Na MV o esforço expiratório foi sustentado por 15 s (pressão oral de 40 mmHg [53,4 cmH2O]. Empregou-se duas técnicas de EPAP (isolada e terapêutica contra 3 níveis de pressão (10, 15 e 20 cmH2O, aplicados aleatoriamente. As manobras foram repetidas três vezes com intervalo de cinco minutos. Considerou-se o maior valor de variação da FC (DFC de cada manobra para análise. Empregou-se o teste Shapiro-Wilk para verificar a distribuição dos dados e ANOVA para medidas repetidas, com post-hoc de Fisher, considerando-se αThe expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP is a therapeutic resource that comprises an inspiration followed by expiration against resistance. During its application there were adjustments in the cardiovascular system, similar to those observed during the Valsalva maneuver (VM. The aim of this study was to analyze the heart rate (HR response to VM and to different ways of EPAP application to identify if and in which condition this technique reproduces the HR response observed in the VM, in apparently healthy young men. Ten subjects (24±3 years, 25±3 kg/m² performed randomly the VM and EPAP procedures on different days. The expiratory effort in VM was sustained for 15 s (oral pressure of 40 mmHg [53.4cm H2O]. Two EPAP techniques were

  19. A reversible, non-invasive method for airway resistance measurements and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid sampling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikepahad, Sumanth; Barranco, Wade T; Porter, Paul; Anderson, Bruce; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2010-04-13

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) measurements and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid sampling are essential to experimental asthma models, but repeated procedures to obtain such measurements in the same animal are generally not feasible. Here, we demonstrate protocols for obtaining from mice repeated measurements of AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples. Mice were challenged intranasally seven times over 14 days with a potent allergen or sham treated. Prior to the initial challenge, and within 24 hours following each intranasal challenge, the same animals were anesthetized, orally intubated and mechanically ventilated. AHR, assessed by comparing dose response curves of respiratory system resistance (RRS) induced by increasing intravenous doses of acetylcholine (Ach) chloride between sham and allergen-challenged animals, were determined. Afterwards, and via the same intubation, the left lung was lavaged so that differential enumeration of airway cells could be performed. These studies reveal that repeated measurements of AHR and BAL fluid collection are possible from the same animals and that maximal airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia are achieved within 7-10 days of initiating allergen challenge. This novel technique significantly reduces the number of mice required for longitudinal experimentation and is applicable to diverse rodent species, disease models and airway physiology instruments.

  20. Low-intensity aerobic exercise training attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in a rat model of steroid-resistant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qingwu; Chen, Xi; Feng, Juntao; Qin, Ling; Hu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise can improve symptoms, reduce airway inflammation, and even ameliorate airway remodeling in asthmatic animals and patients. However, previous studies have focused mainly on the effect of aerobic exercise on steroid-sensitive asthma (SSA). The goals of this study were to determine the effect of low-intensity aerobic exercise training on airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a rat model of steroid-resistant asthma (SRA) and to identify the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Endotoxin-free ovalbumin with or without lipopolysaccharide were applied to establish rat models of SRA and SSA, respectively. Airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, remodeling, expression of interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and IL-17 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and the role of dexamethasone (DXM) were compared between these two asthmatic rat models. The effect of low-intensity aerobic exercise training and anti-HMGB1 treatment on airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in SRA rats also was evaluated. SRA rats developed neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation ((29.5±4.1)% of the total cell numbers in BALF), whereas SSA rats developed eosinophil-dominated airway inflammation ((24.0±6.1)% of the total cell numbers in BALF). Compared with SSA rats, SRA rats had more severe airway hyperresponsiveness, lower levels of IL-25 ((33.6±10.3) vs. (104.8±24.9) pg/ml), IL-33 ((87.5±25.0) vs. (226.6±40.7) pg/ml), and TSLP ((1 933.2±899.5) vs. (7 224.0±992.1) pg/ml), and higher levels of HMGB1 ((21.2±4.5) vs. (5.4±1.6) ng/ml) and IL-17 ((780.5±261.7) vs. (291.4±76.4) pg/ml) in BALF (all P exercise training decreased the expression of both HMGB1 ((14.1±2.9) vs. (21.2±4.5) ng/ml in control SRA rats) and IL-17 ((545.3±148.6) vs. (780.5±261.7) pg/ml in control SRA rats) in BALF (all P exercise training attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation

  1. Resistance training improves cardiac output, exercise capacity and tolerance to positive airway pressure in Fontan physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Rachael L; O'Meagher, Shamus; Karmali, Alia; Rae, Caroline L; Liess, Carsten; Kemp, Graham J; Puranik, Raj; Singh, Nalin; Celermajer, David S

    2013-09-30

    Subjects with Fontan-type circulation have no sub-pulmonary ventricle and thus depend exquisitely on the respiratory bellows and peripheral muscle pump for cardiac filling. We hypothesised that resistance training to augment the peripheral muscle pump might improve cardiac filling, reduce inspiratory-dependence of IVC return to the heart and thus improve exercise capacity and cardiac output on constant positive airway pressure (CPAP). Eleven Fontan subjects (32+/-2 years, mean+/-SEM) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and exercise testing (CPET); six underwent 20 weeks of high-intensity resistance training; others were non-exercising controls. After training, CPET was repeated. Four trainers had MRI with real-time flow measurement at rest, exercise and on CPAP in the trained state and following a 12-month detrain. In the trained state, muscle strength increased by 43% (p=0.002), as did total muscle mass (by 1.94 kg, p=0.003) and peak VO2 (by 183 ml/min, p=0.02). After detraining, calf muscle mass and peak workload had fallen significantly (pexercise (by 16 ml, p=0.04); inspiratory-dependent IVC blood return during exercise was 40% higher (p=0.02). On CPAP, cardiac output was lower in the detrained state (101 vs. 77 ml/s, p=0.03). Resistance muscle training improves muscle mass, strength and is associated with improved cardiac filling, stroke volume, exercise capacity and cardiac output on CPAP, in adults with Fontan-type circulation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of inhaled menthol on upper airway resistance in humans: A randomized controlled crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie J Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Menthol (l-menthol is a naturally-occurring cold receptor agonist commonly used to provide symptomatic relief for upper airway congestion. Menthol can also reduce the sensation of dyspnea. It is unclear whether the physiological action of menthol in dyspnea reduction is through its cold receptor agonist effect or whether associated mechanical changes occur in the upper airway.

  3. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; E Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group"), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  4. Tedizolid inhibits MUC5AC production induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazuaki; Kaku, Norihito; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2017-09-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role in early immunity against respiratory tract infection. Although airway epithelial cells produce mucus to eliminate pathogens and irritants, hypersecretion of mucus is harmful for the host as it may cause airway obstruction and inhibit influx of antimicrobial agents. It has been reported that several antimicrobial agents have an immunomodulatory effect in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about whether tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, can modulate immune responses. In this study, we evaluated whether tedizolid can suppress MUC5AC production in human airway epithelial cells stimulated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Compared with the control, tedizolid significantly inhibited MUC5AC protein production and mRNA overexpression at concentrations of both 2 and 10 μg/mL (representative of trough and peak concentrations in human epithelial lining fluid). Among the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors tested, only extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was inhibited by tedizolid as indicated by western blot analysis. These results indicate that tedizolid inhibits the overproduction of MUC5AC protein by inhibiting phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study revealed that tedizolid suppresses excessive mucin production in human airway epithelial cells. The immunomodulatory effect of tedizolid may improve outcomes in patients with severe respiratory infectious diseases caused by MRSA. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of imposed resistance on tidal volume with 5 neonatal nasal continuous positive airway pressure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Shannon E; Fedor, Katherine L; Chatburn, Robert L

    2010-05-01

    Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome are often treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Nasal CPAP methods include electronic feedback control, underwater seal, flow opposition, and flow opposition with fluidic flow reversal on expiration. Few studies have compared those modes, and the results have been contradictory. We compared the effect of resistive load on simulated tidal volume (V(T)) with 5 neonatal nasal CPAP systems: Fisher and Paykel nasal CPAP tubing with Maquet Servo-i ventilator in NIV CPAP mode; Cardinal Health AirLife nasal CPAP system; Fisher and Paykel nasal CPAP tubing with water-seal pressure generator; AirLife infant nasal CPAP generator kit; and Hamilton Medical Arabella fluidic nasal CPAP generator. The lung simulator settings were: compliance 0.5 mL/cm H2O, resistance 125 H2O/L/s, sinusoidal patient-effort range 6.5-26 cm H2O, rise 25%, hold 0%, release 25%, respiratory rate 65 breaths/min. We compared the mean values from 10 breaths. The mean inspiratory pressure drop and V(T) difference (compared to the simulator alone, unloaded) increased with V(T), respectively, from 0.32 cm H2O to 1.73 cm H2O, and from -0.04 mL to -0.40 mL. Flow opposition had the smallest pressure drop (from 0.10 cm H2O to 0.64 cm H2O, P nasal CPAP's pressure drop was largest (P or = 9 mL the electronic nasal CPAP's pressure drop was largest (P nasal CPAP systems correlate with the differences in unassisted V(T) due to loading effects. The ventilator imposed the least load, and the AirLife nasal CPAP system imposed the most.

  6. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Balester Mello de Godoy

    Full Text Available To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS, mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and normal individuals.UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10 and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38 associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10 and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38 associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group", adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT was performed five times (each two hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p < 0.05 and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003 and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than "control group" (p < 0.02. UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1 compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5 than mild OSA (p = 0.02. Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to "control group" (p = 0.04.UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  7. Relationships between respiratory and airway resistances and activity-related dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plantier L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Mahut1,2, Aurore Caumont-Prim3,4, Laurent Plantier1,5, Karine Gillet-Juvin1,6, Etienne Callens1, Olivier Sanchez5,6, Brigitte Chevalier-Bidaud3, Plamen Bokov1, Christophe Delclaux1,5,71Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Physiologie – Clinique de la Dyspnée, F-75015 Paris, France; 2Cabinet La Berma, 4 avenue de la Providence; F-92160 Antony, France; 3AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Unité d'Épidémiologie et de Recherche Clinique, F-75015 Paris, France; 4INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Épidémiologique 4, F-75015 Paris, France; 5Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, F-75015 Paris, France; 6AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Pneumologie; F-75015 Paris, France; 7CIC 9201 Plurithématique, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, F-75015 Paris, FranceBackground: The aims of the study were: (1 to compare numerical parameters of specific airway resistance (total, sRawtot, effective, sRaweff and at 0.5 L • s-1, sRaw0.5 and indices obtained from the forced oscillation technique (FOT: resistance extrapolated at 0 Hz [Rrs0 Hz], mean resistance [Rrsmean], and resistance/frequency slope [Rrsslope] and (2 to assess their relationships with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: A specific statistical approach, principal component analysis that also allows graphic representation of all correlations between functional parameters was used. A total of 108 patients (mean ± SD age: 65 ± 9 years, 31 women; GOLD stages: I, 14; II, 47; III, 39 and IV, 8 underwent spirometry, body plethysmography, FOT, and Medical Research Council (MRC scale assessments.Results: Principal component analysis determined that the functional parameters were described by three independent dimensions (airway caliber, lung volumes and their combination, specific resistance and that resistance parameters of the two techniques

  8. Nose-only water-pipe smoking effects on airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Raza, Haider; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; John, Annie; Yasin, Javed; Hameed, Rasheed S; Adeghate, Ernest; Ali, Badreldin H

    2013-11-01

    Water-pipe smoking (WPS) is a common practice in the Middle East and is now gaining popularity in Europe and the United States. However, there is a limited number of studies on the respiratory effects of WPS. More specifically, the underlying pulmonary pathophysiological mechanisms related to WPS exposure are not understood. Presently, we assessed the respiratory effects of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey flavored "moasel" tobacco. The duration of the session was 30 min/day and 5 days/wk for 1 mo. Control mice were exposed to air only. Here, we measured in BALB/c mice the airway resistance using forced-oscillation technique. Lung inflammation was assessed histopathologically and by biochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and oxidative stress was evaluated biochemically by measuring lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and several antioxidant enzymes. Pulmonary inflammation assessment showed an increase in neutrophil and lymphocyte numbers. Likewise, airway resistance was significantly increased in the WPS group compared with controls. Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 concentrations were significantly increased in BAL fluid. Lipid peroxidation in lung tissue was significantly increased whereas the level and activity of antioxidants including reduced glutathione, glutathione S transferase, and superoxide dismutase were all significantly decreased following WPS exposure, indicating the occurrence of oxidative stress. Moreover, carboxyhemoglobin levels were significantly increased in the WPS group. We conclude that 1-mo nose-only exposure to WPS significantly increased airway resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the limited clinical studies that reported the detrimental respiratory effects of WPS.

  9. Bromodomain and Extra Terminal (BET Inhibitor Suppresses Macrophage-Driven Steroid-Resistant Exacerbations of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness and Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Hiep Nguyen

    Full Text Available Exacerbations of asthma are linked to significant decline in lung function and are often poorly controlled by corticosteroid treatment. Clinical investigations indicate that viral and bacterial infections play crucial roles in the onset of steroid-resistant inflammation and airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR that are hallmark features of exacerbations. We have previously shown that interferon γ (IFNγ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS cooperatively activate pulmonary macrophages and induce steroid-resistant airway inflammation and AHR in mouse models. Furthermore, we have established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-induced exacerbation of asthma, which exhibits macrophage-dependent, steroid-resistant lung disease. Emerging evidence has demonstrated a key role for bromo- and extra-terminal (BET proteins in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We hypothesised that BET proteins may be involved in the regulation of AHR and airway inflammation in our steroid-resistant exacerbation models.We investigated the effects of a BET inhibitor (I-BET-762 on the development of steroid-resistant AHR and airway inflammation in two mouse models. I-BET-762 administration decreased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the airways, and suppressed key inflammatory cytokines in both models. I-BET treatment also suppressed key inflammatory cytokines linked to the development of steroid-resistant inflammation such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine (KC, IFNγ, and interleukin 27 (IL-27. Attenuation of inflammation was associated with suppression of AHR.Our results suggest that BET proteins play an important role in the regulation of steroid-resistant exacerbations of airway inflammation and AHR. BET proteins may be potential targets for the development of future therapies to treat steroid-resistant inflammatory components of asthma.

  10. Avaliação da obstrução da via aérea superior através da videonasofaringoscopia: comparação da manobra de Müller com o sono induzido Evaluation of airway obstruction by nasopharyngoscopy: comparison of the Müller maneuver versus induced sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gervilla Gregório

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A nasofaringoscopia com realização de Manobra de Müller é freqüentemente utilizada para determinar o local da obstrução na via aérea superior. No entanto, sua utilidade é controversa, uma vez que é realizada com o paciente acordado e pode não reproduzir os fenômenos obstrutivos que ocorrem durante o sono. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o grau de obstrução faríngea nas regiões retropalatal e retrolingual que ocorrem durante a manobra de Müller com aquelas que ocorrem durante o sono induzido. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 8 pacientes (3 homens e 5 mulheres com idade (média ±desvio padrão de 48,6 ± 9,2 anos de idade através de videonasofaringoscopia durante a manobra de Müller e durante o sono induzido por midazolam endovenoso. RESULTADOS: Observamos obstrução retropalatal similar durante a manobra de Müller e sono induzido (média + desvio padrão 3,13 + 0,99 e 2,75 + 0,46, respectivamente, p= 0,234. Em contraste, a obstrução retrolingual foi significantemente menor durante a manobra de Müller (média + desvio padrão 0,63 + 1,06 e 2,63 + 1,30, respectivamente, p= 0,005. CONCLUSÃO: O método do sono induzido foi seguro sob as condições de monitorização adotadas, tendo detectado maior ocorrência de colapso retrolingual do que a manobra de Müller.The use of nasopharyngoscopy during the application of intrathoracic pressure (Müller maneuver is frequently employed to establish the site of upper airway obstruction. The Müller maneuver, however, is used when the patient is awake and therefore may not correlate with obstruction occurring during sleep. AIM: to compare the degree of pharyngeal obstruction in the retropalatal and retroglossal regions during the Müller maneuver versus induced sleep using nasopharyngoscopy. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, case series study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight patients (three males, five females, with a mean age of 48.6 +/- 9,2 year, underwent nasopharyngoscopy to assess airway

  11. Maneuver Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  12. Children with smoking parents have a higher airway resistance measured by the interruption technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, EMW; Vrijlandt, Elianne J.L.E.; Boezen, HM; Duiverman, EJ

    2004-01-01

    Children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, during or after pregnancy, are known to have decreased lung function. So far this has been measured using spirometry in schoolchildren and invasive techniques in newborns. The interruption technique (Rint) is a noninvasive technique to measure airway

  13. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  14. Progesterone attenuates airway remodeling and glucocorticoid resistance in a murine model of exposing to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Bao, Wuping; Fei, Xia; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Min

    2018-03-01

    Airway remodeling is a vital component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Despite the broad anti-inflammation effects of glucocorticoids, they exhibit relatively little therapeutic benefit in COPD, indicating the accelerating demands of new agents for COPD. We aim to explore the effect of progesterone on airway remodeling in a murine modeling of exposing to ozone and to further examine the potential effect of progesterone on glucocorticoid insensitivity. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone for 12 times over 6 weeks, and were administered with progesterone alone or combined with budesonide (BUD) after each exposure until the 10th week. The peribronchial collagen deposition was measured. The protein levels of MMP8 and MMP9 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs were assessed. Western blot analysis was used to detect the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). The expression of VEGF and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the lung were determined by Immunohistochemical analyses. We observe that progesterone attenuates the peribronchial collagen deposition, as well as the expression of MMP8, MMP9, HIF-1α, VEGF, α-SMA, and GSK-3β in BALF or lung tissues. Progesterone or BUD monotherapy has no effect on HDAC2 production. Progesterone combines with BUD induce dramatically enhanced effects. Thus, these results demonstrate novel roles of progesterone for the pathogenesis and airway remodeling in COPD. Progesterone plus BUD administration exerts more significant inhibition on airway remodeling with dose-independent. Additionally, progesterone may, to some extent, improve the glucocorticoid insensitivity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; prespiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  16. Time-course changes in nasal airway resistance after house dust antigen challenge: With special reference to late phase response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Okubo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The definition of late-phase response (LPR associated with nasal allergy is not as clear as that associated with asthma. Furthermore, LPR and immediate-phase response often act in concert to produce confounding symptoms due to repeated attacks over a short period of time. We examined the nasal airway resistance (NAR, allergic symptoms, eosinophil cationic protein and histamine concentration in nasal surface tissue 30 min before, and 10 min, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 h after a house dust (HD nasal challenge test was performed twice on 10 patients with HD perennial nasal allergy. Nasal airway resistance readings after the HD nasal challenge test were classified into three types based on changes in NAR: type I (short-lasting, five cases; type II (prolonged, eight cases; and type III (biphasic, six cases. Delayed increases in NAR were not observed in type I patients with weak responses to nasal challenge. In type II patients, baseline NAR was elevated and numerous basophilic metachromatic cells (BC were present in the epithelial layer. In type III patients, baseline NAR was not as elevated as it was in type II patients, but marked responses to challenge were noted. In all three types of changes in NAR, eosinophil leukocyte increased at late phase. Moreover, there was no correlation of change in NAR with an increase in the number of eosinophil leukocyte and BC at the epithelial layer in all three types, which suggests that further study is required to confirm the exact role of eosinophils and basophilic cells in LPR.

  17. Inspiratory High Frequency Airway Oscillation Attenuates Resistive Loaded Dyspnea and Modulates Respiratory Function in Young Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20–36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2×30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; pinspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; pinspiratory flow rate (L.s−1) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading–induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT. PMID:24651392

  18. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Morris

    Full Text Available Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT. We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO, a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20 compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT device (n = 15 in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs. HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week. Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003 and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005 groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001. Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001 and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021 groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1 achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001 in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  19. Toward Army Maneuver Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    ..., can be satisfied to form the nucleus of land domain Force Application formations. This branch will be responsive to the needs of the joint force in Unified Action by adjusting the institutional inputs to force development of Army Maneuver Forces...

  20. Structural Changes Following Velopharyngeal Resistance Training (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy): A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Pfeil, Gwenlyn

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility/effectiveness of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to document velopharyngeal (VP) structural changes induced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Changes in velar length and thickness, levator veli palatini (LVP) length and thickness, velar volume, and intravelar muscular proportion along the course of CPAP therapy participation (Pre-CPAP, Post-CPAP, and withdrawal). Velar and LVP lengths remained nearly the same, with the median changes (Δ) less than 0.6%, across repeated conditions. Although varying in magnitudes of change, median velar volume (Δ4%), velar thickness (Δ20%), LVP thickness (Δ17%), and intravelar muscular proportion (Δ10%) illustrated a consistent pattern of increases following the 8-week CPAP therapy. These VP structural measurements slightly decreased but remained above the pretraining condition after 8-week detraining. This report successfully demonstrated that MRI is a viable tool to document CPAP therapy-induced VP structural changes while providing preliminary empirical data.

  1. Sleep architecture, insulin resistance and the nasal cycle: Implications for positive airway pressure therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A.P. Crofts

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global pandemic of metabolic disease is worsening. The metabolic theory of obesity proposes that hormonal changes, especially hyperinsulinaemia, precede metabolic disease development. Although quality sleep is recognised as a key factor for good health, less is known about disrupted sleep as a risk factor for hyperinsulinaemia.   Aim: To explore the relationship between sleep, especially sleep architecture and the nasal cycle, on insulin secretion in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. This review includes a discussion of the potential role of Rest-Activity-Cycler positive airway pressure (RACer-PAP, a novel non-pharmacological OSA treatment strategy.   Methods: A narrative review of all the relevant papers known to the authors was conducted. This review also included results from a polysomnographic sleep clinic pilot study (n = 3 comparing sleep efficiency of RACer-PAP to nasal continuous positive airways pressure (n-CPAP in OSA patients.   Results: Metabolic disease is strongly associated with disturbed sleep. Sleep architecture influences cerebral hormonal secretion, lateral shifts in the autonomic nervous system and nasal airflow dominance. Disturbed sleep shortens short-wave sleep periods, decreasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Improvements to metabolic function during n-CPAP treatment are inconsistent. If RACer-PAP demonstrates superior effects on sleep architecture and autonomic function, it may offer advantages in OSA patients with comorbid metabolic disease.   Conclusion: Improving sleep architecture by maintaining the nasal cycle proposes a novel non-pharmacological treatment paradigm for treating OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. Research is required to demonstrate if RACer-PAP therapy influences whole night sleep architecture, sympathovagal balance and markers of metabolic disease.

  2. Interrupter technique in infancy: Higher airway resistance and lower short-term variability in preterm versus term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usemann, Jakob; Demann, Désirée; Anagnostopoulou, Pinelopi; Korten, Insa; Gorlanova, Olga; Schulzke, Sven; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    In preschool children, measurement of airway resistance using interrupter technique (Rint) is feasible to assess the degree of bronchial obstruction. Although some studies measured Rint in infancy, values of Rint and its variability in preterm infants are unknown. In this study, Rint and its variability was measured at infancy and compared between healthy term and preterm infants. High quality Rint measurements in term (n = 50) and preterm (n = 48) infants were obtained at postmenstrual age of 42-50 weeks in two study centers in Switzerland. Intra-measurement variability of Rint in one measurement and inter-measurement variability between two subsequent measurements was assessed by coefficient of variation (CV). Mean Rint in term infants was 4.2 ± (SD; 1.9) kPa · s · L -1 and in preterm infants was 5.6 ± (2.8) kPa · s · L -1 . Mean CV in term infants was 29.6 ± (14.9)% and in preterm infants was 20.2 ± (8.4)%. Rint was significantly lower (95%CI -2.31 to -0.38; P = 0.007) and CV significantly higher (95%CI 4.53-14.3; P preterm infants. There were no differences in mean Rint and mean CV between the first and the second measurement obtained in a subgroup of term (n = 24, 48%) and preterm (n = 22, 45%) infants. Our results suggest that differences in airway mechanics between term and preterm infants can be assessed with the interrupter technique during early infancy. Before clinical application of Rint measurements in this age group, reasons underlying the variability of measurements should be further investigated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dominant Maneuver: The Art of the Possible

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brozenick, Norman

    1997-01-01

    ...) dominant maneuver, (2) precision engagement, (3) full dimensional protection, and (4) focused logistics. This paper defines dominant maneuver as American maneuver warfare for the early 21st century...

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Mutations in Antimicrobial Resistance Loci of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Airways of Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greipel, Leonie; Fischer, Sebastian; Klockgether, Jens; Dorda, Marie; Mielke, Samira; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Cramer, Nina; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2016-11-01

    The chronic airway infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) are treated with aerosolized antibiotics, oral fluoroquinolones, and/or intravenous combination therapy with aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. An international strain collection of 361 P. aeruginosa isolates from 258 CF patients seen at 30 CF clinics was examined for mutations in 17 antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance loci that had been identified as hot spots of mutation by genome sequencing of serial isolates from a single CF clinic. Combinatorial amplicon sequencing of pooled PCR products identified 1,112 sequence variants that were not present in the genomes of representative strains of the 20 most common clones of the global P. aeruginosa population. A high frequency of singular coding variants was seen in spuE, mexA, gyrA, rpoB, fusA1, mexZ, mexY, oprD, ampD, parR, parS, and envZ (amgS), reflecting the pressure upon P. aeruginosa in lungs of CF patients to generate novel protein variants. The proportion of nonneutral amino acid exchanges was high. Of the 17 loci, mexA, mexZ, and pagL were most frequently affected by independent stop mutations. Private and de novo mutations seem to play a pivotal role in the response of P. aeruginosa populations to the antimicrobial load and the individual CF host. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Flow and volume dependence of rat airway resistance during constant flow inflation and deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Parmagnani, Andrea; Natali, Arturo Nicola

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the flow and volume dependence of both the ohmic and the viscoelastic pressure dissipations of the normal rat respiratory system separately during inflation and deflation. The study was conducted in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory in our institution. Measurements were obtained for Seven albino Wistar rats of both sexes by using the flow interruption method during constant flow inflations and deflations. Measurements included anesthesia induction, tracheostomy and positioning of a tracheal cannula, positive pressure ventilation, constant flow respiratory system inflations and deflations at two different volumes and flows. The ohmic resistance exhibited volume and flow dependence, decreasing with lung volume and increasing with flow rate, during both inflation and deflation. The stress relaxation-related viscoelastic resistance also exhibited volume and flow dependence. It decreased with the flow rate at a constant lung volume during both inflation and deflation, but exhibited a different behavior with the lung volume at a constant flow rate (i.e., increased during inflations and decreased during deflations). Thus, stress relaxation in the rat lungs exhibited a hysteretic behavior. The observed flow and volume dependence of respiratory system resistance may be predicted by an equation derived from a model of the respiratory system that consists of two distinct compartments. The equation agrees well with the experimental data and indicates that the loading time is the critical parameter on which stress relaxation depends, during both lung inflation and deflation.

  6. Adaptive Maneuvering Target Tracking Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the current statistical model, a new adaptive maneuvering target tracking algorithm, CS-MSTF, is presented. The new algorithm keep the merits of high tracking precision that the current statistical model and strong tracking filter (STF have in tracking maneuvering target, and made the modifications as such: First, STF has the defect that it achieves the perfect performance in maneuvering segment at a cost of the precision in non-maneuvering segment, so the new algorithm modified the prediction error covariance matrix and the fading factor to improve the tracking precision both of the maneuvering segment and non-maneuvering segment; The estimation error covariance matrix was calculated using the Joseph form, which is more stable and robust in numerical. The Monte- Carlo simulation shows that the CS-MSTF algorithm has a more excellent performance than CS-STF and can estimate efficiently.

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear ...

  8. Comparison of Mallampati test with lower jaw protrusion maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Haq, Muhammad Irfan; Ullah, Hameed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Failure to maintain a patent airway is one of the commonest causes of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Many protocols, algorithms, and different combinations of tested methods for airway assessment have been developed to predict difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. The reported incidence of a difficult intubation varies from 1.5% to 13%. The objective of this study was to compare Mallampati test (MT) with lower jaw protrusion (LJP) maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Materials and Methods: Seven hundred and sixty patients were included in the study. All the patients underwent MT and LJP maneuver for their airway assessment. After a standardized technique of induction of anesthesia, primary anesthetist performed laryngoscopy and graded it according to the grades described by Cormack and Lehane. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for both these tests with 95% confidence interval (CI) using conventional laryngoscopy as gold standard. Area under curve was also calculated for both, MT and LJP maneuver. A P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: LJP maneuver had higher sensitivity (95.9% vs. 27.1%), NPV (98.7% vs. 82.0%), and accuracy (90.1% vs. 80.3%) when compared to MT in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Both tests, however, had similar specificity and PPV. There was marked difference in the positive and negative likelihood ratio between LJP and MT. Similarly, the area under the curve favored LJP maneuver over MT. Conclusion: The results of this study show that LJP maneuver is a better test to predict difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. We recommend the addition of this maneuver to the routine preoperative evaluation of airway. PMID:24106353

  9. Comparison of Mallampati test with lower jaw protrusion maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan Ul Haq

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failure to maintain a patent airway is one of the commonest causes of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Many protocols, algorithms, and different combinations of tested methods for airway assessment have been developed to predict difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. The reported incidence of a difficult intubation varies from 1.5% to 13%. The objective of this study was to compare Mallampati test (MT with lower jaw protrusion (LJP maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Materials and Methods: Seven hundred and sixty patients were included in the study. All the patients underwent MT and LJP maneuver for their airway assessment. After a standardized technique of induction of anesthesia, primary anesthetist performed laryngoscopy and graded it according to the grades described by Cormack and Lehane. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated for both these tests with 95% confidence interval (CI using conventional laryngoscopy as gold standard. Area under curve was also calculated for both, MT and LJP maneuver. A P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: LJP maneuver had higher sensitivity (95.9% vs. 27.1%, NPV (98.7% vs. 82.0%, and accuracy (90.1% vs. 80.3% when compared to MT in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Both tests, however, had similar specificity and PPV. There was marked difference in the positive and negative likelihood ratio between LJP and MT. Similarly, the area under the curve favored LJP maneuver over MT. Conclusion: The results of this study show that LJP maneuver is a better test to predict difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. We recommend the addition of this maneuver to the routine preoperative evaluation of airway.

  10. Ship maneuvering digital simulator; Simulador digital de manobras de navios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Junior, Jesse Rebello; Tannuri, Eduardo Aoun; Oshiro, Anderson Takehiro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Naval e Oceanica

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on two case studies making use of a digital simulator to investigate the maneuvering motions of ships in canals with shallow and restricted waters. The first case study corresponds to a maneuvering analysis conducted for the Port of Rio Grande (RS - Brazil), whose aim was to assess the potential impact upon maneuvers of the presence of a large offshore platform (the PETROBRAS P-53) which is to remain docked for several months at the Port to complete its construction. The second study made use of the simulator to evaluate the maneuvering conditions along the approach route and maneuvering basin of the Port of Ponta do Felix (PR - Brazil). The simulator includes a complete mathematical model of the ship dynamics in the horizontal plane when subjected to wind and current forces. It also comprises detailed models for the action of thrusters and propellers, both fixed and azimuth, employed to control maneuvers and dynamically position ships, as well as rudders and tugboats. He models used by the simulator allow for the effects of shallow and restricted waters, including the increase in resistance and lateral forces, increase in additional mass and the appearance of lateral and vertical suction (squatting). The simulator is implemented via an interactive interface through which the user is able to apply control actions (rudder angle, main engine, thrusters and tugboats) in real time during maneuvers, thereby reproducing to some extent the action of a pilot. (author)

  11. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET-mediated killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evidence of acquired resistance within the CF airway, independent of CFTR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Young

    Full Text Available The inability of neutrophils to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the cystic fibrosis (CF airway eventually results in chronic infection by the bacteria in nearly 80 percent of patients. Phagocytic killing of P. aeruginosa by CF neutrophils is impaired due to decreased cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function and virulence factors acquired by the bacteria. Recently, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, extracellular structures composed of neutrophil chromatin complexed with granule contents, were identified as an alternative mechanism of pathogen killing. The hypothesis that NET-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa is impaired in the context of the CF airway was tested. P. aeruginosa induced NET formation by neutrophils from healthy donors in a bacterial density dependent fashion. When maintained in suspension through continuous rotation, P. aeruginosa became physically associated with NETs. Under these conditions, NETs were the predominant mechanism of killing, across a wide range of bacterial densities. Peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from CF patients demonstrated no impairment in NET formation or function against P. aeruginosa. However, isogenic clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from CF patients early and later in the course of infection demonstrated an acquired capacity to withstand NET-mediated killing in 8 of 9 isolates tested. This resistance correlated with development of the mucoid phenotype, but was not a direct result of the excess alginate production that is characteristic of mucoidy. Together, these results demonstrate that neutrophils can kill P. aeruginosa via NETs, and in vitro this response is most effective under non-stationary conditions with a low ratio of bacteria to neutrophils. NET-mediated killing is independent of CFTR function or bacterial opsonization. Failure of this response in the context of the CF airway may occur, in part, due to an acquired resistance against NET

  12. Acceleration sensors in abdominal wall position as a non-invasive approach to detect early breathing alterations induced by intolerance of increased airway resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Thomas; Bruells, Christian S; Rossaint, Rolf; Steffen, Henning; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine; Czaplik, Michael; Zoremba, Norbert

    2017-11-10

    Early detection of respiratory overload is crucial to mechanically ventilated patients, especially during phases of spontaneous breathing. Although a diversity of methods and indices has been established, there is no highly specific approach to predict respiratory failure. This study aimed to evaluate acceleration sensors in abdominal and thoracic wall positions to detect alterations in breathing excursions in a setting of gradual increasing airway resistance. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were committed to a standardized protocol of a two-minutes step-down spontaneous breathing on a 5 mm, 4 mm and then 3 mm orally placed endotracheal tube. Accelerator sensors in thoracic and abdominal wall position monitored breathing excursions. 15 participants passed the breathing protocol ("completed" group), 14 individuals cancelled the protocol due to subjective intolerance to the increasing airway resistance ("abandoned" group). Gradual increased respiratory workload led to a significant decrease of acceleration in abdominal wall position in the "abandoned" group compared to the "completed" group (p breathing alterations prior to respiratory failure. EK 309-15; by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany. Retrospectively registered 28th of December 2015.

  13. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  14. Support and maneuvering device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R.L.

    1987-03-23

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

  15. Effect of Heat Moisture Exchanger on Aerosol Drug Delivery and Airway Resistance in Simulated Ventilator-Dependent Adults Using Jet and Mesh Nebulizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Arzu; Dang, Truong; Al Enazi, Fahad H; Alqahtani, Mohammed M; Alkhathami, Abdulrahman; Qoutah, Rowaida; Almamary, Ahmad S; Fink, James B

    2018-02-01

    Placement of a heat moisture exchanger (HME) between aerosol generator and patient has been associated with greatly reduced drug delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filtered and nonfiltered HMEs placed between nebulizer and patient on aerosol deposition and airway resistance (Raw) in simulated ventilator-dependent adults. An in vitro lung model was developed to simulate a mechanically ventilated adult (Vt 500 mL, RR 15/min, and PEEP 5 cmH 2 O, using two inspiratory flow rates 40 and 50 L/min) using an intubated adult manikin with an endotracheal tube (8 mmID). The bronchi of the manikin were connected to a Y-adapter through a collecting filter (Respirgard II) attached to a test lung through a heated humidifier (37°C producing 100% relative humidity) to simulate exhaled humidity. For treatment conditions, a nonfiltered HME (ThermoFlo™ 6070; ARC Medical) and filtered HMEs (ThermoFlo™ Filter; ARC Medical and PALL Ultipor; Pall Medical) were placed between the ventilator circuit at the endotracheal tube and allowed to acclimate to the exhaled heat and humidity for 30 minutes before aerosol administration. Airway resistance (cmH 2 O/L/s) was taken at 0, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after HME placement and after each of four aerosol treatments. Albuterol sulfate (2.5 mg/3 mL) was administered with jet (Misty Max 10; Airlife) and mesh (Aerogen Solo; Aerogen) nebulizers positioned in the inspiratory limb proximal to the Y-adapter. Control consisted of nebulization with no HME. Drug was eluted from filter at the end of the trachea and measured using spectrophotometry (276 nm). Greater than 60% of the control dose was delivered through the ThermoFlo. No significant difference was found between the first four treatments given by the jet (p = 0.825) and the mesh (p = 0.753) nebulizers. There is a small increase in Raw between pre- and post-four treatments with the jet (p = 0.001) and mesh (p = 0.015) nebulizers. Aerosol

  16. Maneuver from the Air Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    disarmament after the first Gulf War.127 The roots of the conflict however, go back to the termination of Operation Desert Storm, and Hussein’s...competency of combined arms maneuver, a maneuver mechanism discussed in detail later in this study. 2...Warden’s plan consisted of just eighty-four targets, of which none were Iraqi fielded forces.9 The actual air campaign that took place during Desert

  17. Air Power and Maneuver Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    way to integrate air power on the one hand with maneuver warfare on the other. While American commanders such as Robert E. Lee and George S. Patton...MANEUVER WARFARE years .’ Nevertheless, it should not be forgotten that few commanders of any time or place have fought as many great battles- batailles ...the process to a boxer who uses one arm to parry his opponent’s punches and draw his attention while striking with the other. Gen George S. Patton

  18. 14 CFR 25.1507 - Maneuvering speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering speed. 25.1507 Section 25.1507....1507 Maneuvering speed. The maneuvering speed must be established so that it does not exceed the design maneuvering speed V A determined under § 25.335(c). ...

  19. Immunomodulatory effect of linezolid on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus supernatant-induced MUC5AC overexpression in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Norihito; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yamada, Koichi; Harada, Yosuke; Migiyama, Yohei; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Linezolid is the first member of the oxazolidinones and is active against drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, linezolid shows an immunomodulatory effect, such as inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we examined the effect of linezolid on MRSA-induced MUC5AC overexpression in airway epithelial cells. In this study, an MRSA supernatant was used to avoid the direct effect of linezolid on MRSA. MUC5AC protein production was significantly increased with a 40-fold dilution of MRSA supernatant. At the mRNA level, MUC5AC gene expression was significantly increased 6 and 9 h after stimulation. In an inhibition study, linezolid significantly reduced MRSA-induced MUC5AC protein and mRNA overexpression at concentrations of 5 and 20 μg/ml, which were the same as the trough and peak concentrations in human epithelial lining fluid. In an analysis of cell signaling, among the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, only the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor reduced the MUC5AC protein production to the same level as that of the control; on Western blot analysis, only ERK1/2 was phosphorylated by the MRSA supernatant. In addition, the ERK1/2 phosphorylation was inhibited by linezolid. MUC5AC and MUC5B are the major barrier that traps inhaled microbial organisms, particulates, and foreign irritants. However, in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, pathogen-induced MUC5AC overexpression causes many problems, and control of the overexpression is important. Thus, this study revealed that linezolid showed a direct immunomodulatory effect in airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Anesthetic concerns in a huge congenital sublingual swelling obscuring airway access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of intraoral pathology poses a great challenge during management of pediatric airway. We report management of big intraoral cystic swelling physically occupying the entire oral cavity restricting access to airway. Preintubation aspiration of swelling was done to decrease its size and make room for airway manipulation, followed by laryngoscopy and intubation in lateral position. Airway patency is at risk in postoperative period also, in this case, though the swelling decreased in size postoperatively but presence of significant edema required placement of tongue stitch and modified nasopharyngeal airway. Case report highlights simple maneuvers to manage a difficult case.

  1. Comparison of force exerted on the sternum during a sneeze versus during low-, moderate-, and high-intensity bench press resistance exercise with and without the valsalva maneuver in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jenny; Schmid, Jack; Parker, Robert D; Coast, J Richard; Cheng, Dunlei; Killian, Aaron D; McCray, Stephanie; Strauss, Danielle; McLeroy Dejong, Sandra; Berbarie, Rafic

    2014-03-15

    Sternal precautions are intended to prevent complications after median sternotomy, but little data exist to support the consensus recommendations. To better characterize the forces on the sternum that can occur during everyday events, we conducted a prospective nonrandomized study of 41 healthy volunteers that evaluated the force exerted during bench press resistance exercise and while sneezing. A balloon-tipped esophageal catheter, inserted through the subject's nose and advanced into the thoracic cavity, was used to measure the intrathoracic pressure differential during the study activities. After the 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) was assessed, the subject performed the bench press at the following intensities, first with controlled breathing and then with the Valsalva maneuver: 40% of 1-RM (low), 70% of 1-RM (moderate), and 1-RM (high). Next, various nasal irritants were used to induce a sneeze. The forces on the sternum were calculated according to a cylindrical model, and a 2-tailed paired t test was used to compare the mean force exerted during a sneeze with the mean force exerted during each of the 6 bench press exercises. No statistically significant difference was found between the mean force from a sneeze (41.0 kg) and the mean total force exerted during moderate-intensity bench press exercise with breathing (41.4 kg). In conclusion, current guidelines and recommendations limit patient activity after a median sternotomy. Because these patients can repeatedly withstand a sneeze, our study indicates that they can withstand the forces from more strenuous activities than are currently allowed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation changes during sub-maximal handgrip maneuver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo C Nogueira

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of handgrip (HG maneuver on time-varying estimates of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA using the autoregressive moving average technique. METHODS: Twelve healthy subjects were recruited to perform HG maneuver during 3 minutes with 30% of maximum contraction force. Cerebral blood flow velocity, end-tidal CO₂ pressure (PETCO₂, and noninvasive arterial blood pressure (ABP were continuously recorded during baseline, HG and recovery. Critical closing pressure (CrCP, resistance area-product (RAP, and time-varying autoregulation index (ARI were obtained. RESULTS: PETCO₂ did not show significant changes during HG maneuver. Whilst ABP increased continuously during the maneuver, to 27% above its baseline value, CBFV raised to a plateau approximately 15% above baseline. This was sustained by a parallel increase in RAP, suggestive of myogenic vasoconstriction, and a reduction in CrCP that could be associated with metabolic vasodilation. The time-varying ARI index dropped at the beginning and end of the maneuver (p<0.005, which could be related to corresponding alert reactions or to different time constants of the myogenic, metabolic and/or neurogenic mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Changes in dynamic CA during HG suggest a complex interplay of regulatory mechanisms during static exercise that should be considered when assessing the determinants of cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ... for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can ...

  6. Synthetic Nanoparticles That Promote Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Expressing Regulatory T Cells in the Lung and Resistance to Allergic Airways Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohimah Mohamud

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glycine coated 50 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NP (PS50G, unlike ambient NP, do not promote pulmonary inflammation, but instead, render lungs resistant to the development of allergic airway inflammation. In this study, we show that PS50G modulate the frequency and phenotype of regulatory T cells (Treg in the lung, specifically increasing the proportion of tumor necrosis factor 2 (TNFR2 expressing Treg. Mice pre-exposed to PS50G, which were sensitized and then challenged with an allergen a month later, preferentially expanded TNFR2+Foxp3+ Treg, which further expressed enhanced levels of latency associated peptide and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated molecule-4. Moreover, PS50G-induced CD103+ dendritic cell activation in the lung was associated with the proliferative expansion of TNFR2+Foxp3+ Treg. These findings provide the first evidence that engineered NP can promote the selective expansion of maximally suppressing TNFR2+Foxp3+ Treg and further suggest a novel mechanism by which NP may promote healthy lung homeostasis.

  7. Detection of changes in respiratory mechanics due to increasing degrees of airway obstruction in asthma by the forced oscillation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Juliana V; Lopes, Agnaldo J; Jansen, José M; Melo, Pedro L

    2006-12-01

    Forced expiratory airflows and volumes are often used to assess the airway obstruction in asthmatics. However, forced maneuvers may change bronchial tone and modify airway patency. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Forced Oscillation Technique (FOT), which does not require forced manoeuvres, may be useful to describe the changes in respiratory mechanics in progressive asthma. This study involved 25 healthy and 84 asthmatics, including patients with normal spirometric exam (NE), mild moderate and severe obstruction. Resistive data were interpreted using the respiratory system resistance extrapolated at 0 Hz (R0), the mean respiratory resistance (Rm), and the resistance/frequency slope (S). Reactance data were interpreted by its mean values (Xm), the dynamic compliance (Crs,dyn), and resonant frequency (fr). Receiver operating characteristics curves were used to determine the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of FOT parameters in identifying asthma. There were not statistically significant differences between the control and NE groups. Comparing the control and mild groups, significant increases of R0 (Pfundamentals. The best parameters for detecting asthma were R0 (Se=81%, Sp=76%), S (Se=78%, Sp=72%) and Xm (Se=81%, Sp=80%). In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the FOT can be proposed as an alternative method for the assessment of the respiratory mechanics in asthmatic patients, representing a promising solution to the problem of effort dependence.

  8. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema on t...... in causing airway narrowing, the latter most likely due to loss of elastic recoil of surrounding tissue....

  9. Mucoidy, quorum sensing, mismatch repair and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis chronic airways infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Feliziani

    Full Text Available Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis, LasR (quorum sensing and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS-deficiency and antibiotic resistance. Thus, 38 isolates from 26 chronically infected CF patients were characterized for their phenotypic traits, PFGE genotypic patterns, mutations in the mucA, lasR, mexZ, mutS and mutL gene coding sequences and antibiotic resistance profiles. The most frequently mutated gene was mexZ (79%, followed by mucA (63% and lasR (39% as well as a high prevalence (42% of hypermutators being observed due to loss-of-function mutations in mutL (60% followed by mutS (40%. Interestingly, mutational spectra were particular to each gene, suggesting that several mechanisms are responsible for mutations during chronic infection. However, no link could be established between hypermutability and mutagenesis in mucA, lasR and mexZ, indicating that MRS-deficiency was not involved in the acquisition of these mutations. Finally, although inactivation of mucA, lasR and mexZ has been previously shown to confer resistance/tolerance to antibiotics, only mutations in MRS genes could be related to an antibiotic resistance increase. These results help to unravel

  10. Mucoidy, quorum sensing, mismatch repair and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis chronic airways infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliziani, Sofía; Luján, Adela M; Moyano, Alejandro J; Sola, Claudia; Bocco, José L; Montanaro, Patricia; Canigia, Liliana Fernández; Argaraña, Carlos E; Smania, Andrea M

    2010-09-10

    Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic infections is based on a genetic adaptation process consisting of mutations in specific genes, which can produce advantageous phenotypic switches and ensure its persistence in the lung. Among these, mutations inactivating the regulators MucA (alginate biosynthesis), LasR (quorum sensing) and MexZ (multidrug-efflux pump MexXY) are the most frequently observed, with those inactivating the DNA mismatch repair system (MRS) being also highly prevalent in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, leading to hypermutator phenotypes that could contribute to this adaptive mutagenesis by virtue of an increased mutation rate. Here, we characterized the mutations found in the mucA, lasR, mexZ and MRS genes in P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Argentinean CF patients, and analyzed the potential association of mucA, lasR and mexZ mutagenesis with MRS-deficiency and antibiotic resistance. Thus, 38 isolates from 26 chronically infected CF patients were characterized for their phenotypic traits, PFGE genotypic patterns, mutations in the mucA, lasR, mexZ, mutS and mutL gene coding sequences and antibiotic resistance profiles. The most frequently mutated gene was mexZ (79%), followed by mucA (63%) and lasR (39%) as well as a high prevalence (42%) of hypermutators being observed due to loss-of-function mutations in mutL (60%) followed by mutS (40%). Interestingly, mutational spectra were particular to each gene, suggesting that several mechanisms are responsible for mutations during chronic infection. However, no link could be established between hypermutability and mutagenesis in mucA, lasR and mexZ, indicating that MRS-deficiency was not involved in the acquisition of these mutations. Finally, although inactivation of mucA, lasR and mexZ has been previously shown to confer resistance/tolerance to antibiotics, only mutations in MRS genes could be related to an antibiotic resistance increase. These results help to unravel the

  11. Plotting Orbital Trajectories For Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Adam R.

    1991-01-01

    Interactive Orbital Trajectory Planning Tool (EIVAN) computer program is forward-looking interactive orbit-trajectory-plotting software tool for use with proximity operations (operations occurring within 1-km sphere of space station) and other maneuvers. Developed to plot resulting trajectories, to provide better comprehension of effects of orbital mechanics, and to help user develop heuristics for planning missions on orbit. Program runs with Microsoft's Excel for execution on MacIntosh computer running MacIntosh OS.

  12. On the relation of nasal cycling with nasal airway dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    The size and configuration of the nasal airways of humans change with time as a result of the normal process of congestion/decongestion of the erectile tissue of the nasal mucosa. To determine the extent to which airway areas change in vivo, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitate both the cross-sectional area and perimeter of coronal sections of the entire nasal airway of a human subject. Changes in airway size or patency were indexed to measured changes in unilateral nasal airway resistance determined by posterior rhino manometry. The results of this study in which two MRI scans were performed for presumed left-side patency and two for right-side patency, showed that changes in nasal airway resistance were difficult to ascribe to systematic changes In the sizes of the airways. (author)

  13. The maneuver search and the maneuver search trajectory framework of search heavy torpedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjin; Zhang, Jingyuan; Li, Jitao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of technology capability of submarine launching heavy torpedo and the demand of intellectualized combat, the paper raises the concept of torpedo maneuver search and analyses maneuver search opportunity. It is necessary to realize the long range heavy torpedo's maneuver search that heavy torpedo's maneuver search can cover the target's location error which results from launching platform's position precision and the target's intentional maneuver when the torpedo is launched. The technology framework of the heavy torpedo's maneuver search trajectory is set up.

  14. Inactivation of the Thymidylate Synthase thyA in Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae Modulates Antibiotic Resistance and Has a Strong Impact on Its Interplay with the Host Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arce, Irene; Martí, Sara; Euba, Begoña; Fernández-Calvet, Ariadna; Moleres, Javier; López-López, Nahikari; Barberán, Montserrat; Ramos-Vivas, José; Tubau, Fe; Losa, Carmen; Ardanuy, Carmen; Leiva, José; Yuste, José E; Garmendia, Junkal

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial treatment with cotrimoxazol (TxS), a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, generates resistance by, among others, acquisition of thymidine auxotrophy associated with mutations in the thymidylate synthase gene thyA , which can modify the biology of infection. The opportunistic pathogen non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is frequently encountered in the lower airways of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, and associated with acute exacerbation of COPD symptoms. Increasing resistance of NTHi to TxS limits its suitability as initial antibacterial against COPD exacerbation, although its relationship with thymidine auxotrophy is unknown. In this study, the analysis of 2,542 NTHi isolates recovered at Bellvitge University Hospital (Spain) in the period 2010-2014 revealed 119 strains forming slow-growing colonies on the thymidine low concentration medium Mueller Hinton Fastidious, including one strain isolated from a COPD patient undergoing TxS therapy that was a reversible thymidine auxotroph. To assess the impact of thymidine auxotrophy in the NTHi-host interplay during respiratory infection, thyA mutants were generated in both the clinical isolate NTHi375 and the reference strain RdKW20. Inactivation of the thyA gene increased TxS resistance, but also promoted morphological changes consistent with elongation and impaired bacterial division, which altered H. influenzae self-aggregation, phosphorylcholine level, C3b deposition, and airway epithelial infection patterns. Availability of external thymidine contributed to overcome such auxotrophy and TxS effect, potentially facilitated by the nucleoside transporter nupC . Although, thyA inactivation resulted in bacterial attenuation in a lung infection mouse model, it also rendered a lower clearance upon a TxS challenge in vivo . Thus, our results show that thymidine auxotrophy modulates both the NTHi host airway interplay and antibiotic resistance, which should be

  15. Manned maneuvering unit technology survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. V. O. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of the manned maneuvering unit (MMU) for the shuttle is investigated, and the current state of the art in certain technology areas that may find application on the operational EVA shuttle MMU is examined. Three broad areas of technology, namely: (1) mechanical energy storage - i.e., the practicality of utilizing the energy storage capability of either a reaction wheel or a control moment gyro, (2) numerical and alphanumerical displays, and (3) recent electronics developments such as microprocessors and integrated injection logic, were covered.

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of ... Pulmonary Exacerbations Clinical Care Guidelines SCREENING & TREATING DEPRESSION & ANXIETY GUIDELINES Clinician Resources As a clinician, you’re ...

  17. 46 CFR 109.564 - Maneuvering characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics. 109.564 Section 109.564 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.564 Maneuvering characteristics. (a) The master or person in charge of each...

  18. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar shoulder dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  20. Aerodynamic maneuvering hypersonic flight mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desautel, Dick

    1988-01-01

    The emergence of current high-interest mission involving aeromaneuvering hypersonic flight has given rise to the corresponding need for preliminary design and performance analyses of such vehicles. This need in turn has motivated efforts to develop simplified analytical and computational methods for parametric analysis of maneuvering hypersonic flight under conditions appropriate to the mission involved. The effort included a review of different formulations of the general equations of motion, their associated coordinate frames, various simplifications of the equations, and previously achieved analytical solutions. This study sought to both extend previous solution methods and to develop new ones. In addition, evaluation of the literature and developing a systematic perspective on the knowledge it represents proved to be a major portion of the effort.

  1. Uma nova abordagem na determinação da resistência das vias aéreas: técnica do interruptor vs. pletismografia A new approach to the determination of airway resistance: interrupter technique vs. plethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Antônio Gritti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concordância da medida da resistência das vias aéreas (RVA pela técnica interrupter resistance (Rint, resistência do interruptor com a do método pletismográfico para fins de aplicabilidade clínica. MÉTODOS: A técnica Rint foi realizada com os pacientes em posição sentada, em expiração, utilizando clipe nasal e com suporte das bochechas. O exame pletismográfico foi realizado de acordo com protocolos padronizados. As medidas foram realizadas antes e após a administração inalatória de um broncodilatador via spray dosimetrado com espaçador. RESULTADOS: Avaliamos 99 pacientes consecutivos encaminhados para o Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre (RS, para a realização de testes de função pulmonar, com idades entre 18 e 82 anos. Desses, 52 eram mulheres. Houve boa concordância entre os métodos (r = 0,8; coeficiente de correlação intraclasse = 0,8 nos pacientes com VEF1 > 60% do previsto. Os valores de Rint foram menores que os da RVA por pletismografia em indivíduos mais graves. Entretanto, houve boa concordância entre Rint > 4 cmH2O • L-1 • s-1 e RVA por pletismografia > 2,5 cmH2O • L-1 • s-1 (razão de verossimilhança > 8 e coeficiente kappa = 0,73. CONCLUSÕES: A concordância entre o Rint e a RVA por pletismografia foi boa nos indivíduos menos graves. A concordância para um diagnóstico de aumento da RVA entre os dois métodos também foi forte. A técnica Rint é um método potencialmente útil na prática assistencial em adultos.OBJECTIVE: To determine the agreement between interrupter resistance (Rint and airway resistance (Raw by plethysmography in order to verify the clinical applicability of the interrupter technique. METHODS: The Rint technique was performed with the patients in a sitting position, during exhalation, with a nose clip and cheek support. Plethysmography was carried out in accordance with standard protocols. All measurements were taken prior to and

  2. 32 CFR 644.137 - Maneuver agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... camp sites, field hospital sites and supply dumps), and buildings needed for warehouses, ordnance shops... the Chief of Engineers upon receipt of a specific request from the using command to acquire maneuver...

  3. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS), in collaboration with the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL), proposed the Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) program...

  4. Automated Robust Maneuver Design and Optimization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking improvements to the current technologies related to Position, Navigation and Timing. In particular, it is desired to automate precise maneuver...

  5. Do recruitment maneuvers simply improve oxygenation?

    OpenAIRE

    Valenza, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment maneuvers have been the subject of intense investigation. Their role in the acute care setting is debated given the lack of information on their influence on clinical outcomes. Oxygenation improvement is often a striking effect, together with changes of respiratory mechanics. However, hemodynamic compromise is frequently associated with the maneuver, sometimes even barotrauma. Another possible downside is bacterial translocation secondary to lung overdistention, as suggested by ex...

  6. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor may...

  7. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  8. Impact of airway morphological changes on pulmonary flows in scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, James; Garrido, Enrique; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between thoracic deformity in scoliosis and lung function is poorly understood. In a pilot study, we reviewed computed tomography (CT) routine scans of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery. The CT scans were processed to segment the anatomy of the airways, lung and spine. A three-dimensional model was created to study the anatomical relationship. Preliminary analysis showed significant airway morphological differences depending on the anterior position of the spine. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was also conducted on the airway geometry using the inspiratory scans. The CFD model assuming non-compliant airway walls was capable of showing pressure drops in areas of high airway resistance, but was unable to predict regional ventilation differences. Our results indicate a dependence between the dynamic deformation of the airway during breathing and lung function. Dynamic structural deformation must therefore be incorporated within any modelling approaches to guide clinicians on the decision to perform surgical correction of the scoliosis.

  9. Update on the roles of distal airways in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This review is the summary of a workshop on the role of distal airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which took place in 2009 in Vence, France. The evidence showing inflammation and remodelling in distal airways and the possible involvement of these in the pathobiology, physiology, clinical manifestations and natural history of COPD were examined. The usefulness and limitations of physiological tests and imaging techniques for assessing distal airways abnormalities were evaluated. Ex vivo studies in isolated lungs and invasive measurements of airway resistance in living individuals have revealed that distal airways represent the main site of airflow limitation in COPD. Structural changes in small conducting airways, including increased wall thickness and obstruction by muco-inflammatory exudates, and emphysema (resulting in premature airway closure, were important determinants of airflow limitation. Infiltration of small conducting airways by phagocytes (macrophages and neutrophils, dendritic cells and T and B lymphocytes increased with airflow limitation. Distal airways abnormalities were associated with patient-related outcomes (e.g. dyspnoea and reduced health-related quality of life and with the natural history of the disease, as reflected by lung function decline and mortality. These data provide a clear rationale for targeting distal airways in COPD.

  10. Human airway smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Jongste, Johan

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less likely, squeezing mucus out of mucous glands and pulling open the alveoli next to the airways1 . Any role of airway smooth muscle is necessarily limited, because an important degree of contraction will l...

  11. Rhinovirus and airway allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuo Yamaya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoviruses cause the majority of common colds, which often provoke wheezing in patients with asthma. The precise mechanisms responsible for the rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbations of bronchial asthma remain uncertain. However, several reports have demonstrated airway hyperresponsiveness, increases in chemical mediators in airway secretions, such as kinin and histamine, and airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma after rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus infection induces the accumulation of inflammatory cells in airway mucosa and submucosa, including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. Rhinovirus affects the barrier function of airway epithelial cells and activates airway epithelial cells and other cells in the lung to produce proinflammatory cytokines, including various types of interleukins, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANTES, and histamine. Rhinovirus also stimulates the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptors in the airway epithelium, receptors for major and minor rhinoviruses. Rhinovirus infection is inhibited by treatment with soluble ICAM-1 and by the reduction of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelial cells after treatment with either glucocorticoid or erythromycin. Both soluble ICAM-1 and erythromycin have been reported to reduce the symptoms of common colds. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbation of bronchial asthma and the relationship between rhinovirus infection and airway allergy.

  12. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Airway narrowing and bronchodilation to deep inspiration in bronchial segments from subjects with and without reported asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Peter B; Jones, Robyn L; Cairncross, Alvenia; Elliot, John G; Mitchell, Howard W; James, Alan L; McFawn, Peter K

    2013-05-15

    The present study presents preliminary findings on how structural/functional abnormalities of the airway wall relate to excessive airway narrowing and reduced bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration (DI) in subjects with a history of asthma. Bronchial segments were acquired from subjects undergoing surgery, mostly to remove pulmonary neoplasms. Subjects reported prior doctor-diagnosed asthma (n = 5) or had no history of asthma (n = 8). In vitro airway narrowing in response to acetylcholine was assessed to determine maximal bronchoconstriction and sensitivity, under static conditions and during simulated tidal and DI maneuvers. Fixed airway segments were sectioned for measurement of airway wall dimensions, particularly the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer. Airways from subjects with a history of asthma had increased ASM (P = 0.014), greater maximal airway narrowing under static conditions (P = 0.003), but no change in sensitivity. Maximal airway narrowing was positively correlated with the area of the ASM layer (r = 0.58, P = 0.039). In tidally oscillating airways, DI produced bronchodilation in airways from the control group (P = 0.0001) and the group with a history of asthma (P = 0.001). While bronchodilation to DI was reduced with increased airway narrowing (P = 0.02; r = -0.64)), when the level of airway narrowing was matched, there was no difference in magnitude of bronchodilation to DI between groups. Results suggest that greater ASM mass in asthma contributes to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. In comparison, the airway wall in asthma may have a normal response to mechanical stretch during DI. We propose that increased maximal airway narrowing and the reduced bronchodilatory response to DI in asthma are independent.

  14. Responsiveness of the human airway in vitro during deep inspiration and tidal oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Peter B; Jones, Robyn L; Needi, Elangovan Thaya; Cairncross, Alvenia; Mitchell, Howard W; James, Alan L; McFawn, Peter K

    2011-06-01

    In healthy individuals, deep inspiration produces bronchodilation and reduced airway responsiveness, which may be a response of the airway wall to mechanical stretch. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro response of isolated human airways to the dynamic mechanical stretch associated with normal breathing. Human bronchial segments (n = 6) were acquired from patients without airflow obstruction undergoing lung resection for pulmonary neoplasms. The side branches were ligated and the airways were mounted in an organ bath chamber. Airway narrowing to cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (3 × 10(-6) M to 3 × 10(-3) M) was measured under static conditions and in the presence of "tidal" oscillations with intermittent "deep inspiration." Respiratory maneuvers were simulated by varying transmural pressure using a motor-controlled syringe pump (tidal 5 to 10 cmH(2)O at 0.25 Hz, deep inspiration 5 to 30 cmH(2)O). Airway narrowing was determined from decreases in lumen volume. Tidal oscillation had no effect on airway responses to acetylcholine which was similar to those under static conditions. Deep inspiration in tidally oscillating, acetylcholine-contracted airways produced potent, transient (inspiration produces bronchodilation and a transient reduction in airway responsiveness, which can explain the beneficial effects of deep inspiration in bronchial provocation testing in vivo.

  15. Safety and effectiveness of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure during general anesthesia for cesarean section: a prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretha, D; Fligou, F; Kiekkas, P; Messini, C; Panteli, E; Zintzaras, E; Karanikolas, M

    2017-05-01

    During cesarean section, the supine position reduces functional residual capacity and worsens lung compliance. We tested the hypothesis that alveolar recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure improve lung compliance in women undergoing general anesthesia for cesarean section. Ninety women undergoing cesarean section were randomly assigned to one of two groups in a prospective, double-blind trial. In the alveolar recruitment maneuver group, pressure-control ventilation was used and inspiratory time was increased to 50% after delivery; positive end-expiratory pressure was increased to 20cmH 2 O and peak airway inspiratory pressure gradually increased to 45-50cmH 2 O. Volume-control ventilation was then used with low tidal volumes (6mL/kg) and positive end-expiratory pressure was reduced stepwise to 8cmH 2 O. In the control group, alveolar recruitment maneuvers were not used. Data were collected before and 3, 10 and 20min after the alveolar recruitment maneuver, before extubation and postoperatively at 10 and 20min. Dynamic compliance, peak airway inspiratory pressure, PaO 2 and PaO 2 /FiO 2 were significantly different in the alveolar recruitment maneuver group compared to controls at all time points during surgery except at baseline. Oxygen saturation was significantly greater in the alveolar recruitment maneuver group at 10 and 20min and before extubation. Dynamic compliance was 29.7-42.5% higher and peak airway inspiratory pressure 3.6-10.2% lower in the alveolar recruitment maneuver group compared to controls. The PaO 2 , PaO 2 /FiO 2 and oxygen saturation were higher (9.4-12%, 10.3-11.9% and 0.4-1.3%, respectively) in the alveolar recruitment maneuver group. Postoperatively, PaO 2 and oxygen saturation were significantly higher in the alveolar recruitment maneuver group compared to controls (PaO 2 9.2% at 10min and 8.4% at 20min, oxygen saturation 0.8% at 10min and 1.1% at 20min). There were no significant differences in hemodynamic stability or

  16. Improved Maneuver Reconstructions for the GRAIL Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Mason; You, Tung-Han; Antreasian, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Maneuver reconstructions for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) A and B lunar orbiters were improved through updates to the orbit determination filter and dynamic models. Consistent reconstructions of the 27 GRAIL A and B maneuvers from the Trans-Lunar Cruise phase in the fall of 2011 through the Transition to Science Formation phase in February 2012 were performed. Standard methods of orbit determination were applied incorporating the latest dynamic models and filter strategies developed by the GRAIL Navigation and Science Teams, including a high resolution, 420 x 420 degree and order lunar spherical harmonic gravity field model. For Trans-Lunar Cruise for GRAIL-A (TLC-A), all maneuvers executed with delta V errors below 5.50 +/- 0.50 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.25 degrees. GRAIL-A lunar orbit maneuvers had delta V errors below 30.0 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.51 degrees. For TLC-B, all maneuvers executed with delta V errors below 8.60 +/- 1.41 mm/s and pointing errors below 0.300 degrees. GRAIL-B maneuvers in lunar orbit executed with maximum delta V errors of 25.0 mm/s and pointing error of 0.43 degrees. These maneuver reconstructions will enable the GRAIL Navigation Team to better characterize the main engine performance of each spacecraft. This will help the Navigation Team to navigate low (greater than 8 km) altitude orbits during the extended mission phase in the fall of 2012.

  17. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    -20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen diameter...... the interior and exterior airway wall surface in three dimensions, and branches were matched in consecutive scans by image registration. Emphysema was defined as attenuation referred to as % low-attenuation area 910 (%LAA910). Emphysema limits were set at

  18. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiang; Lv, Yunhui; Li, Kai; Ma, Lei; Du, Guodong; Xiang, Yan; Li, Xuqing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate systematically the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and the Web of Science were searched for studies investigating the effects of CPAP on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA. The selected studies underwent quality assessment and meta-analysis, as well as being tested for heterogeneity. Six randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of the changes in mean systolic blood pressure and mean diastolic blood pressure (as assessed by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) were -5.40 mmHg (95% CI: -9.17 to -1.64; p = 0.001; I2 = 74%) and -3.86 mmHg (95% CI: -6.41 to -1.30; p = 0.00001; I2 = 79%), respectively. CPAP therapy can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA.

  19. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  20. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    , neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response...... or eNO. CONCLUSIONS: In older patients with asthma, airway inflammatory cells are linked to abnormal airway physiology. Eosinophilic airway inflammation is associated with AHR while neutrophilic inflammation may be an important determinant of airflow limitation at rest and airway closure during......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma...

  1. Upper Airway Control in Airway Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliacek I

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Upper airways (UA are an organic component of the respiratory tract, they serve to respiration, respiratory tract protection and defense, phonation, deglutition, etc. The functions of UA are regulated by motor control of the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles.

  2. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    on the airway distensibility, defined as the ratio of relative change in lumen diameter to the relative change in total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) . Methods – We included 1900 participants from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST); all randomized to annual low...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinician Career Development Awards Clinician Training Awards Mutation Analysis Program Network News Network News: January 2018 Network ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Family Parenting as an Adult With CF Treatments & Therapies People with cystic fibrosis are living longer ... to specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique ...

  6. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another member of your CF care team can show you how to perform many different ACTs and ... of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway ...

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will ... best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as part of your daily ...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CYSTIC FIBROSIS Learn about cystic fibrosis, a genetic lung disorder that affects the pancreas and other organs, ... Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing and Huffing High- ...

  9. Airway protective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx to ensure regulation of pressure when a bolus/air is moving from the upper airway through to the thorax (i.e., inspiration or swallow) or the reverse (i.e., expiration reflex or vomiting). These vital mechanisms have not been evaluated in clinical conditions but could be impaired in many neurodegenerative diseases, leading to aspiration pneumonia. These newly described airway protective mechanisms need further study, especially in healthy and pathologic human populations.

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care ... attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member of your CF care ...

  11. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing ... Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation ( ...

  12. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CFTR Modulator Therapies Mucus Thinners Nebulizer Care at Home Vascular Access Devices PICCs and Ports Partnerships for ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  13. Human airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... many challenges, including medical, social, and financial. By learning more about how you can manage your disease every day, you can ultimately help find a ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic ...

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today. ANNUAL FUND Become a Corporate Supporter Cause Marketing Make a Charitable Gift Our Corporate Supporters Workplace ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member ... specific ACTs for you to try. However, the best ACT is the one that you are most ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in CF Clinical Care Guidelines Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  18. Unifying psychology: epistemological act or disciplinary maneuver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Henderikus J

    2004-12-01

    Two arguments with attempts to unify psychology are adumbrated in this commentary. First, the unification of psychology is largely a disciplinary maneuver and not primarily an epistemological act. Second, the discipline of psychology has been unified for some time around a series of methodological and functional categories that have served to support its institutional projects but hide metaphysical problems. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Detect and Avoid (DAA) Automation Maneuver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    controlled a UAS through airspace including several proximal aircraft. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drones ; Detect and Avoid; Remotely Piloted Aircraft...maneuver guidance presentation but the transparency “threshold” needed to result in appropriate automation usage , which is defined as both high rates of

  20. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navagh, John

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  1. About avatars and maneuvering in virtual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is about the use of avatars and maneuvering in virtual environments for simulation-based design ergonomics. An avatar is a digital human model driven by an instrumented human who is immersed in a virtual environment. A presentation on locomotion devices is followed by descriptions of

  2. Airway Protective Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Pitts, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx t...

  3. New airways for resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Hommers, C

    2006-06-01

    Over the last 15 years supraglottic airway devices (SADs), most notably the classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) have revolutionised airway management in anaesthesia. In contrast for resuscitation, both in and outside hospital, facemask ventilation and tracheal intubation remain the mainstays of airway management. However there is evidence that both these techniques have complications and are often poorly performed by inexperienced personnel. Tracheal intubation also has the potential to cause serious harm or death through unrecognised oesophageal intubation. SADs may have a role in airway management for resuscitation as first responder devices, rescue devices or for use during patient extraction. In particular they may be beneficial as the level of skill required to use the device safely may be less than for the tracheal tube. Concerns have been expressed over the ability to ventilate the lungs successfully and also the risk of aspiration with SADs. The only SADs recommended by ILCOR in its current guidance are the classic LMA and combitube. Several SADs have recently been introduced with claims that ventilation and airway protection is improved. This pragmatic review examines recent developments in SAD technology and the relevance of this to the potential for using SADs during resuscitation. In addition to examining research directly related to resuscitation both on bench models and in patients the review also examines evidence from anaesthetic practice. SADS discussed include the classic, intubating and Proseal LMAs, the combitube, the laryngeal tube, laryngeal tube sonda mark I and II and single use laryngeal masks.

  4. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 25.337... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift... maneuvering load factors prescribed in this section. Pitching velocities appropriate to the corresponding pull...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1507 - Operating maneuvering speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating maneuvering speed. 23.1507... Limitations and Information § 23.1507 Operating maneuvering speed. The maximum operating maneuvering speed, VO, must be established as an operating limitation. VO is a selected speed that is not greater than VS√n...

  6. Molecular and functional assessment of multicellular cancer spheroids produced in double emulsions enabled by efficient airway resistance based selective surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Leth Jepsen, Morten; Ivarsen, Anne Kathrine R.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Multicellular spheroids have garnered significant attention as an in vitro three-dimensional cancer model which can mimick the in vivo microenvironmental features. While microfluidics generated double emulsions have become a potential method to generate spheroids, challenges remain on the tedious procedures. Enabled by a novel ‘airway resistance’ based selective surface treatment, this study presents an easy and facile generation of double emulsions for the initiation and cultivation of multicellular spheroids in a scaffold-free format. Combining with our previously developed DNA nanosensors, intestinal spheroids produced in the double emulsions have shown an elevated activities of an essential DNA modifying enzyme, the topoisomerase I. The observed molecular and functional characteristics of spheroids produced in double emulsions are similar to the counterparts produced by the commercially available ultra-low attachment plates. However, the double emulsions excel for their improved uniformity, and the consistency of the results obtained by subsequent analysis of the spheroids. The presented technique is expected to ease the burden of producing spheroids and to promote the spheroids model for cancer or stem cell study.

  7. Extubation of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Khaldoun; Zayaruzny, Maksim; Spanakis, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Managing the airway in the intensive care unit (ICU) is complicated by a wide array of physiologic factors. Difficult airway may be a consequence of patient’s anatomy or airway edema developed during the ICU stay and mechanical ventilation. The incidence of failed airways and of cardiac arrest related to airway instrumentation in the ICU is much higher than that of elective intubations performed in the operating room. In this article, we will provide a framework for identifying a difficult airway, criteria for safe extubation, as well as review the devices that are available for airway management in the ICU. Proficiency in identifying a potentially difficult airway and thorough familiarity with strategies and techniques of securing the airway are necessary for safe practice of critical care medicine

  8. Desmin modulates lung elastic recoil and airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardonofsky, Felix R; Capetanaki, Yassemi; Boriek, Aladin M

    2006-05-01

    Desmin is a structural protein that is expressed in smooth muscle cells of both airways and alveolar ducts. Therefore, desmin could be well situated to participate in passive and contractile force transmission in the lung. We hypothesized that desmin modulates lung compliance, lung recoil pressure, and airway contractile response. To test this hypothesis, respiratory system complex impedance (Zin,rs) at different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels and quasi-static pressure-volume data were obtained in desmin-null and wild-type mice at baseline and during methacholine administration. Airways and lung tissue properties were partitioned by fitting Zin,rs to a constant-phase model. Relative to controls, desmin-null mice showed 1) lower values for lung stiffness and recoil pressure at baseline and induced airway constriction, 2) greater negative PEEP dependence of H and airway resistance under baseline conditions and cholinergic stimulation, and 3) airway hyporesponsiveness. These results demonstrate that desmin is a load-bearing protein that stiffens the airways and consequently the lung and modulates airway contractile response.

  9. Vibration Characteristics of Squeeze Film Damper during Maneuver Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siji; Liao, Mingfu; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The rotor systems of an aero engine will endure additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment during maneuver flight. A maneuver fly mechanical simulator is designed and experimental investigations on dynamics of squeeze film damper (SFD) under the different additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment are carried out. The results show that the maneuver flight weaken effectiveness of the SFD, the additional centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment caused by maneuver flight will change film damping, film stiffness. And the influence of maneuver flight can be effective relieved by increasing the film clearance.

  10. Factors determining lobar emptying during maximal and partial forced deflations in nonhomogeneous airway obstruction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, D; Gomez, A; Mink, S

    1994-05-01

    The partial expiratory flow-volume (PEFV) maneuver has been proposed as a sensitive test to detect nonuniform airway disease. We tested this hypothesis in seven dogs in an open-chest preparation in which the right upper lobe (RUL) bronchus was partially obstructed. Alveolar capsules were placed on the obstructed RUL and nonobstructed right lower lobe (RLL) to measure respective alveolar pressures (Palv) during PEFV and maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) maneuvers. PEFV curves were initiated at about 75% of the whole-lung vital capacity (VC). A Pitot static tube was placed into the airway to identify sites of flow limitation (choke-points [CP]), frictional pressure losses to CP (Pfr), CP area (A*), and compliance (K*). Results were analyzed at 45% VC, where a central tracheal CP was identified, and at 29% VC, where lobar CP were identified. At both lung volumes, the results showed that during PEFV, Palv and flows of the obstructed RUL decreased, whereas Palv and flows of the RLL increased compared with values obtained during MEFV. However, total maximal expiratory flow (Vmax) did not change between maneuvers. At 45% VC, although Pfr decreased during PEFV, this decrease was not large enough to result in an increase in A* and hence total Vmax because CP were identified in the noncompliant trachea. At 29% VC, offsetting changes in lobar A* and flow occurred between maneuvers: during PEFV, RLL A* and flow relatively increased while RUL A* and flow decreased. This study describes the mechanisms that explain why the PEFV maneuver is not useful in the detection of nonhomogeneous airway obstruction.

  11. Colisional Cloud Debris and Propelled Evasive Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Jesus, A. D. C.; Carvalho, T. C. F.; Sousa, R. R.

    2017-10-01

    Space debris clouds exist at various altitudes in the environment outside the Earth. Fragmentation of debris and/or collision between the debris of a cloud increases the amount of debris, producing smaller debris. This event also increases significantly the chances of collision with operational vehicles in orbit. In this work we study clouds of debris that are close to a spacecraft in relation to its distance from the center of the Earth. The results show several layers of colliding debris depending on their size over time of evasive maneuvers of the vehicle. In addition, we have tested such maneuvers for propulsion systems with a linear and exponential mass variation model. The results show that the linear propulsion system is more efficient.

  12. Review of Tracktable for Satellite Maneuver Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquesta, Erin C.S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Valicka, Christopher G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinga, Mark B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ehn, Carollan Beret [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    As a tool developed to translate geospatial data into geometrical descriptors, Tracktable offers a highly efficient means to detect anomalous flight and maritime behavior. Following the success of using geometrical descriptors for detecting anomalous trajectory behavior, the question of whether Tracktable could be used to detect satellite maneuvers arose. In answering this question, this re- port will introduce a brief description of how Tracktable has been used in the past, along with an introduction to the fundamental properties of astrodynamics for satellite trajectories. This will then allow us to compare the two problem spaces, addressing how easily the methods used by Tracktable will translate to orbital mechanics. Based on these results, we will then be able to out- line the current limitations as well as possible path forward for using Tracktable to detect satellite maneuvers.

  13. Geostationary Collocation: Case Studies for Optimal Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    travel from edge to edge, and finish with two days in the last case. It is worth noting that we could not fit the whole longitude libration in the...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GEOSTATIONARY COLLOCATION: CASE STUDIES FOR OPTIMAL MANEUVERS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Satellite collocation is not a new topic in the space community

  14. Identifying tacit strategies in aircraft maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles M.; Heidorn, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Two machine-learning methods are presently used to characterize the avoidance strategies used by skilled pilots in simulated aircraft encounters, and a general framework for the characterization of the strategic components of skilled behavior via qualitative representation of situations and responses is presented. Descriptions of pilot maneuvers that were 'conceptually equivalent' were ascertained by a concept-learning algorithm in conjunction with a classifier system that employed a generic algorithm; satisficing and 'buggy' strategies were thereby revealed.

  15. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buh, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garces, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Keenoy, E. de Manuel; Masjedi, M. R.; Meten, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Mamas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  16. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garcés, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzmán, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Masjedi, M. R.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schünemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  17. Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on a maneuvering, free-moving airfoil are varied in wind tunnel experiments by controlling vorticity generation/accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic characteristics of the airfoil that is mounted on a 2-DOF traverse are controlled using position and attitude feedback loops that are actuated by servo motors. Bi-directional changes in the pitching moment are induced using controllable trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The time scales associated with the actuation process is determined from PIV measurements of vorticity flux downstream of the trailing edge. Circulation time history shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is only limited by the inertia of the platform. Supported by AFSOR.

  18. Equine recurrent airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Niedźwiedź

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO, also known as heaves or broken wind, is one of the most common disease in middle-aged horses. Inflammation of the airway is inducted by organic dust exposure. This disease is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, bronchospasm, excessive mucus production and pathologic changes in the bronchiolar walls. Clinical signs are resolved in 3-4 weeks after environmental changes. Horses suffering from RAO are susceptible to allergens throughout their lives, therefore they should be properly managed. In therapy the most importanthing is to eliminate dustexposure, administration of corticosteroids and use bronchodilators to improve pulmonary function.

  19. Advanced Pediatric Airway Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Charles M; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation is an emerging and viable means to increase pediatric airway surgical training. A variety of simulators currently exist that may be used or modified for laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and endoscopic intervention, although anatomic realism and utility for complex procedures are limited. There is a need for further development of improved endoscopic and anatomic models. Innovative techniques are enabling small-scale manufacturing of generalizable and patient-specific simulators. The high acuity of the pediatric airway patient makes the use of simulation an attractive modality for training, competency maintenance, and patient safety quality-improvement studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Competitive fitness of influenza B viruses with neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant substitutions in a coinfection model of the human airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Andrew J; Armstrong, Jianling; Lowen, Anice C; Webster, Robert G; Govorkova, Elena A

    2015-04-01

    Influenza A and B viruses are human pathogens that are regarded to cause almost equally significant disease burdens. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only class of drugs available to treat influenza A and B virus infections, so the development of NAI-resistant viruses with superior fitness is a public health concern. The fitness of NAI-resistant influenza B viruses has not been widely studied. Here we examined the replicative capacity and relative fitness in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells of recombinant influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998 viruses containing a single amino acid substitution in NA generated by reverse genetics (rg) that is associated with NAI resistance. The replication in NHBE cells of viruses with reduced inhibition by oseltamivir (recombinant virus with the E119A mutation generated by reverse genetics [rg-E119A], rg-D198E, rg-I222T, rg-H274Y, rg-N294S, and rg-R371K, N2 numbering) or zanamivir (rg-E119A and rg-R371K) failed to be inhibited by the presence of the respective NAI. In a fluorescence-based assay, detection of rg-E119A was easily masked by the presence of NAI-susceptible virus. We coinfected NHBE cells with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses and used next-generation deep sequencing to reveal the order of relative fitness compared to that of recombinant wild-type (WT) virus generated by reverse genetics (rg-WT): rg-H274Y > rg-WT > rg-I222T > rg-N294S > rg-D198E > rg-E119A ≫ rg-R371K. Based on the lack of attenuated replication of rg-E119A in NHBE cells in the presence of oseltamivir or zanamivir and the fitness advantage of rg-H274Y over rg-WT, we emphasize the importance of these substitutions in the NA glycoprotein. Human infections with influenza B viruses carrying the E119A or H274Y substitution could limit the therapeutic options for those infected; the emergence of such viruses should be closely monitored. Influenza B viruses are important human respiratory pathogens contributing to a significant portion

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC Reflections ... help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway clearance. ... Instagram Email Find a Clinical Trial Help us blaze ...

  2. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... center. Carrier Testing for Cystic Fibrosis CFTR-Related Metabolic Syndrome (CRMS) How Babies Are Screened in IRT-Only ... Nutrition in Children and Adults Clinical Care Guidelines Nutrition in Pediatrics Clinical ... Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leaders About Us News Blog Chapters ... different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can ...

  4. Upper airway evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.A.; Gefter, W.B.; Schnall, M.; Nordberg, J.; Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are evaluating upper-airway sleep disorders with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and x-ray cine computed tomography (CT). Fixed structural anatomy is visualized with multisection spin-echo MR imaging, the dynamic component with cine CT. Unique aspects of the study are described in this paper

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Their Families When There's More Than One Person With CF in the Same School Daily Life ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  6. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be taken through a nebulizer during ACTs. Inhaled antibiotics should be taken after ACTs are finished and the lungs are as clear of mucus as possible. This will allow the medication to reach deeply into the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist ...

  7. Obstetric airway management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    face mask. There were 66 cases of aspiration (0.15%) and two mortalities. Both of the mortalities occurred secondary to solid food aspiration. Mendelson correctly identified delayed gastric emptying in the labouring patient, coupled with the loss of airway reflexes during general anaesthesia, as contributory factors to the ...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  9. Positive airway pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and depression and a better mood Normal sleep patterns Lower blood pressure (in people with high blood pressure) Your health care provider will prescribe the type of PAP machine that ... patterns. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or BIPAP) has ...

  10. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bimla Sharma, Chand Sahai, Jayashree Sood Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India Abstract: Extraglottic airway devices (EADs have revolutionized the field of airway management. The invention of the laryngeal mask airway was a game changer, and since then, there have been several innovations to improve the EADs in design, functionality, safety and construction material. These have ranged from changes in the shape of the mask, number of cuffs and material used, like rubber, polyvinylchloride and latex. Phthalates, which were added to the construction material in order to increase device flexibility, were later omitted when this chemical was found to have serious adverse reproductive outcomes. The various designs brought out by numerous companies manufacturing EADs resulted in the addition of several devices to the airway market. These airway devices were put to use, many of them with inadequate or no evidence base regarding their efficacy and safety. To reduce the possibility of compromising the safety of the patient, the Difficult Airway Society (DAS formed the Airway Device Evaluation Project Team (ADEPT to strengthen the evidence base for airway equipment and vet the new extraglottic devices. A preuse careful analysis of the design and structure may help in better understanding of the functionality of a particular device. In the meantime, the search for the ideal EAD continues. Keywords: extraglottic airway devices, laryngeal mask airway, other extraglottic airway devices, safety, technology update

  11. Posterior arm shoulder dystocia alleviated by the Zavanelli maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherman, Robert B; Ouzounian, Joseph G; Chauhan, Suneet

    2010-10-01

    The exact role of the Zavanelli maneuver for the management of shoulder dystocia still remains to be defined. None of the previously reported cases in which the Zavanelli maneuver has been employed described impaction of posterior fetal arm. At 40 weeks' gestation, a nulliparous patient with gestational diabetes, who underwent vacuum delivery, delivered an infant with shoulder dystocia. McRoberts' maneuver, suprapubic pressure, midline episiotomy, and Woods' maneuver were all unsuccessful in alleviating the shoulder dystocia. The posterior fetal arm was noted to be persistently impacted, so the Zavanelli maneuver was used to deliver an unsuspected macrosomic (4215 g) infant. The newborn, at the age of 3 years, has a right Erb's palsy. The Zavanelli maneuver can be used to alleviate a posterior arm shoulder dystocia, though there may be concomitant neurological injury. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  12. The application of vascular technology to esophageal and airway strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Brian F; Scriven, Richard; Sanchez, Julie; Panetta, Thomas; Klotz, Donald; Nguyen, Minh; Ramenofsky, Max L

    2002-01-01

    Strictures of the esophagus and airway tract can be dilated if the strictures can be traversed and dilators passed. Unfortunately, using standard methods, not all strictures can be traversed. The authors set out to find a safe, expeditious, and reproducible way to traverse otherwise impassable strictures of the esophagus and airway. Eight patients (n = 8), over a 2-year period, with strictures were entered prospectively into the study. One patient (n = 1) had a main stem bronchial stricture, and 7 patients (n = 7) had esophageal strictures from the following etiologies: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair, Lye ingestion (n = 2), EA/TEF with gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal atresia without fistula, lye ingestion with colon interposition (n = 2), and iron pill inhalation lodged in left main bronchus. None of the strictures could be passed with conventional maneuvers or instrumentation including endoscopy, guide wires, Fogarty catheters, and filliform and followers. Results of barium studies showed no flow into the stomach. In the bronchial case, no lumen could be identified at bronchoscopy. Utilizing the "Vascular Surgery Glidewire/Berenstein Catheter System" under fluoroscopy and utilizing the "spinning top" dynamic maneuver intrinsic to this system, all of the strictures were traversed easily. The passage of the wire/catheter system thus allowed sequential dilation of the previously impassable strictures. The mean time to cross the strictures with the wire/catheter system was 1 minute, 10 seconds. (t = 70 seconds). All of the procedures were done in the operating room under general endotracheal anesthesia by the same 2 attending pediatric surgeons. The use of vascular surgical technology in difficult, otherwise impassable strictures of the esophagus and upper airway proved to be an extremely effective, easy-to-perform, and reproducible method of therapy. This procedure may obviate the need for resectional surgery in this setting

  13. Aqua/Aura Updated Inclination Adjust Maneuver Performance Prediction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Spencer

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the updated Inclination Adjust Maneuver (IAM) performance prediction model that was developed for Aqua and Aura following the 2017 IAM series. This updated model uses statistical regression methods to identify potential long-term trends in maneuver parameters, yielding improved predictions when re-planning past maneuvers. The presentation has been reviewed and approved by Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager.

  14. Adaptive Target Tracking for Underwater Maneuvering Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    concenetrate on the bearings-only approach. In this method the Observer monitors his bearing to the Source, over a period of time. Usually the Observer must...developed in [ 5] was earlier applied with much success to tracking maneuvering air targets. This approach will now be applied in the underwater environment...April 1977. [11] A. H. Jazwinski, Stochastic Processes and Filtering Theory, Academic Press, New York, 1970. [12] D. H. Halliday, and R. Resnick, Physics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1966. hI

  15. Importance of back blow maneuvers in a 6 month old patient with sudden upper airway obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Duman, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration in children under four years old is one of the most frequently observed reasons for accident related deaths. It is more common in this age group due to inadequate swallowing functions and exploration of objects with the mouth. The most frequently encountered foreign bodies are food and toy parts. Life threatening complete laryngeal obstruction is rarely observed. Dyspnea, hypersalivation, cough and cyanosis can be seen. The basic and life-saving treatment approach is c...

  16. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  17. Caveolae facilitate muscarinic receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and contraction in airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Stelmack, Gerald L.; Dueck, Gordon; Mutawe, Mark M.; Hinton, Martha; McNeill, Karol D.; Paulson, Angela; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Gerthoffer, William T.; Thliveris, James A.; Unruh, Helmut; Zaagsma, Johan; Halayko, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Contractile responses of airway smooth muscle ( ASM) determine airway resistance in health and disease. Caveolae microdomains in the plasma membrane are marked by caveolin proteins and are abundant in contractile smooth muscle in association with nanospaces involved in Ca2+ homeostasis. Caveolin-1

  18. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  19. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengnan Wu

    Full Text Available People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects' ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral "lane-change" maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects' ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost.

  20. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O'Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO 2 , (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14 C acetate and 14 C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  1. Causes of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  3. Linking spatial and dynamic models for traffic maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olderog, Ernst-Rüdiger; Ravn, Anders Peter; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    For traffic maneuvers of multiple vehicles on highways we build an abstract spatial and a concrete dynamic model. In the spatial model we show the safety (collision freedom) of lane-change maneuvers. By linking the spatial and dynamic model via suitable refinements of the spatial atoms to distance...

  4. Braking news: link between crash severity and crash avoidance maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the link between crash severity and crash avoidance maneuvers. Various emergency lateral and speed control maneuvers were considered in response to different critical events that made the crash imminent. Partial proportional odds models that allowed for changes in effects ac...

  5. Safety analysis of passing maneuvers using extreme value theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Farah

    2017-04-01

    The results indicate that this is a promising approach for safety evaluation. On-going work of the authors will attempt to generalize this method to other safety measures related to passing maneuvers, test it for the detailed analysis of the effect of demographic factors on passing maneuvers' crash probability and for its usefulness in a traffic simulation environment.

  6. 14 CFR 25.331 - Symmetric maneuvering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Symmetric maneuvering conditions. 25.331 Section 25.331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... determining elevator angles and chordwise load distribution in the maneuvering conditions of paragraphs (b...

  7. Actuator Characterization of Man Portable Precision Maneuver Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    limited due to gun recoil limits on the human shoulder. Lastly, rifled guns often induce high spin rates (hundreds or thousands of cycles per second...small diameter, high spin rate, gun -launched projectiles is proposed. The performance of the actuation technology associated with this class of maneuver...5 Table 2. Individual experiment maneuver system parameters

  8. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155 Section 23.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force...

  9. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  10. AIRCRAFT CONFLICTS RESOLUTION BY COURSE MANEUVERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Харченко

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of requirements for air traffic efficiency at increasing of flights intensity determines the necessity of development of new optimization methods for aircraft conflict resolutions. The statement of problem of optimal conflict resolutions at Cooperative Air Traffic Management was done. The method for optimal aircraft conflict  resolution by course maneuvering has been  developed. The method using dynamic programming provides planning of aircraft conflict-free trajectory with minimum length. The decomposition of conflict resolution process on phases and stages, definition of states, controls and recursive  equations for generation of optimal course control program were done. Computer modeling of aircraft conflict resolution by developed method was done

  11. X-31 in flight - Mongoose Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Two X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrators were flown at the Rockwell International facility, Palmdale, California, and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to obtain data that may apply to the design of highly-maneuverable next-generation fighters. The program had its first flight on October 11, 1990, in Palmdale; it ended in June 1995. The X-31 program demonstrated the value of thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems, to provide controlled flight during close-in air combat at very high angles of attack. The result of this increased maneuverability is an aircraft with a significant advantage over conventional fighters. 'Angle-of-attack' (alpha) is an engineering term to describe the angle of an aircraft body and wings relative to its actual flight path. During maneuvers, pilots often fly at extreme angles of attack -- with the nose pitched up while the aircraft continues in its original direction. This can lead to loss of control and result in the loss of the aircraft, pilot or both. Three thrust-vectoring paddles made of graphite epoxy mounted on the exhaust nozzle of the X-31 aircraft directed the exhaust flow to provide control in pitch (up and down) and yaw (right and left) to improve control. The paddles can sustain heat of up to 1,500 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time. In addition the X-31 aircraft were configured with movable forward canards and fixed aft strakes. The canards were small wing-like structures set on the wing line between the nose and the leading edge of the wing. The strakes were set on the same line between the trailing edge of the wing and the engine exhaust. Both supplied additional control in tight maneuvering situations. The X-31 research program produced technical data at high angles of attack. This information is giving engineers and aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls

  12. Azithromycin ameliorates airway remodeling via inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanqi; Pu, Yue; Li, Diandian; Zhou, Liming; Wan, Lihong

    2017-02-01

    Azithromycin can benefit treating allergic airway inflammation and remodeling. In the present study, we hypothesized that azithromycin alleviated airway epithelium injury through inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis via down regulation of caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio in vivo and in vitro. Ovalbumin induced rat asthma model and TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis model were established, respectively. In vivo experiments, airway epithelium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) to histologically evaluate the airway inflammation and remodeling. Airway epithelium apoptotic index (AI) was further analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), while expression of apoptosis related gene (Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-3) in lungs were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In vitro experiments, apoptosis were evaluated by Flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL. Above apoptosis related gene were also measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. Compared with the OVA group, azithromycin significantly reduced the inflammation score, peribronchial smooth muscle layer thickness, epithelial thickening and goblet cell metaplasia (Pazithromycin-treated rats (Pazithromycin significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cells apoptosis (PAzithromycin is an attractive treatment option for reducing airway epithelial cell apoptosis by improving the imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and inhibiting Caspase-3 level in airway epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) as an alternative to airway ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the possibility of airway management using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) during dental procedures on mentally retarded (MR) patients and patients with genetic diseases. Design: A prospective pilot study. Setting: University Hospital. Methods: A pilot study was designed to induce general ...

  14. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway using an objective airway score versus a standard clinical airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Valentin; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    -specific assessment. Data from patients' pre-operative airway assessment are registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Objective scores for intubation and mask ventilation grade the severity of airway managements. The accuracy of predicting difficult intubation and mask ventilation is measured for each group...... the examination and registration of predictors for difficult mask ventilation with a non-specified clinical airway assessment on prediction of difficult mask ventilation.Method/Design: We cluster-randomized 28 Danish departments of anaesthesia to airway assessment either by the SARI or by usual non...... that registration of the SARI and predictors for difficult mask ventilation are mandatory for the intervention group but invisible to controls....

  15. Factors associated with airway colonisation and invasion due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with commnunity-acquired Klebsiella infections were more likely to have underlying chronic respiratory diseases. Prior antibiotic use was a risk factor for nosocomial infections which occurred more conunonly with antibiotic-resistant organisms. The most commmon diagnoses were airway colonisation, acute ...

  16. Effects of Flavin7 on allergen induced hyperreactivity of airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franova S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Some studies have suggested that the polyphenolic compounds might reduce the occurrence of asthma symptoms. The aim of our experiments was to evaluate the effects of 21 days of the flavonoid Flavin7 administration on experimentally induced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. We assessed tracheal smooth muscle reactivity by an in vitro muscle-strip method; changes in airway resistance by an in vivo plethysmographic method; histological picture of tracheal tissue; and the levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4, and interleukin 5 (IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Histological investigation of tracheal tissue and the concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF were used as indices of airway inflammation. Administration of Flavin7 caused a significant decrease of specific airway resistance after histamine nebulization and a decline in tracheal smooth muscle contraction amplitude in response to bronchoconstricting mediators. Flavin7 minimized the degree of inflammation estimated on the basis of eosinophil calculation and IL-4 and IL-5 concentrations. In conclusion, administration of Flavin7 showed bronchodilating and anti-inflammatory effects on allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  17. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann, M; Eckert, D J; Chamberlin, N L; Jordan, A S; Zaremba, S; Smith, S; Rosow, C; Malhotra, A

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (P(crit)). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO(2) concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and P(crit) was unaffected (pentobarbital mean ± SD -11.7 ± 4.5 versus placebo -10.25 ± 3.6 cmH(2)O; p = 0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297 ± 63s versus 232 ± 67 s; ppentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep.

  18. An Estimation Algorithm for Detecting and Reconstructing Optimal Maneuvers from Measurement Residuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed research addresses the problem of optimal maneuver detection and reconstruction with regards to an astrodynamics application. Maneuver detection and...

  19. Impulse oscillometry: a measure for airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Geraldine R; Arets, Hubertus G M; van der Laag, Johan; van der Ent, Cornelis K

    2003-03-01

    The impulse oscillometry system (IOS) was introduced as a new technique to assess airflow obstruction in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers, e.g., subjects with cerebral palsy or severe mental retardation, and young children. This study evaluates the sensitivity and specificity of IOS parameters to quantify changes in airflow obstruction in comparison with forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements. Measurements of FEV(1), PEF, and resistance (R) and reactance (X) at frequencies of 5-35 Hz were performed in 19 children with asthma before, during, and after methacholine challenge and subsequent bronchodilatation. All parameters changed significantly during tests. Values of R5 and R10 correlated with FEV(1) (r = -0.71 and -0.73, respectively, P operating characteristic (ROC) curve to predict a 15% fall in FEV(1) showed better sensitivity and specificity for R5 (area under the curve, 0.85) compared to PEF (0.79) or R10 (0.73). We conclude that IOS parameters can be easily used as an indirect measure of airflow obstruction. This might be helpful in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers. In individual subjects, R values measured at 5 Hz showed to be superior to PEF measurements in the detection of a 15% fall in FEV(1). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The MEMS Reaction Control and Maneuvering for Picosat Beyond LEO project will further develop a multi-functional small satellite technology for low-power attitude control, or orientation, of picosatellites beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept initially developed in 2013, is a thermal valving system which utilizes capillary forces in a microchannel to offset internal pressures in a bulk fluid. The local vapor pressure is increased by resistive film heating until it exceeds meniscus strength in a nozzle which induces vacuum boiling and provides a stagnation pressure equal to vapor pressure at that point which is used for propulsion. Interplanetary CubeSats can utilize FEMTA for high slew rate attitude corrections in addition to desaturating reaction wheels. The FEMTA in cooling mode can be used for thermal control during high-power communication events, which are likely to accompany the attitude correction. Current small satellite propulsion options are limited to orbit correction whereas picosatellites are lacking attitude control thrusters. The available attitude control systems are either quickly saturated reaction wheels or movable high drag surfaces with long response times.

  1. Rhinosinusitis and the lower airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Peter W.; Hens, Greet

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between upper and lower airway disease has been recognized for centuries, with recent studies showing a direct link between upper and airway inflammation in allergic patients. The mechanisms underlying the interaction between nasal and bronchial inflammation have primarily been

  2. Proposal Intensity Adequacy of Expiratory Effort and Heart Rate Behavior During the Valsalva Maneuver in Preadolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Paschoal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: When performing the Valsalva maneuver (VM, adults and preadolescents produce the same expiratory resistance values. Objective: To analyze heart rate (HR in preadolescents performing VM, and propose a new method for selecting expiratory resistance. Method: The maximal expiratory pressure (MEP was measured in 45 sedentary children aged 9-12 years who subsequently performed VM for 20 s using an expiratory pressure of 60%, 70%, or 80% of MEP. HR was measured before, during, and after VM. These procedures were repeated 30 days later, and the data collected in the sessions (E1, E2 were analyzed and compared in periods before, during (0-10 and 10-20 s, and after VM using nonparametric tests. Results: All 45 participants adequately performed VM in E1 and E2 at 60% of MEP. However, only 38 (84.4% and 25 (55.5% of the participants performed the maneuver at 70% and 80% of MEP, respectively. The HR delta measured during 0-10 s and 10-20 s significantly increased as the expiratory effort increased, indicating an effective cardiac autonomic response during VM. However, our findings suggest the VM should not be performed at these intensities. Conclusion: HR increased with all effort intensities tested during VM. However, 60% of MEP was the only level of expiratory resistance that all participants could use to perform VM. Therefore, 60% of MEP may be the optimal expiratory resistance that should be used in clinical practice.

  3. Allergic Fungal Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, E M; Woolnough, K; Pashley, C H; Wardlaw, A J

    Fungi are ubiquitous and form their own kingdom. Up to 80 genera of fungi have been linked to type I allergic disease, and yet, commercial reagents to test for sensitization are available for relatively few species. In terms of asthma, it is important to distinguish between species unable to grow at body temperature and those that can (thermotolerant) and thereby have the potential to colonize the respiratory tract. The former, which include the commonly studied Alternaria and Cladosporium genera, can act as aeroallergens whose clinical effects are predictably related to exposure levels. In contrast, thermotolerant species, which include fungi from the Candida, Aspergillus, and Penicillium genera, can cause a persistent allergenic stimulus independent of their airborne concentrations. Moreover, their ability to germinate in the airways provides a more diverse allergenic stimulus, and may result in noninvasive infection, which enhances inflammation. The close association between IgE sensitization to thermotolerant filamentous fungi and fixed airflow obstruction, bronchiectasis, and lung fibrosis suggests a much more tissue-damaging process than that seen with aeroallergens. This review provides an overview of fungal allergens and the patterns of clinical disease associated with exposure. It clarifies the various terminologies associated with fungal allergy in asthma and makes the case for a new term (allergic fungal airway disease) to include all people with asthma at risk of developing lung damage as a result of their fungal allergy. Lastly, it discusses the management of fungirelated asthma.

  4. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  5. An interventional airway delivery service for congenital high airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneza, M M C; Cameron, A; Clement, W A; Fairgrieve, R; Ledingham, M A; Morrissey, M S; Simpson, J; Wynne, D M; Kubba, H

    2015-08-01

    Congenital airway obstruction is rare but potentially fatal. We developed a complex airways interventional delivery team to manage such cases. Antenatal imaging detects airway compromise at an early stage and facilitates the planning of delivery procedures ('ex utero intrapartum treatment' and 'operation on placental support') which maintain feto-placental circulation whilst an airway is secured. A retrospective review was performed of cases in which ENT input was required at birth for airway obstruction. Four neonates were delivered before implementation of the service: two were intubated and another two underwent tracheostomy but died in the peri-natal period. Seven neonates were delivered after implementation of the service: six were intubated and one underwent immediate tracheostomy. Five subsequently underwent tracheostomy (three have since been decannulated). One child with multiple congenital anomalies died due to respiratory failure. Airway obstruction was caused by lymphatic malformation, teratoma, costo-craniomandibular syndrome and choristoma. In the absence of other anomalies, interventional airway delivery led to reduced mortality and improved outcomes.

  6. [The treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal by Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tan; An, Fengwei; Xie, Cuili; Chen, Jianqiu; Zhu, Chunsheng; Wang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semi-circular canal by Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver. One hundred and fifty patients with benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal were randomly divided into three groups: group A, B and C. Patients in group A were treated by Epley maneuver and patients in group B were treated by Semont maneuver. Patients in group C were received the treatment of Epley maneuver combined with Semont ma- neuver. We recorded the times of treatments in different groups respectively. Statistics of treatment effects and follow-up studies with 3 months after the recovery were assessed. The cure rate of the canalith repositioning on the primary, secondary and tertiary treatment in group A was respective 72% (38/53) and 81% (43/53) and 85% (45/53), in group B was 68% (30/44) and 80% (35/44) and 84% (37/44), in group C was 89% (47/53) and 94% (50/53) and 98% (52/53). The cure rate in group C is significantly higher than group A and group B (χ2 = 6.777, P positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal, the primary cure rate was increased and the numbers of treatments were reduced and the relapse was decreased. It is suitable to use Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver in the clinic.

  7. Airway necrosis after salvage esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Norimitsu; Hokamura, Nobukazu; Tachimori, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Salvage esophagectomy is the sole curative intent treatment for patients with persistent or recurrent locoregional disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal carcinoma. However, salvage esophagectomy is a very high-risk operation, and airway necrosis is a fatal complication. Between 1997 and 2007, 49 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer underwent salvage esophagectomy after definitive CRT. We retrospectively compared patients with and without airway necrosis, and investigated operative procedures related to airway necrosis. Airway necrosis occurred in five patients (10.2%), of four patients (80%) died during their hospitalization. Airway necrosis seemed to be closely related to operative procedures, such as resection of bronchial artery and cervical and subcarinal lymph node dissection. Bronchogastric fistula following necrosis of gastric conduit occured in 2 patients reconstructed through posterior mediastinal route. Airway necrosis is a highly lethal complication after salvage esophagectomy. It is important in salvage esophagectomy to take airway blood supply into consideration sufficiently and to reconstruct through retrosternal route to prevent bronchogastric fistula. (author)

  8. Late airway obstruction and neutrophil infiltration in sensitized mice after antigen provocation were suppressed by selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kaminuma

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of antigen-induced late airway obstruction associated with neutrophilic inflammation by selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitors was investigated in mice. Respiratory resistance (Rrs increased in sensitized BDF1 mice 4-6 h after antigen provocation, whereas no obvious immediate reaction was observed. This reaction was associated with marked airway neutrophilia without significant infiltration of eosinophils. A selective PDE IV inhibitor, T-440 (10-30 mg/kg, and a non-selective PDE inhibitor, theophylline (10 mg/kg, significantly inhibited airway obstruction and neutrophilia when administered orally. An anti-allergic drug, ketotifen (1 mg/kg, caused slight inhibition of airway obstruction, whereas it did not affect airway neutrophilia. These results suggest that neutrophilic inflammation plays a role in the airway obstructive reaction and that PDE has a regulatory role in obstructive airway disease associated with airway inflammation.

  9. Aqua/Aura Spring 2017 Inclination Adjust Maneuver Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Thomas; Stezelberger, Shane

    2017-01-01

    This will be presented at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the AquaAura Spring 2017 Inclination Adjust Maneuver series.

  10. Pulsed Electrogasdynamic Thruster for Attitude Control and Orbit Maneuver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the Phase I program we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the Pulsed ElectroGasdynamic (PEG) thruster for attitude control and orbital maneuvering. In...

  11. Time-Optimization of High Performance Combat Maneuvers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, Benjamin R

    2005-01-01

    .... High angle of attack maneuvers like the Cobra, Herbst Reversal, and Chakra demonstrate that today's cutting edge fighters are capable of exploiting the post-stall flight regime for very dynamic...

  12. Automated Precision Maneuvering and Landing in Extreme and Constrained Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Autonomous, precise maneuvering and landing in extreme and constrained environments is a key enabler for future NASA missions. Missions to map the interior of a...

  13. THE DUBINS TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM WITH CONSTRAINED COLLECTING MANEUVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Váňa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a variant of the Dubins traveling salesman problem (DTSP that is called the Dubins traveling salesman problem with constrained collecting maneuvers (DTSP-CM. In contrast to the ordinary formulation of the DTSP, in the proposed DTSP-CM, the vehicle is requested to visit each target by specified collecting maneuver to accomplish the mission. The proposed problem formulation is motivated by scenarios with unmanned aerial vehicles where particular maneuvers are necessary for accomplishing the mission, such as object dropping or data collection with sensor sensitive to changes in vehicle heading. We consider existing methods for the DTSP and propose its modifications to use these methods to address a variant of the introduced DTSP-CM, where the collecting maneuvers are constrained to straight line segments.

  14. The Space Maneuver Vehicle: Enhancing Space's Utility to the Warfighter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    ... (the purpose of space control) and lack operational responsiveness. The rapid response, quick turnaround, and high on-orbit maneuverability of the Space Maneuver Vehicle can correct these shortfalls...

  15. Close Proximity Robotic Maneuvering through Flux Pinning Manipulation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Non-contacting actuation technology like flux pinning has never been demonstrated in space. The development of a nonphysical joint is critical for maneuvers such as...

  16. Effects-Based Operations: The End of Dominant Maneuver?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheek, Gary

    2002-01-01

    ... without dominant ground maneuver. The paper concludes that such thinking misreads a historical warfare lethality trend in a potentially dangerous effort to vindicate the Air Force doctrine of strategic attack...

  17. Airway fibroepithelial polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Labarca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroepithelial polyps are benign lesions, frequently found in the skin and genitourinary tract. Airway involvement is rare, and few case reports have been published. Our patient was a 79 y.o. male smoker, who was referred to us with a 3-month history of dry cough. At physical examination, the patient looked well, but a chest CT showed a 6-mm polyp lesion in his trachea. A flexible bronchoscopy confirmed this lesion, and forceps biopsies were performed. Argon plasma coagulation was used to completely resect and treat the lesion. Pathological analysis revealed a fibroepithelial polyp (FP. The aim of this manuscript is to report a case of FP with bronchoscopic management and to review the current literature about this condition.

  18. Mode of Glucocorticoid Actions in Airway Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ito

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids are the most potent anti-inflammatory agents used to treat chronic inflammatory disease, such as asthma. However, a small number (<5% of asthmatic patients and almost all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD do not respond well, or at all, to glucocorticoid therapy. If the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid insensitivity is uncovered, it may in turn provide insight into the key mechanism of glucocorticoid action and allow a rational way to implement treatment regimens that restore glucocorticoid sensitivity. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by binding to a cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which is subjected to post-translational modifications. Receptor phosphorylation, acetylation, nitrosylation, ubiquitinylation, and other modifications influence hormone binding, nuclear translocation, and protein half-life. Analysis of GR interactions to other molecules, such as coactivators or corepressors, may explain the genetic specificity of GR action. Priming with inflammatory cytokine or oxidative/nitrative stress is a mechanism for the glucocorticoid resistance observed in chronic inflammatory airway disease via reduction of corepressors or GR modification. Therapies targeting these aspects of the GR activation pathway may reverse glucocorticoid resistance in patients with glucocorticoid-insensitive airway disease and some patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Laura; Machuzak, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Airway complications remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. The incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the definition of the event, and there is still no universally accepted grading system for airway findings after transplantation. Additionally, although surgical technique and organ preservation have improved, other modifiable risk factors remain unclear. The management is as wide-ranging as the definitions. A multimodality approach is often needed with airway stenting reserved for refractory cases and stent management by a transplant team with expertise in placement and management of long-term complications." Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Maintaining Aura's Orbit Requirements Under New Maneuver Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation consists of five member missions (GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura), each of which maintain a frozen, sun-synchronous orbit with a 16-day repeating ground track that follows the Worldwide Reference System-2 (WRS-2). Under nominal science operations for Aura, the propulsion system is oriented such that the resultant thrust vector is aligned 13.493 degrees away from the velocity vector along the yaw axis. When performing orbit maintenance maneuvers, the spacecraft performs a yaw slew to align the thrust vector in the appropriate direction. A new Drag Make Up (DMU) maneuver operations scheme has been implemented for Aura alleviating the need for the 13.493 degree yaw slew. The focus of this investigation is to assess the impact that no-slew DMU maneuver operations will have on Auras Mean Local Time (MLT) which drives the required along track separation between Aura and the constellation members, as well as Auras frozen orbit properties, eccentricity and argument of perigee. Seven maneuver strategies were analyzed to determine the best operational approach. A mirror pole strategy, with maneuvers alternating at the North and South poles, was implemented operationally to minimize impact to the MLT. Additional analysis determined that the mirror pole strategy could be further modified to include frozen orbit maneuvers and thus maintain both MLT and the frozen orbit properties under no-slew operations

  1. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  2. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  3. Antibioticoterapia ambulatorial como fator de indução da resistência bacteriana: uma abordagem racional para as infecções de vias aéreas Outpatient antibiotic therapy as a predisposing factor for bacterial resistance: a rational approach to airway infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Nascimento-Carvalho

    2006-11-01

    , tonsillitis, pneumonia, antibiotic, guidelines and bacterial resistance were used. Articles cited by the articles selected were analyzed for information of interest. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Bacterial resistance has grown, to the extent that today it is recognized as a global public health problem. ARI are the most common cause of antibiotic usage within the community; yet a large proportion of these cases, compromising the upper (otitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis or the lower airways (pneumonia, are the result of viral infections. Recommendations to rationalize the use of antibiotics in patients with ARI have the common objective of minimizing unnecessary antibiotic use, since "antibiotic pressure" is one of the factors triggering bacterial resistance. CONCLUSIONS: It is of great importance to differentiate among ARI patients those who will benefit from the use of antibiotics. The establishment of recommendations for the prescription of antibiotics is one strategy for minimizing the frequency of bacterial resistance.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  5. Vessel-guided airway tree segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2010-01-01

    method is evaluated on 250 low dose computed tomography images from a lung cancer screening trial. Our experiments showed that applying the region growing algorithm on the airway appearance model produces more complete airway segmentations, leading to on average 20% longer trees, and 50% less leakage......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. We propose a voxel classification approach for the appearance model, which uses a classifier that is trained...... to differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. This is in contrast to previous works that use either intensity alone or hand crafted models of airway appearance. We show that the appearance model can be trained with a set of easily acquired, incomplete, airway tree segmentations. A vessel orientation...

  6. Recurrent upper airway infections and bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J; Ardito, F; Calò, L; Mancinelli, L; Imperiali, M; Parrilla, C; Picciotti, P M; Fadda, G

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms identified in various medical devices used in otorhinolaryngology, including tympanostomy tubes, voice prostheses, and cochlear implants, can directly colonise mucosal tissues. The upper airways seem to be at high risk for this type of colonisation. Chronic and/or recurrent upper airway infections may be related to the complex structural and biochemical (quorum sensing) organisation of the biofilm which interferes with the activity of antibiotics (including those with proven in vitro efficacy), thus promoting the establishment of a chronic infection eradicable only by surgical treatment. Biofilm formation plays a role in upper respiratory infections: it not only explains the resistance of these infections to antibiotic therapy but it also represents an important element that contributes to the maintenance of a chronic inflammatory reaction. To document the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from patients with recurrent infection diseases, and identify their possible role in the chronicity of these infectious processes. We examined 32 surgical specimens from the upper respiratory tract (tonsils, adenoids, mucosa from the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses) of 28 patients (20 adults, eight children) with upper airway infections that had persisted despite repeated treatment with anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics with demonstrated in vitro efficacy. Tissues were cultured using conventional methods and subjected to scanning electron microscopy for detection of biofilm formation. Over 80 per cent (26/32; 81.3 per cent) of the tissue specimens were culture-positive. Bacterial biofilms (associated in most cases with coccoid bacteria) were observed in 65.6 per cent of the tissue samples.

  7. Airway Surface Dehydration Aggravates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Hallmarks of COPD in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Leen J M; Verhamme, Fien M; Dupont, Lisa L; Desauter, Elke; Duerr, Julia; Seyhan Agircan, Ayca; Conickx, Griet; Joos, Guy F; Brusselle, Guy G; Mall, Marcus A; Bracke, Ken R

    2015-01-01

    Airway surface dehydration, caused by an imbalance between secretion and absorption of ions and fluid across the epithelium and/or increased epithelial mucin secretion, impairs mucociliary clearance. Recent evidence suggests that this mechanism may be implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of airway surface dehydration in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD remains unknown. We aimed to investigate in vivo the effect of airway surface dehydration on several CS-induced hallmarks of COPD in mice with airway-specific overexpression of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na⁺ channel (βENaC). βENaC-Tg mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were exposed to air or CS for 4 or 8 weeks. Pathological hallmarks of COPD, including goblet cell metaplasia, mucin expression, pulmonary inflammation, lymphoid follicles, emphysema and airway wall remodelling were determined and lung function was measured. Airway surface dehydration in βENaC-Tg mice aggravated CS-induced airway inflammation, mucin expression and destruction of alveolar walls and accelerated the formation of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Moreover, lung function measurements demonstrated an increased compliance and total lung capacity and a lower resistance and hysteresis in βENaC-Tg mice, compared to WT mice. CS exposure further altered lung function measurements. We conclude that airway surface dehydration is a risk factor that aggravates CS-induced hallmarks of COPD.

  8. Does unrestrained single-chamber plethysmography provide a valid assessment of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoqin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unrestrained plethysmography has been used to monitor bronchoconstriction because of its ease of use and ability to measure airway responsiveness in conscious animals. However, its reliability remains controversial. Objective To investigate if unrestrained plethysmography could provide a valid interpretation of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice. Methods Ovalbumin sensitized BALB/c mice were randomized to receive either a single-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-1D group or a three-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-3D group. The OVA-1D group was further divided into OVA-1D-I (measured invasively, using lung resistance as the index of responsiveness and OVA-1D-N group (measured non-invasively, using Penh as the index of responsiveness. Similarly the OVA-3D group was divided into OVA-3D-I and OVA-3D-N groups based on the above methods. The control groups were sensitized and challenged with normal saline. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was taken and airway histopathology was evaluated for airway inflammation. Nasal responsiveness was tested with histamine challenge. Results Compared with controls, a significant increase in airway responsiveness was shown in the OVA-1D-N group (P Conclusion Penh can not be used as a surrogate for airway resistance. The invasive measurement is specific to lower airway. Penh measurement (done as a screening procedure, must be confirmed by a direct invasive measurement specific to lower airway in evaluating lower airway responsiveness.

  9. Orbital maneuvers around irregular shaped bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Flaviane; Rocco, E. M.; Almeida Prado, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the solar system there are many small bodies called asteroids. The large majority of these bodies are located in the asteroid belt, between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. The Near- Earth Objects, or NEOs, are objects with perihelion below 1.3AU, which include comets and asteroids. The NEOs are considered to have orbits passing close to the Earth’s orbit and, in the case of asteroids, are called Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Among the NEAs there are bodies considered potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), whose minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.05AU and that have absolute magnitude (H) of 22, which would mean an asteroid of at least 110-240 meters, depending on its albedo. One of the major characteristic of the asteroids is the irregular shape, causing the dynamics of orbits around these bodies to be different from a spherical shaped one. The fact that an object is not spherical generates a perturbation on the gravitational field. The disturbing force can be determined considering the shape of the specific body. A satellite orbiting this body would suffer the effects of this perturbation, but knowing the disturbing force, it’s possible to correct and control the orbit according to the desired mission. The polyhedron method is a traditional way to model an asteroid by dividing the object into smaller parts. The data used on this work are composed by a combination of triangular faces. The total disturbing force is a sum of the force on each piece of the model. Therefore, after the simulations are obtained, it’s possible to apply the desired corrections of the perturbation using continuous low thrust in closed loop, making it possible to perform maneuvers near these bodies. One of the important applications of the study shown above is in the ASTER mission, that is under study by INPE and several other Brazilian academic institutions, which goal is to send a spacecraft to an asteroid and then

  10. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  11. Multiscale Vessel-guided Airway Tree Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier that is trai......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier...

  12. Purinergic signaling in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Brouns, Inge; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Evidence for a significant role and impact of purinergic signaling in normal and diseased airways is now beyond dispute. The present review intends to provide the current state of knowledge of the involvement of purinergic pathways in the upper and lower airways and lungs, thereby differentiating the involvement of different tissues, such as the epithelial lining, immune cells, airway smooth muscle, vasculature, peripheral and central innervation, and neuroendocrine system. In addition to the vast number of well illustrated functions for purinergic signaling in the healthy respiratory tract, increasing data pointing to enhanced levels of ATP and/or adenosine in airway secretions of patients with airway damage and respiratory diseases corroborates the emerging view that purines act as clinically important mediators resulting in either proinflammatory or protective responses. Purinergic signaling has been implicated in lung injury and in the pathogenesis of a wide range of respiratory disorders and diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and pulmonary hypertension. These ostensibly enigmatic actions are based on widely different mechanisms, which are influenced by the cellular microenvironment, but especially the subtypes of purine receptors involved and the activity of distinct members of the ectonucleotidase family, the latter being potential protein targets for therapeutic implementation.

  13. Morphology, muscle capacity, skill, and maneuvering ability in hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; Segre, Paolo S; Straw, Andrew D; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2018-02-09

    How does agility evolve? This question is challenging because natural movement has many degrees of freedom and can be influenced by multiple traits. We used computer vision to record thousands of translations, rotations, and turns from more than 200 hummingbirds from 25 species, revealing that distinct performance metrics are correlated and that species diverge in their maneuvering style. Our analysis demonstrates that the enhanced maneuverability of larger species is explained by their proportionately greater muscle capacity and lower wing loading. Fast acceleration maneuvers evolve by recruiting changes in muscle capacity, whereas fast rotations and sharp turns evolve by recruiting changes in wing morphology. Both species and individuals use turns that play to their strengths. These results demonstrate how both skill and biomechanical traits shape maneuvering behavior. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Peripheral airway dysfunction and relationship with symptoms in smokers with preserved spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Thamrin, Cindy; Farah, Claude S; Bertolin, Amy; Chapman, David G; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; King, Gregory G

    2017-11-15

    Smokers develop respiratory symptoms and peripheral airway dysfunction even when spirometry is preserved. Multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) and impulse oscillometry system (IOS) are potentially useful measures of peripheral airway function but they have not been compared in such subjects. We hypothesized that MBNW and IOS are jointly abnormal in smokers with normal spirometry and that these abnormalities relate to respiratory symptoms. Eighty smokers with normal spirometry completed a symptom questionnaire, had ventilation heterogeneity in diffusion (Sacin) and convection-dependent (Scond) airways and trapped gas volume at functional residual capacity as a percentage of vital capacity (%VtrFRC/VC) measured by MBNW. Respiratory resistance and reactance at 5 and 20 Hz were measured using IOS. Respiratory symptoms were reported in 55 (68%) subjects. Forty (50%) subjects had at least one abnormal MBNW parameter, predominantly in Sacin. Forty-one (51%) subjects had at least one abnormal IOS parameter, predominantly in resistance. Sixty-one (76%) subjects had an abnormality in either MBNW or IOS. Chronic bronchitis symptoms were associated with an increased Scond, while wheeze was associated with lower spirometry and an increased resistance. Abnormalities in MBNW and IOS parameters were unrelated to each other. Respiratory symptoms and peripheral airway dysfunction are common in smokers with normal spirometry. Symptoms of chronic bronchitis related to conductive airway abnormalities, while wheeze was related to spirometry and IOS. The clinical significance of abnormalities in peripheral airway function in smokers remains undetermined. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Maneuver Planning for Conjunction Risk Mitigation with Ground-track Control Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, David

    2008-01-01

    The planning of conjunction Risk Mitigation Maneuvers (RMM) in the presence of ground-track control requirements is analyzed. Past RMM planning efforts on the Aqua, Aura, and Terra spacecraft have demonstrated that only small maneuvers are available when ground-track control requirements are maintained. Assuming small maneuvers, analytical expressions for the effect of a given maneuver on conjunction geometry are derived. The analytical expressions are used to generate a large trade space for initial RMM design. This trade space represents a significant improvement in initial maneuver planning over existing methods that employ high fidelity maneuver models and propagation.

  16. Reactive airway and anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    the bevel facing upward. On piercing the interspinous ligament, the stylet was removed and a 20mls resistance-free glass syringe half full of air, attached to the epidural needle. A gentle continuous pressure was applied to the plunger as the needle was. *Correspondence author: Lawal I Ibrahim. Department of Anaesthesia.

  17. Virtual simulation of maneuvering captive tests for a surface vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hajivand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic derivatives or coefficients are required to predict the maneuvering characteristics of a marine vehicle. These derivatives are obtained numerically for a DTMB 5512 model ship by virtual simulating of captive model tests in a CFD environment. The computed coefficients are applied to predict the turning circle and zigzag maneuvers of the model ship. The comparison of the simulated results with the available experimental data shows a very good agreement among them. The simulations show that the CFD is precise and affordable tool at the preliminary design stage to obtain maneuverability performance of a marine vehicles.

  18. Postoperative Airway Obstruction by a Bone Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schober

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative airway obstructions are potentially life-threatening complications. These obstructions may be classified as functional (sagging tongue, laryngospasm, or bronchospasm, pathoanatomical (airway swelling or hematoma within the airways, or foreign body-related. Various cases of airway obstruction by foreign bodies have previously been reported, for example, by broken teeth or damaged airway instruments. Here we present the exceptional case of a postoperative airway obstruction due to a large fragment of the patient’s maxillary bone, left accidentally in situ after transoral surgical tumor resection. Concerning this type of airway obstruction, we discuss possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. Although it is an exceptional case after surgery, clinicians should be aware of this potentially life-threatening complication. In summary, this case demonstrates that the differential diagnosis of postoperative airway obstructions should include foreign bodies derived from surgery, including tissue and bone fragments.

  19. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway. PMID:17184555

  20. Clinical review: management of difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway.

  1. Extraction of Airways from CT (EXACT'09)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, P.; Ginneken, B. van; Reinhardt, J.M.; Tarunashree, Y.; Jong, P.A. de; Irving, B.; Fetita, C.; Ortner, M.; Pinho, R.; Sijbers, J.; Feuerstein, M.; Fabijanska, A.; Bauer, C.; Beichel, R.; Mendoza, C.S.; Wiemker, R.; Lee, J. van der; Reeves, A.P.; Born, S.; Weinheimer, O.; Rikxoort, E.M. van; Tschirren, J.; Mori, K.; Odry, B.; Naidich, D.P.; Hartmann, I.J.; Hoffman, E.A.; Prokop, M.; Pedersen, J.H.; de Bruijne, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate fifteen different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference

  2. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    airway and the function of the lungs (decreased residual capacity and aggravated ventilation perfusion mismatch) worse than in lean patients. Proper planning and preparation of airway management is essential, including elevation of the patient's upper body, head and neck. Preoxygenation is mandatory......Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...

  3. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. In this study, 90 cases of 1-14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%-50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (pairway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA.

  4. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    OpenAIRE

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainl...

  5. Airway management in Ludwig's angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, S P; Merry, A F; Anderson, B

    1999-12-01

    A 37-year-old 91 kg man presented with features of Ludwig's angina. Anaesthesia for incision and drainage of his submandibular abscess was undertaken by two specialist anaesthetists with an otorhinolaryngological surgeon prepared for immediate tracheostomy. After preoxygenation, gas induction with sevoflurane in oxygen was followed by a gush of pus into the oral cavity and laryngospam causing acute upper airway obstruction. This resolved with 25 mg of suxamethonium and an endotracheal tube was passed into the trachea with difficulty. Options for management of the difficult airway in Ludwig's angina are discussed.

  6. Investigating the effects of laryngotracheal stenosis on upper airway aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tracy; Carpenter, David; Cohen, Seth; Witsell, David; Frank-Ito, Dennis O

    2017-10-17

    Very little is known about the impact of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) on inspiratory airflow and resistance, especially in air hunger states. This study investigates the effect of LTS on airway resistance and volumetric flow across three different inspiratory pressures. Head-and-neck computed tomography scans of 11 subjects from 2010 to 2016 were collected. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the upper airway from the nostrils to carina, including the oral cavity, were created for one subject with a normal airway and for 10 patients with LTS. Airflow simulations were conducted using computational fluid dynamics modeling at three different inspiratory pressures (10, 25, 40 pascals [Pa]) for all subjects under two scenarios: 1) inspiration through nostrils only (MC), and 2) through both nostrils and mouth (MO). Volumetric flows in the normal subject at the three inspiratory pressures were considerably higher (MC: 11.8-26.1 L/min; MO: 17.2-36.9 L/min) compared to those in LTS (MC: 2.86-6.75 L/min; MO: 4.11-9.00 L/min). Airway resistances in the normal subject were 0.051 to 0.092 pascal seconds per milliliter (Pa.s)/mL (MC) and 0.035-0.065 Pa.s/mL (MO), which were approximately tenfold lower than those of subjects with LTS: 0.39 to 0.89 Pa.s/mL (MC) and 0.45 to 0.84 Pa.s/mL (MO). Furthermore, subjects with glottic stenosis had the greatest resistance, whereas subjects with subglottic stenosis had the greatest variability in resistance. Subjects with tracheal stenosis had the lowest resistance. This pilot study demonstrates that LTS increases resistance and decreases airflow. Mouth breathing significantly improved airflow and resistance but cannot completely compensate for the effects of stenosis. Furthermore, location of stenosis appears to modulate the effect of the stenosis on resistance differentially. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...

  8. Airway Complications following ingestion of corrosive | Ezike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Corrosive ingestion is a major health problem in our environment. The proximal third of the oesophagus and the upper airway are mostly affected. These frequently result in life threatening airway complications demanding urgent tracheostomy. Key words: Corrosives, Burns, Airway, Respiratory distress.

  9. Functional phenotype of airway myocytes from asthmatic airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David B.; Trian, Thomas; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Johnson, Jill R.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bagchi, Rushita; Burgess, Janette K.; Kanabar, Varsha

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell plays a central role in disease pathogenesis through cellular changes which may impact on its microenvironment and alter ASM response and function. The answer to the long debated question of what makes a 'healthy' ASM cell become 'asthmatic' still

  10. Effect of chemical stimuli on nerves supplying upper airway muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, D; Mitra, J; Salamone, J; Cherniack, N S

    1982-03-01

    Studies of upper airway resistance suggest that the activity of cranial nerves supplying upper airway muscles changes with chemical drive and that imbalances in the activation of these nerves as compared to the phrenic play a role in causing upper airway obstruction. We assessed the effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on the activity of the hypoglossal nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and phrenic nerve in paralyzed anesthetized artificially ventilated dogs. Comparison of hypoglossal and phrenic nerves were also repeated after vagotomy. Both hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerves exhibited increased activity with inspiration. Hypoxia and hypercapnia increased phrenic nerve activity as well as the activity of the two cranial nerves. While linear increases occurred in phrenic and recurrent laryngeal nerve activity with both chemical stimuli, the relationship between hypoglossal and phrenic nerve activity was curvilinear. At lower levels of chemical drive, changes in hypoglossal nerve were less than in the phrenic, and the reverse was true at higher levels of chemical stimulation. There were also differences in the response of both cranial nerves and the phrenic to changing vagal stimulation. The dissimilarities observed in the cranial response of the nerves (versus the phrenic) could potentially affect the forces developed during inspiration and lead to obstruction in the upper airway.

  11. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  12. Is surgical airway necessary for airway management in deep neck infections and Ludwig angina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Mary M; Davis, James W; Parks, Steven N

    2011-02-01

    Deep neck infections are potentially life-threatening conditions because of airway compromise. Management requires early recognition, antibiotics, surgical drainage, and effective airway control. The Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program 12 states that awake tracheostomy is the treatment of choice for these patients. With advanced airway control techniques such as retrograde intubation, GlideScope, and fiberoptic intubation, surgical airway is not required. A retrospective analysis of all deep neck abscesses treated from December 1999 to July 2006 was performed. All patients who underwent urgent or emergent surgery for Ludwig angina and submental, submandibular, sublingual, and parapharyngeal abscesses (Current Procedural Terminology codes 41015, 41016, 41017, 42320, and 42725) were included in our review. Charts were studied for age, presence of true Ludwig angina, presence of airway compromise, airway management, morbidity/mortality, and the requirement for surgical airway. Of 29 patients, 6 (20%) had symptoms consistent with true Ludwig angina. Nineteen (65.5%) had evidence of airway compromise. Eight (42%) of these 19 patients required advanced airway control techniques. No patient required a surgical airway, and no mortality resulted from airway compromise. Advance airway control techniques were required more often in patients with airway compromise (P Ludwig angina and deep neck abscesses requires good clinical judgment. Patients with deep neck infections and symptoms of airway compromise may be safely managed with advanced airway control techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aqua/Aura Inclination Adjust Maneuver Series Spring 2018 Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenholme, Elena; Boone, Spencer

    2017-01-01

    This will be presented at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting on December 6-8, 2017 to discuss the Aqua/Aura Spring 2018 Inclination Adjust Maneuver series planning. Presentation has been reviewed and approved by Eric Moyer, ESMO (Earth Science Mission Operations) Deputy Project Manager.

  14. Cluster-based centralized data fusion for tracking maneuvering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interacting multiple model (IMM) algorithm has proved to be useful in tracking maneuvering targets. Tracking accuracy can be further improved using data fusion. Tracking of multiple targets using multiple sensors and fusing them at a central site using centralized architecture involves communication of large volumes of ...

  15. EOS Terra Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update presentation will discuss brief history of Terra EOM work; lifetime fuel estimates; baseline vs. proposed plan origin; resultant exit orbit; baseline vs. proposed exit plan; long term orbit altitude; revised lifetime proposal and fallback options.

  16. Astronaut Bruce McCandless tests astronaut maneuvering unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, backup pilot for Skylab 2, tests the balance and control of an astronaut maneuvering unit (AMU) test model at Martin Marietta Corporation's Denver division. The jet-powered backpack can fly for 30 minutes and can be worn over normal clothing or space suit.

  17. Cluster-based centralized data fusion for tracking maneuvering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The interacting multiple model (IMM) algorithm has proved to be useful in tracking maneuvering targets. Tracking accuracy can be further improved using data fusion. Tracking of multiple targets using multiple sensors and fusing them at a central site using centralized architecture involves communication of.

  18. Maneuvering and stability performance of a robotic tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jamie M; Chhabra, Narender K

    2002-02-01

    The Draper Laboratory Vorticity Control Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (VCUUV) is the first mission-scale, autonomous underwater vehicle that uses vorticity control propulsion and maneuvering. Built as a research platform with which to study the energetics and maneuvering performance of fish-swimming propulsion, the VCUUV is a self-contained free swimming research vehicle which follows the morphology and kinematics of a yellowfin tuna. The forward half of the vehicle is comprised of a rigid hull which houses batteries, electronics, ballast and hydraulic power unit. The aft section is a freely flooded articulated robot tail which is terminated with a lunate caudal fin. Utilizing experimentally optimized body and tail kinematics from the MIT RoboTuna, the VCUUV has demonstrated stable steady swimming speeds up to 1.2 m/sec and aggressive maneuvering trajectories with turning rates up to 75 degrees per second. This paper summarizes the vehicle maneuvering and stability performance observed in field trials and compares the results to predicted performance using theoretical and empirical techniques.

  19. Proposal for Global Standard Maneuvering Orders for Tugboats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Ishikura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of “Standard Maneuvering Orders” for tugboats, vocabulary and phrases mutually pre-agreed between ships and tugboats, is essential for the former to provide clear direction for the latter when berthing or un-berthing safely. Tugboats will need time to change their posture before they take actions in response to orders from persons responsible for ships’ maneuvering. Therefore, when giving directions to change tugboats’ posture, persons who handle their ships are required to send out tug orders, with regard to “delay time,” a gap be-tween the orders from ships and the actions taken by tugboats. “Tug Orders” standardized and used in Japan are composed of the following three factors concerning towage work: tugboat’s motion, direction and engine power, but the author’s research shows that there are “Non-standard” special maneuvering orders other than those “standardized,” which causes such problems as a gap in perception between pilots and tugboat’s opera-tors, etc. The purpose of this paper is to research the delay time between orders for and actions by tugboats and consider the appropriate and safe timing of providing instructions to them, and then to propose globally-authorized “Standard Maneuvering Orders for tugboats”, discussing a problem involved in the use of the special orders used in Japan, and the way in which tug orders are used in other countries.

  20. Transient Structured Distance as a Maneuver in Marital Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Bernard L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Experience with 73 cases has shown the value of Transient Structured Distance as a maneuver in marriage therapy. While the TSD is a radical form of intervention with risks of anxiety reactions, homosexual panic, or divorce, it has proved effective with difficult forms of acute or chronic marital disharmony. (Author)

  1. Optimizing squatting as a physical maneuver to prevent vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, C. T. Paul; Go-Schön, Ingeborg K.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Wieling, Wouter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Squatting is a potent physical maneuver to prevent syncope; however, a major drawback is that standing up from squatting is a large hemodynamic stressor that often causes new presyncopal symptoms. We tested the hypothesis that lower body skeletal muscle tensing (LBMT) attenuates the

  2. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: shared airway; jet ventilation; TIVA/TCI; laser excision; monitoring. Abstract. In this article, we describe the anaesthetic ... (Submitted: 2009-07-14, Accepted: 2010-10-04). S Afr J Anaesth Analg 2011;17(2):182-184 ... Jet ventilation and TCI/TIVA (total intravenous anaesthesia) are our techniques of choice for ...

  3. allergy, asthma airway and anaphylaxis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perioperative preparation of children presenting for surgery aims to identify medical problems that might influence the outcome and to institute management strategies to reduce those risks. Respiratory and airway complications remain the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in modern paediatric ...

  4. Pharyngeal airway changes following mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of dentofacial deformities with jaw osteotomies has an effect on airway anatomy and therefore mandibular setback surgery has the potential to diminish airway size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mandibular setback surgery on airway size. 8 consecutive patients were examined prospectively. All patients underwent mandibular setback surgery. Cephalometric analysis was performed preoperatively and 3 months post operatively with particular attention to pharyngeal airway changes. Pharyngeal airway size decreased considerably in all, patients thus predisposing to development of obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, large anteroposterior discrepancies should be corrected by combined maxillary and mandibular osteotomies.

  5. Surgical airway in emergency department intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lindsay A; Dunn, Mark; Mckeown, Dermot W; Oglesby, Angela J

    2011-06-01

    To determine the frequency of and primary indication for surgical airway during emergency department intubation. Prospectively collected data from all intubations performed in the emergency department from January 1999 to July 2007 were analysed to ascertain the frequency of surgical airway access. Original data were collected on a structured proforma, entered into a regional database and analysed. Patient records were then reviewed to determine the primary indication for a surgical airway. Emergency department intubation was undertaken in 2524 patients. Of these, only five patients (0.2%) required a surgical airway. The most common indication for a surgical airway was trauma in four of the five patients. Two patients had attempted rapid sequence induction before surgical airway. Two patients had gaseous inductions and one patient received no drugs. In all five patients, surgical airway was performed secondary to failed endotracheal intubation attempt(s) and was never the primary technique used. In our emergency department, surgical airway is an uncommon procedure. The rate of 0.2% is significantly lower than rates quoted in other studies. The most common indication for surgical airway was severe facial or neck trauma. Our emergency department has a joint protocol for emergency intubation agreed by the Departments of Emergency Medicine, Anaesthesia and Critical Care at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. We believe that the low surgical airway rate is secondary to this collaborative approach. The identified low rate of emergency department surgical airway has implications for training and maintenance of skills for emergency medicine trainees and physicians.

  6. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brown

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch. The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. Methods In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (< 1 mm. Results Our results show that, while treated airways still have the capacity to close at very high doses of Mch, this ability is seriously impaired after treatment, requiring much higher doses. Conclusions Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  7. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. This includes methods for extracting airway surfaces from the images and ways of achieving comparable measurements in airway branches through matching and anatomical labelling. The methods were used to study effects of differences in inspiration level at the time...

  9. Control of nasal vasculature and airflow resistance in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, M A; Phipps, R J; Wang, J C; Widdicombe, J G

    1984-01-01

    Nasal vascular and airflow resistances have been measured in dogs, simultaneously on both sides separately. Vascular resistance was measured either by constant flow perfusion of the terminal branch of the maxillary artery (which supplies, via the sphenopalatine artery, the nasal septum, most of the turbinates and the nasal sinuses) or by measuring blood flow through this artery, maintained by the dog's own blood pressure. Airflow resistance was assessed by inserting balloon-tipped endotracheal catheters into the back of each nasal cavity via the nasopharynx, and measuring transnasal pressure at constant airflow through each side of the nose simultaneously. Preliminary experiments indicated that there was 5-10% collateral anastomosis between the two sides. Close-arterial injection of drugs showed different patterns of response. Adrenaline, phenylephrine, chlorpheniramine and low doses of prostaglandin F2 alpha increased vascular resistance and lowered airway resistance. Salbutamol, methacholine and histamine lowered vascular resistance and increased airway resistance. Dobutamine decreased airway resistance with a small increase in vascular resistance. Prostaglandins E1, E2 and F2 alpha (high dose) decreased both vascular and airway resistances. Substance P, eledoisin-related peptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide lowered vascular resistance with little change in airway resistance. The results are interpreted in terms of possible drug actions on precapillary resistance vessels, sinusoids and venules, and arteriovenous anastomoses. It is concluded that nasal airway resistance cannot be correlated with vascular resistance or blood flow, since the latter has a complex and ill-defined relationship with nasal vascular blood volume. PMID:6204040

  10. Design of bituminous mixes with high skid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Certain highway locations need exceptionally high skid resistance because of the alignment, geometry, and drainage of the roadway and the complex turning maneuvers required. Several beam specimens made of bituminous mixes incorporating unconventional...

  11. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cong-Yi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograde labeling, immunostaining, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological recordings, here we show that a subpopulation of airway vagal afferent nerves express TRPM8 receptors and that activation of TRPM8 receptors by cold excites these airway autonomic nerves. Thus activation of TRPM8 receptors may provoke autonomic nerve reflex to increase airway resistance. This putative autonomic response may be associated with cold-induced exacerbation of asthma and other pulmonary disorders, making TRPM8 receptors a possible target for prevention of cold-associated respiratory disorders.

  12. The effect of disease and respiration on airway shape in patients with moderate persistent asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Montesantos

    Full Text Available Computational models of gas transport and aerosol deposition frequently utilize idealized models of bronchial tree structure, where airways are considered a network of bifurcating cylinders. However, changes in the shape of the lung during respiration affect the geometry of the airways, especially in disease conditions. In this study, the internal airway geometry was examined, concentrating on comparisons between mean lung volume (MLV and total lung capacity (TLC. A set of High Resolution CT images were acquired during breath hold on a group of moderate persistent asthmatics at MLV and TLC after challenge with a broncho-constrictor (methacholine and the airway trees were segmented and measured. The airway hydraulic diameter (Dh was calculated through the use of average lumen area (Ai and average internal perimeter (Pi at both lung volumes and was found to be systematically higher at TLC by 13.5±9% on average, with the lower lobes displaying higher percent change in comparison to the lower lobes. The average internal diameter (Din was evaluated to be 12.4±6.8% (MLV and 10.8±6.3% (TLC lower than the Dh, for all the examined bronchi, a result displaying statistical significance. Finally, the airway distensibility per bronchial segment and per generation was calculated to have an average value of 0.45±0.28, exhibiting high variability both between and within lung regions and generations. Mixed constriction/dilation patterns were recorded between the lung volumes, where a number of airways either failed to dilate or even constricted when observed at TLC. We conclude that the Dh is higher than Din, a fact that may have considerable effects on bronchial resistance or airway loss at proximal regions. Differences in caliber changes between lung regions are indicative of asthma-expression variability in the lung. However, airway distensibility at generation 3 seems to predict distensibility more distally.

  13. Maneuver Performance Assessment of the Cassini Spacecraft Through Execution-Error Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has executed nearly 300 maneuvers since 1997, providing ample data for execution-error model updates. With maneuvers through 2017, opportunities remain to improve on the models and remove biases identified in maneuver executions. This manuscript focuses on how execution-error models can be used to judge maneuver performance, while providing a means for detecting performance degradation. Additionally, this paper describes Cassini's execution-error model updates in August 2012. An assessment of Cassini's maneuver performance through OTM-368 on January 5, 2014 is also presented.

  14. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Davis, C.W.; Boucher, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    osmolality increased cell Cl- activity, Na+ activity, and transepithelial resistance and decreased both apical and basolateral membrane potentials and the fractional resistance of the apical membrane; equivalent circuit analysis revealed increases in apical, basolateral, and shunt resistances. Prolonged......- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall....... exposure (10 min) to 430 mosM luminal solution elicited no regulation of any parameter. Optical measurements revealed a reduction in the thickness of preparations only in response to luminal hypertonic solutions. We conclude that (a) airway epithelial cells exhibit asymmetric water transport properties...

  15. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert; Wizeman, William; Danek, Christopher; Mitzner, Wayne

    2007-10-12

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch). The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. METHODS: In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  16. Anatomy and muscle activity of the dorsal fins in bamboo sharks and spiny dogfish during turning maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2013-11-01

    Stability and procured instability characterize two opposing types of swimming, steady and maneuvering, respectively. Fins can be used to manipulate flow to adjust stability during swimming maneuvers either actively using muscle control or passively by structural control. The function of the dorsal fins during turning maneuvering in two shark species with different swimming modes is investigated here using musculoskeletal anatomy and muscle function. White-spotted bamboo sharks are a benthic species that inhabits complex reef habitats and thus have high requirements for maneuverability. Spiny dogfish occupy a variety of coastal and continental shelf habitats and spend relatively more time cruising in open water. These species differ in dorsal fin morphology and fin position along the body. Bamboo sharks have a larger second dorsal fin area and proportionally more muscle insertion into both dorsal fins. The basal and radial pterygiophores are plate-like structures in spiny dogfish and are nearly indistinguishable from one another. In contrast, bamboo sharks lack basal pterygiophores, while the radial pterygiophores form two rows of elongated rectangular elements that articulate with one another. The dorsal fin muscles are composed of a large muscle mass that extends over the ceratotrichia overlying the radials in spiny dogfish. However, in bamboo sharks, the muscle mass is divided into multiple distinct muscles that insert onto the ceratotrichia. During turning maneuvers, the dorsal fin muscles are active in both species with no differences in onset between fin sides. Spiny dogfish have longer burst durations on the outer fin side, which is consistent with opposing resistance to the medium. In bamboo sharks, bilateral activation of the dorsal in muscles could also be stiffening the fin throughout the turn. Thus, dogfish sharks passively stiffen the dorsal fin structurally and functionally, while bamboo sharks have more flexible dorsal fins, which result from a

  17. Thermally-Constrained Fuel-Optimal ISS Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sagar; Svecz, Andrew; Alaniz, Abran; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Nguyen, Louis; Spanos, Pol

    2015-01-01

    Optimal Propellant Maneuvers (OPMs) are now being used to rotate the International Space Station (ISS) and have saved hundreds of kilograms of propellant over the last two years. The savings are achieved by commanding the ISS to follow a pre-planned attitude trajectory optimized to take advantage of environmental torques. The trajectory is obtained by solving an optimal control problem. Prior to use on orbit, OPM trajectories are screened to ensure a static sun vector (SSV) does not occur during the maneuver. The SSV is an indicator that the ISS hardware temperatures may exceed thermal limits, causing damage to the components. In this paper, thermally-constrained fuel-optimal trajectories are presented that avoid an SSV and can be used throughout the year while still reducing propellant consumption significantly.

  18. Orbit Estimation of Non-Cooperative Maneuvering Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    approaches is to determine the percent error of the thrust estimate while the maneuver is occurring. ∆ verr = N∑ i ∣∣∣∣∣∣thtrueai ∣∣∣2 − ∣∣∣thestai ∣∣∣2∣∣∣1...6.4. The ∆ verr error column in Table 6.4 captures the average error in estimating the magnitude of the maneuver after the filter has settled and prior...Cases and Filters Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Case 4 Case 5 ∆ verr RMS r ∆ verr RMS r ∆ verr RMS r ∆ verr RMS r ∆ verr RMS r EKF 2.1 % 55.1 km 3.9% 61.9 km 20.0

  19. Novel Fractional Order Calculus Extended PN for Maneuvering Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikun Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of fractional order calculus (FOC, a novel extended proportional guidance (EPN law for intercepting the maneuvering target is proposed. In the first part, considering the memory function and filter characteristic of FOC, the novel extended PN guidance algorithm is developed based on the conventional PN after introducing the properties and operation rules of FOC. Further, with the help of FOC theory, the average load and ballistics characteristics of proposed guidance law are analyzed. Then, using the small offset kinematic model, the robustness of the new guidance law against autopilot parameters is studied theoretically by analyzing the sensitivity of the closed loop guidance system. At last, representative numerical results show that the designed guidance law obtains a better performance than the traditional PN for maneuvering target.

  20. Real-time optimal guidance for orbital maneuvering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A. O.; Brown, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    A new formulation for soft-constraint trajectory optimization is presented as a real-time optimal feedback guidance method for multiburn orbital maneuvers. Control is always chosen to minimize burn time plus a quadratic penalty for end condition errors, weighted so that early in the mission (when controllability is greatest) terminal errors are held negligible. Eventually, as controllability diminishes, the method partially relaxes but effectively still compensates perturbations in whatever subspace remains controllable. Although the soft-constraint concept is well-known in optimal control, the present formulation is novel in addressing the loss of controllability inherent in multiple burn orbital maneuvers. Moreover the necessary conditions usually obtained from a Bolza formulation are modified in this case so that the fully hard constraint formulation is a numerically well behaved subcase. As a result convergence properties have been greatly improved.

  1. Compressed Sensing ISAR Reconstruction Considering Highly Maneuvering Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shaharyar Khwaja

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we propose compressed sensing inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging in the presence of highly maneuvering motion using a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP reconstruction algorithm. Unlike existing methods where motion is limited to first- or second-order phase terms, we take into account realistic motion of a maneuvering target that can involve a third-order phase term corresponding to the rate of rotational acceleration. In addition, unlike existing fixed dictionary-based methods, which require designing a large dictionary that needs to take into account all of the possible motion parameters, we propose a modified OMP reconstruction method that requires a dictionary only based on the first-order phase term and estimates the secondand third-order phase terms using an optimization algorithm. Simulation examples and comparison with existing methods show the viability of our approach for imaging moving targets consisting of higher order motion.

  2. Evasive Maneuvers in Space Debris Environment and Technological Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio D. C. Jesus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of collisional dynamics between space debris and an operational vehicle in LEO. We adopted an approach based on the relative dynamics between the objects on a collisional course and with a short warning time and established a semianalytical solution for the final trajectories of these objects. Our results show that there are angular ranges in 3D, in addition to the initial conditions, that favor the collisions. These results allowed the investigation of a range of technological parameters for the spacecraft (e.g., fuel reserve that allow a safe evasive maneuver (e.g., time available for the maneuver. The numerical model was tested for different values of the impact velocity and relative distance between the approaching objects.

  3. Conjunction challenges of low-thrust geosynchronous debris removal maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-06-01

    The conjunction challenges of low-thrust engines for continuous thrust re-orbiting of geosynchronous (GEO) objects to super-synchronous disposal orbits are investigated, with applications to end-of-life mitigation and active debris removal (ADR) technologies. In particular, the low maneuverability of low-thrust systems renders collision avoidance a challenging task. This study investigates the number of conjunction events a low-thrust system could encounter with the current GEO debris population during a typical re-orbit to 300 km above the GEO ring. Sensitivities to thrust level and initial longitude and inclination are evaluated, and the impact of delaying the start time for a re-orbiting maneuver is assessed. Results demonstrate that the mean number of conjunctions increases hyperbolically as thrust level decreases, but timing the start of the maneuver appropriately can reduce the average conjunction rate when lower thrust levels are applied.

  4. Sustaining Operational Maneuver in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    hedgerows while exploiting the breech created by strategic bombers and the other divisions of the United States Army VII Corps. Maneuver operations would...forces encountered the difficult hedgerow obstacles and a tenacious German enemy adapt at defending them. The allied forces lost momentum and needed... hedgerow country.27 For the American forces, it was the transition between the bloody, slow attritional fighting in the Normandy hedgerows and the

  5. Automated Maneuver Design and Checkout for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Simulink propagator used for maneuver checkout. ............................ 29 Figure 7. S/C orientation evolution for initial problem formulation...you. Fair winds and following seas, and I hope to serve with you once again in the future. xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I...minimum time problems. While it is possible to develop and apply the necessary conditions to solve any optimal control problem, analysis quickly

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling of A Maneuvering Aircraft Using Indicial Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Paper Undergraduate Student Paper Postgraduate Student Paper █ Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling of A Maneuvering Aircraft Using Indicial Functions...this configuration exhibit strong pitch up behaviour at a relatively low angle of attack and lateral instability that can lead to serious aerodynamic...reduce flight speed, the reduced flight speed helps to have a smaller radius turn and total travelled time. Next, the airplane starts to roll as the

  7. Analysis of Tactical Automation Requirements for the Maneuver Functional Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-06

    distribucion of information in order to facilitate battlefield decision-making, employment, and sustainment of units below the battalion level. (2...signal node) level within light, airborne, air assault, motorized, and heavy divisions. Signal company command posts normally collocate with one of...Battalion commander. No device allocated. Normally collocated with aviation battalion TOC or maneuver TOC where a device is available. 2. Battalion S2

  8. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  9. Evaluation of Mathematical Models for Tankers’ Maneuvering Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan AKSU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the maneuvering performance of two tanker ships, KVLCC1 and KVLCC2 which have different stern forms are predicted using a system-based method. Two different 3 DOF (degrees of freedom mathematical models based on the MMG(Maneuvering Modeling Group concept areappliedwith the difference in representing lateral force and yawing moment by second and third order polynomials respectively. Hydrodynamic coefficients and related parameters used in the mathematical models of the same scale models of KVLCC1 and KVLCC2 ships are estimated by using experimental data of NMRI (National Maritime Research Institute. The simulations of turning circle with rudder angle ±35o , zigzag(±10o /±10o and zigzag (±20o /±20o maneuvers are carried out and compared with free running model test data of MARIN (Maritime Research Institute Netherlands in this study. As a result of the analysis, it can be summarised that MMG model based on the third order polynomial is superior to the one based on the second order polynomial in view of estimation accuracy of lateral hull force and yawing moment.

  10. A Fuel-Efficient Conflict Resolution Maneuver for Separation Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Aisha Ruth; Santiago, Confesor

    2012-01-01

    Automated separation assurance algorithms are envisioned to play an integral role in accommodating the forecasted increase in demand of the National Airspace System. Developing a robust, reliable, air traffic management system involves safely increasing efficiency and throughput while considering the potential impact on users. This experiment seeks to evaluate the benefit of augmenting a conflict detection and resolution algorithm to consider a fuel efficient, Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver, when resolving a given conflict based on either minimum fuel burn or minimum delay. A total of twelve conditions were tested in a fast-time simulation conducted in three airspace regions with mixed aircraft types and light weather. Results show that inclusion of this maneuver has no appreciable effect on the ability of the algorithm to safely detect and resolve conflicts. The results further suggest that enabling the Zero-Delay Direct-To maneuver significantly increases the cumulative fuel burn savings when choosing resolution based on minimum fuel burn while marginally increasing the average delay per resolution.

  11. Capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering patterns with mobile cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jicheng; Hao, Wei; White, Travis; Yan, Yuqing; Jones, Maria; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Power wheelchairs have been widely used to provide independent mobility to people with disabilities. Despite great advancements in power wheelchair technology, research shows that wheelchair related accidents occur frequently. To ensure safe maneuverability, capturing wheelchair maneuvering patterns is fundamental to enable other research, such as safe robotic assistance for wheelchair users. In this study, we propose to record, store, and analyze wheelchair maneuvering data by means of mobile cloud computing. Specifically, the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors in smart phones are used to record wheelchair maneuvering data in real-time. Then, the recorded data are periodically transmitted to the cloud for storage and analysis. The analyzed results are then made available to various types of users, such as mobile phone users, traditional desktop users, etc. The combination of mobile computing and cloud computing leverages the advantages of both techniques and extends the smart phone's capabilities of computing and data storage via the Internet. We performed a case study to implement the mobile cloud computing framework using Android smart phones and Google App Engine, a popular cloud computing platform. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed mobile cloud computing framework.

  12. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new version of the modified two-level corrections process is formulated to handle the case of finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of that finite burn modified two-level corrections process which can again be used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. Additionally, performance results and a comparison between the two methods are presented. The finite burn two-level corrector formulation presented here ensures the entry constraints at entry interface are still met without violating the available fuel budget, while still accounting for much longer burn times in its design.

  13. Closed-Loop Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John R.; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in unsteady several maneuvers. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  14. Active Control of Aerodynamic Forces on a Rapidly Maneuvering Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2009-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on a rapidly maneuvering free-moving airfoil are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The airfoil is mounted on a 2-DOF traverse and its trim and dynamic characteristics are controlled using position and attitude feedback loops that are actuated by servo motors. The motion of the airfoil is effected by bi-directional changes in the pitching moment using controllable trapped vorticity concentrations on both the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge that are induced and regulated by hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The unsteady flow characteristics induced by the fluidic actuation during a prescribed maneuver are compared with the effects of a simple rigid-body motion of the airfoil when an external torque is used to achieve a similar maneuver. It is shown that the time-dependent aerodynamic forces and induced flow fields in the near wake of the moving airfoil are significantly different, emphasizing the role of the coupling between the flow control actuation and the model's unsteady aerodynamics.

  15. "Spaghetti Maneuver": A useful tool in pediatric laparoscopy - Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The laparoscopic "Spaghetti Maneuver" consists in holding an organ by its extremity with a grasper and rolling it up around the tool to keep the organ stable and facilitate its traction within a small space. We describe our experience with the "Spaghetti Maneuver" in some minimally invasive procedures. Materials and Methods: We successfully adopted this technique in 13 patients (5F : 8M aged between 6 and 14 years (average age, 10 on whom we performed 7 appendectomies, 2 ureteral reimplantation and 4 cholecystectomies. In all cases, after the first steps, the appendix, the gallbladder and the ureter were rolled around the grasper and easily isolated; hemostasis was thus induced and the organ was mobilized until removal during cholecystectomy and appendectomy, and before the reimplantation in case of ureteral reimplantation. Results: We found that this technique facilitated significantly the acts of holding, isolating and removing, when necessary, the structures involved, which remained constantly within the visual field of the operator. This allowed a very ergonomic work setting, overcoming the problem of the "blind" zone, which represents a dangerous and invisible area out of the operator′s control during laparoscopy. Moreover the isolation maneuvers resulted easier and reduced operating time. Conclusion: We think that this technique is easy to perform and very useful, because it facilitates the dissection of these organs, by harmonizing and stabilizing the force of traction exercised.

  16. State Estimation for Landing Maneuver on High Performance Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P. S.; Sura, Niranjan K.; Shankar, K.

    2018-01-01

    State estimation methods are popular means for validating aerodynamic database on aircraft flight maneuver performance characteristics. In this work, the state estimation method during landing maneuver is explored for the first of its kind, using upper diagonal adaptive extended Kalman filter (UD-AEKF) with fuzzy based adaptive tunning of process noise matrix. The mathematical model for symmetrical landing maneuver consists of non-linear flight mechanics equation representing Aircraft longitudinal dynamics. The UD-AEKF algorithm is implemented in MATLAB environment and the states with bias is considered to be the initial conditions just prior to the flare. The measurement data is obtained from a non-linear 6 DOF pilot in loop simulation using FORTRAN. These simulated measurement data is additively mixed with process and measurement noises, which are used as an input for UD-AEKF. Then, the governing states that dictate the landing loads at the instant of touch down are compared. The method is verified using flight data wherein, the vertical acceleration at the aircraft center of gravity (CG) is compared. Two possible outcome of purely relying on the aircraft measured data is highlighted. It is observed that, with the implementation of adaptive fuzzy logic based extended Kalman filter tuned to adapt for aircraft landing dynamics, the methodology improves the data quality of the states that are sourced from noisy measurements.

  17. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  18. 75 FR 13079 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; MAHAN AIRWAYS; Mahan Airways, Mahan Tower, No. 21, Azadegan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... Regulations and TDO, a United Kingdom court found Mahan Airways in contempt of court on February 1, 2010, for... contempt finding against Mahan Airways in the U.K. litigation, which I understand is still ongoing. I note...

  19. Mediators on human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C; Johnson, P; Anticevich, S; Ammit, A; McKay, K; Hughes, M; Black, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma may be due to several abnormalities, but must include alterations in the airway smooth muscle responsiveness and/or volume. 2. Increased responsiveness of airway smooth muscle in vitro can be induced by certain inflammatory cell products and by induction of sensitization (atopy). 3. Increased airway smooth muscle growth can also be induced by inflammatory cell products and atopic serum. 4. Mast cell numbers are increased in the airways of asthmatics and, in our studies, in airway smooth muscle that is sensitized and hyperresponsive. 5. We propose that there is a relationship between mast cells and airway smooth muscle cells which, once an allergic process has been initiated, results in the development of critical features in the lungs in asthma.

  20. Extraction of airways from CT (EXACT’09)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Ginneken, Bram van; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate 15 different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference standard...... from scratch, we propose to construct the reference using results from all algorithms that are to be evaluated. We start by subdividing each segmented airway tree into its individual branch segments. Each branch segment is then visually scored by trained observers to determine whether...... or not it is a correctly segmented part of the airway tree. Finally, the reference airway trees are constructed by taking the union of all correctly extracted branch segments. Fifteen airway tree extraction algorithms from different research groups are evaluated on a diverse set of 20 chest computed tomography (CT) scans...

  1. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes.

  2. Encountering unexpected difficult airway: relationship with the intubation difficulty scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Wonuk; Kim, Hajung; Kim, Kyongsun; Ro, Young-Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2016-06-01

    An unexpected difficult intubation can be very challenging and if it is not managed properly, it may expose the encountered patient to significant risks. The intubation difficulty scale (IDS) has been used as a validated method to evaluate a global degree of intubation difficulty. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of unexpected difficult intubation using the IDS. We retrospectively reviewed 951 patients undergoing elective surgery in a single medical center. Patients expected to have a difficult intubation or who had history of difficult intubation were excluded. Each patient was assessed by the IDS scoring system with seven variables. Total prevalence of difficult intubation and the contributing individual factors were further analyzed. For the 951 patients, the difficult intubation cases presenting IDS > 5 was 5.8% of total cases (n = 55). The prevalence of Cormack-Lehane Grade 3 or 4 was 16.2% (n = 154). Most of the difficult intubation cases were managed by simple additional maneuvers and techniques such as stylet application, additional lifting force and laryngeal pressure. Unexpected difficult airway was present in 5.8% of patients and most was managed effectively. Among the components of IDS, the Cormack-Lehane grade was most sensitive for predicting difficult intubation.

  3. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) device at the National Hospital Abuja gives immediate improvement in respiratory rate and oxygenation in neonates with respiratory distress.

  4. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  5. Use of GlideScope for double lumen endotracheal tube insertion in an awake patient with difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onrubia, X; Lluch-Oltra, A; Armero, R; Baldó, J

    2014-01-01

    There is scientific evidence that an anticipated difficult airway must be managed with the patient being awake. The GlideScope has been proven to be a useful device to intubate the trachea in some instances when difficult airway is present, and particularly in the awake patient. It has also been used for double lumen tube (DLT) in the anaesthetized patient, but its use with DLT in both circumstances, awake patients with difficult airway has not been described. GlideScope enabled us to achieve accurate local anesthetic spraying and a successful endotracheal intubation with a double lumen tube (DLT) in an awake patient with predicted difficult airway and bronchoaspiration risk. Different ways to resolve cases like this can be found in the anesthetic literature, but we think this could be another option to bear in mind. We also describe a new variation in the maneuver of introducing a DLT into the trachea under GlideScope view as DLT presents with some difficulties when introduced under normal circumstances. This option could add some risk for the patients when used in inexperienced hands and there is not sufficient scientific evidence in the literature to recommend it for all cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Airway contractility and remodeling : Links to asthma symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Adrian R.; Syyong, Harley T.; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Murphy, Thomas M.; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N.; Bosse, Ynuk

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are

  7. An Optimized Method to Detect BDS Satellites' Orbit Maneuvering and Anomalies in Real-Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanwen; Qin, Zhiwei; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Le; Yan, Xingyuan; Wang, Xiaolei

    2018-02-28

    The orbital maneuvers of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Constellations will decrease the performance and accuracy of positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT). Because satellites in the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) are in Geostationary Orbit (GEO) and Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO), maneuvers occur more frequently. Also, the precise start moment of the BDS satellites' orbit maneuvering cannot be obtained by common users. This paper presented an improved real-time detecting method for BDS satellites' orbit maneuvering and anomalies with higher timeliness and higher accuracy. The main contributions to this improvement are as follows: (1) instead of the previous two-steps method, a new one-step method with higher accuracy is proposed to determine the start moment and the pseudo random noise code (PRN) of the satellite orbit maneuvering in that time; (2) BDS Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbital maneuvers are firstly detected according to the proposed selection strategy for the stations; and (3) the classified non-maneuvering anomalies are detected by a new median robust method using the weak anomaly detection factor and the strong anomaly detection factor. The data from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) in 2017 was used for experimental analysis. The experimental results and analysis showed that the start moment of orbital maneuvers and the period of non-maneuver anomalies can be determined more accurately in real-time. When orbital maneuvers and anomalies occur, the proposed method improved the data utilization for 91 and 95 min in 2017.

  8. Repeated Delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors to the Rabbit Airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Suzanne E.; Jones, Lori A.; Chesnut, Kye; Walsh, Scott M.; Reynolds, Thomas C.; Carter, Barrie J.; Askin, Frederic B.; Flotte, Terence R.; Guggino, William B.

    1999-01-01

    Efficient local expression from recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) vectors has been observed in the airways of rabbits and monkeys for up to 6 months following a single bronchoscopic delivery. However, it is likely that repeated administrations of rAAV vectors will be necessary for sustained correction of the CF defect in the airways. The current study was designed to test the feasibility of repeated airway delivery of rAAV vectors in the rabbit lung. After two doses of rAAV-CFTR to the airways, rabbits generated high titers of serum anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. Rabbits then received a third dose of a rAAV vector containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene packaged in either AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) or serotype 3 (AAV3) capsids. Each dose consisted of 1 ml containing 5 × 109 DNase-resistant particles of rAAV vector, having no detectable replication-competent AAV or adenovirus. Three weeks later, GFP expression was observed in airway epithelial cells despite high anti-AAV neutralizing titers at the time of delivery. There was no significant difference in the efficiency of DNA transfer or expression between the rAAV3 and rAAV2 groups. No significant inflammatory responses to either repeated airway exposure to rAAV2-CFTR vectors or to GFP expression were observed. These experiments demonstrate that serum anti-AAV neutralizing antibody titers do not predict airway neutralization in vivo and that repeated airway delivery rAAV allows for safe and effective gene transfer. PMID:10516053

  9. Comparison of drug-induced sleep endoscopy and Müller's maneuver in diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea using the VOTE classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegïn, Yakup; Çelik, Mustafa; Kaya, Kamïl Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    Knowledge of the site of obstruction and the pattern of airway collapse is essential for determining correct surgical and medical management of patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). To this end, several diagnostic tests and procedures have been developed. To determine whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) or Müller's maneuver (MM) would be more successful at identifying the site of obstruction and the pattern of upper airway collapse in patients with OSAS. The study included 63 patients (52 male and 11 female) who were diagnosed with OSAS at our clinic. Ages ranged from 30 to 66 years old and the average age was 48.5 years. All patients underwent DISE and MM and the results of these examinations were characterized according to the region/degree of obstruction as well as the VOTE classification. The results of each test were analyzed per upper airway level and compared using statistical analysis (Cohen's kappa statistic test). There was statistically significant concordance between the results from DISE and MM for procedures involving the anteroposterior (73%), lateral (92.1%), and concentric (74.6%) configuration of the velum. Results from the lateral part of the oropharynx were also in concordance between the tests (58.7%). Results from the lateral configuration of the epiglottis were in concordance between the tests (87.3%). There was no statistically significant concordance between the two examinations for procedures involving the anteroposterior of the tongue (23.8%) and epiglottis (42.9%). We suggest that DISE has several advantages including safety, ease of use, and reliability, which outweigh MM in terms of the ability to diagnose sites of obstruction and the pattern of upper airway collapse. Also, MM can provide some knowledge of the pattern of pharyngeal collapse. Furthermore, we also recommend using the VOTE classification in combination with DISE. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia C

  10. Involvement of galectin-9 in guinea pig allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hitomi; Kashio, Yumiko; Shoji, Hiroki; Shinonaga, Rika; Yoshimura, Teizo; Nishi, Nozomu; Nabe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takanori; Kohno, Shigekatsu; Hirashima, Mitsuomi

    2007-01-01

    There is little information about the involvement of galectin-9 (Gal-9) in allergic inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Gal-9 in asthma model guinea pigs. Airway resistance (R(aw)) was measured using a double-flow plethysmograph system. Gal-9 expression in the lung was assessed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Eosinophil chemotactic activity was evaluated in a chamber containing a polyvinylpyrolidone-free membrane. Cell apoptosis was analyzed on a flowcytometry with propidium iodide. In cloning guinea pig Gal-9 we identified three isoforms that differ only in the length of their linker peptides, just as with human Gal-9. Guinea pig Gal-9 was found to be a chemoattractant for eosinophils and to promote induction of apoptosis in sensitized but not non-sensitized T lymphocytes. In allergic airway hypersensitivity model, a low level of Gal-9 expression was observed in the nonsensitized/nonchallenged group, but upregulation was detected at 7 h after challenge and sustained up to 24 h. Such upregulation correlated with elevation of eosinophil peroxidase activity but not with increased R(aw). The present results provide evidence that Gal-9 is not involved in airway hypersensitivity, but is partly involved in prolonged eosinophil accumulation in the lung.

  11. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  12. [Inadequate management of a difficult airway. Case SENSAR of the trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A clinical case reported to SENSAR is presented (www.sensar.org). A patient came to the operating room for surgery for parathyroidectomy. She had several predictors of difficult airway management, including a story of difficulties in previous intubations in other hospitals, as the patient reported. Therefore, after evaluation in preoperative consultation, fibreoptic bronchoscopy intubation was recommended. The day of surgery after induction of general anesthesia direct laryngoscopy was performed, without recognizing any glottic structure (Cormack-Lehane grade iv). Conventional laryngoscope was changed to a videolaryngoscope (Airtraq(®)) to try to improve the laryngoscopic view, but there were difficulties with handling and insertion of it, causing minor injuries to the lingual mucosa. Finally, tracheal intubation was achieved after several attempts. Analysis of the incident revealed the active error due to lack of experience of the professional who performed intubation maneuvers, favored by latent factors or contributors as were the complex pathology of the patient and the absence of protocols to difficult airway management in the hospital. Communication and analysis of this incident served to highlight the importance of the security protocols in Anesthesia, and as a result a working group that conducted the current algorithm approach to a difficult airway management was formed, established guidelines for further information patient and deals since clinical training and professional practice for the management of airway devices availables in the hospital. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Teaching consultants airway management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargozian, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Airway management skills are integral to the practice of anaesthesiology and also to the practice of emergency medicine and allied health professions such as respiratory care, emergency medical technology, and emergency and critical care nursing. The basic information to be taught is the same but the level of detail will vary depending on the audience. The learning process usually involves progression from didactic lessons to skills training on inanimate models to supervised clinical practice. Modalities that may be used for skills training include cadavers, recently dead patients, videotapes, mannequins, simulators and virtual reality trainers. To maintain knowledge and skills, review and possible retraining should be conducted on an approximately annual basis.

  14. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  15. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsuddin, A. K. M.; Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidi...

  16. Postoperative Airway Emergency following Accidental Flexometallic Tube Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Habib MR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal intubation using flexometallic tubes are often required in anaesthesia practice for a variety of reasons. It is preferred in the head and neck region surgeries due to its relative resistance to kinking forces. At times, these patients postoperatively may need to be shifted to ICU or HDU without extubation for further stabilization/management and extubation after adequate recovery. We present an unusual accident where a new flexometallic endotracheal tube was permanently tapered, transected and migrated proximally due to patient’s bite on tube leading to airway emergency in post-operative recovery period.

  17. Airway management in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized children: comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Airway with the cuffed oropharyngeal airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaya, Biruta

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of the smallest size of the cuffed oropharyngeal airway (COPA) for school age, spontaneously breathing children was investigated and compared with the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Seventy children of school age (7-16 years) were divided into two groups: the COPA (n=35) and the LMA (n=35). Induction was with propofol i.v. or halothane, nitrous oxide, oxygen and fentanyl. After depression of laryngopharyngeal reflexes, a COPA size 8 cm or an LMA was inserted. Ventilation was manually assisted until spontaneous breathing was established. For maintenance, propofol i.v. and fentanyl or halothane with nitrous oxide were used. Local anaesthesia or peripheral blocks were also used. Both extratracheal airways had a highly successful insertion rate, but more positional manoeuvres to achieve a satisfactory airway were required with the COPA, 28.6% versus LMA 2.9%. The need to change the method of airway management was higher (8.6%) in the COPA group. After induction, the need for assisted ventilation was higher in the LMA group 54.3% versus 20% in the COPA group. Airway reaction to cuff inflation was higher in the LMA group 14.3% versus COPA 5.7%. Problems during surgery were similar, except continuous chin support to establish an effective airway was more frequent (11.4%) in the COPA group. In the postoperative period, blood on the device and incidence of sore throat were detected less in the COPA group. The COPA is a good extratracheal airway that provides new possibilities for airway management in school age children with an adequate and well sealed airway, during spontaneous breathing or during short-term assisted manual ventilation.

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonist and airway dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Mathias M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH, peripheral airway obstruction is frequent. This is partially attributed to the mediator dysbalance, particularly an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1, to increased pulmonary vascular and airway tonus and to local inflammation. Bosentan (ET-1 receptor antagonist improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise limitation, and disease severity in IPAH. We hypothesized that bosentan might affect airway obstruction. Methods In 32 IPAH-patients (19 female, WHO functional class II (n = 10, III (n = 22; (data presented as mean ± standard deviation pulmonary vascular resistance (11 ± 5 Wood units, lung function, 6 minute walk test (6-MWT; 364 ± 363.7 (range 179.0-627.0 m, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, sPAP, 79 ± 19 mmHg, and NT-proBNP serum levels (1427 ± 2162.7 (range 59.3-10342.0 ng/L were measured at baseline, after 3 and 12 months of oral bosentan (125 mg twice per day. Results and Discussion At baseline, maximal expiratory flow at 50 and 25% vital capacity were reduced to 65 ± 25 and 45 ± 24% predicted. Total lung capacity was 95.6 ± 12.5% predicted and residual volume was 109 ± 21.4% predicted. During 3 and 12 months of treatment, 6-MWT increased by 32 ± 19 and 53 ± 69 m, respectively; p Conclusion This study gives first evidence in IPAH, that during long-term bosentan, improvement of hemodynamics, functional parameters or serum biomarker occur independently from persisting peripheral airway obstruction.

  19. Associating Crash Avoidance Maneuvers with Driver Attributes and Accident Characteristics: A Mixed Logit Model Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    control maneuvers are considered: “no avoidance maneuvers”, “braking”, “steering”, “braking & steering”, and “other maneuvers”. The importance of avoidance maneuvers derives from the key role of responsible, proactive and state-aware road users within the concept of sustainable safety systems, as well......This study focuses on the propensity of drivers to engage in crash avoidance maneuvers in relation to driver attributes, critical events, crash characteristics, vehicles involved, road characteristics and environmental attributes. Five alternative actions involving emergency lateral and speed...... maneuvers, (iii) fatigue and distractions have a greater negative impact on the tendency to engage in crash avoidance maneuvers than alcohol consumption, (iv) difficult road conditions increase the propensity to perform crash avoidance maneuvers, (v) visual obstruction and artificial illumination have...

  20. Bronchology Treatment Of The Malignant Airway Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, R. et al

    2007-01-01

    Central airway stenosis is benign or malignant etiology. Multidiscplinary approach is useful in treatment central airway stenosis. In inoperable cases, interventional bronchology is good therapeutic alternative. We can use NdYAG laser, argon plasma coagulation, elektrocautery, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and stents for obstruction release. In malignant stenosis, we combine often methods of the interventional bronchology with brachytherapy, chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Maneuver optimization for collision avoidance of LEO objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G.

    Consideration of a maneuver might be warranted when a dangerous conjunction between a primary satellite and a secondary object is identified as part of the collision avoidance (COLA) process. Efficient yet accurate numerical solutions to the maneuver problem have been developed and are implemented in The Aerospace Corporation program DVOPT (DeltaV OPTimization) for objects in geosynchronous orbit. However, achieving an accurate solution for satellites in low Earth (LEO) orbits can be problematic. DVOPT utilizes a two-body backwards/forwards propagation technique to determine the effect a proposed burn has on the probability computation. For high altitude, near-circular orbits such as geosynchronous and semisynchronous (i.e., Global Positioning System), the two-body assumption produces sufficient accuracy. The current research determines the validity of the backwards-forwards two-body propagation and identifies the perturbations that are necessary for regimes other than GEO. It is found that LEO orbits experience a significant effect due to other perturbations, which can disrupt the two -body assumption producing an unacceptable reduction in the accuracy of the probability computation. Earth oblateness and drag influence LEOs. Improvement is made to the DVOPT method by allowing for higher order perturbations in the backwards-forwards propagation. An approximate method is utilized that captures the dominant perturbation characteristics without slowing the solution process significantly. The last point is crucial. During operations, determining viable burn solutions can be time critical. The development of the solution shows that the relative error due to the perturbations can be minimized thereby significantly widening the applicability of the maneuver optimization process to other orbit classes without causing a major increase in the s lutiono runtime.

  2. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  3. Effect of width and boundary conditions on meeting maneuvers on two-way separated cycle tracks

    OpenAIRE

    García García, Alfredo; Agustin Gomez, Fernando; Llorca Garcia, Carlos; Angel-Domenech, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cycle track design guidelines are rarely based on scientific studies. In the case of off-road two-way cycle tracks, a minimum width must facilitate both passing and meeting maneuvers, being meeting maneuvers the most frequent. This study developed a methodology to observe meeting maneuvers using an instrumented bicycle, equipped with video cameras, a GPS tracker, laser rangefinders and speed sensors. This bicycle collected data on six two-way cycle tracks ranging 13-2.15 m width delimitated b...

  4. Video laryngoscopes and the obstetric airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Brown, S; Russell, R

    2015-05-01

    The pitfalls surrounding securing the airway in the obstetric patient are well documented. From Tunstall's original failed intubation drill onwards, there has been progress both in recognition of the difficulties of airway management in the pregnant patient and development of algorithms to enhance patient safety. Current trends in obstetric anaesthesia have resulted in a significant decrease in exposure of anaesthetists, especially trainees, to caesarean section under general anaesthesia, compounding the difficulties in safely managing the airway. Video laryngoscopes have recently appeared in airway algorithms. They improve glottic visualisation and are useful in the management of the difficult non-obstetric airway, including those in morbidly obese patients and in the setting of a rapid-sequence induction. There is growing interest in the potential use of video laryngoscopes in the obstetric population and as a teaching tool to maximise training opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Space Shuttle OMS engine valve technology. [Orbital Maneuvering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.

    1974-01-01

    Valve technology program to determine shutoff valve concepts suitable for the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine of the Space Shuttle. The tradeoff studies selected the electric torque motor operated dual poppet and ball valves as the most desirable valve concepts for the OMS Engine Shutoff Valve. A prototype of one of these concepts was built and subjected to a design verification program. A number of unique features were designed to include the required contamination insensitivity, operating fluid compatibility, decontamination capability, minimum maintenance requirement and long service life capability.

  6. Improving aggregate behavior in parking lots with appropriate local maneuvers

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Samuel

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we study the ingress and egress of pedestrians and vehicles in a parking lot. We show how local maneuvers executed by agents permit them to create trajectories in constrained environments, and to resolve the deadlocks between them in mixed-flow scenarios. We utilize a roadmap-based approach which allows us to map complex environments and generate heuristic local paths that are feasible for both pedestrians and vehicles. Finally, we examine the effect that some agent-behavioral parameters have on parking lot ingress and egress. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Manned maneuvering unit - A space platform support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, C. E., Jr.; Lenda, J. A.; Josephson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    The assembly and evaluation of large space platforms in low earth orbit will become practical in the Shuttle era. Extravehicular crewmembers, equipped with manned maneuvering units (MMUs), will play a vital role in the construction and checkout of these platforms. The MMU is a propulsive backpack with mobility extending the crew's visual, mental, and manipulative capabilities beyond the cabin to on-the-spot assembly and maintenance operations. Previous MMU experience is reviewed, Shuttle MMU design features related to space platform support are described, and the use of the MMU for specific construction and assembly tasks is illustrated.

  8. [Laryngeal tube II : alternative airway for children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, R; Scheller, B; Peter, N; Rosskopf, W; Byhahn, C; Zacharowski, K; Meininger, D

    2011-06-01

    Difficult airway situations both expected and unexpected, present major challenges to every anesthesiologist, especially in pediatric anesthesia. However, the integration of extraglottic airway devices, such as the laryngeal mask, into the algorithm of difficult airways has improved the handling of difficult airway situations. A device for establishing a supraglottic airway, the laryngeal tube (LT), was introduced in 1999. The LT is an extraglottic airway designed to secure a patent airway during either spontaneous breathing or controlled ventilation. The design of the device has been revised several times and a further development is the LTS II/LTS-D, which provides an additional channel for the insertion of a gastric drain tube. This article reports on the successful use of the LTS II in 12 children aged from 2 days to 6 years when endotracheal intubation, alternative mask or laryngeal mask ventilation failed. Use of the LTS II was associated with a high level of success, securing the airway when other techniques had failed. The potential advantage of the LTS II over the standard LT is an additional suction port, which allows gastric tube placement and can be used as an indirect indicator of correct placement. With a modified insertion technique using an Esmarch manoeuvre, placement was simple and fast to perform. In emergency situations when direct laryngoscopy fails or is too time-consuming the LTS II tube is recommended as an alternative device to secure the airway. As with all extraglottic airway devices, familiarity and clinical experience with the respective device and the corresponding insertion technique are essential for safe and successful use, especially in emergency situations.

  9. Time-Accurate Calculations of Free-Flight Aerodynamics of Maneuvering Projectiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahu, Jubaraj

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a multidisciplinary computational study undertaken to model the flight trajectories and the free-flight aerodynamics of finned projectiles both with and without control maneuvers...

  10. Diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Evren

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. The Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers are used to diagnose BPPV. Objective: This study aims to investigate the diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers in BPPV. Methods: We performed Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in patients who admitted with peripheral vertigo anamnesis and met our criteria. The present study consists of 207 patients ranging in age from 16 to 70 (52.67 ± 10.67. We conducted the same maneuvers sequentially one more time in patients with negative results. We detected patients who had negative results in first maneuver and later developed symptom and nystagmus. We evaluated post-treatment success and patient satisfaction by performing Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI at first admittance and two weeks after treatment in all patients with BPPV. Results: Of a total of 207 patients, we diagnosed 139 in first maneuver. We diagnosed 28 more patients in sequentially performed maneuvers. The remaining 40 patients were referred to imaging. There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment DHI scores in patients with BPPV (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Performing the diagnostic maneuvers only one more time in vertigo patients in the first clinical evaluation increases the diagnosis success in BPPV. Canalith repositioning maneuvers are effective and satisfactory treatment methods in BPPV.

  11. Orbital Maneuvers Using Low Thrust to Place a Satellite in a Constellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Martins Gomes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of low thrust suboptimal maneuvers to insert a satellite in a constellation. It is assumed that a satellite constellation is given with all the Keplerian elements of the satellite members having known values. Then, it is necessary to maneuver a new satellite from a parking orbit to its position in the constellation. The control available to perform this maneuver is the application of a low thrust to the satellite and the objective is to perform this maneuver with minimum fuel consumption.

  12. State estimators for tracking sharply-maneuvering ground targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visina, Radu S.; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov; Willett, Peter

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an algorithm, based on the Interacting Multiple Model Estimator, that can be used to track the state of kinematic point targets, moving in two dimensions, that are capable of making sharp heading maneuvers over short periods of time, such as certain ground vehicles moving in an open field. The targets are capable of up to 60 °/s turn rates, while polar measurements are received at 1 Hz. We introduce the Non-Zero Mean, White Noise Turn-Rate IMM (IMM-WNTR) that consists of 3 modes based on a White Noise Turn Rate (WNTR) kinematic model that contains additive, white, Gaussian turn rate process noises. Two of the modes are considered maneuvering modes, and they have opposite (left/right), non-zero mean turn rate input noise. The need for non-zero mean turn rate process noise is explained, and Monte Carlo simulations compare this novel design to the traditional (single-mode) White Noise Acceleration Kalman Filter (WNA KF) and the two-mode White Noise Acceleration/Nearly-Coordinated Turn Rate IMM (IMM-CT). Results show that the IMM-WNTR filter achieves better accuracy and real-time consistency between expected error and actual error as compared to the (single-mode) WNA KF and the IMM-CT in all simulated scenarios, making it a very accurate state estimator for targets with sharp coordinated turn capability in 2D.

  13. A simplex method for the orbit determination of maneuvering satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, JianRong; Li, JunFeng; Wang, XiJing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, DanNa

    2018-02-01

    A simplex method of orbit determination (SMOD) is presented to solve the problem of orbit determination for maneuvering satellites subject to small and continuous thrust. The objective function is established as the sum of the nth powers of the observation errors based on global positioning satellite (GPS) data. The convergence behavior of the proposed method is analyzed using a range of initial orbital parameter errors and n values to ensure the rapid and accurate convergence of the SMOD. For an uncontrolled satellite, the orbit obtained by the SMOD provides a position error compared with GPS data that is commensurate with that obtained by the least squares technique. For low Earth orbit satellite control, the precision of the acceleration produced by a small pulse thrust is less than 0.1% compared with the calibrated value. The orbit obtained by the SMOD is also compared with weak GPS data for a geostationary Earth orbit satellite over several days. The results show that the position accuracy is within 12.0 m. The working efficiency of the electric propulsion is about 67% compared with the designed value. The analyses provide the guidance for subsequent satellite control. The method is suitable for orbit determination of maneuvering satellites subject to small and continuous thrust.

  14. How hummingbirds hum: Acoustic holography of hummingbirds during maneuvering flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Ben; Wijnings, Patrick; Ingersoll, Rivers; Chin, Diana; Scholte, Rick; Lentink, David

    2017-11-01

    Hummingbirds make a characteristic humming sound when they flap their wings. The physics and the biological significance of hummingbird aeroacoustics is still poorly understood. We used acoustic holography and high-speed cameras to determine the acoustic field of six hummingbirds while they either hovered stationary in front of a flower or maneuvered to track flower motion. We used a robotic flower that oscillated either laterally or longitudinally with a linear combination of 20 different frequencies between 0.2 and 20 Hz, a range that encompasses natural flower vibration frequencies in wind. We used high-speed marker tracking to dissect the transfer function between the moving flower, the head, and body of the bird. We also positioned four acoustic arrays equipped with 2176 microphones total above, below, and in front of the hummingbird. Acoustic data from the microphones were back-propagated to planes adjacent to the hummingbird to create the first real-time holograms of the pressure field a hummingbird generates in vivo. Integration of all this data offers insight into how hummingbirds modulate the acoustic field during hovering and maneuvering flight.

  15. Post-extubation airway obstruction. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro SÁNCHEZ-TABERNERO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: airway obstruction after extubation in any surgery is a critical event with low incidence, which may require reintubation or tracheostomy, which often otolaryngologist is required. Objective: To determine the prevalence of BVA and its causes through systematic literature review. Method: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane clinical trials, meta-analysis, reviews and case series and control over airway obstruction after extubation that requires reintubation in adults. Results: 6 studies and one clinical practice guidelines were selected. The most common cause of extubation failure is blocking the airway for various reasons (pharyngeal muscle weakness residual effect -often farmacologycal-, laryngospasm, vocal cord paralysis, edema of upper respiratory tract, cervical postoperative hematoma, foreign bodies or secretions. Most cases of re-intubation occurred within 2 hours after extubation. Conclusions: The most common cause of failure after general anesthesia extubation is blocking the airway generally caused by residual neuromuscular blocking effect. Airway obstruction risk increases in airway and head and neck surgery. Difficult intubation guidlines have improved performance and reduced adverse events and similar strategies must be implemented in extubation. The procedure extubation and reintubation should be documented. Working groups airway must be multidisciplinary and include specialists in otolaryngology.

  16. Color analysis of the human airway wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepa; McLennan, Geoffrey; Donnelley, Martin; Delsing, Angela; Suter, Melissa; Flaherty, Dawn; Zabner, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2002-04-01

    A bronchoscope can be used to examine the mucosal surface of the airways for abnormalities associated with a variety of lung diseases. The diagnosis of these abnormalities through the process of bronchoscopy is based, in part, on changes in airway wall color. Therefore it is important to characterize the normal color inside the airways. We propose a standardized method to calibrate the bronchoscopic imaging system and to tabulate the normal colors of the airway. Our imaging system consists of a Pentium PC and video frame grabber, coupled with a true color bronchoscope. The calibration procedure uses 24 standard color patches. Images of these color patches at three different distances (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) were acquired using the bronchoscope in a darkened room, to assess repeatability and sensitivity to illumination. The images from the bronchoscope are in a device-dependent Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color space, which was converted to a tri-stimulus image and then into a device-independent color space sRGB image by a fixed polynomial transformation. Images were acquired from five normal human volunteer subjects, two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and one normal heavy smoker subject. The hue and saturation values of regions within the normal airway were tabulated and these values were compared with the values obtained from regions within the airways of the CF patients and the normal heavy smoker. Repeated measurements of the same region in the airways showed no measurable change in hue or saturation.

  17. Nurses' Awareness about Principles of Airway Suctioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Airway suctioning is one of the most common interventions for patients with respiratory disorders and having adequate knowledge in implementing this technique is quite crucial for nurses. To assess the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning. This study was a cross-sectional study done on 85 staff nurses' in Vali-Asr hospital. Sampling was based on census data collection. A researcher made questionnaire was used for assessment of nurses' awareness about the principles of airway suctioning. The validity and reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.78) of the questionnaire have been examined and proved. The level of nurses' awareness about airway suctioning was measured based on the questionnaire that includes demographic and specialty information in the form of eight questions of 3-selection-item. The maximum and minimum score of knowledge ranged between 0-8. The data obtained was statistically analysed using SPSS software Version 16.0 and was analysed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient. The results reveal that the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning was average. There was a significant association between knowledge and gender of nurses (pprinciples of airway suctioning was more than men. The results indicate that nurses' awareness of airway suctioning technique was in an average state. Considering the importance of this technique and the effects this technique has on the patients' haemodynamic status, we recommend in-service courses.

  18. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  19. Altered airway responsiveness in adult sheep born prematurely: effects of allergen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snibson, Kenneth J; Bischof, Robert J; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; McMurtrie, Lachlan S; Cock, Megan; Harding, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of preterm birth per se on airway function in adult sheep. Preterm birth was induced at approximately 0.89 of term. At approximately 1 year of age the authors measured pulmonary resistance (RL) and airway responsiveness before and after house dust mite (HDM) challenge. Mature preterm sheep tended to have greater baseline RL than controls (P = .12): the smaller preterm sheep showed significantly greater RL than controls following bronchoconstrictor challenge. Preterm animals tended to have greater baseline total blood leukocyte count (P = .06). It was concluded that preterm sheep, especially with low postnatal growth, have greater airway responsiveness to bronchoconstrictor and higher baseline RL.

  20. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... pulse wave. We performed digital photoplethysmography during sleep at night in 94 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and 29 patients treated with nCPAP. Digital volume pulse waves were obtained independently of an investigator and were quantified using an algorithm for continuous.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p CPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p

  1. [Acute hemodynamic effects of upper airway obstruction in normal dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Lai, D K; Liu, C C

    1990-09-01

    Eight normal dogs were anesthetized to assess the effects of an upper airway obstruction (UAO) on arterial blood gases (ABG) and hemodynamic (HD) parameters. Each dog was fitted with an arterial line, a Swan-Ganz catheter and an endotracheal tube. The HD parameters including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, central venous pressure (CVP), cardiac index (CI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), left ventricle stroke work index (LVSWI) and right ventricle stroke work index (RVSWI), were monitored. The baseline ABG and HD parameters were taken prior to endotracheal tube clamping, and then checked at 0.3, 1.5, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 minutes. The clamp was subsequently removed to allow spontaneous breathing, and then another set of measurements were taken at 5, 15 and 30 minutes, respectively. The above procedures were then repeated a second time. The results showed that UAO can produce the following: (1) decreases in the CI, PaO2 and pH; (2) increases in the mean systemic and pulmonary arterial pressure, PCWP, SVRI, PVRI, LVSWI, RVSWI, and PaCO2; (3) significant and acute changes in PaO2 and pH, with the most significant changes occurring within 90 seconds after clamping and then reaching a plateau; and (4) repeated UAO increases in SVRI and PVRI. In conclusion, upper airway obstructions may possibly induce serious ABG and HD changes in humans, as it does in normal dogs.

  2. Decompression of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes due to mycobacterium tuberculosis causing severe airway obstruction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert P; Janson, Jacques T; le Roux, Pieter; Kling, Sharon; Andronikou, Savvas; Roussouw, Gawie J

    2015-04-01

    Large airway compression by enlarged tuberculosis (TB) lymph nodes results in life-threatening airway obstruction in a small proportion of children. The indications, safety, and efficacy of TB lymph node decompression are inadequately described. This study aims to describe the indications and efficacy of TB lymph node decompression in children with severe airway compression and investigate variables influencing outcome. A prospective cohort of children (aged 3 months to 13 years) with life-threatening airway obstruction resulting from TB lymph node compression of the large airways were enrolled. The site and degree of airway obstruction were assessed by bronchoscopy and chest computed tomography scan. Of the 250 children enrolled, 34% (n = 86) required transthoracic lymph node decompression, 29% as an urgent procedure and 71% (n = 63) after failing 1 month of antituberculosis treatment that included glucosteroids. Compression (less than 75%) of the bronchus intermedius (odds ratio 2.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.29 to 4.02) and left main bronchus (odds ratio 3.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.73 to 6.83) were the best predictors for lymph node decompression. Human immunodeficiency virus status, drug resistance, and malnutrition were not associated with decompression. Few complications (self-limiting, 8%) or treatment failures (2%) resulted from the decompression. There were no deaths. In one third of children with TB, severe airway obstruction caused by enlarged lymph nodes requires decompression. Transthoracic decompression can be safely performed with low complication, failure, and fatality rates. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Deficiency of RAMP1 attenuates antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Li

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lung, characterized by breathing difficulty during an attack following exposure to an environmental trigger. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a neuropeptide that may have a pathological role in asthma. The CGRP receptor is comprised of two components, which include the G-protein coupled receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1. RAMPs, including RAMP1, mediate ligand specificity in addition to aiding in the localization of receptors to the cell surface. Since there has been some controversy regarding the effect of CGRP on asthma, we sought to determine the effect of CGRP signaling ablation in an animal model of asthma. Using gene-targeting techniques, we generated mice deficient for RAMP1 by excising exon 3. After determining that these mice are viable and overtly normal, we sensitized the animals to ovalbumin prior to assessing airway resistance and inflammation after methacholine challenge. We found that mice lacking RAMP1 had reduced airway resistance and inflammation compared to wildtype animals. Additionally, we found that a 50% reduction of CLR, the G-protein receptor component of the CGRP receptor, also ameliorated airway resistance and inflammation in this model of allergic asthma. Interestingly, the loss of CLR from the smooth muscle cells did not alter the airway resistance, indicating that CGRP does not act directly on the smooth muscle cells to drive airway hyperresponsiveness. Together, these data indicate that signaling through RAMP1 and CLR plays a role in mediating asthma pathology. Since RAMP1 and CLR interact to form a receptor for CGRP, our data indicate that aberrant CGRP signaling, perhaps on lung endothelial and inflammatory cells, contributes to asthma pathophysiology. Finally, since RAMP-receptor interfaces are pharmacologically tractable, it may be possible to develop compounds targeting the RAMP1/CLR

  4. Lingual traction to facilitate fiber-optic intubation of difficult airways: a single-anesthesiologist randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Chen, Henian; Camporesi, Enrico M; Shah, Vimal V; Padhya, Tapan A; Mangar, Devanand

    2015-04-01

    Flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation is a valuable technique with demonstrated benefits in the management of difficult airways. Despite its popularity with anesthesia providers, the technique is not fail-safe and airway-related complications secondary to failed intubation attempts remain an important problem. We sought to determine the effect of incorporating lingual traction on the success rate of fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in patients with anticipated difficult airways. In this prospective, randomized, cohort study, we enrolled 91 adult patients with anticipated difficult airways scheduled for elective surgery to undergo fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided orotracheal intubation alone or with lingual traction by an individual anesthesiologist after induction of general anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade. A total of 78 patients were randomized: 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation with lingual traction group and 39 patients to the fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation alone group. The primary endpoint was the rate of successful first attempt intubations. The secondary outcome was sore throat grade on post-operative day 1. Fiber-optic intubation with lingual traction compared to fiber-optic intubation alone resulted in a higher success rate (92.3 vs. 74.4 %, χ (2) = 4.523, p = 0.033) and greater odds for successful first attempt intubation (OR 4.138, 95 % CI 1.041-16.444, p = 0.044). Sore throat severity on post-operative day 1 was not significantly different but trended towards worsening grades with lingual traction. In this study, lingual traction was shown to be a valuable maneuver for facilitating fiber-optic bronchoscope-guided intubation in the management of patients with anticipated difficult airways.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  6. Predictors of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, Louise L; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elite athletes frequently experience asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We aimed to investigate predictors of airway pathophysiology in a group of unselected elite summer-sport athletes, training for the summer 2008 Olympic Games, including markers of airway inflammation......, systemic inflammation, and training intensity. METHODS: Fifty-seven Danish elite summer-sport athletes with and without asthma symptoms all gave a blood sample for measurements of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF...

  7. Eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients is associated with an altered airway microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Kiilerich, Pia; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of eosinophilic airway inflammation correlates with variations in the microbiome across asthmatic patients, whereas neutrophilic airway inflammation does not. This warrants further investigation on molecular pathways involved in both patients with eosinophilic and those with noneosinophilic asthma.......BACKGROUND: Asthmatic patients have higher microbiome diversity and an altered composition, with more Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes compared with healthy control subjects. Studies comparing airway inflammation and the airway microbiome are sparse, especially in subjects not receiving anti......-inflammatory treatment. OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe the relationship between the airway microbiome and patterns of airway inflammation in steroid-free patients with asthma and healthy control subjects. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected from 23 steroid-free nonsmoking patients with asthma and 10...

  8. Airway Remodelling in Asthma: From Benchside to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Bergeron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling refers to the structural changes that occur in both large and small airways relevant to miscellaneous diseases including asthma. In asthma, airway structural changes include subepithelial fibrosis, increased smooth muscle mass, gland enlargement, neovascularization and epithelial alterations. Although controversial, airway remodelling is commonly attributed to an underlying chronic inflammatory process. These remodelling changes contribute to thickening of airway walls and, consequently, lead to airway narrowing, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, airway edema and mucous hypersecretion. Airway remodelling is associated with poor clinical outcomes among asthmatic patients. Early diagnosis and prevention of airway remodelling has the potential to decrease disease severity, improve control and prevent disease expression. The relationship between structural changes and clinical and functional abnormalities clearly deserves further investigation. The present review briefly describes the characteristic features of airway remodelling observed in asthma, its clinical consequences and relevance for physicians, and its modulation by therapeutic approaches used in the treatment of asthmatic patients.

  9. Host Defense and the Airway Epithelium: Frontline Responses That Protect against Bacterial Invasion and Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Eisele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against invading microbes, and they protect themselves through the production of carbohydrate and protein matrices concentrated with antimicrobial products. In addition, they act as sentinels, expressing pattern recognition receptors that become activated upon sensing bacterial products and stimulate downstream recruitment and activation of immune cells which clear invading microbes. Bacterial pathogens that successfully colonize the lungs must resist these mechanisms or inhibit their production, penetrate the epithelial barrier, and be prepared to resist a barrage of inflammation. Despite the enormous task at hand, relatively few virulence factors coordinate the battle with the epithelium while simultaneously providing resistance to inflammatory cells and causing injury to the lung. Here we review mechanisms whereby airway epithelial cells recognize pathogens and activate a program of antibacterial pathways to prevent colonization of the lung, along with a few examples of how bacteria disrupt these responses to cause pneumonia.

  10. Airway hyperresponsiveness in FVB/N delta F508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazett, Mark; Haston, Christina K

    2014-07-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness is a feature of clinical CF lung disease. In this study, we investigated whether the FVB/N ΔF508 CFTR mouse model has altered airway mechanics. Mechanics were measured in 12-14week old FVB/N Cftr(tm1Eur) (ΔF508) mice and wildtype littermates using the FlexiVent small animal ventilator. Lung disease was assayed by immunohistochemistry, histology and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. Cftr(tm1Eur) mice presented with increased airway resistance, compared to wildtype littermates, in response to methacholine challenge. No differences in bronchoalveolar cell number or differential, or in tissue lymphocyte, goblet cell or smooth muscle actin levels were evident in mice grouped by Cftr genotype. The bronchoalveolar lavage of Cftr(tm1Eur) mice included significantly increased levels of interleukin 12(p40) and CXCL1 compared to controls. We conclude that the pulmonary phenotype of Cftr(tm1Eur) mice includes airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of overt lung inflammation or airway remodeling. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Braking News: the Link between Crash Severity and Crash Avoidance Maneuvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the linkage between crash severity and crash avoidance maneuvers. Various emergency lateral and speed control maneuvers are considered in response to different critical events that made the crash imminent. Partial proportional odds models are estimated to accommodate the ord...

  12. Proof of concept: differential effects of Valsalva and straining maneuvers on the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasz, Helena; Kremser, Christian; Kofler, Markus; Kalchschmid, Elisabeth; Lechleitner, Monika; Rudisch, Ansgar

    2012-10-01

    To prove a basic physiological principle in healthy women, demonstrating different movement patterns of diaphragm, pelvic floor, and muscular wall surrounding the abdominal cavity during a Valsalva maneuver as opposed to a straining maneuver, by means of real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study was performed at Hochzirl Hospital, Austria and Department of Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Four healthy women underwent MRI measurements in a 1.5-T whole body MR-scanner. Coronal, sagittal, and axial slices were acquired simultaneously and a dynamic MRI sequence was used to assess cranio-caudal movements of the diaphragm and pelvic floor and of concomitant changes in anterolateral abdominal muscle thickness and abdominal diameter at the umbilical level. Both the Valsalva maneuver and the straining maneuver began with deep inspiration and downward movement of the diaphragm. During the exertion phase of both maneuvers, abdominal muscle thickness increased and abdominal diameter decreased. During the Valsalva maneuver, the pelvic floor moved cranially parallel to the diaphragm, whereas during the straining maneuver, the pelvic floor was markedly displaced caudally. The Valsalva maneuver reflects an expiratory pattern with diaphragm and pelvic floor elevation, whereas during straining the pelvic floor descends. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Real Estate and Interest Therein § 552.38 Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. (a... specific areas desired for use. (b) Real estate coverage. Real estate coverage will be in the form of agreements with landowners, granting the right to conduct maneuvers at a given time or periodically. Short...

  14. 33 CFR 83.34 - Maneuvering and warning signals (Rule 34).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES RULES Sound and Light Signals § 83.34 Maneuvering and warning signals... propulsion”. (2) Upon hearing the one or two blast signal of the other shall, if in agreement, sound the same... vessel doubts the safety of the proposed maneuver, she shall sound the danger signal specified in...

  15. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadder Korkmaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning procedures for treatment. METHODS: Data were obtained from the clinical records of 153 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Patients were treated by repositioning maneuvers. Demographic data and the factors including age, sex, canal type, duration of symptoms, comorbidities and number of repositioning maneuvers for relief were documented for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Age, sex, canal type and the duration of symptoms had no impact on the number of maneuvers. The most common comorbidity was spine problems. Hypertension was the only comorbidity that significantly associated with increased number of maneuvers. CONCLUSION: The presence of hypertension is a risk factor for repeated maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment. Physicians should be aware of the increased probability of repeated repositioning maneuvers in these group of patients. The role of comorbidities and vascular factors need to be further clarified in the course of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  16. The effects of betahistine in addition to epley maneuver in posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneri, Enis Alpin; Kustutan, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver on the quality of life of patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the canalithiasis type. Double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Academic university hospital. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. The first group was treated with Epley maneuver only. The second group received placebo drug 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver, and the third group received 24 mg betahistine 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver. The effectiveness of the treatments was assessed in each group as well as between them by analyzing and comparing data of 4 different vertigo symptom scales. Epley maneuver, alone or combined with betahistine or placebo, was found to be very effective with a primary success rate of 86.2%. The symptoms were significantly reduced in group 3 patients overall, and those patients younger or older than 50 years of age who had hypertension, with symptom onset <1 month, and with attack duration of less than a minute did significantly better with the combination of betahistine 48 mg daily. Betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver is more effective than Epley maneuver alone or combined with placebo with regard to improvement of symptoms in certain patients. However, future clinical studies covering more patients to investigate the benefit of medical treatments in addition to Epley maneuver are needed.

  17. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning procedures for treatment. Data were obtained from the clinical records of 153 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Patients were treated by repositioning maneuvers. Demographic data and the factors including age, sex, canal type, duration of symptoms, comorbidities and number of repositioning maneuvers for relief were documented for statistical analysis. Age, sex, canal type and the duration of symptoms had no impact on the number of maneuvers. The most common comorbidity was spine problems. Hypertension was the only comorbidity that significantly associated with increased number of maneuvers. The presence of hypertension is a risk factor for repeated maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment. Physicians should be aware of the increased probability of repeated repositioning maneuvers in these group of patients. The role of comorbidities and vascular factors need to be further clarified in the course of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Applying Dynamical Systems Theory to Optimize Libration Point Orbit Stationkeeping Maneuvers for WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan M.; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's WIND mission has been operating in a large amplitude Lissajous orbit in the vicinity of the interior libration point of the Sun-Earth/Moon system since 2004. Regular stationkeeping maneuvers are required to maintain the orbit due to the instability around the collinear libration points. Historically these stationkeeping maneuvers have been performed by applying an incremental change in velocity, or (delta)v along the spacecraft-Sun vector as projected into the ecliptic plane. Previous studies have shown that the magnitude of libration point stationkeeping maneuvers can be minimized by applying the (delta)v in the direction of the local stable manifold found using dynamical systems theory. This paper presents the analysis of this new maneuver strategy which shows that the magnitude of stationkeeping maneuvers can be decreased by 5 to 25 percent, depending on the location in the orbit where the maneuver is performed. The implementation of the optimized maneuver method into operations is discussed and results are presented for the first two optimized stationkeeping maneuvers executed by WIND.

  19. 46 CFR 35.20-40 - Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maneuvering characteristics-T/OC. 35.20-40 Section 35.20-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-40 Maneuvering characteristics—T/OC. For each ocean and coastwise tankship of 1,600 gross tons or...

  20. Levator co-activation is a significant confounder of pelvic organ descent on Valsalva maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornö, A K; Dietz, H P

    2007-09-01

    A Valsalva maneuver is used clinically and on imaging in order to determine female pelvic organ prolapse. We have examined the potential confounding effect of levator co-activation at the time of a Valsalva maneuver and the impact of repetition with biofeedback instruction. Fifty nulliparous women at 36-38 weeks' gestation received 3D/4D translabial ultrasound investigation in the dorsal resting position after bladder emptying. Valsalva maneuvers were recorded initially and after repeated attempts with visual biofeedback both during the maneuver and after, with the operator demonstrating findings on the ultrasound monitor, in order to abolish levator co-activation. Offline analysis was subsequently undertaken. Significant differences between first and optimal Valsalva maneuver were found for bladder neck position, bladder neck descent, hiatal sagittal diameter and hiatal area on Valsalva. In a minority of women (22/50) we observed a reduction in the sagittal hiatal diameter on first Valsalva maneuver, indicating levator co-activation. A reduction in sagittal diameter was seen in only 11/50 after instruction. Levator co-activation was associated with significantly lower bladder neck descent. The Valsalva maneuver is frequently accompanied by a pelvic floor muscle contraction. Levator co-activation may be a substantial confounder, reducing pelvic organ descent. Without repetition and digital, auditory or visual biofeedback, women may not perform a correct Valsalva maneuver. Biofeedback markedly reduces the likelihood of levator co-activation but does not abolish it completely. Copyright 2007 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cenk; Demirbilek, Nevzat; Elbistanlı, Mustafa Suphi; Köktürk, Füruzan; Çelik, Mustafa

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. The Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers are used to diagnose BPPV. This study aims to investigate the diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers in BPPV. We performed Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in patients who admitted with peripheral vertigo anamnesis and met our criteria. The present study consists of 207 patients ranging in age from 16 to 70 (52.67±10.67). We conducted the same maneuvers sequentially one more time in patients with negative results. We detected patients who had negative results in first maneuver and later developed symptom and nystagmus. We evaluated post-treatment success and patient satisfaction by performing Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) at first admittance and two weeks after treatment in all patients with BPPV. Of a total of 207 patients, we diagnosed 139 in first maneuver. We diagnosed 28 more patients in sequentially performed maneuvers. The remaining 40 patients were referred to imaging. There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment DHI scores in patients with BPPV (pvertigo patients in the first clinical evaluation increases the diagnosis success in BPPV. Canalith repositioning maneuvers are effective and satisfactory treatment methods in BPPV. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Closeup of STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Closeup of STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) nitrogen tetroxide gas leak was captured by a Cobra borescope and displayed on a video monitor. The borescope has a miniature videocamera at the end of a flexible rubber tube and is able to be maneuvered into other inaccessible locations.

  3. Airflow behavior changes in upper airway caused by different head and neck positions: Comparison by computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chen, Lian-Hua; Qi, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Min; Li, Shi-Tong

    2017-02-08

    The feasibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evaluate airflow characteristics in different head and neck positions has not been established. This study compared the changes in volume and airflow behavior of the upper airway by CFD simulation to predict the influence of anatomical and physiological airway changes due to different head-neck positions on mechanical ventilation. One awake volunteer with no risk of difficult airway underwent computed tomography in neutral position, extension position (both head and neck extended), and sniffing position (head extended and neck flexed). Three-dimensional airway models of the upper airway were reconstructed. The total volume (V) and narrowest area (A min ) of the airway models were measured. CFD simulation with an Spalart-Allmaras model was performed to characterize airflow behavior in neutral, extension, and sniffing positions of closed-mouth and open-mouth ventilation. The comparison result for V was neutral airway patency by increasing airway volume and decreasing airway resistance, suggesting that sniffing position may be the optimal choice for mask ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comprehensive airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Robert M; Losquadro, William D

    2008-11-01

    Airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma is complicated by injuries to routes of intubation, and the surgeon is frequently asked to secure the airway. Airway obstruction from hemorrhage, tissue prolapse, or edema may require emergent intervention for which multiple intubation techniques exist. Competing needs for both airway and surgical access create intraoperative conflicts during repair of maxillofacial fractures. Postoperatively, edema and maxillomandibular fixation place the patient at risk for further airway compromise.

  5. Critical Airway Team: A Retrospective Study of an Airway Response System in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, Emily C; Myer, Charles M; Oehler, Jennifer; Das, Bobby; Kerrey, Benjamin T

    2017-12-01

    Objective Study the performance of a pediatric critical airway response team. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Freestanding academic children's hospital. Subjects and Methods A structured review of the electronic medical record was conducted for all activations of the critical airway team. Characteristics of the activations and patients are reported using descriptive statistics. Activation of the critical airway team occurred 196 times in 46 months (March 2012 to December 2015); complete data were available for 162 activations (83%). For 49 activations (30%), patients had diagnoses associated with difficult intubation; 45 (28%) had a history of difficult laryngoscopy. Results Activation occurred at least 4 times per month on average (vs 3 per month for hospital-wide codes). The most common reasons for team activation were anticipated difficult intubation (45%) or failed intubation attempt (20%). For 79% of activations, the team performed an airway procedure, most commonly direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Bronchoscopy was performed in 47% of activations. Surgical airway rescue was attempted 4 times. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in 41 activations (25%). Twenty-nine patients died during or following team activation (18%), including 10 deaths associated with the critical airway event. Conclusion Critical airway team activation occurred at least once per week on average. Direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, and bronchoscopic procedures were performed frequently; surgical airway rescue was rare. Most patients had existing risk factors for difficult intubation. Given our rate of serious morbidity and mortality, primary prevention of critical airway events will be a focus of future efforts.

  6. Associating crash avoidance maneuvers with driver attributes and accident characteristics: a mixed logit model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    from the key role of proactive and state-aware road users within the concept of sustainable safety systems, as well as from the key role of effective corrective maneuvers in the success of automated in-vehicle warning and driver assistance systems. Methods: The analysis is conducted by means of a mixed......Objective: The current study focuses on the propensity of drivers to engage in crash avoidance maneuvers in relation to driver attributes, critical events, crash characteristics, vehicles involved, road characteristics, and environmental conditions. The importance of avoidance maneuvers derives......, (2) women and elderly have a relatively lower propensity to conduct crash avoidance maneuvers, (3) drowsiness and fatigue have a greater negative marginal effect on the tendency to engage in crash avoidance maneuvers than alcohol and drug consumption, (4) difficult road conditions increase...

  7. Time-optimal spacecraft attitude maneuver path planning under boundary and pointing constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changqing; Xu, Rui; Zhu, Shengying; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-08-01

    The rapid large angle attitude maneuver capability of spacecraft is required during many space missions. This paper addresses the challenge of time-optimal spacecraft attitude maneuver under boundary and pointing constraints. From the perspective of the optimal time, the constrained attitude maneuver problem is summarized as an optimum path-planning problem. To address this problem, a metaheuristic maneuver path planning method is proposed, Angular velocity-Time Coding Differential Evolution (ATDE). In the ATDE method, the angular velocity and time are coded for attitude maneuver modeling, which increases the number of variables and results in a high-dimensional problem. In order to deal with this problem, differential evolution is employed to perform variation and evolution. The boundary and pointing constraints are constructed into the fitness function for path evaluation. Finally, numerical simulations for the different cases were performed to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Efeito da obstrução de vias aéreas nas variações das propriedades resistivas e elásticas do sistema respiratório de asmáticos, mediadas pelo uso de salbutamol Effects of airway obstruction on albuterol-mediated variations in the resistive and elastic properties of the respiratory system of patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Veiga

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos da obstrução de vias aéreas nas variações das propriedades resistivas e elásticas do sistema respiratório de asmáticos adultos mediadas pelo uso de salbutamol. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 24 indivíduos controles e 69 asmáticos, todos não tabagistas, divididos em três grupos segundo o nível de obstrução de vias aéreas (leve, moderada e acentuada. Cada grupo foi dividido em dois subgrupos de acordo com a resposta broncodilatadora: resposta broncodilatadora positiva (RB+ ou negativa (RB-. A espirometria foi utilizada para a avaliação da obstrução, e a técnica de oscilações forçadas, para a análise das propriedades resistivas e elásticas, sendo realizadas antes e após a utilização de 300 µg de salbutamol. RESULTADOS: A resistência no intercepto (R0 apresentou maior redução nos grupos com maior obstrução. Essa redução foi mais evidente nos subgrupos RB+ do que nos RB- (p OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of airway obstruction on albuterol-mediated variations in the resistive and elastic properties of the respiratory system of adult patients with asthma. METHODS: This study comprised 24 healthy controls and 69 patients with asthma, all of whom were nonsmokers. The patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of airway obstruction (mild, moderate or severe. Each of the three groups was divided into two subgroups according to the bronchodilator response (BR: positive (BR+ or negative (BR-. Airway obstruction was determined by means of spirometry, and the resistive and elastic properties were determined by means of the forced oscillation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after albuterol use (300 µg. RESULTS: The resistance at the intercept (R0 presented greater reductions in the groups with higher obstruction. This reduction was more evident in the BR+ subgroups than in the BR- subgroups (p < 0.02 and p < 0.03, respectively. There was a

  9. Laryngeal mask airway insertion in children: comparison between rotational, lateral and standard technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Babita; Makkar, Jeetinder Kaur; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Wig, Jyotsna

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the success and ease of insertion of three techniques of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion; the standard Brain technique, a lateral technique with cuff partially inflated and a rotational technique with cuff partially inflated. One hundred and sixty-eight ASA I and II children aged 6 months to 6 years undergoing short elective surgical procedures lasting 40-60 min were included in the study. A standard anesthesia protocol was followed for all patients. Patients were randomly allocated into one of the three groups i.e. standard (S), rotational (R) and lateral (L). The primary outcome measure of the study was success rate at the first attempt using three techniques of LMA insertion. Secondary outcomes measures studied were overall success rate, time before successful LMA insertion, complications and maneuvers used to relieve airway obstruction. Successful insertion at the first attempt was significantly higher in group R (96%) compared with group L (84%) and group S (80%) (P = 0.03). Overall success rate (i.e. successful insertion with two attempts) was 100% for group R, 93% for group L and 87% for group S (P = 0.03). Time for successful insertion was significantly lower in group R compared with group L and S (P insertion and lowest incidence of complications and could be the technique of first choice for LMA insertion in pediatric patients.

  10. Upper airway obstruction in canine laryngeal paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; Smith, M M; Gaber, C E; Kurpershoek, C

    1986-05-01

    The type and the severity of airway obstruction in 30 dogs with bilateral laryngeal paralysis was assessed, using tidal breathing flow-volume loop (TBFVL) analysis. The dogs had clinical evidence of mild-to-severe upper airway obstruction (ie, respiratory distress, exercise intolerance, stridor). Seventeen dogs had TBFVL consistent with a nonfixed (inspiratory) obstruction, 10 had TBFVL indicative of a fixed (inspiratory/expiratory) obstruction, and 3 had normal TBFVL. Analysis of TBFVL confirmed that dogs with laryngeal paralysis have upper airway obstruction that differs in type and severity. Use of TBFVL provided a quantitative evaluation of airway obstruction and demonstrated the effects of bilateral laryngeal paralysis on the breathing patterns of dogs.

  11. Airway Tree Extraction with Locally Optimal Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Pedersen, Jesper Johannes Holst

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to extract the airway tree from CT images by continually extending the tree with locally optimal paths. This is in contrast to commonly used region growing based approaches that only search the space of the immediate neighbors. The result is a much more robust method...... for tree extraction that can overcome local occlusions. The cost function for obtaining the optimal paths takes into account of an airway probability map as well as measures of airway shape and orientation derived from multi-scale Hessian eigen analysis on the airway probability. Significant improvements...... were achieved compared to a region growing based method, with up to 36% longer trees at a slight increase of false positive rate....

  12. Helicopter Acoustic Flight Test with Altitude Variation and Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben; Stephenson, James; Smith, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A cooperative flight test campaign between NASA and the U.S. Army was performed from September 2014 to February 2015. The purposes of the testing were to: investigate the effects of altitude variation on noise generation, investigate the effects of gross weight variation on noise generation, establish the statistical variability in acoustic flight testing of helicopters, and characterize the effects of transient maneuvers on radiated noise for a medium-lift utility helicopter. This test was performed at three test sites (0, 4000, and 7000 feet above mean sea level) with two aircraft (AS350 SD1 and EH-60L) tested at each site. This report provides an overview of the test, documents the data acquired and describes the formats of the stored data.

  13. Three axis rotational maneuver and vibration stabilization of elastic spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1987-01-01

    A control law for three-axis rotational maneuvers of a spacecraft beam-tip body configuration based on non-linear inversion and modal velocity feedback is presented. A decoupling attitude control law is presented such that in the closed-loop system the attitude angles of the spacecraft are independently controlled, using the control moments acting on the space vehicle. This controller asymptotically decouples the flexible dynamics from the rigid one and also allows the decomposition of the elastic dynamics into two subsystems representing the transverse deflections of the beam in two orthogonal planes. These low-order subsystems are used for the derivation of a modal velocity feedback stabilizer using the force and moment actuators at the end body. Simulation results are presented to show the capability of the controller.

  14. Non-Toxic Orbital Maneuvering System Engine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher; Claflin, Scott; Maeding, Chris; Butas, John

    1999-01-01

    Recent results using the Aestus engine operated with LOx/ethanol propellant are presented. An experimental program at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power is underway to adapt this engine for the Boeing Reusable Space Systems Division non-toxic Orbital Maneuvering System/Reaction control System (OMS/RCS) system. Daimler-Chrysler Aerospace designed the Aestus as an nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) upper-stage engine for the Ariane 5. The non-toxic OMS/RCS system's preliminary design requires a LOx/ethanol (O2/C2H5OH) engine that operates with a mixture ratio of 1.8, a specific impulse of 323 seconds, and fits within the original OMS design envelope. This paper describes current efforts to meet these requirements including, investigating engine performance using LOx/ethanol, developing the en-ine system sizing package, and meeting the vehicle operation parameters. Data from hot-fire testing are also presented and discussed.

  15. Canalith repositioning in apogeotropic horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Do we need faster maneuvering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Minho; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kang, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Dasom; Lee, Sae-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Han

    2015-11-15

    A correct diagnosis and a proper treatment may yield a rapid and simple cure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Although the Gufoni maneuver is widely used to treat apogeotropic horizontal-canal BPPV (HC-BPPV), few studies have clarified the relationship between the speed and intensity of maneuver execution and successful canalith reposition. To evaluate the effect of accelerated execution of the Gufoni maneuver, a prospective randomized controlled study was conducted with HC-BPPV patients in a single dizziness clinic. The patients had been diagnosed with apogeotropic HC-BPPV and were undergoing treatment at the dizziness clinic of a tertiary university hospital from January 2013 to August 2014. Two groups were treated with the maneuver performed at different speeds and the resolution rate was compared. The accelerated maneuver group was subjected to faster position changing-within 1s-during the reposition maneuver, while the non-accelerated maneuver group underwent slower maneuvers. Therapeutic efficacy was defined as dizziness relief or resolution of nystagmus within 1h. Fifty patients with apogeotropic HC-BPPV were enrolled and treated with the Gufoni maneuver in two groups of 25 patients. The overall resolution rate was 48% (24 of 50; p=1.00), regardless of acceleration. Our results suggest that a faster, more intense execution of the Gufoni maneuver provides little benefit in treating apogeotropic HC-BPPV. Detachment of the otolith from the cupula or the gravitational force-when the otolith is in the anterior arm of the HC-may be more important contributors to treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Deep Inspiration Maneuver for Difficult Transseptal Puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Tolga; Guler, Tumer Erdem; Yalin, Kivanc; Golcuk, Sukriye Ebru; Ozcan, Kazim Serhan; Guler, Niyazi

    2017-02-01

    Transseptal puncture (TSP) may not be possible in cases of an elastic, aneurysmal, or thickened interatrial septum (IAS). During deep inspiration (DI), the chest wall expands and the diaphragm descends. This makes intrapleural pressure to become more negative, which leads to movement of the IAS to the right side. The aim of this study was to verify prospectively the feasibility, safety, and outcome of DI associated with conventional TSP technique in patients with challenging IAS anatomy. From September 2012 to May 2016, 224 patients underwent TSP due to different indications. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 213 patients in whom the left atrium was successfully accessed in 3 attempts were grouped as conventional TSP group and 11 patients in whom left atrium access was failed after 3 conventional attempts were grouped as DI-TSP group. Conventional TSP was successful in 89.6% of patients with the first attempt. Second and third attempts were required in 4.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Septal puncture was achieved at the first attempt in 10 patients within a median of 1 second of DI maneuver (interquartile range, 1 to 3) and without any complications. Challenging IAS anatomy consisting of IAS aneurysm, a thick IAS, and an excessively mobile IAS were more frequent in the DI-TSP group (45% to 8%, 27% to 3%, and 21% to 5%, respectively, p <0.001). In conclusion, TSP by using the DI maneuver may be a reliable and safe method after failed conventional attempts. If there is any doubt about the correct location of the needle, additional imaging modalities have to be used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Impending Airway Compromise due to Cystic Hygroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Shavit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 3-month-old infant, who arrived in the pediatric emergency department (ED with a cervical cystic hygroma causing an impending compromise of the airway. We recognize that such a lesion can rapidly progress, and the judicious use of imaging in the ED may help to avoid airway compromise and possibly fatal complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:368–369.

  19. Airways obstruction, coal mining, and disability.

    OpenAIRE

    Lapp, N L; Morgan, W K; Zaldivar, G

    1994-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the inhalation of coal in the absence of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) or smoking can lead to disabling airways obstruction. The cause of such obstruction has been variously attributed to emphysema or bronchitis. The frequency of significant airways obstruction in a group of United States coal miners seeking compensation for occupationally induced pulmonary impairment was therefore determined. In a sample of 611 "Black Lung" claimants there...

  20. Airway Management in Athletes Wearing Lacrosse Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Boergers, Richard J; Lininger, Monica R

    2018-03-01

      Patient ventilation volume and rate have been found to be compromised due to the inability to seal a pocket mask over the chinstrap of football helmets. The effects of supraglottic airway devices such as the King LT and of lacrosse helmets on these measures have not been studied.   To assess the effects of different airway management devices and helmet conditions on producing quality ventilations while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on simulation manikins.   Crossover study.   Simulation laboratory.   Thirty-six athletic trainers (12 men, 24 women) completed this study.   Airway-management device (pocket mask, oral pharyngeal airway, King LT airway [KA]) and helmet condition (no helmet, Cascade helmet, Schutt helmet, Warrior helmet) served as the independent variables. Participant pairs performed 2 minutes of 2-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation under 12 trial conditions.   Ventilation volume (mL), ventilation rate (ventilations/min), rating of perceived difficulty (RPD), and percentage of quality ventilations were the dependent variables.   A significant interaction was found between type of airway-management device and helmet condition on ventilation volume and rate ( F 12,408 = 2.902, P < .0001). In addition, a significant interaction was noted between airway-management device and helmet condition on RPD scores ( F 6,204 = 3.366, P = .003). The no-helmet condition produced a higher percentage of quality ventilations compared with the helmet conditions ( P ≤ .003). Also, the percentage of quality ventilations differed, and the KA outperformed each of the other devices ( P ≤ .029).   The helmet chinstrap inhibited quality ventilation (rate and volume) in airway procedures that required the mask to be sealed on the face. However, the KA allowed quality ventilation in patients wearing a helmet with the chinstrap fastened. If a KA is not available, the helmet may need to be removed to provide quality ventilations.

  1. The effect of rapid maxillary expansion on pharyngeal airway pressure during inspiration evaluated using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomonori; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Inada, Emi; Sato, Hideo; Suga, Hokuto; Saitoh, Issei; Kakuno, Eriko; Kanomi, Ryuzo; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2014-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is an effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with maxillary constriction. Nonetheless, the effect of RME on pharyngeal airway pressure during inspiration is not clear. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate changes induced by the RME in ventilation conditions using computational fluid dynamics. Twenty-five subjects (14 boys, 11 girls; mean age 9.7 years) who required RME had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after the RME. The CBCT data were used to reconstruct 3-dimensional shapes of nasal and pharyngeal airways. Measurement of airflow pressure was simulated using computational fluid dynamics for calculating nasal resistance during exhalation. This value was used to assess maximal negative pressure in the pharyngeal airway during inspiration. Nasal resistance after RME, 0.137 Pa/(cm(3)/s), was significantly lower than that before RME, 0.496 Pa/(cm(3)/s), and the maximal negative pressure in the pharyngeal airway during inspiration was smaller after RME (-48.66 Pa) than before (-124.96 Pa). Pharyngeal airway pressure during inspiration is decreased with the reduction of nasal resistance by the RME. This mechanism may contribute to the alleviation of OSAS in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Y. Kao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2 Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations.

  3. Glutamate receptors and the airways hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapkova, Anna; Antosova, Martina

    2012-03-01

    It is proposed the link between the hyperactivity of NMDA receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness. We investigated the effect of agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs. The airways hyperreactivity was influenced by the agonist (NMDA) and selective antagonist - competitive (AP-5) and non-competitive (MK-801) of NMDA receptors. Airway responsiveness to histamine or acetylcholine was evaluated in in vitro conditions. NMDA administration caused the increase of tracheal smooth muscle response in ovalbumin-induced hyperreactivity to acetylcholine. MK 801 as well as AP-5 provoked the decrease of reactivity mainly to acetylcholine in tracheal smooth muscle, while the former, non-competitive antagonist was more effective. We recorded more pronounced response in tracheal than in lung tissue smooth muscle with more considerable response to acetylcholine than to histamine. The results of experiments show the modification of airway smooth muscles responses by agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors. They confirm the possibility of NMDA receptors participation in experimental airway hyperreactivity. The results enlarge information regarding the link of the inflammatory diseases and glutamatergic system.

  4. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berraies A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anissa Berraies, Kamel Hamzaoui, Agnes HamzaouiPediatric Respiratory Diseases Department, Abderrahmen Mami Hospital, Ariana, and Research Unit 12SP15 Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, TunisiaAbstract: In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma.Keywords: vitamin D, asthma, airway remodeling, airway smooth muscle, supplementation

  5. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  6. Airway foreign body in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina GONZÁLEZ-HERRERO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aspiration of a foreign body in children is a frequent emergency in pediatrics, being potentially lethal. Method: Narrative review. Results: This pathology mainly affects children under 5 years of age with a peak of incidence between the first and third years of life. The clinic will depend on the type of foreign body (size, shape, possibility of breaking, organic or not, the age of the child and the location of the object. In our environment, the most frequent is the aspiration of nuts (peanuts and sunflower seeds. After the initial picture, an asymptomatic period tends to occur, which favors delayed diagnosis and leads to possible errors in the diagnosis. Discussion: An adequate clinical history and a high diagnostic suspicion are fundamental to favor an early treatment. The presence of a normal chest X-ray does not exclude the presence of a foreign body in the airway, so a bronchoscopy is indicated if the diagnostic suspicion is high. The treatment of choice is extraction by rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of flexible fibrobronchoscope. Conclusions: Conclusions: The aspiration of a foreign body is a pediatric emergency that requires a diagnosis and early treatment. The highest incidence occurs in children under 3 years and more frequently in men. The most commonly aspirated material in our environment are nuts, mainly located in the bronchial tree. The initial episode may go unnoticed, delaying the diagnosis and may lead to progressive respiratory distress in the child. A detailed clinical history and suspicion of this pathology are essential in children at risk age who present with cough and dyspnea of sudden onset. The existence of a normal chest radiograph should not postpone bronchoscopy when there is high clinical suspicion. The treatment of choice for the extraction of foreign bodies in airways in children is rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of the flexible fibrobronchoscope

  7. Capnographic Parameters in Ventilated Patients: Correspondence with Airway and Lung Tissue Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Zsofia; Petak, Ferenc; Nevery, Kitti; Tolnai, Jozsef; Balogh, Adam L; Rarosi, Ferenc; Fodor, Gergely H; Babik, Barna

    2016-05-01

    Although the mechanical status of the lungs affects the shape of the capnogram, the relations between the capnographic parameters and those reflecting the airway and lung tissue mechanics have not been established in mechanically ventilated patients. We, therefore, set out to characterize how the mechanical properties of the airways and lung tissues modify the indices obtained from the different phases of the time and volumetric capnograms and how the lung mechanical changes are reflected in the altered capnographic parameters after a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated patients (n = 101) undergoing heart surgery were studied in a prospective consecutive cross-sectional study under the open-chest condition before and 5 minutes after CPB. Forced oscillation technique was applied to measure airway resistance (Raw), tissue damping (G), and elastance (H). Time and volumetric capnography were performed to assess parameters reflecting the phase II (SII) and phase III slopes (SIII), their transition (D2min), the dead-space indices according to Fowler, Bohr, and Enghoff and the intrapulmonary shunt. Before CPB, SII and D2min exhibited the closest (P = 0.006) associations with H (0.65 and -0.57; P elastic recoil, whereas the effect of airway patency on SIII dominates over the lung tissue stiffness. However, severe deterioration in lung resistance or elastance affects both capnogram slopes.

  8. Nutrient availability as a mechanism for selection of antibiotic tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the CF airway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Hoffman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are subjected to selective pressures during chronic infections of host tissues. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with inactivating mutations in the transcriptional regulator LasR are frequently selected within the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF, and infection with these isolates has been associated with poorer lung function outcomes. The mechanisms underlying selection for lasR mutation are unknown but have been postulated to involve the abundance of specific nutrients within CF airway secretions. We characterized lasR mutant P. aeruginosa strains and isolates to identify conditions found in CF airways that select for growth of lasR mutants. Relative to wild-type P. aeruginosa, lasR mutants exhibited a dramatic metabolic shift, including decreased oxygen consumption and increased nitrate utilization, that is predicted to confer increased fitness within the nutrient conditions known to occur in CF airways. This metabolic shift exhibited by lasR mutants conferred resistance to two antibiotics used frequently in CF care, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, even under oxygen-dependent growth conditions, yet selection for these mutants in vitro did not require preceding antibiotic exposure. The selection for loss of LasR function in vivo, and the associated adverse clinical impact, could be due to increased bacterial growth in the oxygen-poor and nitrate-rich CF airway, and from the resulting resistance to therapeutic antibiotics. The metabolic similarities among diverse chronic infection-adapted bacteria suggest a common mode of adaptation and antibiotic resistance during chronic infection that is primarily driven by bacterial metabolic shifts in response to nutrient availability within host tissues.

  9. Intubations and airway management: An overview of Hassles through third millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alanazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The placement of a tube into a patient′s trachea "the intubation" as we call is not as simple as it looks. It is a very tricky and tedious maneuver that entails skills to assess and perform. Nevertheless, often this is left to the chores of inefficient hands due to a paucity of the availability of experts. They seldom are able to complete the task and often wind up calling the attention of the unit. The present review is an attempt to describe the need to undertake intubation, the procedures and techniques, the complications, including morbidity and mortality and airway management. This overview includes explicit descriptions of the difficult airway which represents multifaceted interface amid patient factors, clinical setting, and skills of the practitioner. Materials and Methods: To accomplish the target, peer-reviewed English language articles published during third millennium up to 2013 were selected from Pub Med, Pub Med Central, Science Direct, Up-to-date, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library, and the Internet (Google, Yahoo. Review of Literature: The review constituted a systematic search of literature on the requirements that necessitate the practice of intubation, different techniques that facilitate easy conduct of procedure, the complications, including, morbidity and mortality, and the airway management. Conclusion: Recording every single detail has been beyond the scope of this review, however; some aspects have been wrapped up in nutshell. Some areas of the review are too basic which the medics are well aware of and knowledgeable. Nevertheless, these are difficult to be dispensed with in consideration of their source to the awareness of a common man and a great majority of the patients.

  10. A comparison of videolaryngoscopes for tracheal intubation in predicted difficult airway: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Maria; Pastore, Antonio; Aloj, Fulvio; Laffey, John G; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2017-02-20

    Videolaryngoscopy has become increasingly attractive for the routine management of the difficult airway. Glidescope® is well studied in the literature while imago V-Blade® is a recent videolaryngoscope. This is a feasibility study with 1:1 case-control sequential allocation comparing Imago V-Blade ® and Glidescope® in predicted difficult airway settings. Two senior anesthesiologists with no clinical experience in video assisted intubation but previously trained in a simulated scenario, performed the endotracheal intubations with Imago V-Blade® and Glidescope®. A third experienced anesthesiologist supervised the procedures. Forty-two patients, 21 for each group, with the presence of predicted difficult airway according to the Italian guideline were included. The primary end point is the feasibility of intubation. The secondary end-points are the success to intubate in the first attempt, the intubation time, the Cormack and Lehane score view, the comparison of the intubation difficulty scale (IDS) score and the need for maneuvers to aid the endotracheal intubation comparing Imago V-Blade® and Glidescope®. The intubation was achieved in 100% of cases in both groups. No differences were found in the first-attempt success rate (p = 0.383), intubation time (p = 0.280), Cormack and Lehane score view (p = 0.799) and IDS score (p = 0.252). Statistical differences were found in external laryngeal pressure (p = 0.005), advancement of the blade (p = 0.024) and use of increasing lifting force (p = 0.048). This feasibility study showed that the intubation with the newly introduced Imago V-Blade® is feasible. Further randomized and/or non-inferiority trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of Imago V-Blade® in this procedure. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02897518 . Retrospectively registered 25 August 2016.

  11. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan, E-mail: yuan.xu@ki.se; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  12. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuan; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B 2 receptor agonist) and des-Arg 9 -bradykinin- (selective B 1 receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE 2 . The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg 9 -bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B 2 receptors, but not those on B 1 . Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in some patients with asthma

  13. Mechanical interactions between adjacent airways in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Bates, Jason H T

    2014-03-15

    The forces of mechanical interdependence between the airways and the parenchyma in the lung are powerful modulators of airways responsiveness. Little is known, however, about the extent to which adjacent airways affect each other's ability to narrow due to distortional forces generated within the intervening parenchyma. We developed a two-dimensional computational model of two airways embedded in parenchyma. The parenchyma itself was modeled in three ways: 1) as a network of hexagonally arranged springs, 2) as a network of triangularly arranged springs, and 3) as an elastic continuum. In all cases, we determined how the narrowing of one airway was affected when the other airway was relaxed vs. when it narrowed to the same extent as the first airway. For the continuum and triangular network models, interactions between airways were negligible unless the airways lay within about two relaxed diameters of each other, but even at this distance the interactions were small. By contrast, the hexagonal spring network model predicted that airway-airway interactions mediated by the parenchyma can be substantial for any degree of airway separation at intermediate values of airway contraction forces. Evidence to date suggests that the parenchyma may be better represented by the continuum model, which suggests that the parenchyma does not mediate significant interactions between narrowing airways.

  14. SIMPLE, TIMELY, SAFELY? LARYNGEAL MASK AND PEDIATRIC AIRWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karišik, Marijana

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was a useful, powerful airway management device for routine pediatric airway management, pediatric difficult airway, and in pediatric emergency situations. Over years, various designs, induction and insertion techniques have been described. LMA provides ease of placement and removal as compared with endotracheal intubation, less traumatism for the respiratory tract, better tolerability by patients, improved hemodynamic stability during emergency, less coughing, less sore throat, avoidance of laryngoscopy, and hands free airway. On the other hand, LMA is not suitable to overcome functional airway problems and mechanical airway obstruction in children. Simple airway management in pediatric patients is normally easy in experienced hands, for anesthesiologists working in specialized hospitals with appropriate personnel and equipment that guarantee optimal safety in these patients. On the other hand, pediatric airway management is a great challenge for anesthesiologists working in departments with a small number of pediatric surgical procedures. Careful preoperative evaluation, preparation and training in the recognition of challenges in pediatric airway are essential for the management of the airway in children. LMA plays a special role in the management of difficult pediatric airway; as a supraglottic airway device, it is incorporated into difficult pediatric airway algorithms.

  15. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  16. Lower airway papillomatosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzka-Głos, Lidia; Jakubowska, Anna; Chmielik, Mieczysław; Bielicka, Anna; Brzewski, Michał

    2003-10-01

    Laryngeal papilloma in children is a frequent disease caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 or type 11. This disease has a tendency to recur and the changes are histologically benign. In some cases papilloma may affect the lower levels of the respiratory tract. In this study, among 90 patients treated for laryngeal papillomatosis, in four children papilloma of trachea, bronchi and lung tissue were detected in endoscopic and radiological examination. This constitutes 4.4% of all patients. Compact nodules and acquired cysts between 5 and 50 mm long were found in chest X-rays and in computerised tomography. These cysts appeared from 4 to 8 years after establishing a diagnosis of laryngeal papilloma, and 1 year after recognising papilloma in the trachea. In all four children the presence of nodules and cysts in the lungs was preceded by recurrent pneumonia, emphysema or atelectasis of the lungs. All children with laryngeal papillomatosis should have a chest X-ray. Detection of acquired cyst-like changes in lung tissue in children with laryngeal papillomatosis is a warning of future papilloma in the trachea and bronchi, with involvement of lung tissue. In differential diagnosis of these changes in the lungs we should take into consideration the presence of papilloma in the bronchi. A prognosis of papillomatosis in the lower airways in children is always serious.

  17. Automatic airway-artery analysis on lung CT to quantify airway wall thickening and bronchiectasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening are commonly assessed in computed tomography (CT) by comparing the airway size with the size of the accompanying artery. Thus, in order to automate the quantification of bronchiectasis and wall thickening following a similar principle, there is a...

  18. SLOWLY ADAPTING SENSORY UNITS HAVE MORE RECEPTORS IN LARGE AIRWAYS THAN IN SMALL AIRWAYS IN RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na+/K+-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi vs small (bronchioles 0.05. However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6±0.6 vs 3.6±0.3; P<0.0001. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities.

  19. Extracellular matrix in airway smooth muscle is associated with dynamics of airway function in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yick, C. Y.; Ferreira, D. S.; Annoni, R.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Kunst, P. W.; Bel, E. H.; Lutter, R.; Mauad, T.; Sterk, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Altered deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer as observed in asthma may influence ASM mechanical properties. We hypothesized that ECM in ASM is associated with airway function in asthma. First, we investigated the difference in ECM expression in

  20. IMAGE-BASED IN VIVO QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN AIRWAY OPENING AND CONTRACTILITY BY FIBER OPTICAL NASOPHARYNGOSCOPY IN HEALTHY AND ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINHONG DENG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of human airway lumen opening is important in diagnosing and understanding the mechanisms of airway dysfunctions such as the excessive airway narrowing in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Although there are indirect methods to evaluate the airway calibre, direct in vivo measurement of the airway calibre has not been commonly available. With recent advent of the flexible fiber optical nasopharyngoscope with video recording it has become possible to directly visualize the passages of upper and lower airways. However, quantitative analysis of the recorded video images has been technically challenging. Here, we describe an automatic image processing and analysis method that allows for batch analysis of the images recorded during the endoscopic procedure, thus facilitates image-based quantification of the airway opening. Video images of the airway lumen of volunteer subject were acquired using a fiber optical nasopharyngoscope, and subsequently processed using Gaussian smoothing filter, threshold segmentation, differentiation, and Canny image edge detection, respectively. Thus the area of the open airway lumen was identified and computed using a predetermined converter of the image scale to true dimension of the imaged object. With this method we measured the opening/narrowing of the glottis during tidal breathing with or without making "Hee" sound or cough. We also used this method to measure the opening/narrowing of the primary bronchus of either healthy or asthmatic subjects in response to histamine and/or albuterol treatment, which also provided an indicator of the airway contractility. Our results demonstrate that the image-based method accurately quantified the area change waveform of either the glottis or the bronchus as observed by using the optical nasopharygoscope. Importantly, the opening/narrowing of the airway lumen generally correlated with the airflow and resistance of the airways, and could

  1. Laryngotracheal anomalies and airway fluoroscopy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaiah, Amal; Pereira, Kevin D

    2017-06-01

    The role of airway fluoroscopy in the diagnosis of laryngotracheal anomalies in infants is controversial. We aimed to (i) compare airway fluoroscopic characteristics with endoscopic findings in infants presenting for evaluation of upper airway obstruction and (ii) assess the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) status for airway fluoroscopy as an initial diagnostic test in suspected laryngotracheal anomalies. We performed a retrospective review of children who underwent fluoroscopy and endoscopic evaluation of the airway in the operating room for suspected laryngotracheal anatomic abnormalities. Thirty-four infants who underwent both procedures at a tertiary level university-based children's hospital from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2013 were included. Infants with suspected foreign bodies or an existing tracheostomy were excluded. Intraoperative findings from endoscopy and radiologic interpretation from fluoroscopy were compared using standard tools for validation of a diagnostic test. These metrics were compared with historic data that suggested good correlation between radiologic and endoscopic findings in older children. The median age was 3.6 months (range 1-8 months). The sensitivity of airway fluoroscopy for determining laryngotracheal pathology was 18%. Specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 83%, 67% and 35%, respectively. Although each fluoroscopic exposure was optimized for pediatric patients, the median cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation was 19 mR (range 10-34 mR). Airway fluoroscopy yields metrics that are overall poor to be considered a valid and accurate universal radiologic diagnostic test in infants evaluated for laryngotracheal pathology. The cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation from use of a fluoroscope cannot be justified by the sensitivity of the test and may not conform to ALARA standards for imaging in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetics of upper and lower airway diseases in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, V; Tessier, C; Marti, E

    2015-07-01

    Genetic predispositions for guttural pouch tympany, recurrent laryngeal neuropathy and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) are well documented. There is also evidence that exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage and infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in horses have a genetic component. The clinical expression of equine respiratory diseases with a genetic basis results from complex interactions between the environment and the genetic make-up of each individual horse. The genetic effects are likely to be due to variations in several genes, i.e. they are polygenic. It is therefore unlikely that single gene tests will be diagnostically useful in these disorders. Genetic profiling panels, combining several genetic factors with an assessment of environmental risk factors, may have greater value, but much work is still needed to uncover diagnostically useful genetic markers or even causative variants for equine respiratory diseases. Nonetheless, chromosomal regions associated with guttural pouch tympany, recurrent laryngeal neuropathy and RAO have been identified. The association of RAO with other hypersensitivities and with resistance to intestinal parasites requires further study. This review aims to provide an overview of the available data and current thoughts on the genetics of equine airway diseases. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  3. Percutaneous Transtracheal Jet Ventilation with Various Upper Airway Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Doi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A “cannot-ventilate, cannot-intubate” situation is critical. In difficult airway management, transtracheal jet ventilation (TTJV has been recommended as an invasive procedure, but specialized equipment is required. However, the influence of upper airway resistance (UAR during TTJV has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to compare TTJV using a manual jet ventilator (MJV and the oxygen flush device of the anesthetic machine (AM. We made a model lung offering variable UAR by adjustment of tracheal tube size that can ventilate through a 14-G cannula. We measured side flow due to the Venturi effect during TTJV, inspired tidal volume (TVi, and expiratory time under various inspiratory times. No Venturi effect was detected during TTJV with either device. With the MJV, TVi tended to increase in proportion to UAR. With AM, significant variations in TVi was not detected with changes in any UAR. In conclusion, UAR influenced forward flow of TTJV in the model lung. The influence of choked flow from the Venturi effect was minimal under all UAR settings with the MJV, but the AM could not deliver sufficient flow.

  4. Statistical study of overvoltages by maneuvering in switches in high voltage using EMTP-RV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Herrera, Diego Armando

    2013-01-01

    The transient overvoltages produced by maneuvering of switches are studied in a statistical way and through a variation the sequential closing times of switches in networks larger than 230 kV. This study is performed according to time delays and typical deviation ranges, using the tool EMTP- RV (ElectroMagnetic Trasient Program Restructured Version). A conceptual framework related with the electromagnetic transients by maneuver is developed in triphasic switches installed in nominal voltages higher than 230 kV. The methodology established for the execution of statistical studies of overvoltages by switch maneuver is reviewed and evaluated by simulating two fictitious cases in EMTP-RV [es

  5. Effects of automobile steering characteristics on driver/vehicle system performance in discrete maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R. H.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1975-01-01

    A series of discrete maneuver tasks were used to evaluate the effects of steering gain and directional mode dynamic parameters on driver/vehicle responses. The importance and ranking of these parameters were evaluated through changes in subjective driver ratings and performance measures obtained from transient maneuvers such as a double lane change, an emergency lane change, and an unexpected obstacle. The unexpected obstacle maneuver proved more sensitive to individual driver differences than to vehicle differences. Results were based on full scale tests with an experienced test driver evaluating many different dynamic configurations plus seventeen ordinary drivers evaluating six key configurations.

  6. A Greedy Search Algorithm for Maneuver-Based Motion Planning of Agile Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Neas, Charles Bennett

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents a greedy search algorithm for maneuver-based motion planning of agile vehicles. In maneuver-based motion planning, vehicle maneuvers are solved offline and saved in a library to be used during motion planning. From this library, a tree of possible vehicle states can be generated through the search space. A depth-first, library-based algorithm called AD-Lib is developed and used to quickly provide feasible trajectories along the tree. AD-Lib combines greedy search tech...

  7. Optical coherence tomography of the newborn airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, James M; Su, Jianping; Wright, Ryan; Guo, Shuguang; Kim, David C; Barretto, Roberto; Ahuja, Gurpreet; Sepehr, Ali; Perez, Jorge; Sills, Jack H; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-05-01

    Acquired subglottic stenosis in a newborn is often associated with prolonged endotracheal intubation. This condition is generally diagnosed during operative endoscopy after airway injury has occurred. Unfortunately, endoscopy is unable to characterize the submucosal changes observed in such airway injuries. Other modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound, do not possess the necessary level of resolution to differentiate scar, neocartilage, and edema. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that produces high-resolution, cross-sectional images of living tissue (8 to 20 microm). We examined the ability of this noninvasive technique to characterize the newborn airway in a prospective clinical trial. Twelve newborn patients who required ventilatory support underwent OCT airway imaging. Comparative analysis of intubated and non-intubated states was performed. Imaging of the supraglottis, glottis, subglottis, and trachea was performed in 12 patients, revealing unique tissue characteristics as related to turbidity, signal backscattering, and architecture. Multiple structures were identified, including the vocal folds, cricoid cartilage, tracheal rings, ducts, glands, and vessels. Optical coherence tomography clearly identifies in vivo tissue layers and regional architecture while offering detailed information concerning tissue microstructures. The diagnostic potential of this technology makes OCT a promising modality in the study and surveillance of the neonatal airway.

  8. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 [mu]m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 [mu]m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 [mu]m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  9. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Ho [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Guang Yu [Department of Radiology, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133002 (China); Guo, Hui Shu [Centralab, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Piao, Hong Mei [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133000 (China); Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China); Lin, Zhen Hua [Department of Pathology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, YanJi 133000 (China); Yan, Guang Hai, E-mail: ghyan@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  10. Unexpected difficult airway with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferda Yaman,1 Bengi Arslan,2 Ercan Yuvanç,3 Ünase Büyükkoçak1 1Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, 2Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, 3Urology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale, Turkey Background: A critical aspect of safe general anesthesia is providing adequate ventilation and oxygenation. Failed endotracheal intubation and inadequate ventilation with insufficient oxygenation may lead to serious complications, even death. Anesthesiologists rarely encounter unexpected difficult airway problems in daily routine. Management of an unexpectedly difficult airway consists of laryngeal mask ventilation, gum-elastic bougie and video laryngoscopy-assisted intubation. Gum-elastic bougie is the easiest and cheapest tool used in case of an unexpected difficult intubation occurring in the operating room. Case: A 53-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism presented as an unexpected difficult intubation after the induction of anesthesia. No pathological finding or predictor of difficult intubation was present. In addition, bag-mask ventilation was poor and inadequate. The patient was finally successfully intubated with a gum-elastic bougie. Conclusion: A difficult airway has been described in patients with a variety of endocrine disorders, including pituitary diseases, but not with hypogonadism. There may be an unrevealed relationship between hypogonadism and difficult airway. Gum-elastic bougie is still the most attainable and effective tool in the operation room in this situation. Keywords: airway management, intubation, hypogonadism

  11. Comparison of ventilatory efficacy and airway dynamics between ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube in adult patients during general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheesh Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Studies have demonstrated minimal hemodynamic variation and postoperative complications with ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA compared to endotracheal tube (ETT. Hence, a study was conducted to compare the ventilatory parameters and airway dynamics required to maintain normocarbia and stable hemodynamics with PLMA and ETT. Material and Methods: A prospective, randomized, single blinded study was conducted on 60 patients aged 20-40 years of American society of anesthesiologists class I and II, divided into Group PLMA and Group ETT. Standard anesthesia protocol was instituted. Group PLMA received PLMA sizes as per manufacturer′s recommendations and group ETT received appropriate sized cuffed ETT. Patients were initially ventilated at 14 bpm, I:E ratio 1:2, tidal volume (Vt 6 ml/kg and later adjusted to maintain end tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2 between 35 and 40 mmHg. Peak airway pressure (Ppeak, compliance (Compl., Vt, airway resistance (R aw , hemodynamic parameters, oxygen saturation (SpO 2 and EtCO 2 were recorded throughout surgery. Postoperative complications if any, were noted. Results: Demographic parameters, R aw , EtCO 2 , SpO 2 were comparable between groups. Ppeak was lower and Vt needed to maintain EtCO 2 of 35-40 mmHg was lesser in Group PLMA. Compl was low for 5 min after insertion of PLMA. Heart rate was significantly reduced at 1 min post insertion; blood pressures were significantly lower upto 2 min after insertion and post removal in group PLMA. Incidence of cough was significantly lower in group PLMA. Conclusion: ProSeal laryngeal mask airway maintains adequate ventilation at lower Vts and minimal peak pressures, has lesser hemodynamic variations and lower incidence of postoperative cough compared to ETT.

  12. Dexamethasone reduces tachykinin but not ACh airway hyperreactivity after O[sub 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murlas, C.G.; Lang, Z.; Chodimella, V. (Rush Univ., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    We investigated whether dexamethasone pretreatment affected the acute increase in airway reactivity produced by high-level ozone exposure. Reactivity to intravenous IV substance P (SP), IV acetylcholine (ACh), or aerosolized capsaicin (CAP) before and 1 hr after ozone exposure (3 ppm for 2 hr) was determined by measuring specific airway resistance in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pigs, half of whom had been pretreated for 2 days pre-ozone with dexamethasone (2 mg/kg intramuscularly [IM] daily). The amount of IV SP, IV ACh, or inhaled capsaicin necessary to increase baseline specific airway resistance by 100% (ED200ACh or ED200SP) or 35% (ED135CAP) was determined by interpolation from dose-response curves. Compared to their pre-ozone status on the day of exposure, we found that dexamethasone-pretreated animals manifested significantly less of an increase in airway reactivity postozone to IV SP or inhaled CAP than did untreated animals. Changes in logEDs of the pretreated group were 0.18 +/- 0.03 (mean +/- SE) for SP and 2.20 +/- 0.11 for CAP compared to 0.27 +/- 0.04 and 3.38 +/- 0.34, respectively, for the untreated groups post-ozone (p < 0.05 and n = 4 for each). In contrast, dexamethasone pretreatment had no effect on IV ACh reactivity postozone: changes in logED200ACh were 0.27 +/- 0.08 and 0.28 +/- 0.04 for the pretreated and untreated groups, respectively (n = 4). In animals pretreated with captopril to block possible dexamethasone stimulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme synthesis that could influence tachykinin reactivity, we found that the corticosteroid effect on post-ozone SP reactivity was as marked as that seen in animals without captopril (n = 4). These reactivity studies were consistent with the possibility that dexamethasone may ameliorate ozone-induced, tachykinin hyperreactivity by stimulating airway neutral endopeptidase (NEP).

  13. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma.

  14. The Dix-Hallpike test and the canalith repositioning maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viirre, Erik; Purcell, Ian; Baloh, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    The Dix-Hallpike test and the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM) are used to diagnose and treat benign positional vertigo (BPV). Dix-Hallpike is the standard procedure for diagnosis of BPV, but if the horizontal canal is not tested for BPV and the Dix-Hallpike is only carried out once, the condition may not be diagnosed and appropriately treated. We describe our method of testing for BPV and treating it with CRM. The Dix-Hallpike test involves rapidly moving the patient from a sitting position to "head hanging," where the patient's head is at least 10 degrees below horizontal. This is performed initially for the posterior semicircular canals. If these movements fail to elicit vertigo and nystagmus, tests of the horizontal semicircular canals are performed by laying the patient on each side. Importantly, if there is no vertigo or nystagmus elicited by testing the horizontal semi-circular canals, the posterior semicircular canals are tested again. It appears that being held in the head hanging positions and then left and right lateral positions will often allow the canaliths to collect such that the Dix-Hallpike test will become positive. Failure to repeat the tests of the posterior semicircular canals may result in a falsely negative test. Testing the horizontal canals and repeating the Dix-Hallpike test will reduce the likelihood of patients undergoing extra testing or other consequences of misdiagnosis. If, during any of this testing, a movement elicits vertigo or nystagmus, the appropriate CRM is then carried out.

  15. Effective Valsalva maneuvering during TCCD and unrevealed etiology of RLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparci, M; Guney Senol, M; Yalcin, M; Tansel Kendirli, M; Isilak, Z

    2016-04-01

    Either transcranial color-coded Doppler (TCCD) or contrast echocardiography (CE) is the bests of clinically applicable and reproducible methods to evaluate the functionality of right-to-left shunts that can be found in different localization on atrial septum. As the anatomical features of right-to-left shunts could vary in many forms, detection of RLS by functional tests may aid the clinician to do risk prediction and management of patients. Sensitivity of TCDD or CE can be increased by performing effective Valsalva maneuvering during the test procedure. Timing of RLS during the cardiac cycles may help interpreting about the etiology of RLS, atrial septum or intrapulmonary shunts. Intrapulmonary shunts have been recently reported to be associated with RLS and frequently overlooked unless the tests prolonged up to 10th cardiac beat. Migraine, cryptogenic strokes, and paradoxic embolism are closely associated with RLS which should be evaluated by the collaboration of cardiologists and neurologists. Success of diagnostic procedure depends on high suspicion of index for RLS and application of contrast-enhanced tests that are effectively performed at each step. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Tactical approach to maneuvering within the chemical contamination labyrinth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, T.W. [Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need and accepts the responsibility for understanding the reality and mitigating the consequence of the complex chemical contamination legacy it inherited as well as controlling, reducing, and eliminating extant emissions and effluents. The key to maneuvering through this complicated and multifaceted labyrinth of concerns, from which a meaningful, high quality, and cost-effective restoration/mitigation machine is then set in motions, is the ability to perform accurate, factual, and explicit health and environmental/ecological risk assessments. Likewise, the common denominator for carrying out this essential task is to have access to comprehensive and reliable data of known quality with which to perform those analyses. DOE is committed to identifying the data universe; to technically scrutinize and ensure the quality of that data; to develop efficient and cost-effective means to maximize the handling, utilization, and sharing of that universe; and to undertake those assessments. DOE views this as an effort that can only be accomplished through a merging of the technical excellence that exists within federal and state agencies, academia, and industry. The task at hand is so large that only by integrating that intelligence base can we hope to accomplish the goals of establishing meaningful standards, developing functional and effective solutions, and providing quality guidance at a national scale.

  17. Application of a discretized vortex impulse framework to fish maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    In studies of biological propulsion, metrics for quantitative analysis of the vortex wake, including circulation, impulse, and their time derivatives, are a valuable indicator of performance. To better utilize volumetric PIV data in this type of analysis, a discretized method of deriving vortex impulse relying only on velocity data is developed. The impulse formulation is based on the geometry and distribution of circulation along the vortex core line, which can be detected using critical points in the velocity field. This analysis method is then applied to time-resolved velocity data of a turning giant danio (Devario aequipinnatus) and a jumping archer fish (Toxotes microlepis) obtained using Synthetic Aperture PIV (SAPIV). In the case of the danio, the vortex force vector derived from the impulse derivative shows good agreement with the kinematics of the fish tail during the turning maneuver. With the archer fish, the model is used to explore the relationship between the number of tail beats prior to the jump and the jump height.

  18. Development of Strategy Generator for PWRs Core Maneuver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deswandri

    2003-01-01

    Generally, nuclear power plants are utilized for base-load operation. However, if the nuclear capacity constitutes a large fraction of the total electric capacity in a country, the ability of nuclear power plants to perform load following operation is inevitable. In the load following operation, the reactor power is adjusted based on the fluctuation of electric power demand in the grid. That changes of power level can cause unbalance in the reactor, therefore, the control actions should be done during the power maneuvering. In order that the control actions could be effective and efficient, guidance for the reactor operators is needed. Strategy generator refers to a tool which provides guidance for operators as to control actions to be taken. This work developed the strategy generator based on the three concepts of control strategy. By numerical simulation, performance of these three strategies was tested and compared. The simulation result shows the unique characteristic for each strategy and discussion was provided to evaluate the abilities of each strategy in achieving the control targets. (author)

  19. Steering characteristic of an articulated bus under quasi steady maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaidillah, Setiawan, Budi Agus; Aridharma, Airlangga Putra; Lenggana, Bhre Wangsa; Caesar, Bernardus Placenta Previo

    2018-02-01

    Articulated buses have been being preferred as public transportation modes due to their operational capacity. Therefore, passenger safety must be the priority of this public service vehicle. This research focused on the analytical approach of steering characteristics of an articulated bus when it maneuvered steadily. Such turning condition could be referred as a stability parameter of the bus for preliminary handling assessment. The analytical approach employed kinematics relationship between front and rear bodies as well as steering capabilities. The quasi steady model was developed to determine steering parameters such as turning radius, oversteer, and understeer. The mathematical model was useful for determining both coefficients of understeer and oversteer. The dimension of articulated bus followed a commonly used bus as utilized in Trans Jakarta busses. Based on the simulation, for one minimum center of the body, the turning radius was calculated about 8.8 m and 7.6 m at steady turning speed of 10 km/h. In neutral condition, the minimum road radius should be 6.5 m at 10 km/h and 6.9 m at 40 km/h. For two centers of the body and oversteer condition, the front body has the turning radius of 8.8 m, while, the rear body has the turning radius of 9.8 m at both turning speeds of 40 km/h. The other steering parameters were discussed accordingly.

  20. On the maneuvering of a flexible space crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Mark; Farhat, Charbel; Reisenauer, Brian; Thorwald, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design of an articulated space crane under NASA's 'Pathfinder' program continues to push forward. However, the large size and extreme flexibility of the crane entail major difficulties in precision positioning. To illustrate this and to gain more insight into its structural dynamic behavior, we have built three-dimensional rigid, flexible, homogenized and non-homogenized finite element models (FEM) of the articulated space crane and simulated its three-dimensional maneuvering. We have also begun to develop control strategies for the flexible system using first a simplified finite element model. The model captures much of the system's low frequency characteristics. From the FEM, a reduced-order model (ROM) based controller is designed based on a specific configuration of the crane. The ROM controller rotates the fixed shape crane about the alpha joint and uses three torque wheels at the tip to actuate its control law. Our analysis of the closed-loop system shows the destabilizing effect of control interaction with unmodeled system dynamics (Controller-Structure-Interaction). Making use of a parallel bank of residual-mode filters (RMF), we are able to compensate for CSI and restore system stability and performance. The implementation of the discrete-time control law on the simplified multi-body model is completed using the SAMCEF code.

  1. The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Wang, Chia-To; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Ma, Hsin-I; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common complaints encountered in clinics and is strongly correlated with advanced age or, possibly, degeneration. Redistribution exercises are the most effective approaches to treat BPPV, and canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) cure most BPPV cases. However, the mechanisms through which the treatment modulates systemic molecules in BPPV patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that the miR-34a and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) genes correlated with the treatment effects of CRP in BPPV subjects. We found that miR-34a expression was largely inhibited and SIRT1 expression was significantly reversed after BPPV maneuver treatment. We also confirmed that the PPAR-γ, PGC-1 and FoxO gene expressions were decreased immediately after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for BPPV, and were largely increased after a complete cure of BPPV. Moreover, we observed that after a complete recovery of BPPV, the ROS concentrations, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations and p53 expression levels were attenuated. We conclude that BPPV treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status. PMID:27203679

  2. Motion Planning for Bipedal Robot to Perform Jump Maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyang Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of humans to perform jump maneuvers greatly contributes to the improvements of the obstacle negotiation ability of humans. The paper proposes a jumping control scheme for a bipedal robot to perform a high jump. The half-body of the robot is modeled as three planar links and the motion during the launching phase is taken into account. A geometrically simple motion was first conducted through which the gear reduction ratio that matches the maximum motor output for high jumping was selected. Then, the following strategies to further exploit the motor output performance was examined: (1 to set the maximum torque of each joint as the baseline that is explicitly modeled as a piecewise linear function dependent on the joint angular velocity; (2 to exert it with a correction of the joint angular accelerations in order to satisfy some balancing criteria during the motion. The criteria include the location of ZMP (zero moment point and the torque limit. Using the technique described above, the jumping pattern is pre-calculated to maximize the jump height. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated through simulations. In the simulation, the bipedal robot model achieved a 0.477-m high jump.

  3. Host–microbe interactions in distal airways: relevance to chronic airway diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Martin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is the summary of a workshop, which took place in November 2013, on the roles of microorganisms in chronic respiratory diseases. Until recently, it was assumed that lower airways were sterile in healthy individuals. However, it has long been acknowledged that microorganisms could be identified in distal airway secretions from patients with various respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other chronic airway diseases (e.g. post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans. These microorganisms were sometimes considered as infectious agents that triggered host immune responses and contributed to disease onset and/or progression; alternatively, microorganisms were often considered as colonisers, which were considered unlikely to play roles in disease pathophysiology. These concepts were developed at a time when the identification of microorganisms relied on culture-based methods. Importantly, the majority of microorganisms cannot be cultured using conventional methods, and the use of novel culture-independent methods that rely on the identification of microorganism genomes has revealed that healthy distal airways display a complex flora called the airway microbiota. The present article reviews some aspects of current literature on host–microbe (mostly bacteria and viruses interactions in healthy and diseased airways, with a special focus on distal airways.

  4. A safe-repositioning maneuver for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Gans vs. Epley maneuver; a randomized comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Alia; Nemati, Shadman; Sabnan, Salah; Mollahoseini, Fatemeh; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Some repositioning maneuvers have been described for its management. The aim of this study was comparing the therapeutic effect of Epley and Gans maneuvers in BPPV. This randomized clinical trial was performed from September to December 2015. 73 patients with true vertigo diagnosed as BPPV enrolled the study. They randomly assigned in quadripartite blocks to modified Epley maneuver group (E) or Gans maneuver group (G). 1 day and 1 week after intervention, the objective and subjective responses to treatment were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and regression model in the SPSS software version 21. Thirty patients enrolled each group with a mean age of 46.9 ± 13.4 (E group) and 46.7 ± 7.5 year (G group). 23.3 % of E group and 26.7 % of G group were men (p = 0.766). In E and G groups in the first day, subjective outcomes revealed 86.7 and 60 % rate of success (p = 0.02); and 86.7 and 56.7 % of patients exhibited objective improvement, respectively (p = 0.01). After 1 week, the subjective and objective outcomes revealed improvement among 70 % of E group and 46.7 % of G group (p = 0.067). The only complication with significant difference was cervical pain with a higher rate in E group (23.3 vs. 0.0 %, p = 0.005). These results revealed the similar long-term efficacy of Epley and Gans maneuver for the treatment of BPPV. Cervical pain was most frequent complication of Epley maneuver.

  5. Airway Science curriculum demonstration project : summary of initial evaluation findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    The performance, perceptions, and characteristics of Airway Science hires were compared with those of traditional hires. As of May 12, 1987. a total of 197 Airway Science candidates had been selected into FAA occupations. The demographic characterist...

  6. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W.; Casale, Thomas B.; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Lockey, Richard J.; Zuberbier, Torsten; Akdis, C. A.; Baena-Cagnani, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bousquet, P. J.; Burney, P. G.; Cardell, L. O.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carsten-Jensens, B.; Chen, Y.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A.; Cox, L.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Delgado, L.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J.; Dolen, W. K.; Dubakiene, R.; El-Gamal, Y.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fukuda, T.; Gerth van Wiijk, R.; Gjomarkaj, M.; Haahtela, T.; Hamelmann, E.; Holgate, S. T.; Howarth, P.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Kalayci, O.; Kaliner, M.; Kim, Y. Y.; Kowalski, M. L.; Le, L.; Lee, B. W.; Leynaert, B.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mohammad, Y.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mullol, J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Papadopoulos, N.; Park, H. S.; Passalacqua, G.; Pawankar, R.; Popov, T.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Rodriguez Perez, N.; Romano, A.; Rosenwasser, L.; Ryan, D.; Salapatas, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P. D.; Simons, F. E. R.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toskala, E.; Valovirta, E.; van Cauwenberge, P.; van Weel, C.; Vandenplas, O.; Vichyanond, P.; Wang, D. Y.; Wickman, M.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O.; Zar, H.; Zhong, N.; Zitt, M.; Zock, P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and

  7. Detection of the airway obstruction stage in asthma using impulse oscillometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guang-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Cai; Gu, Wen-Chao; Xi, Feng; Wu, Hao; Yang, Wen-Lan; Liu, Jin-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Although spirometry is the most common method for evaluating the airway obstruction stage in asthma patients, it is difficult to perform in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether impulse oscillometry, an easy-to-perform technique, can detect asthmatic airway obstruction stage. A total of 80 subjects, including healthy volunteers and patients with asthma, were enrolled in this study. The asthma patients were classified into three groups according to American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS)-2005: the mild group (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) ≥ 70% predicted (Pred), n = 20), the moderate group (50% Pred ≤ FEV(1) IOS) parameters were obtained from every subject. Correlation analysis was used to compare spirometry measurements and IOS parameters. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare IOS parameters among different groups. The potential of using all individual IOS parameters to detect the different stages of asthmatic airway obstruction was evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The correlation analysis showed that IOS parameters, such as respiratory resistance at 5 Hz (R(5)), respiratory resistance at 10 Hz (R(10)), respiratory resistance at 20 Hz (R(20)), difference in resistance between 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R(5-20)), impedance at 5 Hz (Z(5)), resonant frequency (Fres), and area of reactance (AX) were negatively correlated with FEV(1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF), while reactance at 5 Hz (X(5)) was positively correlated with FEV(1) and PEF. The increase in R(5), R(10), R(20), Z(5), R(5-20), Fres, (-X(5)), and AX parameters corresponded significantly with an increase in the airway obstruction stage, as determined by one-way ANOVA . ROC curve analysis revealed that all the IOS parameters studied, except for Fres, were capable of classifying asthmatic airway obstruction. R(5), R(5-20), and Z(5) were the most accurate parameters. IOS provides an

  8. Efficacy of Epley’s Maneuver in Treating BPPV Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Gaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo and balance disorders are among the most common symptoms encountered in patients who visit ENT outpatient department. This is associated with risk of falling and is compounded in elderly persons with other neurologic deficits and chronic medical problems. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact, and medical costs. The objective of Epley’s maneuver, which is noninvasive, inexpensive, and easily administered, is to move the canaliths out of the canal to the utricle where they no longer affect the canal dynamics. Our study aims to analyze the response to Epley’s maneuver in a series of patients with posterior canal BPPV and compares the results with those treated exclusively by medical management alone. Even though many studies have been conducted to prove the efficacy of this maneuver, this study reinforces the validity of Epley’s maneuver by comparison with the medical management.

  9. Development of a Ground Vehicle Maneuver Ontology to Support the Common Operational Picture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richmond, Paul W; Blais, Curtis L; Goerger, Niki C

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper describes both the Mobility-COP, from which warfighters can assess the ability of forces to maneuver effectively under multiple environmental and tactical conditions, and a formal ontology...

  10. The Effects of Natural Locomotion on Maneuvering Task Performance in Virtual and Real Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unguder, Eray

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigates human performance differences on maneuvering tasks in virtual and real spaces when a natural locomotion technique is used as opposed to an abstraction through a device such as a...

  11. A Computer Simulation of the System-Wide Effects of Parallel-Offset Route Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Todd A.; Santiago, Confesor; Pankok, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Most aircraft managed by air-traffic controllers in the National Airspace System are capable of flying parallel-offset routes. This paper presents the results of two related studies on the effects of increased use of offset routes as a conflict resolution maneuver. The first study analyzes offset routes in the context of all standard resolution types which air-traffic controllers currently use. This study shows that by utilizing parallel-offset route maneuvers, significant system-wide savings in delay due to conflict resolution of up to 30% are possible. It also shows that most offset resolutions replace horizontal-vectoring resolutions. The second study builds on the results of the first and directly compares offset resolutions and standard horizontal-vectoring maneuvers to determine that in-trail conflicts are often more efficiently resolved by offset maneuvers.

  12. Real-Time, Maneuvering Flight Noise Prediction for Rotorcraft Flight Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a plan for developing new technology to provide accurate real-time noise prediction for rotorcraft in steady and maneuvering flight. Main...

  13. Pulsed Electrogasdynamic Thruster for Attitude Control and Orbit Maneuver, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new pulsed electric thruster, named "pulsed electrogasdynamic thruster," for attitude control and orbit maneuver is proposed. In this thruster, propellant gas is...

  14. Self-Synchronized Fires in Support of Ship-to-Objective Maneuver (STOM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herman, John

    2002-01-01

    Self-synchronized joint fires in a netted environment are not able to provide the timely and accurate fire support required by infantry units when conducting Ship-to-Objective Maneuver (STOM) operations...

  15. Ion Propulsion System and Orbit Maneuver Integration in CubeSats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated cubesat propulsion and control system is proposed that provide three-axis attitude control and orbit maneuver capability using a micro radio-frequency...

  16. Respiratory impedance is correlated with airway narrowing in asthma using three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayama, M; Inui, N; Mori, K; Kono, M; Hozumi, H; Suzuki, Y; Furuhashi, K; Hashimoto, D; Enomoto, N; Fujisawa, T; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, H; Suda, T

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory impedance comprises the resistance and reactance of the respiratory system and can provide detailed information on respiratory function. However, details of the relationship between impedance and morphological airway changes in asthma are unknown. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between imaging-based airway changes and respiratory impedance in patients with asthma. Respiratory impedance and spirometric data were evaluated in 72 patients with asthma and 29 reference subjects. We measured the intraluminal area (Ai) and wall thickness (WT) of third- to sixth-generation bronchi using three-dimensional computed tomographic analyses, and values were adjusted by body surface area (BSA, Ai/BSA, and WT/the square root (√) of BSA). Asthma patients had significantly increased respiratory impedance, decreased Ai/BSA, and increased WT/√BSA, as was the case in those without airflow limitation as assessed by spirometry. Ai/BSA was inversely correlated with respiratory resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and 20 Hz (R20). R20 had a stronger correlation with Ai/BSA than did R5. Ai/BSA was positively correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio, percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and percentage predicted mid-expiratory flow. WT/√BSA had no significant correlation with spirometry or respiratory impedance. Respiratory resistance is associated with airway narrowing. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nebulized perflubron and carbon dioxide rapidly dilate constricted airways in an ovine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mays, Tamer Y; Choudhury, Parichita; Leigh, Richard; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Van der Velden, Joanne; Shrestha, Grishma; Pieron, Cora A; Dennis, John H; Green, Francis Hy; Snibson, Ken J

    2014-09-16

    The low toxicity of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), their high affinity for respiratory gases and their compatibility with lung surfactant have made them useful candidates for treating respiratory diseases such as adult respiratory distress syndrome. We report results for treating acute allergic and non-allergic bronchoconstriction in sheep using S-1226 (a gas mixture containing carbon dioxide and small volumes of nebulized perflubron). The carbon dioxide, which is highly soluble in perflubron, was used to relax airway smooth muscle. Sheep previously sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were challenged with HDM aerosols to induce early asthmatic responses. At the maximal responses (characterised by an increase in lung resistance), the sheep were either not treated or treated with one of the following; nebulized S-1226 (perflubron + 12% CO2), nebulized perflubron + medical air, 12% CO2, salbutamol or medical air. Lung resistance was monitored for up to 20 minutes after cessation of treatment. Treatment with S-1226 for 2 minutes following HDM challenge resulted in a more rapid, more profound and more prolonged decline in lung resistance compared with the other treatment interventions. Video bronchoscopy showed an immediate and complete (within 5 seconds) re-opening of MCh-constricted airways following treatment with S-1226. S-1226 is a potent and rapid formulation for re-opening constricted airways. Its mechanism(s) of action are unknown. The formulation has potential as a rescue treatment for acute severe asthma.

  18. Dilemmas, Confusion, and Misconceptions Related to Small Airways Directed Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Pedersen, Søren; Usmani, Omar S

    2017-06-01

    During the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that the small airways (ie, airways misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. To this end, we have reviewed all studies on small-particle aerosol therapy systematically to address the dilemmas, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Lung Opening Maneuver in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure After Cardiosurgical Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Yeremenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative respiratory failure is a most common complication and a main cause of postoperative death. The lung opening maneuver is a most effective method of respiratory therapy for this syndrome.Objective. To evaluate the impact of recruiting maneuver on gas exchange parameters, the biomechanical properties of the lung, and hemodynamic parameters. To determine whether the lung opening maneuver can be fully performed in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Materials and methods. The study covered 19 patients aged 53 to 70 years who had postoperative failure. The indication for the recruiting maneuver was a decrease in the oxygenation index below 250 mm Hg during assisted ventilation (AV with FiO2>0.5, an inspiratory-expira-tory phase ratio of 1:1 to 3:1, and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 5—10 cm H2O.Results. A decrease in the oxygenation index to 139±36 mm Hg was observed before the recruiting maneuver was applied. Cd;n. averaged 41.1±8.4 ml/cm H2O. After use of the recruiting maneuver, there were increases in the oxygenation index up to 371±121 mm Hg and in Cd;n. up to 64.3±10 ml/cm H2O in all the patients. When the recruiting maneuver was employed, 14 patients were observed to have elevated blood pressures corrected with a vasopressor. One patient developed pneumothorax that was drained in proper time.Conclusion. The application of the lung opening maneuver leads to a considerable improvement of gas exchange parameters and lung mechanical properties.

  20. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning proced...

  1. How would surround vehicles move? A Unified Framework for Maneuver Classification and Motion Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Deo, Nachiket; Rangesh, Akshay; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2018-01-01

    Reliable prediction of surround vehicle motion is a critical requirement for path planning for autonomous vehicles. In this paper we propose a unified framework for surround vehicle maneuver classification and motion prediction that exploits multiple cues, namely, the estimated motion of vehicles, an understanding of typical motion patterns of freeway traffic and inter-vehicle interaction. We report our results in terms of maneuver classification accuracy and mean and median absolute error of...

  2. Orbit maneuvers with finite thrust. Volume 3: User's guide, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelisse, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Several software packages were developed and installed on the ESTEC Honeywell L66. These programs called SOMFIT, COMFIT, SOMPLOT, and COMPLOT, respectively, calculate a single transfer maneuver, a set of transfer maneuvers and generate the corresponding plots. In addition to these four programs which use single precision arithmetic, and second version of SOMFIT, called SOMFITD, using double precision arithmetic was installed on the ESTEC Honeywell.

  3. Efficacy of Epley maneuver in treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babac Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most frequent peripheral vestibular system disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of the Epley maneuver in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal (p- BPPV and to discover possible causes of failure. Methods. This prospective study included 75 patients. In all the cases medical history showed and the positioning Dix-Hallpike test confirmed the diagnosis of p-BPPV. We also performed clinical ENT examination, searching for spontaneous nystagmus, vestibulospinal tests, caloric test, and audiometry. All the patients were treated by the modified Epley canalith repositioning maneuver. The patients were followed up at the intervals of seven and, fourteen days, and one, tree, and six months and one year. The maneuver was repeated if vertigo and nystagmus on control positioning test persisted. The transition from positive into negative Dix Hallpike test after one or two Epley maneuver was considered as success in treatment. Results. After the initial Epley maneuver the recovery rate was 90.7%, and after the second 96%. In three (4% patients with secondary p-BPPV, symptoms did not cease even after the second repositioning maneuver. The etiology of p-BPPV had a significant effect on the maneuver’s success rate (p < 0.01, whereas duration of symptoms, age and gender had no effect (p > 0.05. After a successful treatment 11 (14.66% patients had recurrent attack of BPPV during the first year. Conclusion. The Epley maneuver is very successful repositioning procedure in treating p- BPPV. The patients with idiopathic form p-BPPV showed higher success rate with Epley maneuver than those with secondary p-BPPV.

  4. Impossible Airway Requiring Venovenous Bypass for Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Gardes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The elective surgical airway is the definitive management for a tracheal stenotic lesion that is not a candidate for tracheal resection, or who has failed multiple-tracheal dilations. This case report details the management of a patient who has failed an elective awake tracheostomy secondary to the inability to be intubated as well as severe scar tissue at the surgical site. A combination of regional anesthesia and venovenous bypass is used to facilitate the surgical airway management of this patient. Cerebral oximetry and a multidisciplinary team approach aid in early detection of an oxygenation issue, as well as the emergent intervention that preserved this patient’s life.

  5. Water permeability in human airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Procida, Kristina; Larsen, Per Leganger

    2005-01-01

    of those seen in AQP-associated water transport. Together, these results indicate the presence of an AQP in the apical membrane of the spheroids. Notably, identical values for P(f) were found in CF and non-CF airway preparations, as was the case also for the calculated spontaneous fluid absorption rates.......Osmotic water permeability (P(f)) was studied in spheroid-shaped human airway epithelia explants derived from nasal polyps by the use of a new improved tissue collection and isolation procedure. The fluid-filled spheroids were lined with a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane...

  6. Rigid fibrescope Bonfils: use in simulated difficult airway by novices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Tim

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bonfils intubation fibrescope is a promising alternative device for securing the airway. We examined the success rate of intubation and the ease of use in standardized simulated difficult airway scenarios by physicians. We compared the Bonfils to a classical laryngoscope with Macintosh blade. Methods 30 physicians untrained in the use of rigid fibrescopes but experienced in airway management performed endotracheal intubation in an airway manikin (SimMan, Laerdal, Kent, UK with three different airway conditions. We evaluated the success rate using the Bonfils (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany or the Macintosh laryngoscope, the time needed for securing the airway, and subjective rating of both techniques. Results In normal airway all intubations were successful using laryngoscope (100% vs. 82% using the Bonfils (p Conclusion The Bonfils can be successfully used by physicians unfamiliar with this technique in an airway manikin. The airway could be secured with at least the same success rate as using a Macintosh laryngoscope in difficult airway scenarios. Use of the Bonfils did not delay intubation in the presence of a difficult airway. These results indicate that intensive special training is advised to use the Bonfils effectively in airway management.

  7. Occupational upper airway disease: how work affects the nose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, V.; Steelant, B.; Fokkens, W.; Nemery, B.; Hellings, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the upper airways is common and can arbitrarily be divided into rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. Infection and allergy represent two well-characterized and most frequently diagnosed etiologies of upper airway inflammation. Persistent upper airway inflammation caused by agents

  8. Airway management: A survey of training and practices of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway management is an integral part of anesthetist's training and clinical practice. Studies have suggested that opportunities for anesthesia trainees to ... There is increased use of simple airway devices with deskilling in complex airway management. Resource limitation means that very few individuals have ...

  9. Effect of width and boundary conditions on meeting maneuvers on two-way separated cycle tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alfredo; Gomez, Fernando Agustin; Llorca, Carlos; Angel-Domenech, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Cycle track design guidelines are rarely based on scientific studies. In the case of off-road two-way cycle tracks, a minimum width must facilitate both passing and meeting maneuvers, being meeting maneuvers the most frequent. This study developed a methodology to observe meeting maneuvers using an instrumented bicycle, equipped with video cameras, a GPS tracker, laser rangefinders and speed sensors. This bicycle collected data on six two-way cycle tracks ranging 1.3-2.15m width delimitated by different boundary conditions. The meeting maneuvers between the instrumented bicycle and every oncoming bicycle were characterized by the meeting clearance between the two bicycles, the speed of opposing bicycle and the reaction of the opposing rider: change in trajectory, stop pedaling or braking. The results showed that meeting clearance increased with the cycle track width and decreased if the cycle track had lateral obstacles, especially if they were higher than the bicycle handlebar. The speed of opposing bicycle shown the same tendency, although were more disperse. Opposing cyclists performed more reaction maneuvers on narrower cycle tracks and on cycle tracks with lateral obstacles to the handlebar height. Conclusions suggested avoiding cycle tracks narrower than 1.6m, as they present lower meeting clearances, lower bicycle speeds and frequent reaction maneuvers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Epley and Semont maneuvers for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ao-Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Using network meta-analysis, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of Epley and Semont maneuvers as treatment options for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Network meta-analysis. Randomized controlled studies with a Jadad score ≥ 3 that used an Epley or Semont maneuver in posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients were analyzed in this project. The following efficacy outcomes included 1-week recovery rate and end of study recovery rate. Recurrence rate was used to assess the safety of each treatment. Of 589 articles, 12 studies that enrolled 999 posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients were selected. The pooled analysis revealed that the Epley maneuver was as efficacious as the Semont maneuver, in both the 1-week recovery rate and end of study recovery rate (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.48-7.00; OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.47-7.20), and had a similar recurrence rate (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.33-4.4). These two techniques were both better than sham-controlled treatment in the two efficacy indicators. No difference was observed in recurrence rate for treatments. The Epley maneuver was similar to the Semont maneuver in both efficacy and safety for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in short-term effects, and both were superior to the sham-controlled treatment. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Effectiveness of Chin-tuck Maneuver to Facilitate Swallowing in Neurologic Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saconato, Mariana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The chin-tuck maneuver is the most frequently employed postural maneuver in the treatment of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia caused by encephalic vascular strokes and degenerative diseases. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of this maneuver in patients with neurogenic dysphagia and factors that could interfere in it. Methods In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed the medical files and videofluoroscopy exams of 35 patients (19 male – 54% and 16 female – 46%; age range between 20 and 89 years old; mean = 69 years. Results The results suggest that the effectiveness of chin-tuck maneuver is related to the overall degree of dysphagia: the more severe the dysphagia, the less effective the maneuver. Conclusion Chin-tuck maneuver should benefit dysphagic patients with delay in the swallowing trigger, reduced laryngeal elevation, and difficulties to swallow liquids, but is not the best compensatory strategy for patients with severe dysphagia.

  12. Epley's Maneuver in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Series of Cases Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is probably the most common cause of vertigo in women. Objective: To report the result of Epley's maneuver when treating BPPV patients. Method: Study of a series of 9-month-long cases of five female individuals aged between 46 and 64 with BPPV, who were submitted to Epley's maneuver at a scholar clinics, having the positive Dix-Hallpike maneuver at the first consultation as an inclusion criterion, and evaluations were repeated in a six and nine-month term. Results: Only one Epley's maneuver, as the only therapeutic procedure, was enough to eliminate nystagmus and positional vertigo in 4 patients, who did not show a positive Dix-Hallpike maneuver in the two reevaluations performed. Only one patient showed BPPV in the first reevaluation of the study term, and nystagmus reoccurred in the second evaluation only. Conclusion: Epley's repositioning maneuver proved to be a simple and effective BPPV treatment method for this study's patients at length.

  13. A comparison of obstetric maneuvers for the acute management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Matthew K; Bailit, Jennifer L; Branch, D Ware; Burkman, Ronald T; Van Veldhusien, Paul; Lu, Li; Kominiarek, Michelle A; Hibbard, Judith U; Landy, Helain J; Haberman, Shoshana; Wilkins, Isabelle; Quintero, Victor H Gonzalez; Gregory, Kimberly D; Hatjis, Christos G; Ramirez, Mildred M; Reddy, Uma M; Troendle, James; Zhang, Jun

    2011-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of obstetric maneuvers for resolving shoulder dystocia and the effect that these maneuvers have on neonatal injury when shoulder dystocia occurs. Using an electronic database encompassing 206,969 deliveries, we identified all women with a vertex fetus beyond 34 0/7 weeks of gestation who incurred a shoulder dystocia during the process of delivery. Women whose fetuses had a congenital anomaly and women with an antepartum stillbirth were excluded. Medical records of all cases were reviewed by trained abstractors. Cases involving neonatal injury (defined as brachial plexus injury, clavicular or humerus fracture, or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy or intrapartum neonatal death attributed to the shoulder dystocia) were compared with those without injury. Among 132,098 women who delivered a term cephalic liveborn fetus vaginally, 2,018 incurred a shoulder dystocia (1.5%), and 101 (5.2%) of these incurred a neonatal injury. Delivery of the posterior shoulder was associated with the highest rate of delivery when compared with other maneuvers (84.4% compared with 24.3-72.0% for other maneuvers; Pshoulder should be considered following the McRoberts maneuver and suprapubic pressure in the management of shoulder dystocia. The need for additional maneuvers was associated with higher rates of neonatal injury.

  14. Determinants of peripheral airway function in adults with and without asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul D; King, Gregory G; Sears, Malcolm R; Hong, Chuen Y; Hancox, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral airway involvement in asthma remains poorly understood. We investigated impulse oscillometry (IOS) measures of peripheral airway function in a population-based birth cohort. Pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and IOS measures of respiratory resistance and reactance were measured in 915 participants at age 38 years. Current asthma was associated with impairments in both spirometry and IOS parameters. These impairments were greater in men and in those with childhood persistent asthma. Spirometry and IOS values for those whose asthma was in remission were not different to non-asthmatic participants. There were significant changes in IOS in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic participants after bronchodilator, but between-group differences persisted. Higher BMIs were associated with impairments in IOS but not spirometry. Cumulative tobacco use was associated with spirometric airflow obstruction in both sexes, whereas cannabis use was associated with impairments in IOS in women. Despite higher lifetime exposure, there were few associations between cannabis and IOS in men. Asthma is associated with abnormalities in IOS measures of peripheral airway dysfunction. This association is stronger in men and in those with asthma persisting since childhood. Tobacco and cannabis use are associated with different patterns of spirometry and IOS abnormalities and may affect the bronchial tree at different airway generations with differences in susceptibility between sexes. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J D A Excoffon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7 and CAR(Ex8. We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8 isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8 providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8 in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8 may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  16. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffon, Katherine J D A; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Mobily, Matthew E; Karp, Philip H; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Zabner, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7) and CAR(Ex8)). We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8) isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7), CAR(Ex8) differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8) providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8) in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8) may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  17. A randomised trial comparing the laryngeal mask airway Supreme™ with the laryngeal mask airway Unique™ in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, N; Sohn, L E; Sawardekar, A; Chang, E; Langen, K E; Anderson, K

    2012-02-01

    We conducted a randomised controlled trial comparing the laryngeal mask airway Supreme(™) with the laryngeal mask airway Unique(™) in children. Fifty children presenting for elective surgery were randomly assigned to receive either the laryngeal mask airway Supreme or laryngeal mask airway Unique. The outcomes measured were airway leak pressure, ease and time for insertion, insertion success rate, fibreoptic examination, incidence of gastric insufflation, ease of gastric tube placement through the laryngeal mask airway Supreme, quality of airway during anaesthetic maintenance and complications. Median (IQR [range]) time to successful device placement was shorter with the laryngeal mask airway Unique, 14.5 [13.5-16.3 (10.0-23.6)] s than with the laryngeal mask airway Supreme, 17.4 [14.8-19.8 (11.5-29.2)] s; p = 0.007. Median (IQR [range]) airway leak pressures for the laryngeal mask airway Supreme and laryngeal mask airway Unique were 20 [16-21 (12-22)] cmH(2)O and 15 [14-18 (10-24)] cmH(2)O, respectively (p = 0.001). The incidence of gastric insufflation was lower with the laryngeal mask airway Supreme (zero vs six patients), p = 0.01. In conclusion, the laryngeal mask airway Supreme performed as well as the laryngeal mask airway Unique and is a useful alternative for airway maintenance, particularly in children who require evacuation of gastric contents during anaesthesia. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. A unified flight control methodology for a compound rotorcraft in fundamental and aerobatic maneuvering flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Adam

    This study investigates a novel approach to flight control for a compound rotorcraft in a variety of maneuvers ranging from fundamental to aerobatic in nature. Fundamental maneuvers are a class of maneuvers with design significance that are useful for testing and tuning flight control systems along with uncovering control law deficiencies. Aerobatic maneuvers are a class of aggressive and complex maneuvers with more operational significance. The process culminating in a unified approach to flight control includes various control allocation studies for redundant controls in trim and maneuvering flight, an efficient methodology to simulate non-piloted maneuvers with varying degrees of complexity, and the setup of an unconventional control inceptor configuration along with the use of a flight simulator to gather pilot feedback in order to improve the unified control architecture. A flight path generation algorithm was developed to calculate control inceptor commands required for a rotorcraft in aerobatic maneuvers. This generalized algorithm was tailored to generate flight paths through optimization methods in order to satisfy target terminal position coordinates or to minimize the total time of a particular maneuver. Six aerobatic maneuvers were developed drawing inspiration from air combat maneuvers of fighter jet aircraft: Pitch-Back Turn (PBT), Combat Ascent Turn (CAT), Combat Descent Turn (CDT), Weaving Pull-up (WPU), Combat Break Turn (CBT), and Zoom and Boom (ZAB). These aerobatic maneuvers were simulated at moderate to high advance ratios while fundamental maneuvers of the compound including level accelerations/decelerations, climbs, descents, and turns were investigated across the entire flight envelope to evaluate controller performance. The unified control system was developed to allow controls to seamlessly transition between manual and automatic allocations while ensuring that the axis of control for a particular inceptor remained constant with flight

  19. Vortex Ring Extremization for Low Speed Maneuvering of Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Kamran

    2004-11-01

    Most attempts in underwater locomotion have been focused on propeller thrust generation or recently on flapping locomotion. However, new developments in autonomous and tethered underwater vehicles motivated closer look at the biomimetics of sea animals. To this end, Cephalopoda and jelly fish utilize pulsatile jets and vortex formation for locomotion. To avoid further complications with background flows, we focus on the formation of the leading vortex ring rather than a train of vortices. It is shown that a pinched-off vortex ring characterizes the extremum impulse accumulated by the leading vortex ring in vortex formation process. An appropriate scaling for vortex ring impulse is found and the limiting values of the non-dimensionalized impulses are established. An estimate for the non-dimensional impulses is provided by equating their values from the slug model with their values from a vortex in the Norbury family of vortices. For a vortex ring generator with constant kinetic energy and circulation generation rate, the pinched-off vortex ring has a maximum impulse of I_nd^E ≈ 11 normalized by the circulation and energy. On the other hand, for a vortex ring generator with constant rate of circulation generation at a constant translational velocity, a pinched-off vortex ring produces a minimum impulse of I_nd^Γ ≈ 0.12 normalized by the circulation and translational velocity. Direct numerical simulations of vortex ring formation and vortex ring pinch-off process are performed and the estimated values of the non-dimensionalized impulses are confirmed. These ideas are employed in designing a vortex jet generator for low speed maneuvering of underwater robots. The presented vortex generators are simple and low cost, they consume little valuable payload space, and they have no moving external parts. Experimental data are presented in support of the optimal formation number of 4 for maximum thrust generation.

  20. A Zinc Chelator TPEN Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness Airway Inflammation in Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Fukuyama

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: In pulmonary allergic inflammation induced in mice immunized with antigen without alum, zinc chelator inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. These findings suggest that zinc may be a therapeutic target of allergic asthma.

  1. Airway Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma: The United Airways Concept Further Supported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Bachert, Claus; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been established that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have co-existing asthma. Objective We aimed to test two hypotheses: (i) upper and lower airway inflammation in CRSwNP is uniform in agreement with the united airways concept; and (ii......) bronchial inflammation exists in all CRSwNP patients irrespective of clinical asthma status. Methods We collected biopsies from nasal polyps, inferior turbinates and bronchi of 27 CRSwNP patients and 6 controls. All participants were evaluated for lower airway disease according to international guidelines...... cytokines measured, IL-13 was significantly increased in bronchial biopsies from CRSwNP patients with, but not without asthma. Conclusion Our findings support the united airways concept; however, we did not find evidence for subclinical bronchial inflammation in CRSwNP patients without asthma. Finally...

  2. Removal of an Airway Foreign Body via Flexible Endoscopy Through a Laryngeal Mask Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, Manuel; Cortright, Catherine C; Koba, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    A Silky terrier weighing 4.7 kg was presented with an airway foreign body after having aspirated a fragment of an orotracheal tube that was identified on radiological examination. Due to the small size of the patient, flexible endoscopy could not be performed through the lumen of a tracheal tube. Following IV induction of general anesthesia, the airway was instrumented with a laryngeal mask airway that was attached via a three-way connector to an anesthesia breathing circuit. A flexible endoscope was passed through the free port of the connector. That arrangement allowed for the passage of an endoscope through the lumen of the laryngeal mask airway and into the trachea without interrupting the continuous supply of O2 and sevoflurane.

  3. Airway function and markers of airway inflammation in patients with treated hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Birring, S; Patel, R; Parker, D; Mckenna, S; Hargadon, B; Monteiro, W; Falconer, S; Pavord, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of an association between organ specific autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and respiratory morbidity. A study was undertaken to determine whether patients with autoimmune thyroid disease have objective evidence of airway inflammation and dysfunction.

  4. [The place of attack of beta-2 receptor stimulating bronchodilators. Fenoterol (Berotec) in allergic airway obstruction in dogs, hypersensitive to Ascaris suum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, I; Bugalho de Almeida, A A; Walkenhorst, W; Ulmer, W T

    1980-04-15

    On dogs sensitive against Ascaris suum extract an increase of the airway resistance can be caused by challenge alone on the upper part or the lower part of the airways by Ascaris suum extract. Fenoterol as beta 2-receptor stimulator is capable to decrease this reaction by deposition of this drug on the upper part as on the lower part of the airways. The effect of Fenoterol on the upper part of the airways is much stronger and lasts much longer than on the lower part of the airways or by intravenous route. A direct effect of the beta 2-receptor stimulator Fenoterol on the sensoric part of the reflex way of the reflex bronchoconstriction must be considered. It will be also discussed that the local application of Fenoterol on the upper part of the airways may influence also the reaction of the bronchial muscles in the lower part of the airways without a direct resorptive-systemic effect. The relationship of these findings for the clinical situation on man has to be investigated.

  5. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 ...

  6. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  7. Trauma unit emergency doctor airway management | Hardcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A data collection proforma was completed either at the time of intubation or from medical records. Results. Fifty-seven patients required definitive airway management. In the unit 32 patients (56%) were intubated by emergency medicine registrars or medical officers, with rapidsequence intubations (RSIs) in all 32 (100%).

  8. Postoperative upper airway problems | Zuccherelli | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Postoperative upper airway ...

  9. Essential ultrasound techniques of the pediatric airway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stafrace, Samuel; Engelhardt, Thomas; Teoh, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound of the airways is a technique which has been described in a number of recent articles and reviews highlighting the diagnostic possibilities and simple methodology. However, there is a paucity of information focusing specifically on such methods in children where equipment, technique, a...

  10. Insulin induces airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, D.; Gosens, R.; Ris, J. M.; Zaagsma, J.; Meurs, H.; Nelemans, S. A.

    Background and purpose: Recently, the use of inhaled insulin formulations for the treatment of type I and type II diabetes has been approved in Europe and in the United States. For regular use, it is critical that airway function remains unimpaired in response to insulin exposure. Experimental

  11. Progressive Dysphagia Post Laryngeal Mask Airway Intubation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an important addition to the anaesthetic equipments; however its use may involve some important complications. We report an unusual and potentially serious complication arising from the use of this equipment. A 58 year old man underwent cataract surgery under general anaesthesia ...

  12. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... ous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is often sufficient to tide a preterm infant through RDS. ... eration in BCPAP and arrived at a modification of the existing bubble CPAP device which is effective, ..... gestational age dependent, oxygen induced retinopathy. Conclusion. The NHA-BCPAP device produces ...

  13. Outcomes following prehospital airway management in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backgound. Prevention of hypoxia and thus secondary brain injury in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical. However there is controversy regarding the role of endotracheal intubation in the prehospital management of TBI. Objective. To describe the outcome of TBI with various airway management methods employed in the ...

  14. Viruses in cystic fibrosis patients' airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Lisa; Le Berre, Rozenn; Pilorgé, Léa; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Vallet, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Although bacteria have historically been considered to play a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway damage, a strong impact of respiratory viral infections (RVI) is also now recognized. Emerging evidence confirms that respiratory viruses are associated with deterioration of pulmonary function and exacerbation and facilitation of bacterial colonization in CF patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on respiratory viruses in CF airways, to discuss the resulting inflammation and RVI response, to determine how to detect the viruses, and to assess their clinical consequences, prevalence, and interactions with bacteria. The most predominant are Rhinoviruses (RVs), significantly associated with CF exacerbation. Molecular techniques, and especially multiplex PCR, help to diagnose viral infections, and the coming rise of metagenomics will extend knowledge of viral populations in the complex ecosystem of CF airways. Prophylaxis and vaccination are currently available only for Respiratory syncytial and Influenza virus (IV), but antiviral molecules are being tested to improve CF patients' care. All the points raised in this review highlight the importance of taking account of RVIs and their potential impact on the CF airway ecosystem.

  15. Airway inflammation in mild cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckrich, Jonas; Zissler, Ulrich M; Serve, Friederike; Leutz, Patricia; Smaczny, Christina; Schmitt-Grohé, Sabina; Fussbroich, Daniela; Schubert, Ralf; Zielen, Stefan; Eickmeier, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Airway infection and inflammation play major roles in the progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In patients with mild disease, airway inflammation is a clinically relevant and often underdiagnosed feature. Lung function, sputum cell counts, and cytokine profiles in CF with mild disease might be different in patients with and without involvement of small airway disease (SAD). Patients with mild CF (n=32) and 22 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Patients with CF were assigned to two groups: (1) patients without SAD (n=19, median age 12.3years, MEF 25 >50% predicted), and (2) patients with SAD (n=13 median age, 13.2years, MEF 25 inflammation compared to controls as indicated by elevated levels of sputum biomarkers like total cells, neutrophils, and IL6. Our study demonstrated that patients with CF with mild disease defined by lung function might be further endotyped according to their involvement of SAD. In patients with CF and SAD, airway neutrophilic inflammation is more pronounced and is in part distinct from that seen in patients without SAD. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CT quantification of central airway in tracheobronchomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Won Hyeong; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Kim, Eun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To know which factors help to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) using CT quantification of central airway. From April 2013 to July 2014, 19 patients (68.0 ± 15.0 years; 6 male, 13 female) were diagnosed as TBM on CT. As case-matching, 38 normal subjects (65.5 ± 21.5 years; 6 male, 13 female) were selected. All 57 subjects underwent CT with end-inspiration and end-expiration. Airway parameters of trachea and both main bronchus were assessed using software (VIDA diagnostic). Airway parameters of TBM patients and normal subjects were compared using the Student t-test. In expiration, both wall perimeter and wall thickness in TBM patients were significantly smaller than normal subjects (wall perimeter: trachea, 43.97 mm vs. 49.04 mm, p = 0.020; right main bronchus, 33.52 mm vs. 42.69 mm, p < 0.001; left main bronchus, 26.76 mm vs. 31.88 mm, p = 0.012; wall thickness: trachea, 1.89 mm vs. 2.22 mm, p = 0.017; right main bronchus, 1.64 mm vs. 1.83 mm, p = 0.021; left main bronchus, 1.61 mm vs. 1.75 mm, p = 0.016). Wall thinning and decreased perimeter of central airway of expiration by CT quantification would be a new diagnostic indicators in TBM.

  17. Dilemmas, Confusion, and Misconceptions Related to Small Airways Directed Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavorini, Federico; Pedersen, Søren; Usmani, Omar S.

    2017-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that the small airways (ie, airways < 2 mm in internal diameter) contribute substantially to the pathophysiologic and clinical expression of asthma and COPD. The increased interest in small airways is, at least in part, a result of innova......, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. To this end, we have reviewed all studies on small-particle aerosol therapy systematically to address the dilemmas, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy....

  18. PPARγ as a Potential Target to Treat Airway Mucus Hypersecretion in Chronic Airway Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway mucus hypersecretion (AMH is a key pathophysiological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AMH contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, and it is associated with reduced lung function and high rates of hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that AMH should be a target in the treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that a key regulator of airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. PPARγ is expressed in structural, immune, and inflammatory cells in the lung. PPARγ is involved in mucin production, and PPARγ agonists can inhibit mucin synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that PPARγ is a novel target in the treatment of AMH and that further work on this transcription factor may lead to new therapies for chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  19. Indications of airway stenting for severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hiroaki; Kishaba, Tomoo; Nei, Yuichirou; Yamashiro, Shin; Takara, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer is a medical and technical challenge. The impact of airway stenting on the clinical outcome of such patients is unclear. This single-center, retrospective study evaluated 21 patients who underwent airway stenting for advanced cancer. We examined predictors of the post-stenting mortality, including age, serum albumin, tracheal diameter, smoking, opioid use, respiratory failure, and performance status (PS). We also compared survival according to the PS. The mean survival period after stenting was 85.2 days. On univariate analysis, age, albumin, PS before airway stenting, respiratory failure, admission route, and PS grade were the candidates as possible predictors of prognosis after the procedure. On multivariate analysis, PS before airway stenting was identified as possible predictor of prognosis after stenting (HR 1.6180, 95% CI 0.969 to 2.7015, p = 0.066). The mean survival period after stenting was significantly longer in the good PS group, compared to the poor PS group (147.8 days vs. 38.2 days,p = 0.0346). Airway stenting for advanced cancer may be more effective for patients in good general condition than in those with poor performance status.

  20. Indications of airway stenting for severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nagano

    Full Text Available Management of severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer is a medical and technical challenge. The impact of airway stenting on the clinical outcome of such patients is unclear.This single-center, retrospective study evaluated 21 patients who underwent airway stenting for advanced cancer. We examined predictors of the post-stenting mortality, including age, serum albumin, tracheal diameter, smoking, opioid use, respiratory failure, and performance status (PS. We also compared survival according to the PS.The mean survival period after stenting was 85.2 days. On univariate analysis, age, albumin, PS before airway stenting, respiratory failure, admission route, and PS grade were the candidates as possible predictors of prognosis after the procedure. On multivariate analysis, PS before airway stenting was identified as possible predictor of prognosis after stenting (HR 1.6180, 95% CI 0.969 to 2.7015, p = 0.066. The mean survival period after stenting was significantly longer in the good PS group, compared to the poor PS group (147.8 days vs. 38.2 days,p = 0.0346.Airway stenting for advanced cancer may be more effective for patients in good general condition than in those with poor performance status.

  1. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924

  2. Influence of pharyngeal airway respiration pressure on Class II mandibular retrusion in children: A computational fluid dynamics study of inspiration and expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, T; Sato, H; Suga, H; Takemoto, Y; Inada, E; Saitoh, I; Kakuno, K; Kanomi, R; Yamasaki, Y

    2017-05-01

    To examine the influence of negative pressure of the pharyngeal airway on mandibular retraction during inspiration in children with nasal obstruction using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. Sixty-two children were divided into Classes I, II (mandibular retrusion) and III (mandibular protrusion) malocclusion groups. Cone-beam computed tomography data were used to reconstruct three-dimensional shapes of the nasal and pharyngeal airways. Airflow pressure was simulated using CFD to calculate nasal resistance and pharyngeal airway pressure during inspiration and expiration. Nasal resistance of the Class II group was significantly higher than that of the other two groups, and oropharyngeal airway inspiration pressure in the Class II (-247.64 Pa) group was larger than that in the Class I (-43.51 Pa) and Class III (-31.81 Pa) groups (P<.001). The oropharyngeal airway inspiration-expiration pressure difference in the Class II (-27.38 Pa) group was larger than that in the Class I (-5.17 Pa) and Class III (0.68 Pa) groups (P=.006). Large negative inspiratory pharyngeal airway pressure due to nasal obstruction in children with Class II malocclusion may be related to their retrognathia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Airway Walls Using CT Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Jung; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kwang Gi; Im, Jung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop dedicated software for quantitative analysis of the airways and to validate the software using airway phantoms and excised swine lung. The dedicated software was validated in airway phantoms and excised swine lung through comparison of the actual values with the measurements acquired with dedicated software. The accuracy of the measurements according to the reconstruction methods (standard, lung, sharp) and spatial resolution were compared using airway phantoms. Repeatability of the measurement of airway phantoms was assessed with follow-up CT scans three months later. Airway dimension measurements obtained in airway phantoms and excised swine lung showed good agreements with actual values. Airway measurements were more accurate when the sharp reconstruction algorithm was used and when the spatial resolution was improved using pixels smaller than conventional size. There was good agreement between the initial airway measurements and those obtained three months later. We developed and validated dedicated software for quantitative airway measurement. Reconstruction with sharp algorithms and high spatial resolution images is recommended for obtaining airway measurements.

  4. Qualitative analysis of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver in multi-canal BPPV using a biomechanical model: Introduction of an expanded Dix-Hallpike maneuver for enhanced diagnosis of multi-canal BPPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Traboulsi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The Dix–Hallpike maneuver may cause simultaneous movement of otoliths present in multiple canals and create an obstacle to accurate diagnosis in multi-canal BPPV. An expanded Dix-Hallpike maneuver is described which adds intermediate steps with the head positioned to the right and left in the horizontal position before head-hanging. This expanded maneuver has helped to isolate affected semi-circular canals for individual assessment in multiple canal BPPV.

  5. Rapid systematic review of repeated application of the epley maneuver for treating posterior BPPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, Hendrik; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of repeated application of the Epley maneuver on patient-reported symptom relief and resolution of nystagmus in patients with posterior benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (p-BPPV). PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. A systematic search was conducted. Studies reporting original study data were included. Relevance and risk of bias (RoB) of the selected articles were assessed. Studies with low relevance, high RoB, or both were excluded. Success percentages and mean values were extracted. A total of 955 unique studies were retrieved. Fourteen of these satisfied the eligibility criteria. All of the included studies carried a high relevance and a moderate RoB. The majority of studies were 1-armed trials, in which the Epley was repeated only in case previous attempt(s) had failed. The maneuver was not repeated if it was successful. In 32% to 90% of patients, the first treatment session was successful. Reported cumulative success percentages ranged from 40% to 100% after the second session, 67% to 98% after the third session, 87% to 100% after the fourth session, and 100% in the studies in which patients received 5 sessions. One study evaluating the effect of multiple maneuvers in a single session showed a rise in success percentages from 84% for 1 maneuver to 90% after 2 maneuvers and 92% after 3 maneuvers. Multiple studies with moderate RoB show a beneficial effect of multiple sessions of the Epley maneuver in p-BPPV patients who are not fully cleared of symptoms after the first session. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  6. Mechanical Constraints on Flight at High Elevation Decrease Maneuvering Performance of Hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Paolo S; Dakin, Roslyn; Read, Tyson J G; Straw, Andrew D; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-12-19

    High-elevation habitats offer ecological advantages including reduced competition, predation, and parasitism [1]. However, flying organisms at high elevation also face physiological challenges due to lower air density and oxygen availability [2]. These constraints are expected to affect the flight maneuvers that are required to compete with rivals, capture prey, and evade threats [3-5]. To test how individual maneuvering performance is affected by elevation, we measured the free-flight maneuvers of male Anna's hummingbirds in a large chamber translocated to a high-elevation site and then measured their performance at low elevation. We used a multi-camera tracking system to identify thousands of maneuvers based on body position and orientation [6]. At high elevation, the birds' translational velocities, accelerations, and rotational velocities were reduced, and they used less demanding turns. To determine how mechanical and metabolic constraints independently affect performance, we performed a second experiment to evaluate flight maneuvers in an airtight chamber infused with either normoxic heliox, to lower air density, or nitrogen, to lower oxygen availability. The hypodense treatment caused the birds to reduce their accelerations and rotational velocities, whereas the hypoxic treatment had no significant effect on maneuvering performance. Collectively, these experiments reveal how aerial maneuvering performance changes with elevation, demonstrating that as birds move up in elevation, air density constrains their maneuverability prior to any influence of oxygen availability. Our results support the hypothesis that changes in competitive ability at high elevations are the result of mechanical limits to flight performance [7]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Importance of adequately performed Valsalva maneuver to detect patent foramen ovale during transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Clara; Picard, Michael H; Carbone, Aime; Arruda, Ana Lúcia; Flores, Thaís; Klohn, Juliana; Furtado, Meive; Lira-Filho, Edgar B; Cerri, Giovanni G; Andrade, José L

    2013-11-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) plays an important role in evaluating cardioembolic sources of emboli. The identification of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is reportedly improved with TEE compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), but the Valsalva maneuver during TEE may be difficult or suboptimal. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the Valsalva maneuver for PFO diagnosis using TEE compared with TTE by evaluating patients with ischemic stroke referred for echocardiography. Only patients able to perform the Valsalva maneuver during TTE were included; efficacy was defined by a 20 cm/sec decrease in transmitral E velocity. A PFO was judged present when microbubbles of agitated intravenous saline were seen in the left chambers within three cycles after right atrial opacification. Of 108 patients (mean age, 55 ± 15 years; 61 men), 48 (44%) were judged to have PFOs by TEE and/or TTE. In 36 patients (33% of the total, 75% of those with PFOs), microbubbles were observed both by TEE and TTE, in seven patients only during TTE, and in five patients only during TEE. In patients able to satisfactorily perform the Valsalva maneuver during TEE, 22 PFOs were found, and two shunts (9%) were missed, whereas in patients unable to perform this maneuver, 26 PFOs were observed, with five shunts missed (19%) (P TTE, either the echocardiographic window was suboptimal or the shunt was small. An adequate Valsalva maneuver is crucial for diagnosis of PFO; most patients with stroke may be screened using TTE with contrast and the Valsalva maneuver, with TEE indicated in case of suboptimal transthoracic images. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tomatidine Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation by Suppressing Th2 Cytokines in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Ying Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomatidine is isolated from the fruits of tomato plants and found to have anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. In the present study, we investigated whether tomatidine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and eosinophil infiltration in asthmatic mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and treated with tomatidine by intraperitoneal injection. Airway resistance was measured by intubation analysis as an indication of airway responsiveness, and histological studies were performed to evaluate eosinophil infiltration in lung tissue. Tomatidine reduced AHR and decreased eosinophil infiltration in the lungs of asthmatic mice. Tomatidine suppressed Th2 cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tomatidine also blocked the expression of inflammatory and Th2 cytokine genes in lung tissue. In vitro, tomatidine inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and CCL11 production in inflammatory BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. These results indicate that tomatidine contributes to the amelioration of AHR and eosinophil infiltration by blocking the inflammatory response and Th2 cell activity in asthmatic mice.

  9. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  10. Impacts of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in a mouse model of influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Ohara, Yuki; Takahashi, Kenta; Sato, Yuko; Ainai, Akira; Nagata, Noriyo; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus is the respiratory pathogen responsible for influenza. Infection by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus caused severe lower airway inflammation and pneumonia. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that affects the entire brachial tree, and was one of the commonest underlying medical conditions among patients hospitalized with the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infection. Although respiratory virus infections are the major causes of asthma exacerbation, the mechanism by which influenza exacerbates asthma is poorly understood. Animal models of disease comorbidity are crucial to understanding host-pathogen interactions and elucidating complex pathologies. Existing murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatics show that asthmatic mice are highly resistant to influenza virus infection, which contradicts clinical observations in humans. Here, we developed a murine model of influenza virus/asthma comorbidity using NC/Nga mice, which are highly sensitive to allergic reactions such as atopic dermatitis and allergic airway inflammation. This model was then used to examine the impact of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infected mice. The results showed that induction of acute allergic airway inflammation in pre-existing influenza virus infection had additive effects on exacerbation of lung pathology, which mirrors findings in human epidemiological studies. In contrast, pre-existing allergic airway inflammation protected from subsequent influenza virus infection, which was compatible with those of previous murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatic mice. These variable outcomes of this murine model indicate that the temporal relation between allergic airway inflammation and influenza virus infection might play a critical role in asthma and influenza comorbidity. Thus, this murine model will further our understanding of how influenza virus infection affects an

  11. Neutralisation of interleukin-13 in mice prevents airway pathology caused by chronic exposure to house dust mite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Tomlinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repeated exposure to inhaled allergen can cause airway inflammation, remodeling and dysfunction that manifests as the symptoms of allergic asthma. We have investigated the role of the cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13 in the generation and persistence of airway cellular inflammation, bronchial remodeling and deterioration in airway function in a model of allergic asthma caused by chronic exposure to the aeroallergen House Dust Mite (HDM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were exposed to HDM via the intranasal route for 4 consecutive days per week for up to 8 consecutive weeks. Mice were treated either prophylactically or therapeutically with a potent neutralising anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody (mAb administered subcutaneously (s.c.. Airway cellular inflammation was assessed by flow cytometry, peribronchial collagen deposition by histocytochemistry and airway hyperreactivity (AHR by invasive measurement of lung resistance (R(L and dynamic compliance (C(dyn. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with an anti-IL-13 mAb significantly inhibited (P<0.05 the generation and maintenance of chronic HDM-induced airway cellular inflammation, peribronchial collagen deposition, epithelial goblet cell upregulation. AHR to inhaled methacholine was reversed by prophylactic but not therapeutic treatment with anti-IL-13 mAb. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with anti-IL-13 mAb significantly reversed (P<0.05 the increase in baseline R(L and the decrease in baseline C(dyn caused by chronic exposure to inhaled HDM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that in a model of allergic lung disease driven by chronic exposure to a clinically relevant aeroallergen, IL-13 plays a significant role in the generation and persistence of airway inflammation, remodeling and dysfunction.

  12. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  13. The operative cooperation and nursing in performing airway stent placement under DSA guidance for treating airway stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Baojun; Wu Gang; Han Xinwei; Wang Nan; Shi Jin; Si Wenfeng; Wang Kai; Su Ning; Liu Jia; Hai Dandan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the key points of the nursing care for effectively performing airway stent placement under DSA monitoring for airway stenosis. Methods: Corresponding nursing care measures were carried out for 118 patients with airway stenosis who were treated with airway stent placement. Results: The symptom of dyspnea was markedly relieved after stent implantation in all 118 patients with airway stenosis. Conclusion: To strengthen the preoperative psychological nursing and operative posture training, to make close postoperative watch on vital signs, to adopt some prevention measures for possible complications and to give necessary medical advises at the time of discharge are very helpful for patient's recovery after the surgery. (authors)

  14. Manipulation of Cell Physiology Enables Gene Silencing in Well-differentiated Airway Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sateesh Krishnamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of RNA interference-based gene silencing to the airway surface epithelium holds great promise to manipulate host and pathogen gene expression for therapeutic purposes. However, well-differentiated airway epithelia display significant barriers to double-stranded small-interfering RNA (siRNA delivery despite testing varied classes of nonviral reagents. In well-differentiated primary pig airway epithelia (PAE or human airway epithelia (HAE grown at the air–liquid interface (ALI, the delivery of a Dicer-substrate small-interfering RNA (DsiRNA duplex against hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT with several nonviral reagents showed minimal uptake and no knockdown of the target. In contrast, poorly differentiated cells (2–5-day post-seeding exhibited significant oligonucleotide internalization and target knockdown. This finding suggested that during differentiation, the barrier properties of the epithelium are modified to an extent that impedes oligonucleotide uptake. We used two methods to overcome this inefficiency. First, we tested the impact of epidermal growth factor (EGF, a known enhancer of macropinocytosis. Treatment of the cells with EGF improved oligonucleotide uptake resulting in significant but modest levels of target knockdown. Secondly, we used the connectivity map (Cmap database to correlate gene expression changes during small molecule treatments on various cells types with genes that change upon mucociliary differentiation. Several different drug classes were identified from this correlative assessment. Well-differentiated epithelia treated with DsiRNAs and LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, significantly improved gene silencing and concomitantly reduced target protein levels. These novel findings reveal that well-differentiated airway epithelia, normally resistant to siRNA delivery, can be pretreated with small molecules to improve uptake of synthetic oligonucleotide and RNA interference (RNAi responses.

  15. Sustained protein kinase D activation mediates respiratory syncytial virus-induced airway barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Fariba; DeSando, Samantha A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Chapman, Timothy J; Knowlden, Sara A; Beck, Lisa A; Georas, Steve N

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the regulation of airway epithelial barrier function is a new frontier in asthma and respiratory viral infections. Despite recent progress, little is known about how respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) acts at mucosal sites, and very little is known about its ability to influence airway epithelial barrier function. Here, we studied the effect of RSV infection on the airway epithelial barrier using model epithelia. 16HBE14o- bronchial epithelial cells were grown on Transwell inserts and infected with RSV strain A2. We analyzed (i) epithelial apical junction complex (AJC) function, measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran, and (ii) AJC structure using immunofluorescent staining. Cells were pretreated or not with protein kinase D (PKD) inhibitors. UV-irradiated RSV served as a negative control. RSV infection led to a significant reduction in TEER and increase in permeability. Additionally it caused disruption of the AJC and remodeling of the apical actin cytoskeleton. Pretreatment with two structurally unrelated PKD inhibitors markedly attenuated RSV-induced effects. RSV induced phosphorylation of the actin binding protein cortactin in a PKD-dependent manner. UV-inactivated RSV had no effect on AJC function or structure. Our results suggest that RSV-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption involves PKD-dependent actin cytoskeletal remodeling, possibly dependent on cortactin activation. Defining the mechanisms by which RSV disrupts epithelial structure and function should enhance our understanding of the association between respiratory viral infections, airway inflammation, and allergen sensitization. Impaired barrier function may open a potential new therapeutic target for RSV-mediated lung diseases.

  16. Test of the Starling resistor model in the human upper airway during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Andrew; Genta, Pedro R; Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Loring, Stephen H; White, David P; Jackson, Andrew C; Pedersen, Ole F; Butler, James P

    2014-12-15

    The human pharyngeal airway during sleep is conventionally modeled as a Starling resistor. However, inspiratory flow often decreases with increasing effort (negative effort dependence, NED) rather than remaining fixed as predicted by the Starling resistor model. In this study, we tested a major prediction of the Starling resistor model--that the resistance of the airway upstream from the site of collapse remains fixed during flow limitation. During flow limitation in 24 patients with sleep apnea, resistance at several points along the pharyngeal airway was measured using a pressure catheter with multiple sensors. Resistance between the nose and the site of collapse (the upstream segment) was measured before and after the onset of flow limitation to determine whether the upstream dimensions remained fixed (as predicted by the Starling resistor model) or narrowed (a violation of the Starling resistor model). The upstream resistance from early to mid inspiration increased considerably during flow limitation (by 35 ± 41 cmH2O · liter(-1) · s(-1), P < 0.001). However, there was a wide range of variability between patients, and the increase in upstream resistance was strongly correlated with the amount of NED (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, patients with little NED exhibited little upstream narrowing (consistent with the Starling model), and patients with large NED exhibited large upstream narrowing (inconsistent with the Starling model). These findings support the idea that there is not a single model of pharyngeal collapse, but rather that different mechanisms may dominate in different patients. These differences could potentially be exploited for treatment selection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Ship operation and failure mode analysis using a maneuver simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Molina, Rafael; de los Santos, Francisco; Camarero, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    In a ship or floating structure operation the agents that contribute to the systems behaviour are not only those derived from fluid-structure interaction, but also the ones linked to mooring-control line set-up evolution and human interaction. Therefore, the analysis of such systems is affected by boundary conditions that change during a complete operation. Frequently, monitoring techniques in laboratory (model) and field (prototype) are based in different instrumental techniques adding difficulty to data comparison and, in some cases, inducing precision and repeatability errors. For this reason, the main aim of this study is to develop the methods and tools to achieve a deep knowledge of those floating systems and obtain capabilities to optimize their operationally thresholds. This abstract presents a methodology and an instrumental system applicable both in field and laboratory: SRECMOCOS Project (Small scale REal-time Caisson MOnitoring and COntrol System). SRECMOCOS compiles three modules. For the monitoring and control of the structure it has been developed a synchronized open and modular microcontroller-based electronic system that comprises sensors, to monitor agents and reactions, and actuators to perform pertinent actions after processing the sensors' data. A secondary objective has been to design and implement a global scaled simulator (1:22), at the 3D basin of The Harbour Research Lab at Technical University of Madrid, in which climatic agents and those derived from the rig/maneuvering setup and the structural design were included. The particular case of Campamento's drydock, in Algeciras Bay (Spain), has been used to apply and validate the methodology. SRECMOCOS Project conjugates control, monitoring and wireless communication systems in a real time basis, offering the possibility to register and simulate all the parameters involved in port operations. This approach offers a step forward into a monitoring strategy to be included in monitoring

  18. Goishi tea consumption inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR is one of the important traits that characterize bronchial asthma. Goishi tea is a post-heating fermented tea that has been reported to have higher free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we evaluated the prophylactic effects of Goishi tea on AHR in BALB/c mice. Results The number of inflammatory cells in BAL fluid was considerably reduced in Goishi tea/Der f and Gallic acid/Der f groups as compared with Tap water/Der f group. Regarding inflammatory cells in BAL, a significant reduction of eosinophils and neutrophils was observed in Goishi tea-treated mice (p Der f group (p Der f group. In asthmatic mice (Tap water/Der f group, the intensity of airway resistance increased simultaneously with the increase in acetylcholine concentration in a dose-dependant way. AHR was significantly inhibited in Goishi tea/Der f and Gallic acid/Der f (p Der f group. Regarding serum specific-IgG1, significantly lower levels of this antibody were observed in Goishi tea/Der f and Gallic acid/Der f groups as compared with the Tap water/Der f group (p Conclusions The results suggest that Goishi tea consumption exerted an inhibitory effect on eosinophilic and neutrophilic infiltration in the lung, attenuated the increase in airway resistance and increased the production of adiponectin; thus reducing Der f induced allergic inflammatory process in mice.

  19. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  20. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of