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Sample records for airway lung disease

  1. Patient-Specific Airway Wall Remodeling in Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mona; Kuschner, Ware G; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lung disease affects more than a quarter of the adult population; yet, the mechanics of the airways are poorly understood. The pathophysiology of chronic lung disease is commonly characterized by mucosal growth and smooth muscle contraction of the airways, which initiate an inward folding of the mucosal layer and progressive airflow obstruction. Since the degree of obstruction is closely correlated with the number of folds, mucosal folding has been extensively studied in idealized circular cross sections. However, airflow obstruction has never been studied in real airway geometries; the behavior of imperfect, non-cylindrical, continuously branching airways remains unknown. Here we model the effects of chronic lung disease using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth. We perform finite element analysis of patient-specific Y-branch segments created from magnetic resonance images. We demonstrate that the mucosal folding pattern is insensitive to the specific airway geometry, but that it critically depends on the mucosal and submucosal stiffness, thickness, and loading mechanism. Our results suggests that patient-specific airway models with inherent geometric imperfections are more sensitive to obstruction than idealized circular models. Our models help to explain the pathophysiology of airway obstruction in chronic lung disease and hold promise to improve the diagnostics and treatment of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and respiratory failure. PMID:25821112

  2. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Eyring

    Full Text Available Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS or filtered air (FA. DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3 are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of inhaled radioactive aerosol deposition patterns in the lungs in obstructive airways disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uneven distribution of inhaled aerosol in the lungs is the characteristics of obstructive airways disease such as chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema, and has been classified typically into peripheral and central deposition patterns, respectively by visual inspection, whereas in the normal the distribution is homogeneous throughout the lungs. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the distribution of inhaled radioactivity in the lungs by way of matrixes by a computer. The seemingly homogeneous distribution pattern in normal subjects has been found to indicate a gradual change in count profile between the neighboring matrixes. The peripheral pattern indicates the patchy presence of small number of matrixes with excessive radioactivity throughout the lungs, and the central pattern, the presence of matrixes of excessive radioactivity along the major central airways forming a comma-like configuration superimposed on the peripheral pattern. Our computer analysis has a potentiality to characterize obstructive airways disease for a better understanding of their pathophysiology, which is not feasible by a simple visual inspection of images on a polaroid picture. (author)

  4. [Continuous positive airway pressure and high-frequency independent lung ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, E A; Vyzhigina, M A; Gal'perin, Iu S; Zhukova, S G; Titov, V A; Godin, A V

    2004-01-01

    The original hypoxemia, hypercapnia, high pulmonary hypertension, high resistance of microcirculation vessels, right volumetric ventricular overload, persistent sub-edema of pulmonary intersticium as well as disparity of ventilation and perfusion between both lungs are the main problems in patients with chronic obstructive disease of the lungs (CODL). Such patients are, as a rule, intolerant to the independent lung collaboration or artificial single-stage ventilation (ASV). Patients with respiratory insufficiency, stages 2 and 3, and with a pronounced impaired type of ventilation have originally a deranged blood gas composition, like hypoxemia or hypercapnia. The application of volume-controllable bi-pulmonary ASV in such patients maintains an adequate gas exchange hemodynamics. However, ASV is accompanied by a significantly reduced gas-exchange function of the single ventilated lung and by essentially worsened intrapulmonary hemodynamics. Therefore, what is needed is to use alternative methods of independent lung ventilation in order to eliminate the gas-exchange impairments and to enable surgical interventions at thoracic organs in such patients (who are intolerant to ASV). A choice of a method and means of oxygen supply to the independent lung is of great importance. The possibility to avoid a high pressure in the airways, while maintaining, simultaneously, an adequate gas exchange, makes the method related with maintaining a constant positive pressure in the airways (CPPA) a priority one in case of CODL patients. The use of constant high-frequency ventilation in the independent lung in patients with obstructive pulmonary lesions does not improve the gas exchange or hemodynamics. Simultaneously, a growing total pulmonary resistance and an increasing pressure in the pulmonary artery are observed. Consequently, the discussed method must not be used for the ventilation support of the independent lung in patients with the obstructive type of the impaired external

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  6. Early cystic fibrosis lung disease: Role of airway surface dehydration and lessons from preventive rehydration therapies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Marcus A; Graeber, Simon Y; Stahl, Mirjam; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease starts in the first months of life and remains one of the most common fatal hereditary diseases. Early therapeutic interventions may provide an opportunity to prevent irreversible lung damage and improve outcome. Airway surface dehydration is a key disease mechanism in CF, however, its role in the in vivo pathogenesis and as therapeutic target in early lung disease remains poorly understood. Mice with airway-specific overexpression of the epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC-Tg) recapitulate airway surface dehydration and phenocopy CF lung disease. Recent studies in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration produces early mucus plugging in the absence of mucus hypersecretion, which triggers airway inflammation, promotes bacterial infection and causes early mortality. Preventive rehydration therapy with hypertonic saline or amiloride effectively reduced mucus plugging and mortality in neonatal βENaC-Tg mice. These results support clinical testing of preventive/early rehydration strategies in infants and young children with CF. PMID:24561284

  7. Carbon Particles in Airway Macrophage as a Surrogate Marker in the Early Detection of Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, R.; KG Basavarajappa; K Nagendra; D. Sanjay; C Gouli; CS CS VinodKumar; NK Kalappanavar

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter may impair lung function in children. Objective: Using the carbon content of airway macrophages as a marker of individual exposure to particulate matter derived from fossil fuel, we sought direct evidence for this association.Methods: 300 children from puffed rice industrial areas and 300 children from population living in green zone were selected randomly. Airway macrophages were obtained from healthy children t...

  8. High resolution CT in obstructive and air-ways lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics briefly discussed i.e. emphysema, its diagnosis, bronchiectasis etc. HRTC (high resolution computerized tomography) in diagnosing both disease and small airways abnormalities also discussed. (33 refs.)

  9. Uncontrolled airway inflammation in lung disease represents a defect in counter-regulatory signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Planaguma, Anna; Levy, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Counter-regulatory lipid mediators are generated during airway inflammation to promote resolution. Defects in the production of these lipid mediators have now been associated with several diseases of persistent airway inflammation. Lipoxins are the lead members of this class of anti-inflammatory and proresolving chemical mediators. Recently, several new families of fatty acid-derived counter-regulatory mediators have been discovered, including the resolvins and protectins. Diminished formatio...

  10. 133Xe three-phase ventilation scans characterize airways disease and aid diagnosis of pulmonary embolism on lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 133Xe has largely been replaced by 99Tcm aerosols for the ventilation component of lung scans performed for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. However, aerosols such as Technegas are deposited in the small airways and alveoli and constitute only a snapshot of a single inhalation, which may also be compromised by deposition of activity in central airways. All three phases of ventilatory function - inhalation, equilibration and expiration - are characterized on 133Xe studies, which allows definition of focal ventilatory dysfunction, particularly in obstructive or bullous airways disease. A series of 15 patients with normal inspiratory studies but focal abnormalities in equilibrium and/or washout phases of the 133Xe ventilation scan were reviewed with the concomitant lung perfusion study. The normal inspiratory phase of the 133Xe ventilation scan in these patients reflects the expected deposition pattern of radiolabelled aerosols. However, focal retention of radioxenon activity in the washout phase matched perfusion deficits and allowed scintigraphic differentiation of airways disease from pulmonary embolism in these patients with a normal inspiratory study

  11. Effect of lung volume on airway luminal area assessed by computed tomography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Kambara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although airway luminal area (Ai is affected by lung volume (LV, how is not precisely understood. We hypothesized that the effect of LV on Ai would differ by airway generation, lung lobe, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD severity. METHODS: Sixty-seven subjects (15 at risk, 18, 20, and 14 for COPD stages 1, 2, and 3 underwent pulmonary function tests and computed tomography scans at full inspiration and expiration (at functional residual capacity. LV and eight selected identical airways were measured in the right lung. Ai was measured at the mid-portion of the 3(rd, the segmental bronchus, to 6(th generation of the airways, leading to 32 measurements per subject. RESULTS: The ratio of expiratory to inspiratory LV (LV E/I ratio and Ai (Ai E/I ratio was defined for evaluation of changes. The LV E/I ratio increased as COPD severity progressed. As the LV E/I ratio was smaller, the Ai E/I ratio was smaller at any generation among the subjects. Overall, the Ai E/I ratios were significantly smaller at the 5(th (61.5% and 6(th generations (63.4% and than at the 3(rd generation (73.6%, p<0.001 for each, and also significantly lower in the lower lobe than in the upper or middle lobe (p<0.001 for each. And, the Ai E/I ratio decreased as COPD severity progressed only when the ratio was corrected by the LV E/I ratio (at risk v.s. stage 3 p<0.001, stage 1 v.s. stage 3 p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: From full inspiration to expiration, the airway luminal area shrinks more at the distal airways compared with the proximal airways and in the lower lobe compared with the other lobes. Generally, the airways shrink more as COPD severity progresses, but this phenomenon becomes apparent only when lung volume change from inspiration to expiration is taken into account.

  12. Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ePublications > Our ePublications > Lung disease fact sheet ePublications Lung disease fact sheet This information in Spanish (en ... disease? More information on lung disease What is lung disease? Lung disease refers to disorders that affect ...

  13. Genetic Deletion and Pharmacological Inhibition of PI3Kγ Reduces Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation and Lung Damage in Mice with Cystic Fibrosis-Like Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Galluzzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation is a key feature of progressive lung damage in cystic fibrosis (CF. Thus, reducing airway inflammation is a major goal to prevent lung damage in CF. However, current anti-inflammatory drugs have shown several limits. PI3Kγ plays a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment and activation; in the present study we determined the effects of genetic deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of PI3Kγ on airway inflammation and structural lung damage in a mouse model of CF lung disease. Methods. βENaC overexpressing mice (βENaC-Tg were backcrossed with PI3Kγ-deficient (PI3KγKO mice. Tissue damage was assessed by histology and morphometry and inflammatory cell number was evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Furthermore, we assessed the effect of a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor (AS-605240 on inflammatory cell number in BALF. Results. Genetic deletion of PI3Kγ decreased neutrophil numbers in BALF of PI3KγKO/βENaC-Tg mice, and this was associated with reduced emphysematous changes. Treatment with the PI3Kγ inhibitor AS-605240 decreased the number of neutrophils in BALF of βENaC-Tg mice, reproducing the effect observed with genetic deletion of the enzyme. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the biological efficacy of both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of PI3Kγ in reducing chronic neutrophilic inflammation in CF-like lung disease in vivo.

  14. A Dynamic Bronchial Airway Gene Expression Signature of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Lung Function Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Florido, Roberta; Campbell, Joshua; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Xiaohui; Duclos, Grant; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Perdomo, Catalina; Dumont, Charles; Coxson, Harvey O.; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Sin, Don; Pare, Peter; Hogg, James C.; McWilliams, Annette; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Timens, Wim; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Sebastiani, Paola; O'Connor, George T.; Bild, Andrea H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Lam, Stephen; Spira, Avrum; Lenburg, Marc E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Molecular phenotyping of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been impeded in part by the difficulty in obtaining lung tissue samples from individuals with impaired lung function. Objectives: We sought to determine whether COPD-associated processes are reflected in gene express

  15. Interpretation of bronchodilator response in patients with obstructive airways disease. The Dutch Chronic Non-Specific Lung Disease (CNSLD) Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, P L; Quanjer, P. H.; Postma, D. S.; Kerstjens, H.A.; Koëter, G. H.; Dekhuijzen, P. N.; Sluiter, H J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no agreement on how a bronchodilator response should be expressed. Ideally, the index used should be able to distinguish asthma from chronic obstructive lung disease and be independent of initial FEV1. METHODS: Two hundred and seventy four adults (aged 18-60 years) outpatients with obstructive airways disease were studied. Patients were divided into syndrome groups on the basis of a standardised history: asthma (n = 99), asthmatic bronchitis (n = 88), and chronic obstruct...

  16. The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biselli, Paolo; Grossman, Peter R; Kirkness, Jason P; Patil, Susheel P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Schneider, Hartmut

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea disease severity. Sleep studies, including quantitative assessment of airflow at various nasal pressure levels, were conducted to determine upper airway mechanical properties [passive critical closing pressure (Pcrit)] and for quantifying respiratory timing responses to experimentally induced IFL. COPD patients had lower passive Pcrit than their matched controls (COPD: -2.8 ± 0.9 cmH2O; controls: -0.5 ± 0.5 cmH2O, P = 0.03), and there was an inverse relationship of subject's functional residual capacity and passive Pcrit (-1.7 cmH2O/l increase in functional residual capacity, r(2) = 0.27, P = 0.002). In response to IFL, inspiratory duty cycle increased more (P = 0.03) in COPD patients (0.40 to 0.54) than in controls (0.41 to 0.51) and led to a marked reduction in expiratory time from 2.5 to 1.5 s (P hyperinflation due to a marked reduction in expiratory time. PMID:26048975

  17. Dissociation of lung function and airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapperre, TS; Snoeck-Stroband, JB; Gosman, M.M.; Stolk, J; Sont, JK; Jansen, DF; Kerstjens, HAM; Postma, DS; Sterk, PJ

    2004-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined by progressive, irreversible airflow limitation and an inflammatory response of the lungs, usually to cigarette smoke. However, COPD is a heterogeneous disease in terms of clinical, physiologic, and pathologic presentation. We aimed to evaluate

  18. IL-32 expression in the airway epithelial cells of patients with Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, X.; Ovrutsky, A.R.; Kartalija, M.; Chmura, K.; Kamali, A.; Honda, J.R.; Oberley-Deegan, R.E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Crapo, J.D.; Chang, L.Y.; Chan, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lung disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms is increasing. A greater understanding of the host immune response to MAC organisms will provide a foundation to develop novel therapies for these recalcitrant infections. IL-32 is a newly described pro-inflammatory cytokine that enhanc

  19. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger;

    2013-01-01

    -dose CT for a period of 5 years (table 1). Images were reconstructed both with high contrast resolution (3 mm, kernel C) for emphysema analysis and with high spatial resolution (1 mm, kernel D) for airway analysis. Images were analysed by in-house developed software designed to segment lungs and localize...... the interior and exterior airway wall surface in three dimensions, and branches were matched in consecutive scans by image registration. Emphysema was defined as attenuation limits were set at

  20. Particles causing lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell ...

  1. Airway epithelium in obliterative airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Lung transplantation is currently the only available treatment for endstage lung disease patients. Despite the success of improved modern lung transplantation with the introduction of new surgical techniques, improved immunosuppressive agents and innovations in managing of acute rejection and infect

  2. Dysfunctional lung anatomy and small airways degeneration in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgel PR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clémence Martin, Justine Frija, Pierre-Régis BurgelDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP and Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, FranceAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Direct measurement of airways resistance using invasive techniques has revealed that the site of obstruction is located in the small conducting airways, ie, bronchioles with a diameter < 2 mm. Anatomical changes in these airways include structural abnormalities of the conducting airways (eg, peribronchiolar fibrosis, mucus plugging and loss of alveolar attachments due to emphysema, which result in destabilization of these airways related to reduced elastic recoil. The relative contribution of structural abnormalities in small conducting airways and emphysema has been a matter of much debate. The present article reviews anatomical changes and inflammatory mechanisms in small conducting airways and in the adjacent lung parenchyma, with a special focus on recent anatomical and imaging data suggesting that the initial event takes place in the small conducting airways and results in a dramatic reduction in the number of airways, together with a reduction in the cross-sectional area of remaining airways. Implications of these findings for the development of novel therapies are briefly discussed.Keywords: emphysema, small airways disease, airway mucus, innate immunity, adaptive immunity

  3. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  4. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  5. Association between lung function and airway wall density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Tedrow, John; Park, Sang C.; Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Drescher, John M.; Gur, David; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2009-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examination is often used to quantify the relation between lung function and airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this preliminary study, we examined the association between lung function and airway wall computed attenuation ("density") in 200 COPD screening subjects. Percent predicted FVC (FVC%), percent predicted FEV1 (FEV1%), and the ratio of FEV1 to FVC as a percentage (FEV1/FVC%) were measured post-bronchodilator. The apical bronchus of the right upper lobe was manually selected from CT examinations for evaluation. Total airway area, lumen area, wall area, lumen perimeter and wall area as fraction of the total airway area were computed. Mean HU (meanHU) and maximum HU (maxHU) values were computed across pixels assigned membership in the wall and with a HU value greater than -550. The Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) between FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% and meanHU were -0.221 (p = 0.002), -0.175 (p = 0.014), and -0.110 (p = 0.123), respectively. The PCCs for maxHU were only significant for FVC%. The correlations between lung function and the airway morphometry parameters were slightly stronger compared to airway wall density. MeanHU was significantly correlated with wall area (PCC = 0.720), airway area (0.498) and wall area percent (0.611). This preliminary work demonstrates that airway wall density is associated with lung function. Although the correlations in our study were weaker than a recent study, airway wall density initially appears to be an important parameter in quantitative CT analysis of COPD.

  6. Aspergillus tubingensis: a major filamentous fungus found in the airways of patients with lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Magali; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Cassagne, Carole; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Brégeon, Fabienne; Hendrickx, Marijke; Gomez, Carine; Ranque, Stéphane; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    The black Aspergillus group comprises A. niger and 18 other species, which are morphologically indistinguishable. Among this species subset, A. tubingensis, described in less than 30 human cases before 2014, is primarily isolated from ear, nose, and throat samples. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique to identify microbes in diagnostic settings. We applied this method to identify 1,720 filamentous fungi routinely isolated from clinical samples our laboratory over a two-year study period. Accordingly, we found 85 isolates of A. niger, 58 of A. tubingensis, and six other black Aspergillus (4 A. carbonarius and 2 A. japonicus). A. tubingensis was the fifth most frequent mold isolated in our mycology laboratory, primarily isolated from respiratory samples (40/58 isolates). In this study, we mainly aimed to describe the clinical pattern of Aspergillus tubingensisWe analyzed the clinical features of the patients in whom A. tubingensis had been isolated from 40 respiratory samples. Thirty patients suffered from cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or other types of chronic respiratory failure. Strikingly, 20 patients were experiencing respiratory acute exacerbation at the time the sample was collected. Antifungal susceptibility testing of 36 A. tubingensis isolates showed lower amphotericin B MICs (P cystic fibrosis and chronic pulmonary diseases. PMID:26773134

  7. MEDIATING EFFECTS OF SMOKING AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE AIRWAY DISEASE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CHRNA5-A3 GENETIC LOCUS AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Spitz, Margaret R.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Wu, Xifeng; Shete, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lung cancer have shown that the CHRNA5-A3 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1 is strongly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and nicotine dependence, and thought to be associated with chronic obstructive airways disease as well. However, it has not been established whether the association between genetic variants and lung cancer risk is a direct one or one mediated by nicotine dependence. Methods In this paper we applied a rigorous statistical approach, mediation analysis, to examine the mediating effect of smoking behavior and self-reported physician-diagnosed emphysema (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) on the relationship between the CHRNA5-A3 region genetic variant rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Results Our results showed that rs1051730 is directly associated with lung cancer risk, but that it is also associated with lung cancer risk through its effect on both smoking behavior and COPD. Furthermore, we showed that COPD is a mediating phenotype that explains part of the effect of smoking behavior on lung cancer. Our results also suggested that smoking behavior is a mediator of the relationship between rs1051730 and COPD risk. Conclusions Smoking behavior and COPD are mediators of the association between the SNP rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Also, COPD is a mediator of the association between smoking behavior and lung cancer. Finally, smoking behavior also has mediating effects on the association between the SNP and COPD. PMID:20564069

  8. AEROSOL DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AIRWAY DISEASE: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progressive lung disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a continuous interaction of the processes of airway obstruction, infection and inflammation. ecent literature has suggested that the manifestation of CF could compromise the successful administration of pharmacologi...

  9. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buh, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garces, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Keenoy, E. de Manuel; Masjedi, M. R.; Meten, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Mamas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will ad

  10. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will...

  11. Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  12. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise [Institut National des Telecommunications, Department ARTEMIS, Evry (France); Brauner, Michel W. [Avicenne Hospital, UFR SMBH Paris XIII, Bobigny (France); Lenoir, Stephane [Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris (France)

    2002-05-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  13. Distinct PKA and Epac compartmentalization in airway function and plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Racke, Kurt; Schmidt, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are obstructive lung diseases characterized by airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Next to inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells, airway mesenchymal cells, including airway smooth muscle cells and (myo)fibro

  14. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui Salman; Brightling Christopher E

    2007-01-01

    Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: ...

  15. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  16. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  17. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Ian P

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The availability of a draft sequence for the human genome will revolutionise research into airway disease. This review deals with two of the most important areas impinging on the treatment of patients: pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Considerable inter-individual variation exists at the DNA level in targets for medication, and variability in response to treatment may, in part, be determined by this genetic variation. Increased knowledge about the human genome might also permit the identification of novel therapeutic targets by expression profiling at the RNA (genomics or protein (proteomics level. This review describes recent advances in pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics with regard to airway disease.

  18. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  19. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  20. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Salman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: eosinophilic, neutrophilic, mixed inflammatory and paucigranulocytic asthma. Recent studies suggest that these subgroups may differ in their etiology, immunopathology and response to treatment. Importantly, novel treatment approaches targeted at specific patterns of airway inflammation are emerging, making an appreciation of subphenotypes particularly relevant. New developments in phenotyping inflammation and other facets of airway disease mean that we are entering an era where careful phenotyping will lead to targeted therapy.

  1. Lung disease - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  2. PPARγ as a Potential Target to Treat Airway Mucus Hypersecretion in Chronic Airway Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway mucus hypersecretion (AMH is a key pathophysiological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AMH contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, and it is associated with reduced lung function and high rates of hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that AMH should be a target in the treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that a key regulator of airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. PPARγ is expressed in structural, immune, and inflammatory cells in the lung. PPARγ is involved in mucin production, and PPARγ agonists can inhibit mucin synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that PPARγ is a novel target in the treatment of AMH and that further work on this transcription factor may lead to new therapies for chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  3. Novel therapeutic strategies for lung disorders associated with airway remodelling and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Simon G; Moodley, Yuben; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine release, epithelial damage, airway/lung remodelling and fibrosis are central features of inflammatory lung disorders, which include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although the lung has some ability to repair itself from acute injury, in the presence of ongoing pathological stimuli and/or insults that lead to chronic disease, it no longer retains the capacity to heal, resulting in fibrosis, the final common pathway that causes an irreversible loss of lung function. Despite inflammation, genetic predisposition/factors, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and mechanotransduction being able to independently contribute to airway remodelling and fibrosis, current therapies for inflammatory lung diseases are limited by their ability to only target the inflammatory component of the disease without having any marked effects on remodelling (epithelial damage and fibrosis) that can cause lung dysfunction independently of inflammation. Furthermore, as subsets of patients suffering from these diseases are resistant to currently available therapies (such as corticosteroids), novel therapeutic approaches are required to combat all aspects of disease pathology. This review discusses emerging therapeutic approaches, such as trefoil factors, relaxin, histone deacetylase inhibitors and stem cells, amongst others that have been able to target airway inflammation and airway remodelling while improving related lung dysfunction. A better understanding of the mode of action of these therapies and their possible combined effects may lead to the identification of their clinical potential in the setting of lung disease, either as adjunct or alternative therapies to currently available treatments. PMID:24513131

  4. Lipid Analysis of Airway Epithelial Cells for Studying Respiratory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zehethofer, Nicole; Bermbach, Saskia; Hagner, Stefanie; Garn, Holger; Müller, Julia; Goldmann, Torsten; Lindner, Buko; Schwudke, Dominik; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis and COPD. Studies concerning the function of the lipid metabolism of the airway epithelium are so far based only on the detection of lipids by immunohistochemistry but quantitative analyses have not been performed. Although recent advances in mass spectrometry have allowed to identify a variety of lipid classes simultaneously in isolated tissue samples, up until now...

  5. Specific immune responses against airway epithelial cells in a transgenic mouse-trachea transplantation model for obliterative airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, N; de Haan, A; Harmsen, MC; Kroese, FGM; de Leij, LFMH; Prop, J

    2003-01-01

    Background. Immune injury to airway epithelium is suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) after clinical lung transplantation. In several studies, a rejection model of murine trachea transplants is used, resulting in obliterative airway disease (OAD) w

  6. Influence of Chronic Sinusitis and Nasal Polyp on the Lower Airway of Subjects Without Lower Airway Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Suh-Young; Yoon, Soon Ho; Song, Woo-Jung; Lee, So-Hee; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Sun-Sin; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Upper and lower respiratory tract pathologies are believed to be interrelated; however, the impact of upper airway inflammation on lung function in subjects without lung disease has not been evaluated. This study investigated the association of CT finding suggesting chronic sinusitis and lung function in healthy subjects without lung disease. Methods This was a retrospective study of prospectively collected data from 284 subjects who underwent a pulmonary function test, bronchial prov...

  7. United airway disease: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Giavina-Bianchi P; Aun MV; Takejima P; Kalil J; Agondi RC

    2016-01-01

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi,* Marcelo Vivolo Aun,* Priscila Takejima, Jorge Kalil, Rosana Câmara Agondi Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil*These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is str...

  8. Airway hyperresponsiveness and development of lung function in adolescence and adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Porsbjerg, Celeste;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term longitudinal studies of lung function from childhood to adulthood are important in linking our understanding of childhood risk factors to adult disease. Airway hyperresponsiveness has been shown to independently affect lung function growth in studies of adolescence. The obje......BACKGROUND: Long-term longitudinal studies of lung function from childhood to adulthood are important in linking our understanding of childhood risk factors to adult disease. Airway hyperresponsiveness has been shown to independently affect lung function growth in studies of adolescence....... The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that airway hyperresponsiveness has an independent deleterious effect on lung function in adolescence that extends into adulthood. METHODS: A random population sample (n = 983) aged 7-17 from Copenhagen was followed longitudinally for 20 years with four...

  9. Airway vascular reactivity and vascularisation in human chronic airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Simon R; Boustany, Sarah; Burgess, Janette K; Hirst, Stuart J; Sharma, Hari S; Simcock, David E; Suravaram, Padmini R; Weckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Altered bronchial vascular reactivity and remodelling including angiogenesis are documented features of asthma and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Expansion of the bronchial vasculature under these conditions involves both functional (vasodilation, hyperperfusion, increased microvascular

  10. Rheumatoid lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  11. A novel small molecule target in human airway smooth muscle for potential treatment of obstructive lung diseases: a staged high-throughput biophysical screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Rechenberg Moritz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A newly identified mechanism of smooth muscle relaxation is the interaction between the small heat shock protein 20 (HSP20 and 14-3-3 proteins. Focusing upon this class of interactions, we describe here a novel drug target screening approach for treating airflow obstruction in asthma. Methods Using a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP assay, we screened a library of compounds that could act as small molecule modulators of HSP20 signals. We then applied two quantitative, cell-based biophysical methods to assess the functional efficacy of these molecules and rank-ordered their abilities to relax isolated human airway smooth muscle (ASM. Scaling up to the level of an intact tissue, we confirmed in a concentration-responsive manner the potency of the cell-based hit compounds. Results Among 58,019 compound tested, 268 compounds caused 20% or more reduction of the polarized emission in the FP assay. A small subset of these primary screen hits, belonging to two scaffolds, caused relaxation of isolated ASM cell in vitro and attenuated active force development of intact tissue ex vivo. Conclusions This staged biophysical screening paradigm provides proof-of-principle for high-throughput and cost-effective discovery of new small molecule therapeutic agents for obstructive lung diseases.

  12. Role of Airway Recruitment and Derecruitment in Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadiali, S. N.; Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical forces generated during the ventilation of patients with acute lung injury causes significant lung damage and inflammation. Low-volume ventilation protocols are commonly used to prevent stretch-related injury that occurs at high lung volumes. However, the cyclic closure and reopening of pulmonary airways at low lung volumes, i.e., derecruitment and recruitment, also causes significant lung damage and inflammation. In this review, we provide an overview of how biomedical enginee...

  13. Aspiration-related lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Andrew D; Smith, Tristan R; Poletto, Dana M; Tavora, Fabio; Chung, Jonathan H; Nallamshetty, Leelakrishna; Hazelton, Todd R; Rojas, Carlos A

    2014-09-01

    Aspiration is a common but underrecognized clinicopathologic entity, with varied radiographic manifestations. Aspiration represents a spectrum of diseases, including diffuse aspiration bronchiolitis, aspiration pneumonitis, airway obstruction by foreign body, exogenous lipoid pneumonia, interstitial fibrosis, and aspiration pneumonia with or without lung abscess formation. Many patients who aspirate do not present with disease, suggesting that pathophysiology is related to a variety of factors, including decreased levels of consciousness, dysphagia, impaired mucociliary clearance, composition of aspirate, and impaired host defenses. In this pictorial essay, we will review the different types of aspiration lung diseases, focusing on their imaging features and differential diagnosis. PMID:24911122

  14. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  15. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-09-01

    correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC, FEV1/Pre (justified r=-0.308, P<0.001; justified r=-0.295, P=0.001, respectively and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=-0.289, P=0.001; justified r=-0.273, P=0.002, respectively, but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001, the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively. Besides, multivariable linear analysis showed that FEV1/FVC, CRP, and TIMP-1 were independent parameters associated with PAI-1. Conclusion: Our findings first illustrate that elevated serum PAI-1 levels are related to the lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and SAO in COPD, suggesting that PAI-1 may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of COPD. Keywords: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, systemic inflammation, small airway obstruction (SAO

  16. 气道表面液转运与囊性纤维化肺病的病因研究%Airway surface liquid transport and pathogenesis research of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧传宝; 卢丽丽; 王晓飞

    2009-01-01

    It has been considered that dysfunction of ions and liquid transport in airway epithelia is a main pathogenic factor of genetic cystic fibrosis lung disease. However, the problem about how airway surface liquid transport makes cystic fibrosis lung inflamed and impaired, has been argued in researches. Starting with explaining the cellular mechanisms of airway surface liquid transport, this article reviews the pathologic and genetic characteristics of cystic fibrosis lung disease and the research progress of late years in cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.%呼吸道上皮的离子和液体的转运功能失调,一直被认为是遗传性疾病囊性纤维化肺病的主要致病因素,但学术界对气道表面液转运缺陷如何引致囊性纤维化肺的感染和受损存在不同的观点.本文从解释气道表面液转运的细胞机制入手,综述了囊性纤维化肺病的病理和遗传特征和近年国际上对囊性纤维化肺病病因的研究进展.

  17. Effects of lung inflation on airway heterogeneity during histaminergic bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W; Mitzner, Wayne; Brown, Robert H

    2013-09-01

    Lung inflation has been shown to dilate airways by altering the mechanical equilibrium between opposing airway and parenchymal forces. However, it is not known how heterogeneously such dilation occurs throughout the airway tree. In six anesthetized dogs, we measured the diameters of five to six central airway segments using high-resolution computed tomography, along with respiratory input impedance (Zrs) during generalized aerosol histamine challenge, and local histamine challenge in which the agonist was instilled directly onto the epithelia of the imaged central airways. Airway diameters and Zrs were measured at 12 and 25 cmH2O. The Zrs spectra were fitted with a model that incorporated continuous distributions of airway resistances. Airway heterogeneity was quantified using the coefficient of variation for predefined airway distribution functions. Significant reductions in average central airway diameter were observed at 12 cmH2O for both aerosolized and local challenges, along with significant increases upon inflation to 25 cmH2O. No significant differences were observed for the coefficient of variation of airway diameters under any condition. Significant increases in effective airway resistance as measured by Zrs were observed only for the aerosolized challenge at 12 cmH2O, which was completely reversed upon inflation. We conclude that the lung periphery may be the most dominant contributor to increases in airway resistance and tissue elastance during bronchoconstriction induced by aerosolized histamine. However, isolated constriction of only a few central airway segments may also affect tissue stiffness via interdependence with their surrounding parenchyma. PMID:23813528

  18. Generation of ESC-derived Mouse Airway Epithelial Cells Using Decellularized Lung Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Jinxia; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lung lineage differentiation requires integration of complex environmental cues that include growth factor signaling, cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to this complexity, recapitulation of lung development in vitro to promote differentiation of stem cells to lung epithelial cells has been challenging. In this protocol, decellularized lung scaffolds are used to mimic the 3-dimensional environment of the lung and generate stem cell-derived airway epithelial cells. Mouse embryonic stem cell are first differentiated to the endoderm lineage using an embryoid body (EB) culture method with activin A. Endoderm cells are then seeded onto decellularized scaffolds and cultured at air-liquid interface for up to 21 days. This technique promotes differentiation of seeded cells to functional airway epithelial cells (ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells) without additional growth factor supplementation. This culture setup is defined, serum-free, inexpensive, and reproducible. Although there is limited contamination from non-lung endoderm lineages in culture, this protocol only generates airway epithelial populations and does not give rise to alveolar epithelial cells. Airway epithelia generated with this protocol can be used to study cell-matrix interactions during lung organogenesis and for disease modeling or drug-discovery platforms of airway-related pathologies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:27214388

  19. The Role of CLCA Proteins in Inflammatory Airway Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anand C.; Brett, Tom J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit stereotyped traits that are variably expressed in each person. In experimental mouse models of chronic lung disease, these individual disease traits can be genetically segregated and thereby linked to distinct determinants. Functional genomic analysis indicates that at least one of these traits, mucous cell metaplasia, depends on members of the calcium-activated chloride channel (CLCA) gene family. Here we review advances in the biochemistry of the CLCA family and the evidence of a role for CLCA family members in the development of mucous cell metaplasia and possibly airway hyperreactivity in experimental models and in humans. Based on this information, we develop the model that CLCA proteins are not integral membrane proteins with ion channel function, but instead are secreted signaling molecules that specifically regulate airway target cells in healthy and disease conditions. PMID:18954282

  20. Airway and lung parenchyma morphology during the respiratory cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Escolar Castellón, J.de D.; Escolar, M.A.; Blasco, J; Ros, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Describe the morphological changes that take place in the lung parenchyma and in the airways during the respiratory cycle with a view to establishing a relationship between them. Subjects: Adult Wistar rats. Interventions: The lungs were fixed at seven different points in the respiratory cycle: Inflation, 10 and 20 cm. transpulmonary pressure, total lung capacity. Deflation, 20, 15, 10 and 0 cm transpulmonary pressure. Measurements: The lungs were pr...

  1. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilias; Papanikolaou; Konstantinos; Kagouridis; Spyros; A; Papiris

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD). Pulmonary manifestations(PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and highresolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheo-bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency.

  2. Lung function and airway inflammation monitoring after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Moermans, Catherine; Poulet, Christophe; Henket, Monique; Bonnet, Christophe; WILLEMS, Evelyne; Baron, Frédéric; Beguin, Yves; Louis, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Background Induced sputum is a non-invasive method to investigate airway inflammation, which has been used to assess pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, this procedure has not been studied in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods We monitored lung function in 182 patients who underwent HSCT and measured airway inflammation by sputum induction in 80 of them. We prospectively measured FEV1, FVC, DLCO, KCO, TLC, RV, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) as ...

  3. Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to view this content or go to source URL . Health Studies & Clinical Trials LIFE and VALID Lung ... 27709 Last Reviewed: June 03, 2016 This page URL: NIEHS website: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Email ...

  4. Interstitial lung diseases in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Interstitial lung diseases include a heterogeneous group of disorders that may affect men and women, but some of them are more frequent in females. Therefore, it is very important to take into account the female gender as a specific risk factor for some of these diseases. Discussion and Review of Literature. Interstitial lung diseases in women include the following: 1. diseases specific for female gender such as lymphangioleiomyomatosis, 2. disorders predominant in women due to the underlying disease (breast cancer and collagen vascular diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, Sjögren syndrome, 3. idiopathic lung diseases predominant in women such an idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia, 4. interstitial lung diseases predominant in women for unknown reason. All of these diseases have a wide spectrum of thoracic manifestations. Chest x-ray is a basic method for the detection, but computerized tomography is more useful for the assessment of the extensivity of parenchymal, airway and pleural manifestations of these diseases. Conclusion. A great variety of manifestations of interstitial lung diseases in women makes their detailed review impossible. Therefore, this article gives a short and overall review of these conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175046 i br. 175081

  5. Clinical significance of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): potential target for prevention of airway fibrosis and lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Mahmood, Malik Quasir; Walters, Eugene Haydn

    2014-01-01

    Unfortunately, the research effort directed into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been disproportionately weak compared to its social importance, and indeed it is the least researched of all common chronic conditions. Tobacco smoking is the major etiological factor. Only 25% of smokers will develop “classic” COPD; in these vulnerable individuals the progression of airways disease to symptomatic COPD occurs over two or more decades. We know surprisingly little about the pathobi...

  6. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all. PMID:26024343

  7. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27340818

  8. Interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  9. CT analysis of peripheral airway and lung lesions of patients with asthma and COPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sahara, Shin; Ohnishi, Tetsuro; Abe, Shosaku [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Koba, Hiroyuki [Teinekeijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ueno, Kan [Hitachi Medico Technology Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We compared peripheral airway and lung parenchyma images among patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy controls using high-resolution CT images taken by a multidetector-row CT scanner (Aquillion, Toshiba, Japan). CT images were saved as digital image and communication (DICOM) files and %low attenuation area (LAA) (<-960 Hounsfield Unit) was calculated with the imaging software. %LAA was significantly increased in patients with COPD (p<0.0001) and smokers with stable asthma (p<0.01) as compared with healthy controls. In stable asthma, mucous plugging in the airway sometime appeared, while during asthma exacerbation small nodules and mosaic pattern of peripheral lung field appeared. Since smoker's patients with asthma have hyper-secretion of sputum due to smoking, mucous plugging and airway inflammation may easily occur and consequently air trapping may increase. In the future, image diagnosis of peripheral airway should develop for early detection of airway diseases as a non-invasive examination. On the other hand, micro focus X-ray computed tomography system (Hitachi Medico Technology Co., Japan) can display CT images closely similar to the pictures of microscopic findings and it will be a useful tool to analyze radiologic-pathologic correlations of peripheral airways and lung parenchyma. (author)

  10. CT analysis of peripheral airway and lung lesions of patients with asthma and COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared peripheral airway and lung parenchyma images among patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy controls using high-resolution CT images taken by a multidetector-row CT scanner (Aquillion, Toshiba, Japan). CT images were saved as digital image and communication (DICOM) files and %low attenuation area (LAA) (<-960 Hounsfield Unit) was calculated with the imaging software. %LAA was significantly increased in patients with COPD (p<0.0001) and smokers with stable asthma (p<0.01) as compared with healthy controls. In stable asthma, mucous plugging in the airway sometime appeared, while during asthma exacerbation small nodules and mosaic pattern of peripheral lung field appeared. Since smoker's patients with asthma have hyper-secretion of sputum due to smoking, mucous plugging and airway inflammation may easily occur and consequently air trapping may increase. In the future, image diagnosis of peripheral airway should develop for early detection of airway diseases as a non-invasive examination. On the other hand, micro focus X-ray computed tomography system (Hitachi Medico Technology Co., Japan) can display CT images closely similar to the pictures of microscopic findings and it will be a useful tool to analyze radiologic-pathologic correlations of peripheral airways and lung parenchyma. (author)

  11. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  12. Impulse oscillometry in COPD: identification of measurements related to airway obstruction, airway conductance and lung volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Borrill, Zoë; Roy, Kay;

    2008-01-01

    ). In contrast, X5 changes were significantly related to FEV(1) changes over 1 year (r=-0.27, p=0.05), while for Fres changes there was a trend to statistical significance (p=0.08). CONCLUSIONS: IOS reactance measurements are more closely related than resistance measurements to other pulmonary function...... measurements in COPD patients. The IOS reactance measurements appear to be indicative of changes in pulmonary compliance caused by airflow obstruction.......BACKGROUND: Impulse oscillometry system (IOS) assesses pulmonary resistance and reactance. We set out to investigate which IOS measurements are related to airflow obstruction, airway conductance and lung volumes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Ninety-four COPD patients...

  13. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  14. Phase contrast X-ray imaging for the non-invasive detection of airway surfaces and lumen characteristics in mouse models of airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, K.K.W. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Karen.Siu@sync.monash.edu.au; Morgan, K.S.; Paganin, D.M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Boucher, R. [CF Research and Treatment Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States); Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N. [SPring-8/JASRI, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Parsons, D.W. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Women' s and Children' s Hospital, South Australia 5006 (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5006 (Australia); Women' s and Children' s Health Research Institute, South Australia, 5006 (Australia)

    2008-12-15

    We seek to establish non-invasive imaging able to detect and measure aspects of the biology and physiology of surface fluids present on airways, in order to develop novel outcome measures able to validate the success of proposed genetic or pharmaceutical therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease. Reduction of the thin airway surface liquid (ASL) is thought to be a central pathophysiological process in CF, causing reduced mucociliary clearance that supports ongoing infection and destruction of lung and airways. Current outcome measures in animal models, or humans, are insensitive to the small changes in ASL depth that ought to accompany successful airway therapies. Using phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI), we have directly examined the airway surfaces in the nasal airways and tracheas of anaesthetised mice, currently to a resolution of {approx}2 {mu}m. We have also achieved high resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the small airways in mice using phase-contrast enhanced computed tomography (PC-CT) to elucidate the structure-function relationships produced by airway disease. As the resolution of these techniques improves they may permit non-invasive monitoring of changes in ASL depth with therapeutic intervention, and the use of 3D airway and imaging in monitoring of lung health and disease. Phase contrast imaging of airway surfaces has promise for diagnostic and monitoring options in animal models of CF, and the potential for future human airway imaging methodologies is also apparent.

  15. Comparison of airway responses in sheep of different age in precision-cut lung slices (PCLS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena A Lambermont

    Full Text Available Animal models should display important characteristics of the human disease. Sheep have been considered particularly useful to study allergic airway responses to common natural antigens causing human asthma. A rationale of this study was to establish a model of ovine precision-cut lung slices (PCLS for the in vitro measurement of airway responses in newborn and adult animals. We hypothesized that differences in airway reactivity in sheep are present at different ages.Lambs were delivered spontaneously at term (147d and adult sheep lived till 18 months. Viability of PCLS was confirmed by the MTT-test. To study airway provocations cumulative concentration-response curves were performed with different allergic response mediators and biogenic amines. In addition, electric field stimulation, passive sensitization with house dust mite (HDM and mast cells staining were evaluated.PCLS from sheep were viable for at least three days. PCLS of newborn and adult sheep responded equally strong to methacholine and endothelin-1. The responses to serotonin, leukotriene D4 and U46619 differed with age. No airway contraction was evoked by histamine, except after cimetidine pretreatment. In response to EFS, airways in PCLS from adult and newborn sheep strongly contracted and these contractions were atropine sensitive. Passive sensitization with HDM evoked a weak early allergic response in PCLS from adult and newborn sheep, which notably was prolonged in airways from adult sheep. Only few mast cells were found in the lungs of non-sensitized sheep at both ages.PCLS from sheep lungs represent a useful tool to study pharmacological airway responses for at least three days. Sheep seem well suited to study mechanisms of cholinergic airway contraction. The notable differences between newborn and adult sheep demonstrate the importance of age in such studies.

  16. Investigation of airway inflammation and asthma by repeated bronchoalveolar lavage combined with measurements of airway and lung tissue mechanics in individual rats.

    OpenAIRE

    dr Bánfi Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Acute and chronic airway inflammations are the main pathogenetic features of numerous pulmonary diseases. There are several methods studying the pathomechanisms of inflammatory respiratory diseases. To asses the severity of lung diseases, the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung function tests are the most current diagnostic methods in the experimental and human pulmonology. However, repetition of BAL procedures and assessments of respiratory mechanic parameters in small rodents (mice and ra...

  17. Noninvasive Investigations for the Early Detection of Chronic Airways Dysfunction Following Lung Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Richard C.; Guy Fradet; Nestor L Muller; Daniel F Worsley; David Ostrow; Levy, Robert D

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of chronic rejection after lung transplantation is limited by the lack of a reliable test to detect airways disease early.OBJECTIVES: To determine whether maximum midexpiratory flow (MMEF), or changes on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) or ventilation/perfusion lung (V/Q) scans are sensitive and specific for early detection of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS; forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] less than 80% post-transplant baseline) by evaluating...

  18. Diet and obstructive lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, I; Trenga, C

    2001-01-01

    The results presented in this review suggest that the impact of nutrition on obstructive lung disease is most evident for antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C and, to a lesser extent, vitamin E. By decreasing oxidant insults to the lung, antioxidants could modulate the development of chronic lung diseases and lung function decrement. Antioxidant vitamins could also play an important role in gene-environment interactions in complex lung diseases such as childhood asthma. Data also suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may have a potentially protective effect against airway hyperreactivity and lung function decrements; however, relevant data are still sparse. Although epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of fresh fruit may reduce risk of noncarcinogenic airway limitation, there are no clear data on which nutrients might be most relevant. While some studies evaluate daily intake of vitamin C, other studies use fruit consumption as a surrogate for antioxidant intake. Given the dietary intercorrelations among antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C, beta-carotene, and flavonoids, as well as other micronutrients, it may be difficult to isolate a specific effect. Some population subgroups with higher levels of oxidative stress, such as cigarette smokers, may be more likely to benefit from dietary supplementation, since some studies have suggested that antioxidant intake may have a greater impact in this group. Studies of lung function decrement and COPD in adults suggest that daily intake of vitamin C at levels slightly exceeding the current Recommended Dietary Allowance (60 mg/day among nonsmokers and 100 mg/day among smokers) may have a protective effect (20). In the Schwartz and Weiss (85) and Britton et al. (87) studies, an increase of 40 mg/day in vitamin C intake led to an approximate 20-ml increase in FEV1. Daily mean vitamin C intakes in these studies were 66 mg and 99.2 mg, respectively, and the highest intake level (178 mg/day) was approximately

  19. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma. PMID:25867172

  20. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Paganin

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD. Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good

  1. Inflammatory Signalings Involved in Airway and Pulmonary Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ta Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In respiratory diseases, there is an increased expression of multiple inflammatory proteins in the respiratory tract, including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Chemokines have been shown to regulate inflammation and immune cell differentiation. Moreover, many of the known inflammatory target proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, are associated with airway and lung inflammation in response to various stimuli. Injuriously environmental stimuli can access the lung through either the airways or the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The time course and intensity of responses by resident and circulating cells may be regulated by various inflammatory signalings, including Src family kinases (SFKs, protein kinase C (PKC, growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH/reactive oxygen species (ROS, PI3K/Akt, MAPKs, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, activator protein-1 (AP-1, and other signaling molecules. These signaling molecules regulate both key inflammatory signaling transduction pathways and target proteins involved in airway and lung inflammation. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the expression of inflammatory target proteins associated with the respiratory diseases. Knowledge of the mechanisms of inflammation regulation could lead to the pharmacological manipulation of anti-inflammatory drugs in the respiratory diseases.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E Foong; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron...

  3. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-06-15

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a group of pathophysiologically heterogenous processes that are characterized by the presence of multiple spherical or irregularly shaped, thin-walled, air-filled spaces within the pulmonary parenchyma. Although the mechanisms of cyst formation remain incompletely defined for all DCLDs, in most cases lung remodeling associated with inflammatory or infiltrative processes results in displacement, destruction, or replacement of alveolar septa, distal airways, and small vessels within the secondary lobules of the lung. The DCLDs can be broadly classified according to underlying etiology as those caused by low-grade or high-grade metastasizing neoplasms, polyclonal or monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, interstitial lung diseases, smoking, and congenital or developmental defects. In the first of a two-part series, we present an overview of the cystic lung diseases caused by neoplasms, infections, smoking-related diseases, and interstitial lung diseases, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:25906089

  4. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  5. Inhalational Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    S Kowsarian; Farzaneh; F Jamshidiha

    2010-01-01

    Inhalational lung diseases are among the most important occupational diseases. Pneumoconiosis refers to a group of lung diseases result from inhalation of usually inorganic dusts such as silicon dioxide, asbestos, coal, etc., and their deposition in the lungs. The resultant pulmonary disorders depend on the susceptibility of lungs; size, concentration, solubility and fibrogenic properties of the inhaled particles; and duration of exposure. Radiographic manifestations of pneumoconiosis become ...

  6. Sliding thin slab, minimum intensity projection of the lung in asymptomatic subjects: lower limits of lung attenuation, without airways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sliding thin slab, minimum intensity projection (STS-MinIP) is considered to be useful for detecting diseases that decrease lung attenuation. For evaluating these diseases, it would be useful to ascertain the lower limits of normal lung attenuation, allowing a division between normal and subnormal attenuation. However, normal lung attenuation may vary depending on respiratory status, anatomical position, and patient background factors. Our aim was to determine whether the lower limits of lung attenuation, without airways, in asymptomatic subjects using STS-MinIP varies under different conditions. The study subjects were 43 volunteers without pulmonary symptoms. STS-MinIP was performed at full inspiration and full expiration at three levels of the lung. The lower limits of lung attenuation were compared among the three lung levels and between full inspiration and full expiration, the sexes, age groups, smokers and nonsmokers, and the right and left lungs. The lower limits of lung attenuation had significantly different Hounsfield unit values among lung levels, between the sexes at full inspiration, and between age groups at full expiration. This study shows that the lower limits of lung attenuation are influenced by lung fields, sex, and, on expiration, age. (author)

  7. Work-related lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Ainsley

    2011-01-01

    Work-related respiratory diseases affect people in every industrial sector, constituting approximately 60% of all disease and injury mortality and 70% of all occupational disease mortality. There are two basic types: interstitial lung diseases, that is the pneumoconioses (asbestosis, byssinosis, chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), silicosis, flock workers' lung, and farmers' lung disease), and airways diseases, such as work-related or exacerbated asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiolitis obliterans (a disease that was recognized in the production of certain foods only 10 years ago). Common factors in the development of these diseases are exposures to dusts, metals, allergens and other toxins, which frequently cause oxidative damage. In response, the body reacts by activating primary immune response genes (i.e. cytokines that often lead to further oxidative damage), growth factors and tissue remodelling proteins. Frequently, complex imbalances in these processes contribute to the development of disease. For example, tissue matrix metalloproteases can cause the degradation of tissue, as in the development of CWP small profusions, but usually overexpression of matrix metalloproteases is controlled by serum protein inhibitors. Thus, disruption of such a balance can lead to adverse tissue damage. Susceptibility to these types of lung disease has been investigated largely through candidate gene studies, which have been characteristically small, often providing findings that have been difficult to corroborate. An important exception to this has been the finding that the HLA-DPB11(E69) allele is closely associated with chronic beryllium disease and beryllium sensitivity. Although chronic beryllium disease is only caused by exposure to beryllium, inheritance of HLA-DPB1(E69) carries an increased risk of between two- and 30-fold in beryllium exposed workers. Most, if not all, of these occupationally related diseases are

  8. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  9. Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Markus; Rosen, Glenn D.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (...

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells and serelaxin synergistically abrogate established airway fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic allergic airways disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Simon G; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2015-11-01

    This study determined if the anti-fibrotic drug, serelaxin (RLN), could augment human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated reversal of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) associated with chronic allergic airways disease (AAD/asthma). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD were either untreated or treated with MSCs alone, RLN alone or both combined from weeks 9-11. Changes in airway inflammation (AI), epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, subepithelial and total lung collagen deposition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, and AHR were then assessed. MSCs alone modestly reversed OVA-induced subepithelial and total collagen deposition, and increased MMP-9 levels above that induced by OVA alone (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). RLN alone more broadly reversed OVA-induced epithelial thickening, TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, airway fibrosis and AHR (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). Combination treatment further reversed OVA-induced AI and airway/lung fibrosis compared to either treatment alone (all p<0.05 vs either treatment alone), and further increased MMP-9 levels. RLN appeared to enhance the therapeutic effects of MSCs in a chronic disease setting; most likely a consequence of the ability of RLN to limit TGF-β1-induced matrix synthesis complemented by the MMP-promoting effects of MSCs. PMID:26426509

  11. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. If ... lead to a disease called COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). COPD prevents proper airflow in and out of ...

  12. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25906201

  13. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease - discharge; Alveolitis - discharge; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis - discharge; IPP - discharge; Chronic interstitial lung - discharge; Chronic respiratory interstitial lung - ...

  14. Take the Wnt out of the inflammatory sails: modulatory effects of Wnt in airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Sebastian; Beckert, Hendrik; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic diseases that are associated with inflammation and structural changes in the airways and lungs. Recent findings have implicated Wnt pathways in critically regulating inflammatory responses, especially in asthma. Furthermore, canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways are involved in structural changes such as airway remodeling, goblet cell metaplasia, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation. In COPD, Wnt pathways are not only associated with structural changes in the airways but also involved in the development of emphysema. The present review summarizes the role and function of the canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathway with regard to airway inflammation and structural changes in asthma and COPD. Further identification of the role and function of different Wnt molecules and pathways could help to develop novel therapeutic options for these diseases. PMID:26595171

  15. Airway resistance and deposition of particles in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartengren, M; Philipson, K; Linnman, L; Camner, P

    1984-01-01

    The percentage 24-h lung retention of 4-micrometers monodispersed Teflon particles, aerodynamic diameter about 6 micrometers, was studied twice in 8 healthy nonsmokers. The particles were inhaled at 0.5 liter/sec with maximally deep breaths. Bronchoconstriction was induced by inhalation of a methacholine-bromide aerosol for one exposure before and for the other 20-30 min after the inhalation of the Teflon particles. For both exposures, airway resistance (Raw) was measured with a whole body plethysmograph before and after the induction of the bronchoconstriction and was found on an average to increase with a factor of 2-3. For the exposure when bronchoconstriction was induced after the inhalation of the Teflon particles, Raw and 24-h lung retention correlated significantly. Retention at 24 h was markedly lower when bronchoconstriction was induced before inhalation of the Teflon particles than when bronchoconstriction was induced after, the ranges being 13-24% and 38-68%, respectively. The experimental data agreed well with theoretical data from a lung model wherein the diameters of the airways were varied. The results indicate that the magnitude of bronchoconstriction occurring in real life can protect the alveolar part of the lung by reducing the amount of inhaled particles that deposit there. PMID:6525990

  16. Interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina M. Antoniou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases are a group of diffuse parenchymal lung disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Knowledge achieved in recent years has resulted in the publication of the new classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, according to which there are three groups: major, rare and unclassified. The novelty of the new classification comes from the fact that difficult to classify entities can be treated according to the disease behaviour classification. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most lethal amongst the interstitial lung diseases and presents high heterogeneity in clinical behaviour. A number of biomarkers have been proposed in order to predict the course of the disease and group patients with the same characteristics in clinical trials. Early diagnosis and disease stratification is also important in the field of other interstitial lung diseases.

  17. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  18. Multiple cystic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Francisco, Flavia Angélica; Soares Souza, Arthur; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt-Hogg-Dubé); other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:26621970

  19. IL-22 is produced by innate lymphoid cells and limits inflammation in allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Taube

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-22 is an effector cytokine, which acts primarily on epithelial cells in the skin, gut, liver and lung. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties have been reported for IL-22 depending on the tissue and disease model. In a murine model of allergic airway inflammation, we found that IL-22 is predominantly produced by innate lymphoid cells in the inflamed lungs, rather than TH cells. To determine the impact of IL-22 on airway inflammation, we used allergen-sensitized IL-22-deficient mice and found that they suffer from significantly higher airway hyperreactivity upon airway challenge. IL-22-deficiency led to increased eosinophil infiltration lymphocyte invasion and production of CCL17 (TARC, IL-5 and IL-13 in the lung. Mice treated with IL-22 before antigen challenge displayed reduced expression of CCL17 and IL-13 and significant amelioration of airway constriction and inflammation. We conclude that innate IL-22 limits airway inflammation, tissue damage and clinical decline in allergic lung disease.

  20. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  1. Therapeutical measures to control airway tolerance in asthma and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerine eAndreev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airway tolerance is a specialized immunological surveillance which is activated by the cells of the lung to deal with and distinguish between innocuous and pathogenic inhalants. However, this distinction does not always occur. Airway tolerance is necessary to avoid the development of allergic disorders, such as asthma, which is dominated by a pathological expansion of Th2 and Th17 cells in the airways. By contrast, tumour cells induce tolerogenic factors in their microenvironment to evade T-cell mediated anti-tumour-immune responses. This review updates current understanding on the effect of the cytokines TGF-ƒÒ, IL-10 and IL-17A on the lung immune responses to antigen, and analyzes their involvement in allergic asthma and lung cancer. The aim of the review is to evaluate where therapeutic intervention may be feasible and where it might fail. The multifunctional role of these cytokines further complicates the decision on the timing and concentration for their use as therapeutical targets. In fact, TGF-ƒÒ has suppressive activity in early tumorigenesis, but may become tumourpromoting in the later stages of the disease. This dual behaviour is sometimes due to changes in the cellular target of TGF-£], and to the expansion of the induced (i-Tregs. Similarly, IL-17A has been found to elicit pro- as well as anti-tumour properties. Thus, this pro-inflammatory cytokine induces the production of IL-6 which interferes with Treg development. Yet IL-17A could promote tumour growth in conjunction with IL-6-dependent activation of Stat3. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of airway tolerance could help to improve the therapy to both, allergic asthma and lung cancer. Hereby asthma therapy aims to induce and maintain tolerance to inhaled allergens and therapy against lung cancer tries to inhibit the tolerogenic response surrounding the tumour.

  2. Determinants of lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, S; Anhøj, J;

    2007-01-01

    Genetic Study (SAGA). RESULTS: The primary analysis studied the association between the lung function and delay of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) after asthma diagnosis among asthmatic children and young adults with a history of regular ICS treatment (N=919). FEV(1) percent predicted (FEV(1)% pred) was 0......BACKGROUND: Asthma patients exhibit an increased rate of loss of lung function. Determinants to such decline are largely unknown and the modifying effect of steroid therapy is disputed. This cross-sectional study aimed to elucidate factors contributing to such decline and the possible modifying...... effect of steroid treatment. METHODS: We analyzed determinants of lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in a Scandinavian study of 2390 subjects from 550 families. Families were selected for the presence of two or more asthmatic children as part of a genetic study, Scandinavian Asthma...

  3. Nanoparticle mass transfer from lung airways to systemic regions--Part I: Whole-lung aerosol dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanjiyil, Arun V; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2013-12-01

    This is a two-part paper describing inhaled nanoparticle (NP) transport and deposition in a model of a human respiratory tract (Part I) as well as NP-mass transfer across barriers into systemic regions (Part II). Specifically, combining high-resolution computer simulation results of inhaled NP deposition in the human airways (Part I) with a multicompartmental model for NP-mass transfer (Part II) allows for the prediction of temporal NP accumulation in the blood and lymphatic systems as well as in organs. An understanding of nanoparticle transport and deposition in human respiratory airways is of great importance, as exposure to nanomaterial has been found to cause serious lung diseases, while the use of nanodrugs may have superior therapeutic effects. In Part I, the fluid-particle dynamics of a dilute NP suspension was simulated for the entire respiratory tract, assuming steady inhalation and planar airways. Thus, a realistic airway configuration was considered from nose/mouth to generation 3, and then an idealized triple-bifurcation unit was repeated in series and parallel to cover the remaining generations. Using the current model, the deposition of NPs in distinct regions of the lung, namely extrathoracic, bronchial, bronchiolar, and alveolar, was calculated. The region-specific NP-deposition results for the human lung model were used in Part II to determine the multicompartmental model parameters from experimental retention and clearance data in human lungs. The quantitative, experimentally validated results are useful in diverse fields, such as toxicology for exposure-risk analysis of ubiquitous nanomaterial as well as in pharmacology for nanodrug development and targeting. PMID:24008503

  4. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M; Barker, Donna M; Barcham, Garry J; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K; Snibson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10(+)-20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  5. Lung Compliance and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Papandrinopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, namely, pulmonary emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is a chronic inflammatory response of the airways to noxious particles or gases, with resulting pathological and pathophysiological changes in the lung. The main pathophysiological aspects of the disease are airflow obstruction and hyperinflation. The mechanical properties of the respiratory system and its component parts are studied by determining the corresponding volume-pressure (P-V relationships. The consequences of the inflammatory response on the lung structure and function are depicted on the volume-pressure relationships.

  6. Analysis of the Airway Microbiota of Healthy Individuals and Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by T-RFLP and Clone Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharkina, Tetyana; Heinzel, Elke; Koczulla, Rembert A;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory lung disease that affects a large number of patients and has significant impact. One hallmark of the disease is the presence of bacteria in the lower airways....

  7. Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depending on the cause. Importantly, each person responds differently to treatment, so close monitoring during treatment is important. More Interstitial Lung Disease ... a Question Learn About Clinical Trials Find a Doctor Find Departments ...

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansel, Nadia N.; Pare, Peter D.; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D.; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W. Mark; Pascoe, Chris D.; Arsenault, Bryna A.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boezen, Marieke H.; Bosse, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R.; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina

  9. AIRWAY IDENTIFICATION WITHIN PLANAR GAMMA CAMERA IMAGES USING COMPUTER MODELS OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quantification of inhaled aerosols could be improved if a more comprehensive assessment of their spatial distribution patterns among lung airways were obtained. A common technique for quantifying particle deposition in human lungs is with planar gamma scintigraphy. However, t...

  10. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008429 The predictive factors and unfavourable prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis. WANG Peizhen(王培珍), et al. Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Changhai Hosp, Milit Med Univ, Shanghai 200433. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):417-420. Objective To analyze the predictive factors and the unfavourable prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with polymyositis

  11. Multiple cystic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco; Arthur Soares Souza; Gláucia Zanetti; Edson Marchiori

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and a...

  12. Utility of radionuclide studies in patients with pulmonary vascular and airways diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide studies aid the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases by providing information about regional pulmonary ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion (V-P) relationships which cannot be obtained by other methods. Ventilation-perfusion lung studies are used to evaluate regional lung function in patients prior to pulmonary surgery, to detect obstructive airways disease and to aid management of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. The following sections will discuss each of these subjects in detail. (orig.)

  13. Gold-induced lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyd, J.; Simmeran, A.

    1983-01-01

    A 70-year-old female with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis developed interstitial pneumonitis while on chrysotherapy. The reversibility of lung disease and favourable response to steroid treatment support the diagnosis of gold-induced lung disease and distinguish this entity from other forms of interstitial lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The relevant literature related to gold-induced lung disease is briefly reviewed.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wielopolski, Piotr A. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wild, Jim M. [University of Sheffield, Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Pulmonary Divisions, Boston, MA (United States); Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello Regional Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Lequin, Maarten H. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intensities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathing. Young children are even more challenging because of higher cardiac and respiratory rates giving motion blurring. For these reasons, CT has often been preferred over MRI for chest pediatric imaging. Despite its drawbacks, MRI also has advantages over CT, which justifies its further development and clinical use. The most important advantage is the absence of ionizing radiation, which allows frequent scanning for short- and long-term follow-up studies of chronic diseases. Moreover, MRI allows assessment of functional aspects of the chest, such as lung perfusion and ventilation, or airways and diaphragm mechanics. In this review, we describe the most common MRI acquisition techniques on the verge of clinical translation, their problems and the possible solutions to make chest MRI feasible in children. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A W M; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Wild, Jim M; Lee, Edward Y; Morana, Giovanni; Lequin, Maarten H

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intenstities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathing. Young children are even more challenging because of higher cardiac and respiratory rates giving motion blurring. For these reasons, CT has often been preferred over MRI for chest pediatric imaging. Despite its drawbacks, MRI also has advantages over CT, which justifies its further development and clinical use. The most important advantage is the absence of ionizing radiation, which allows frequent scanning for short- and long-term follow-up studies of chronic diseases. Moreover, MRI allows assessment of functional aspects of the chest, such as lung perfusion and ventilation, or airways and diaphragm mechanics. In this review, we describe the most common MRI acquisition techniques on the verge of clinical translation, their problems and the possible solutions to make chest MRI feasible in children. PMID:26342643

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intensities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathing. Young children are even more challenging because of higher cardiac and respiratory rates giving motion blurring. For these reasons, CT has often been preferred over MRI for chest pediatric imaging. Despite its drawbacks, MRI also has advantages over CT, which justifies its further development and clinical use. The most important advantage is the absence of ionizing radiation, which allows frequent scanning for short- and long-term follow-up studies of chronic diseases. Moreover, MRI allows assessment of functional aspects of the chest, such as lung perfusion and ventilation, or airways and diaphragm mechanics. In this review, we describe the most common MRI acquisition techniques on the verge of clinical translation, their problems and the possible solutions to make chest MRI feasible in children. (orig.)

  17. Effect of parenchymal stiffness on canine airway size with lung inflation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Brown

    Full Text Available Although airway patency is partially maintained by parenchymal tethering, this structural support is often ignored in many discussions of asthma. However, agonists that induce smooth muscle contraction also stiffen the parenchyma, so such parenchymal stiffening may serve as a defense mechanism to prevent airway narrowing or closure. To quantify this effect, specifically how changes in parenchymal stiffness alter airway size at different levels of lung inflation, in the present study, we devised a method to separate the effect of parenchymal stiffening from that of direct airway narrowing. Six anesthetized dogs were studied under four conditions: baseline, after whole lung aerosol histamine challenge, after local airway histamine challenge, and after complete relaxation of the airways. In each of these conditions, we used High resolution Computed Tomography to measure airway size and lung volume at five different airway pressures (0, 12, 25, 32, and 45 cm H(2O. Parenchymal stiffening had a protective effect on airway narrowing, a fact that may be important in the airway response to deep inspiration in asthma. When the parenchyma was stiffened by whole lung aerosol histamine challenge, at every lung volume above FRC, the airways were larger than when they were directly challenged with histamine to the same initial constriction. These results show for the first time that a stiff parenchyma per se minimizes the airway narrowing that occurs with histamine challenge at any lung volume. Thus in clinical asthma, it is not simply increased airway smooth muscle contraction, but perhaps a lack of homogeneous parenchymal stiffening that contributes to the symptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

  18. Mode of Glucocorticoid Actions in Airway Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ito

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids are the most potent anti-inflammatory agents used to treat chronic inflammatory disease, such as asthma. However, a small number (<5% of asthmatic patients and almost all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD do not respond well, or at all, to glucocorticoid therapy. If the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid insensitivity is uncovered, it may in turn provide insight into the key mechanism of glucocorticoid action and allow a rational way to implement treatment regimens that restore glucocorticoid sensitivity. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by binding to a cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which is subjected to post-translational modifications. Receptor phosphorylation, acetylation, nitrosylation, ubiquitinylation, and other modifications influence hormone binding, nuclear translocation, and protein half-life. Analysis of GR interactions to other molecules, such as coactivators or corepressors, may explain the genetic specificity of GR action. Priming with inflammatory cytokine or oxidative/nitrative stress is a mechanism for the glucocorticoid resistance observed in chronic inflammatory airway disease via reduction of corepressors or GR modification. Therapies targeting these aspects of the GR activation pathway may reverse glucocorticoid resistance in patients with glucocorticoid-insensitive airway disease and some patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells and serelaxin synergistically abrogate established airway fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic allergic airways disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon G. Royce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study determined if the anti-fibrotic drug, serelaxin (RLN, could augment human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-mediated reversal of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR associated with chronic allergic airways disease (AAD/asthma. Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced chronic AAD were either untreated or treated with MSCs alone, RLN alone or both combined from weeks 9–11. Changes in airway inflammation (AI, epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, subepithelial and total lung collagen deposition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression, and AHR were then assessed. MSCs alone modestly reversed OVA-induced subepithelial and total collagen deposition, and increased MMP-9 levels above that induced by OVA alone (all p < 0.05 vs OVA group. RLN alone more broadly reversed OVA-induced epithelial thickening, TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, airway fibrosis and AHR (all p < 0.05 vs OVA group. Combination treatment further reversed OVA-induced AI and airway/lung fibrosis compared to either treatment alone (all p < 0.05 vs either treatment alone, and further increased MMP-9 levels. RLN appeared to enhance the therapeutic effects of MSCs in a chronic disease setting; most likely a consequence of the ability of RLN to limit TGF-β1-induced matrix synthesis complemented by the MMP-promoting effects of MSCs.

  20. Lipocalin2 protects against airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic airway disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, A M; Krokowski, M; Meyer, H-A;

    2010-01-01

    Allergen-induced bronchial asthma is a chronic airway disease that involves the interplay of various genes with environmental factors triggering different inflammatory pathways.......Allergen-induced bronchial asthma is a chronic airway disease that involves the interplay of various genes with environmental factors triggering different inflammatory pathways....

  1. The loss of Hoxa5 function promotes Notch-dependent goblet cell metaplasia in lung airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Boucherat

    2012-05-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors controlling complex developmental processes in various organs. Little is known, however, about how HOX proteins control cell fate. Herein, we demonstrate that the goblet cell metaplasia observed in lung airways from Hoxa5−/− mice originates from the transdifferentiation of Clara cells. Reduced CC10 expression in Hoxa5−/− embryos indicates that altered cell specification occurs prior to birth. The loss of Hoxa5 function does not preclude airway repair after naphthalene exposure, but the regenerated epithelium presents goblet cell metaplasia and less CC10-positive cells, demonstrating the essential role of Hoxa5 for correct differentiation. Goblet cell metaplasia in Hoxa5−/− mice is a FOXA2-independent process. However, it is associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Consistent with these findings, expression levels of activated NOTCH1 and the effector gene HEY2 are enhanced in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In vivo administration of a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates goblet cell metaplasia in Hoxa5−/− mice, highlighting the contribution of Notch signaling to the phenotype and suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy to inhibit goblet cell differentiation and mucus overproduction in airway diseases. In summary, the loss of Hoxa5 function in lung mesenchyme impacts on epithelial cell fate by modulating Notch signaling.

  2. Quantification of atopy, lung function and airway hypersensitivity in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinho Susana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in children have shown that concentration of specific serum IgE (sIgE and size of skin tests to inhalant allergens better predict wheezing and reduced lung function than the information on presence or absence of atopy. However, very few studies in adults have investigated the relationship of quantitative atopy with lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR. Objective To determine the association between lung function and AHR and quantitative atopy in a large sample of adults from the UK. Methods FEV1 and FVC (% predicted were measured using spirometry and airway responsiveness by methacholine challenge (5-breath dosimeter protocol in 983 subjects (random sample of 800 parents of children enrolled in a population-based birth cohort enriched with 183 patients with physician-diagnosed asthma. Atopic status was assessed by skin prick tests (SPT and measurement of sIgE (common inhalant allergens. We also measured indoor allergen exposure in subjects' homes. Results Spirometry was completed by 792 subjects and 626 underwent methacholine challenge, with 100 (16.0% having AHR (dose-response slope>25. Using sIgE as a continuous variable in a multiple linear regression analysis, we found that increasing levels of sIgE to mite, cat and dog were significantly associated with lower FEV1 (mite p = 0.001, cat p = 0.0001, dog p = 2.95 × 10-8. Similar findings were observed when using the size of wheal on skin testing as a continuous variable, with significantly poorer lung function with increasing skin test size (mite p = 8.23 × 10-8, cat p = 3.93 × 10-10, dog p = 3.03 × 10-15, grass p = 2.95 × 10-9. The association between quantitative atopy with lung function and AHR remained unchanged when we repeated the analyses amongst subjects defined as sensitised using standard definitions (sIgE>0.35 kUa/l, SPT-3 mm>negative control. Conclusions In the studied population, lung function decreased and AHR increased with increasing

  3. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  4. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  5. The effect of airway deposition on the assessment of lung injury by 99mTc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method permits detection of pulmonary epithelial damage. We investigated one of several problems, airway deposition of inhaled aerosol, on the assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability in healthy nonsmokers and patients with interstitial lung diseases. We used the rate constant of pulmonary 99mTc-DTPA clearance curve, k, as a parameter of the epithelial permeability. The alveolar-peripheral airway deposition of aerosol was estimated by the duplicated inhalation method, which we newly developed. The mean k in patients with interstitial lung disease (2.52±0.72%/min, n=8; pc) was higher in patients with interstitial lung disease (4.08±1.63%/min; pc in both groups (pc obtained among the subjects (r=0.951; p99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation method although the correction was significant in the individual subjects. (author)

  6. Inhalational Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kowsarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalational lung diseases are among the most important occupational diseases. Pneumoconiosis refers to a group of lung diseases result from inhalation of usually inorganic dusts such as silicon dioxide, asbestos, coal, etc., and their deposition in the lungs. The resultant pulmonary disorders depend on the susceptibility of lungs; size, concentration, solubility and fibrogenic properties of the inhaled particles; and duration of exposure. Radiographic manifestations of pneumoconiosis become apparent several years after exposure to the particles. However, for certain types of dusts, e.g., silicone dioxide crystal and beryllium, heavy exposure within a short period can cause an acute disease. Pulmonary involvement in asbestosis is usually in the lower lobes. On the contrary, in silicosis and coal worker pneumoconiosis, the upper lobes are involved predominantly. For imaging evaluation of pneumoconiosis, high-resolution computed tomography (CT is superior to conventional chest x-ray. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET scan are helpful in those with suspected tumoral lesions. In this essay, we reviewed the imaging aspects of inhalational lung disease.

  7. Accelerated decline in lung function in smoking women with airway obstruction: SAPALDIA 2 cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemp Elisabeth

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to determine if effects from smoking on lung function measured over 11 years differ between men and women. Methods In a prospective population based cohort study (Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults current smokers in 1991 (18 – 60 yrs were reassessed in 2002 (n = 1792. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate effects from pack-years of cigarettes smoked to 1991 and mean packs of cigarettes smoked per day between 1991 and 2002 on change in lung volume and flows over the 11 years. Results In both sexes, packs smoked between assessments were related to lung function decline but pack-years smoked before 1991 were not. Mean annual decline in FEV1 was -10.4 mL(95%CI -15.3, -5.5 per pack per day between assessments in men and -13.8 mL(95%CI-19.5,-8.1 in women. Decline per pack per day between 1991 and 2002 was lower in women who smoked in 1991 but quit before 2002 compared to persistent smokers (-6.4 vs -11.6 mL, p = 0.05 but this was not seen in men (-14.3 vs -8.8 mL p = 0.49. Smoking related decline was accelerated in men and women with airway obstruction, particularly in women where decline in FEV1 was three fold higher in participants with FEV1/FVC Conclusion There are differences in effects from smoking on lung function between men and women. Lung function recovers faster in women quitters than in men. Women current smokers with airway obstruction experience a greater smoking related decline in lung function than men.

  8. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    . The remaining 27 articles were relevant for this review. RESULTS: The current literature concerning lung manifestations describes various respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea or shortness of breath, wheezing, and dry cough. These symptoms are often related to cardiac involvement in Fabry disease as respiratory...

  9. On the Role of Mechanics in Chronic Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Eskandari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Progressive airflow obstruction is a classical hallmark of chronic lung disease, affecting more than one fourth of the adult population. As the disease progresses, the inner layer of the airway wall grows, folds inwards, and narrows the lumen. The critical failure conditions for airway folding have been studied intensely for idealized circular cross-sections. However, the role of airway branching during this process is unknown. Here, we show that the geometry of the bronchial tree plays a crucial role in chronic airway obstruction and that critical failure conditions vary significantly along a branching airway segment. We perform systematic parametric studies for varying airway cross-sections using a computational model for mucosal thickening based on the theory of finite growth. Our simulations indicate that smaller airways are at a higher risk of narrowing than larger airways and that regions away from a branch narrow more drastically than regions close to a branch. These results agree with clinical observations and could help explain the underlying mechanisms of progressive airway obstruction. Understanding growth-induced instabilities in constrained geometries has immediate biomedical applications beyond asthma and chronic bronchitis in the diagnostics and treatment of chronic gastritis, obstructive sleep apnea and breast cancer.

  10. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  11. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Margaritopoulos, George A.; Eirini Vasarmidi; Joseph Jacob; Wells, Athol U; Katerina M. Antoniou

    2015-01-01

    For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currentl...

  12. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  13. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD.

    OpenAIRE

    Burrowes, K. S.; Doel, T.; Brightling, C

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by airway obstruction and airflow limitation and pose a huge burden to society. These obstructive lung diseases impact the lung physiology across multiple biological scales. Environmental stimuli are introduced via inhalation at the organ scale, and consequently impact upon the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular scale by triggering signaling pathways. These changes are propagated upwards to the organ level again and vice...

  14. Volumetric capnography for the evaluation of chronic airways diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronez L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Liliani de Fátima Veronez,1 Monica Corso Pereira,2 Silvia Maria Doria da Silva,2 Luisa Affi Barcaui,2 Eduardo Mello De Capitani,2 Marcos Mello Moreira,2 Ilma Aparecida Paschoalz2 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Votuporanga (Educational Foundation of Votuporanga, Votuporanga, 2Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, Sao Paulo, BrazilBackground: Obstructive lung diseases of different etiologies present with progressive peripheral airway involvement. The peripheral airways, known as the silent lung zone, are not adequately evaluated with conventional function tests. The principle of gas washout has been used to detect pulmonary ventilation inhomogeneity and to estimate the location of the underlying disease process. Volumetric capnography (VC analyzes the pattern of CO2 elimination as a function of expired volume.Objective: To measure normalized phase 3 slopes with VC in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCB and in bronchitic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in order to compare the slopes obtained for the groups.Methods: NCB and severe COPD were enrolled sequentially from an outpatient clinic (Hospital of the State University of Campinas. A control group was established for the NCB group, paired by sex and age. All subjects performed spirometry, VC, and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT. Two comparisons were made: NCB group versus its control group, and NCB group versus COPD group. The project was approved by the ethical committee of the institution. Statistical tests used were Wilcoxon or Student’s t-test; P<0.05 was considered to be a statistically significant difference.Results: Concerning the NCB group (N=20 versus the control group (N=20, significant differences were found in body mass index and in several functional variables (spirometric, VC, 6MWT with worse results observed in the NCB group. In the comparison between

  15. Therapeutical Measures to Control Airway Tolerance in Asthma and Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, Katerina; Graser, Anna; Maier, Anja; Mousset, Stephanie; Finotto, Susetta

    2012-01-01

    Airway tolerance is a specialized immunological surveillance which is activated by the cells of the lung to deal with and distinguish between innocuous and pathogenic inhalants. However, this distinction does not always occur. Airway tolerance is necessary to avoid the development of allergic disorders, such as asthma, which is dominated by a pathological expansion of Th2 and Th17 cells in the airways. By contrast, tumor cells induce tolerogenic factors in their microenvironment to evade T-ce...

  16. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice, E-mail: btrotmandickenson@partners.org

    2014-01-15

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended.

  17. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended

  18. Congenital Cystic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cystic diseases of the lung are a rare but significant cause of morbidity in children and young adults presenting with respiratory distress and repeated chest infections. They consist of cystic adenomatoid malformation, bronchogenic cyst, pulmonary sequestration, and congenital lobar emphysema. Surgical treatment is a safe and an effective method of treatment. Chest X-ray and computed tomography are the key imaging modalities used for diagnosis.

  19. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a...

  20. Has the airway microbiome been overlooked in respiratory disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Salami, Olawale; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary The respiratory disease field is changing because of recent advances in our understanding of the airway microbiome. Central to this is dysbiosis, an imbalance of microbial communities that can lead to and flag inflammation in the airways. The increasing momentum of research in this area holds promise for novel treatment strategies.

  1. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930512 Changes of interleukin—I released bypulmonary alveolar macrophage in patients withinterstitial lung disease.LI Zhenhua(李振华),etal.Respir Dis Instit,China Med Univ,Shengyang,110001.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis1993;16(2):90—92.To evaluate the activity of PAM,levels of IL-l released by PAM in patients with ILD(nonsmokers)were measured by usinglipopolysacharide(LPS)stimulation and thymo-cyte proliferation method,with healthy non-smokers as control group.The results showed

  2. Eosinophils in the lung – modulating apoptosis and efferocytosis in airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Felton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defence against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis. In terms of therapeutic approaches for treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways.

  3. Eosinophils in the lung - modulating apoptosis and efferocytosis in airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Jennifer M; Lucas, Christopher D; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

  4. Grading obstructive lung disease using tomographic pulmonary scintigraphy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and long-term smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Bajc, Marika; Markstad, Hanna; Jarenbäck, Linnea; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Jögi, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The severity of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) is defined by the degree of flow limitation measured as forced expiratory volume in 1 s, which mainly reflects impairment of large and intermediate airways. However, COPD is primarily a small airways disease. Therefore, better diagnostic tools are needed. Ventilation-Perfusion (V/P) SPECT is a sensitive method to detect obstructive lung changes but criteria for staging airway obstruction are missing. Purpose To define and valida...

  5. Drug induced lung disease - amiodarone in focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Nada R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 380 medications are known to cause pulmonary toxicity. Selected drugs that are important causes of pulmonary toxicity fall into the following classes: cytotoxic, cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, illicit drugs, miscellaneous. The adverse reactions can involve the pulmonary parenchyma, pleura, the airways, pulmonary vascular system, and mediastinum. Drug-induced lung diseases have no pathognomonic clinical, laboratory, physical, radiographic or histological findings. A drug-induced lung disease is usually considered a diagnosis of exclusion of other diseases. The diagnosis of drug-mediated pulmonary toxicity is usually made based on clinical findings. In general, laboratory analyses do not help in establishing the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography scanning is more sensitive than chest radiography for defining radiographic abnormalities. The treatment of drug-induced lung disease consists of immediate discontinuation of the offending drug and appropriate management of the pulmonary symptoms. Glucocorticoids have been associated with rapid improvement in gas exchange and reversal of radiographic abnormalities. Before starting any medication, patients should be educated about the potential adverse effects of the drug. Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of many types of tachyarrhythmia. Amiodarone-caused pulmonary toxicity is a well-known side effect (complication of this medication. The incidence of amiodarone-induced lung disease is approximately 5-7%.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Wild, Jim M.; Lee, Edward Y.; Morana, Giovanni; Lequin, Maarten H.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intenstities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathin...

  7. Increased volume of conducting airways in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is independent of disease severity: a volumetric capnography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantier, Laurent; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Estellat, Candice; Flamant, Martin; Roy, Carine; Bancal, Catherine; Borie, Raphaël; Israël-Biet, Dominique; Mal, Hervé; Crestani, Bruno; Delclaux, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolisation of alveolar regions are salient features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We asked whether IPF was associated with physiological changes consistent with increases in the volume of conducting airways, and whether airway volume was related to the severity of lung fibrosis. Patients with IPF (N  =  57, vital capacity-VC: 73  ±  20%), patients with non-IPF interstitial lung disease (non-IPF ILD, N  =  24, VC  =  78  ±  18%) and controls without lung disease (N  =  51, VC  =  112  ±  21%) underwent volumetric capnography for the determination of conducting airway volume using Fletcher's equal area method, reported to predicted total lung capacity to control for the effect of lung size (VDaw/TLCp, mL/L). VDaw/TLCp was higher in patients with IPF (45.3  ±  12.8 ml L(-1)) in comparison with controls (34.2  ±  11.0 ml L(-1), p  capnography showed higher conducting airway volume in IPF patients in comparison with controls and non-IPF ILDs, independent of disease severity. This result is consistent with either anatomical predisposition or dilation/longitudinal growth of conducting airways in IPF. PMID:26828240

  8. Bronchoconstriction Induces TGF-β Release and Airway Remodelling in Guinea Pig Lung Slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjitske A Oenema

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling, including smooth muscle remodelling, is a primary cause of airflow limitation in asthma. Recent evidence links bronchoconstriction to airway remodelling in asthma. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. A possible player is the multifunctional cytokine TGF-β, which plays an important role in airway remodelling. Guinea pig lung slices were used as an in vitro model to investigate mechanisms involved in bronchoconstriction-induced airway remodelling. To address this aim, mechanical effects of bronchoconstricting stimuli on contractile protein expression and TGF-β release were investigated. Lung slices were viable for at least 48 h. Both methacholine and TGF-β1 augmented the expression of contractile proteins (sm-α-actin, sm-myosin, calponin after 48 h. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that increased sm-myosin expression was enhanced in the peripheral airways and the central airways. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction mediated the release of biologically active TGF-β, which caused the increased contractile protein expression, as inhibition of actin polymerization (latrunculin A or TGF-β receptor kinase (SB431542 prevented the methacholine effects, whereas other bronchoconstricting agents (histamine and KCl mimicked the effects of methacholine. Collectively, bronchoconstriction promotes the release of TGF-β, which induces airway smooth muscle remodelling. This study shows that lung slices are a useful in vitro model to study mechanisms involved in airway remodelling.

  9. In vivo imaging of the airway wall in asthma: fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy in relation to histology and lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bel Elisabeth H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway remodelling is a feature of asthma including fragmentation of elastic fibres observed in the superficial elastin network of the airway wall. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM is a new and non-invasive imaging technique performed during bronchoscopy that may visualize elastic fibres, as shown by in vitro spectral analysis of elastin powder. We hypothesized that FCFM images capture in vivo elastic fibre patterns within the airway wall and that such patterns correspond with airway histology. We aimed to establish the concordance between the bronchial elastic fibre pattern in histology and FCFM. Second, we examined whether elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM were different between asthmatic subjects and healthy controls. Finally, the association between these patterns and lung function parameters was investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising 16 subjects (8 atopic asthmatic patients with controlled disease and 8 healthy controls spirometry and bronchoscopy were performed, with recording of FCFM images followed by endobronchial biopsy at the airway main carina. Elastic fibre patterns in histological sections and FCFM images were scored semi-quantitatively. Agreement between histology and FCFM was analysed using linearly weighted kappa κw. Results The patterns observed in histological sections and FCFM images could be divided into 3 distinct groups. There was good agreement between elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM patterns (κw 0.744. The semi-quantitative pattern scores were not different between asthmatic patients and controls. Notably, there was a significant difference in post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted between the different patterns by histology (p = 0.001 and FCFM (p = 0.048, regardless of asthma or atopy. Conclusion FCFM captures the elastic fibre pattern within the airway wall in humans in vivo. The association between post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted and

  10. Aeroparticles, Composition, and Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon-Rodriguez, Carlos I.; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R.; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past 60 years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently particulate matter (PM) is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics, and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution disaster happened in London on December 1952; it has been calculated that more than 4,000 deaths occurred during this event. Air pollution is a complex mix of gases and particles. Gaseous pollutants disseminate deeply into the alveoli, allowing its diffusion through the blood–air barrier to several organs. Meanwhile, PM is a mix of solid or liquid particles suspended in the air. PM is deposited at different levels of the respiratory tract, depending on its size: coarse particles (PM10) in upper airways and fine particles (PM2.5) can be accumulated in the lung parenchyma, inducing several respiratory diseases. Additionally to size, the composition of PM has been associated with different toxicological outcomes on clinical and epidemiological, as well as in vivo and in vitro animal and human studies. PM can be constituted by organic, inorganic, and biological compounds. All these compounds are capable of modifying several biological activities, including alterations in cytokine production, coagulation factors balance, pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and cardiac function. It can also generate different modifications during its passage through the airways, like inflammatory cells recruitment, with the release of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS). These inflammatory mediators can activate different pathways, such as MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Stat-1, or induce DNA adducts. All these alterations can mediate obstructive or restrictive respiratory diseases like

  11. Aeroparticles, composition and lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ivan Falcon-Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past sixty years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently Particulate matter (PM is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution disaster happened in London on December 1952; it has been calculated that more than 4000 deaths occurred during this event. Air pollution is a complex mix of gases and particles. Gaseous pollutants disseminate deeply into the alveoli, allowing its diffusion through the blood-air barrier to several organs. Meanwhile, PM is a mix of solid or liquid particles suspended in the air. PM is deposited at different levels of the respiratory tract, depending on its size: Coarse particles (PM10 in upper airways and fine particles (PM2.5 can be accumulated in the lung parenchyma, inducing several respiratory diseases. Additionally to size, the composition of particulate matter has been associated with different toxicological outcomes on clinical, epidemiological, as well as in vivo and in vitro animal and human studies. PM can be constituted by organic, inorganic and biological compounds. All these compounds are capable of modifying several biological activities including alterations in cytokine production, coagulation factors balance, pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and cardiac function. It can also generate different modifications during its passage through the airways, like inflammatory cells recruitment, with the release of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS. These inflammatory mediators can activate different pathways such as MAP-kinases, NF-B, and stat-1, or induce DNA adducts. All these alterations can mediate obstructive or restrictive

  12. Aeroparticles, Composition, and Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon-Rodriguez, Carlos I; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past 60 years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently particulate matter (PM) is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics, and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution disaster happened in London on December 1952; it has been calculated that more than 4,000 deaths occurred during this event. Air pollution is a complex mix of gases and particles. Gaseous pollutants disseminate deeply into the alveoli, allowing its diffusion through the blood-air barrier to several organs. Meanwhile, PM is a mix of solid or liquid particles suspended in the air. PM is deposited at different levels of the respiratory tract, depending on its size: coarse particles (PM10) in upper airways and fine particles (PM2.5) can be accumulated in the lung parenchyma, inducing several respiratory diseases. Additionally to size, the composition of PM has been associated with different toxicological outcomes on clinical and epidemiological, as well as in vivo and in vitro animal and human studies. PM can be constituted by organic, inorganic, and biological compounds. All these compounds are capable of modifying several biological activities, including alterations in cytokine production, coagulation factors balance, pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and cardiac function. It can also generate different modifications during its passage through the airways, like inflammatory cells recruitment, with the release of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS). These inflammatory mediators can activate different pathways, such as MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Stat-1, or induce DNA adducts. All these alterations can mediate obstructive or restrictive respiratory diseases like

  13. Endogenous lung stem cells and contribution to disease

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, JC; Teisanu, RM; Stripp, BR

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial branching during the process of lung development results in the establishment of distinct functional zones, each of which is characterized by a unique cellular composition and repertoire of local progenitor cells. Significant new insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms of epithelial maintenance that provide insights into the pathophysiology of lung disease have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the complex structure–function relationship in the airway epithe...

  14. Smoking-related lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Jeffrey R; Franks, Teri J

    2009-11-01

    Dyspneic smokers who come to clinical attention demonstrate varying combinations of emphysema, airway inflammation, and fibrosis in addition to the changes of pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. There is also growing acceptance of a link between cigarette smoke and alveolar wall fibrosis. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a dramatic response to recent-onset smoking seen in a small number of individuals. The interconnected pathways that lead to lung inflammation and fibrosis in cigarette smokers are slowly coming into focus. PMID:19935224

  15. Viral bronchiolitis in young rats causes small airway lesions that correlate with reduced lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkness, Ronald L; Szakaly, Renee J; Rosenthal, Louis A; Sullivan, Ruth; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Sun, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Viral illness with wheezing during infancy is associated with the inception of childhood asthma. Small airway dysfunction is a component of childhood asthma, but little is known about how viral illness at an early age may affect the structure and function of small airways. We used a well-characterized rat model of postbronchiolitis chronic airway dysfunction to address how postinfectious small airway lesions affect airway physiological function and if the structure/function correlates persist into maturity. Brown Norway rats were sham- or virus inoculated at 3 to 4 weeks of age and allowed to recover from the acute illness. At 3 to 14 months of age, physiology (respiratory system resistance, Newtonian resistance, tissue damping, and static lung volumes) was assessed in anesthetized, intubated rats. Serial lung sections revealed lesions in the terminal bronchioles that reduced luminal area and interrupted further branching, affecting 26% (range, 13-39%) of the small airways at 3 months of age and 22% (range, 6-40%) at 12 to 14 months of age. At 3 months of age (n = 29 virus; n = 7 sham), small airway lesions correlated with tissue damping (rs = 0.69) but not with Newtonian resistance (rs = 0.23), and Newtonian resistance was not elevated compared with control rats, indicating that distal airways were primarily responsible for the airflow obstruction. Older rats (n = 7 virus; n = 6 sham) had persistent small airway dysfunction and significantly increased Newtonian resistance in the postbronchiolitis group. We conclude that viral airway injury at an early age may induce small airway lesions that are associated quantitatively with small airway physiological dysfunction early on and that these defects persist into maturity.

  16. Indoor air pollution and airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegi, G.; Simoni, M.; Scognamiglio, A.; Baldacci, S.; Pistelli, F.; Carrozzi, L.; Annesi-Maesano, I. [CNR, Pisa (Italy). Inst. of Clinical Physiology

    2004-12-15

    Growing scientific evidence has shown that because people generally spend the majority of their time indoors, indoor pollution plays a significant role in affecting health and is thus an important health issue. Common indoor pollutants are environmental tobacco smoke, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and biological allergens. In developing countries, relevant sources of indoor pollution include biomass and coal burning for cooking and heating. Concentrations of these pollutants can be many times higher indoors than outdoors. Indoor air pollution may increase the risk of irritation phenomena, allergic sensitisation, acute and chronic respiratory disorders and lung function impairment. Recent conservative estimates have shown that 1.5-2 million deaths per year worldwide could be attributed to indoor air pollution. Approximately 1 million of these deaths occur in children aged under 5 years due to acute respiratory infections and significant proportions of deaths occur due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in women. Today, indoor air pollution ranks tenth among preventable risk factors contributing to the global burden of disease. Further research is necessary to better evaluate the respiratory health effects of indoor pollution and to implement protective programmes for public health.

  17. Sub-chronic lung inflammation after airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kenneth K; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Hammer, Maria;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess possible health effects of airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based biopesticides in mice. Endpoints were lung inflammation evaluated by presence of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), clearance of bacteria from the lung...

  18. Interleukin-1α drives the dysfunctional cross-talk of the airway epithelium and lung fibroblasts in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Emmanuel T; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Hackett, Tillie L; Spanjer, Anita I R; Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Heijink, Irene H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with aberrant epithelial-mesenchymal interactions resulting in inflammatory and remodelling processes. We developed a co-culture model using COPD and control-derived airway epithelial cells (AECs) and lung fibroblasts to understand the mediators that are involved in remodelling and inflammation in COPD.AECs and fibroblasts obtained from COPD and control lung tissue were grown in co-culture with fetal lung fibroblast or human bronchial epithelial cell lines. mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators, pro-fibrotic molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were assessed.Co-culture resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-8/CXCL8 and heat shock protein (Hsp70) from lung fibroblasts, and decreased expression of ECM molecules (e.g. collagen, decorin) that was not different between control and COPD-derived primary cells. This pro-inflammatory effect was mediated by epithelial-derived IL-1α and increased upon epithelial exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). When exposed to CSE, COPD-derived AECs elicited a stronger IL-1α response compared with control-derived airway epithelium and this corresponded with a significantly enhanced IL-8 release from lung fibroblasts.We demonstrate that, through IL-1α production, AECs induce a pro-inflammatory lung fibroblast phenotype that is further enhanced with CSE exposure in COPD, suggesting an aberrant epithelial-fibroblast interaction in COPD. PMID:27418555

  19. Regional lung aeration and ventilation during pressure support and biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation in experimental lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Spieth, Peter M; Carvalho, Alysson R; Hietschold, Volker; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiedemann, Bärbel; Koch, Thea; Pelosi, Paolo; Koch, Edmund

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There is an increasing interest in biphasic positive airway pressure with spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBmean), which is a combination of time-cycled controlled breaths at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure (BIPAP+SBcontrolled) and non-assisted spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBspont), in the early phase of acute lung injury (ALI). However, pressure support ventilation (PSV) remains the most commonly used mode of assisted ventilation. To date, the effects of BIPAP+SBm...

  20. Biphasic positive airway pressure minimizes biological impact on lung tissue in mild acute lung injury independent of etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Saddy, Felipe; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cintia Lourenço; Oliveira, Gisele Pena; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Baez Garcia, Cristiane Souza Nascimento; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macêdo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIVENT) is a partial support mode that employs pressure-controlled, time-cycled ventilation set at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure with unrestricted spontaneous breathing. BIVENT can modulate inspiratory effort by modifying the frequency of controlled breaths. Nevertheless, the optimal amount of inspiratory effort to improve respiratory function while minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury during partial ventilatory assis...

  1. Spontaneous peristaltic airway contractions propel lung liquid through the bronchial tree of intact and fetal lung explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittny, J C; Miserocchi, G; Sparrow, M P

    2000-07-01

    Spontaneous contractions of the fetal airways are a well recognized but poorly characterized phenomenon. In the present study spontaneous narrowing of the airways was analyzed in freshly isolated lungs from early to late gestation in fetal pigs and rabbits and in cultured fetal mouse lungs. Propagating waves of contraction traveling proximal to distal were observed in fresh lungs throughout gestation which displaced the lung liquid along the lumen. In the pseudoglandular and canalicular stages (fetal pigs) the frequency ranged from 2.3 to 3.3 contractions/min with a 39 to 46% maximum reduction of lumen diameter. In the saccular stage (rabbit) the frequency was 10 to 12/min with a narrowing of approximately 30%. In the organ cultures the waves of narrowing started at the trachea in whole lungs, or at the main bronchus in lobes (5.2 +/- 1.5 contractions/min, 22 +/- 8% reduction of lumen diameter), and as they proceeded distally along the epithelial tubes the luminal liquid was shifted toward the terminal tubules, which expanded the endbuds. As the tubules relaxed the flow of liquid was reversed. Thus the behavior of airway smooth muscle in the fetal lung is phasic in type (like gastrointestinal muscle) in contrast to that in postnatal lung, where it is tonic. An intraluminal positive pressure of 2.33 +/- 0.77 cm H(2)O was recorded in rabbit fetal trachea. It is proposed that the active tone of the smooth muscle maintains the positive intraluminal pressure and acts as a stimulus to lung growth via the force exerted across the airway wall and adjacent parenchyma. The expansion of the compliant endbuds by the fluid shifts at the airway tip may promote their growth into the surrounding mesenchyme.

  2. Lung hyperinflation and its reversibility in patients with airway obstruction of varying severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deesomchok, Athavudh; Webb, Katherine A; Forkert, Lutz; Lam, Yuk-Miu; Ofir, Dror; Jensen, Dennis; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2010-12-01

    The natural history of lung hyperinflation in patients with airway obstruction is unknown. In particular, little information exists about the extent of air trapping and its reversibility to bronchodilator therapy in those with mild airway obstruction. We completed a retrospective analysis of data from individuals with airway obstruction who attended our pulmonary function laboratory and had plethysmographic lung volume measurements pre- and post-bronchodilator (salbutamol). COPD was likely the predominant diagnosis but patients with asthma may have been included. We studied 2,265 subjects (61% male), age 65 ± 9 years (mean ± SD) with a post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC lung hyperinflation, and measured responses to bronchodilation across subgroups stratified by GOLD criteria. In GOLD stage I, vital capacity (VC) and inspiratory capacity (IC) were in the normal range; pre-bronchodilator residual volume (RV), functional residual capacity (FRC) and specific airway resistance were increased to 135%, 119% and 250% of predicted, respectively. For the group as a whole, RV and FRC increased exponentially as FEV(1) decreased, while VC and IC decreased linearly. Regardless of baseline FEV(1), the most consistent improvement following bronchodilation was RV reduction, in terms of magnitude and responder rate. In conclusion, increases (above normal) in airway resistance and plethysmographic lung volumes were found in those with only minor airway obstruction. Indices of lung hyperinflation increased exponentially as airway obstruction worsened. Those with the greatest resting lung hyperinflation showed the largest bronchodilator-induced volume deflation effects. Reduced air trapping was the predominant response to acute bronchodilation across severity subgroups.

  3. The involvement of glycosaminoglycans in airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-02-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) present with severe airway destruction and extensive bronchiectasis. It has been assumed that these structural airway changes have occurred secondary to infection and inflammation, but recent studies suggest that glycosaminoglycan (GAG) remodelling may be an important independent parallel process. Evidence is accumulating that not only the concentration, but also sulphation of GAGs is markedly increased in CF bronchial cells and tissues. Increased expression of GAGs and, in particular, heparan sulphate, has been linked to a sustained inflammatory response and neutrophil recruitment to the CF airways. This present review discusses the biological role of GAGs in the lung, as well as their involvement in CF respiratory disease, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  4. Application of indigenous continuous positive airway pressure during one lung ventilation for thoracic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Yadav; Arvind Chaturvedi; Girija Prasad Rath; Keshav Goyal

    2011-01-01

    During one lung ventilation (OLV) hypoxemia may occur due to ventilation-perfusion mismatch. It can be prevented with application of ventilation strategy that prevents atelectasis while minimally impairing perfusion of the dependant lung. Here, two cases are reported who required OLV and in whom hypoxemia could be prevented with the application of continuous positive airway pressure to the deflated or non-dependant lung, using an indigenous technique. We suggest use of this technique which is...

  5. Aerosol-Based Cell Therapy for Treatment of Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardia, Egi; Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol-based cell delivery technique via intratracheal is an effective route for delivering transplant cells directly into the lungs. An aerosol device known as the MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer is invented to transform liquid into an aerosol form, which then can be applied via intratracheal administration for drug delivery. The device produces a uniform and concentrated distribution of aerosolized liquid. Using the capability of MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer to transform liquid into aerosol form, our group has designed a novel method of cell delivery using an aerosol-based technique. We have successfully delivered skin-derived fibroblast cells and airway epithelial cells into the airway of a rabbit with minimum risk of cell loss and have uniformly distributed the cells into the airway. This chapter illustrates the application of aerosol device to deliver any type of cells for future treatment of lung diseases. PMID:27062596

  6. Metabolic lung disease: imaging and histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic lung disease includes pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), pulmonary amyloidosis, metastatic pulmonary calcification, dendritic pulmonary ossification, pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis, and storage diseases. In pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, CT demonstrates air-space consolidation with thickened interlobular septa, producing the so-called 'crazy paving' appearance. Pulmonary amyloidosis can appear as parenchymal nodules (nodular parenchymal form), diffuse interstitial deposit (diffuse interstitial form), or submucosal deposits in the airways (tracheobronchial form). Metastatic pulmonary calcification may appear on high-resolution CT as numerous 3- to 10-mm diameter calcified nodules or, more commonly as fluffy and poorly defined nodular opacities. In pulmonary microlithiasis, high-resolution CT demonstrates diffuse punctuate micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in apparent calcification of interlobular septa. Niemann-Pick disease appears as ground-glass attenuation in the upper lung zone and thickening of the interlobular septa in the lower lung zone. Radiologic study including high-resolution CT will be helpful for the diagnosis and follow-up of these diseases

  7. Molecular characterization of the peripheral airway field of cancerization in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Chieh J Tsay

    Full Text Available Field of cancerization in the airway epithelium has been increasingly examined to understand early pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer. However, the extent of field of cancerization throughout the lung airways is unclear. Here we sought to determine the differential gene and microRNA expressions associated with field of cancerization in the peripheral airway epithelial cells of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We obtained peripheral airway brushings from smoker controls (n=13 and from the lung contralateral to the tumor in cancer patients (n=17. We performed gene and microRNA expression profiling on these peripheral airway epithelial cells using Affymetrix GeneChip and TaqMan Array. Integrated gene and microRNA analysis was performed to identify significant molecular pathways. We identified 26 mRNAs and 5 miRNAs that were significantly (FDR <0.1 up-regulated and 38 mRNAs and 12 miRNAs that were significantly down-regulated in the cancer patients when compared to smoker controls. Functional analysis identified differential transcriptomic expressions related to tumorigenesis. Integration of miRNA-mRNA data into interaction network analysis showed modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK pathway in the contralateral lung field of cancerization. In conclusion, patients with lung adenocarcinoma have tumor related molecules and pathways in histologically normal appearing peripheral airway epithelial cells, a substantial distance from the tumor itself. This finding can potentially provide new biomarkers for early detection of lung cancer and novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  9. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases? Asbestos-related lung diseases are ... as the peritoneum (PER-ih-to-NE-um). Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases Figure A shows the location ...

  10. Selective PDE4 inhibitors as potent anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of airway diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Lagente

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphodiesterases (PDEs are responsible for the breakdown of intracellular cyclic nucleotides, from which PDE4 are the major cyclic AMP metabolizing isoenzymes found in inflammatory and immune cells. This generated greatest interest on PDE4 as a potential target to treat lung inflammatory diseases. For example, cigarette smoke-induced neutrophilia in BAL was dose and time dependently reduced by cilomilast. Beside the undesired side effects associated with the first generation of PDE4 inhibitors, the second generation of selective inhibitors such as cilomilast and roflumilast showed clinical efficacy in asthma and chronic obstrutive pulmonary diseases trials, thus re-enhancing the interest on these classes of compounds. However, the ability of PDE4 inhibitors to prevent or modulate the airway remodelling remains relatively unexplored. We demonstrated that selective PDE4 inhibitor RP 73-401 reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 activity and TGF-beta1 release during LPS-induced lung injury in mice and that CI-1044 inhibited the production of MMP-1 and MMP-2 from human lung fibroblasts stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since inflammatory diseases of the bronchial airways are associated with destruction of normal tissue structure, our data suggest a therapeutic benefit for PDE4 inhibitors in tissue remodelling associated with chronic lung diseases.

  11. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children. PMID:27113355

  12. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children.

  13. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W; Casale, Thomas B; Cruz, Alvaro A; Lockey, Richard J; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-09-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and acceptable) pharmacologic treatment based on guidelines. These patients have impaired quality of life, social functioning, sleep, and school/work performance. Severe uncontrolled allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases, or occupational airway diseases are defined as SCUADs. Pediatric SCUADs are still unclear. In developing countries SCUADs exist, but risk factors can differ from those seen in developed countries. Comorbidities are common in patients with SCUADs and might increase their severity. The present document is the position of a group of experts considering that SCUADs should be considered differently from mild chronic upper airway diseases. It reviews the state of the art, highlighting gaps in our knowledge, and proposes several areas for a better understanding, prevention, and management of SCUADs. This document can also serve to optimize the pharmacoeconomic evaluation of SCUADs by means of comparison with mild chronic upper airway diseases. PMID:19660803

  14. The effects of emphysema on airway disease: Correlations between multi-detector CT and pulmonary function tests in smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahaba, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp; Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp; Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp; Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp; Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp; Kasai, Hajime, E-mail: daikasai6075@yahoo.co.jp; Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com; Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp; Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2014-06-15

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation caused by emphysema and small airway narrowing. Quantitative evaluation of airway dimensions by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has revealed a correlation between airway dimension and airflow limitation. However, the effect of emphysema on this correlation is unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine whether emphysematous changes alter the relationships between airflow limitation and airway dimensions as measured by inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Methods: Ninety-one subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Images were evaluated for mean airway luminal area (Ai), wall area percentage (WA%) from the third to the fifth generation of three bronchi (B1, B5, B8) in the right lung, and low attenuation volume percent (LAV%). Correlations between each airway index and airflow limitation were determined for each patient and compared between patients with and without evidence of emphysema. Results: In patients without emphysema, Ai and WA% from both the inspiratory and expiratory scans were significantly correlated with FEV{sub 1.} No correlation was detected in patients with emphysema. In addition, emphysematous COPD patients with GOLD stage 1 or 2 disease had significantly lower changes in B8 Ai than non-emphysematous patients. Conclusions: A significant correlation exists between airway parameters and FEV{sub 1} in patients without emphysema. Emphysema may influence airway dimensions even in patients with mild to moderate COPD.

  15. The effects of emphysema on airway disease: Correlations between multi-detector CT and pulmonary function tests in smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation caused by emphysema and small airway narrowing. Quantitative evaluation of airway dimensions by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has revealed a correlation between airway dimension and airflow limitation. However, the effect of emphysema on this correlation is unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine whether emphysematous changes alter the relationships between airflow limitation and airway dimensions as measured by inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Methods: Ninety-one subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Images were evaluated for mean airway luminal area (Ai), wall area percentage (WA%) from the third to the fifth generation of three bronchi (B1, B5, B8) in the right lung, and low attenuation volume percent (LAV%). Correlations between each airway index and airflow limitation were determined for each patient and compared between patients with and without evidence of emphysema. Results: In patients without emphysema, Ai and WA% from both the inspiratory and expiratory scans were significantly correlated with FEV1. No correlation was detected in patients with emphysema. In addition, emphysematous COPD patients with GOLD stage 1 or 2 disease had significantly lower changes in B8 Ai than non-emphysematous patients. Conclusions: A significant correlation exists between airway parameters and FEV1 in patients without emphysema. Emphysema may influence airway dimensions even in patients with mild to moderate COPD

  16. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowski, Katherine E; Lucas, Selita N; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O3)-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O3-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O2) or hypoxia (10.0% O2), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1ppm O3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O3-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability. PMID:27286659

  17. Occupational and environmental lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Danielle M; Meyer, Cristopher A; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Occupational and environmental lung disease remains a major cause of respiratory impairment worldwide. Despite regulations, increasing rates of coal worker's pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis are being reported in the United States. Dust exposures are occurring in new industries, for instance, silica in hydraulic fracking. Nonoccupational environmental lung disease contributes to major respiratory disease, asthma, and COPD. Knowledge of the imaging patterns of occupational and environmental lung disease is critical in diagnosing patients with occult exposures and managing patients with suspected or known exposures. PMID:26024603

  18. Small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia in children: HRCT findings and correlation with radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of small airway abnormalities after mycoplasma pneumonia and correlate them with the findings of chest radiography performed during the acute and follow-up phases of the condition. We retrospectively evaluated HRCT and chest radiographic findings of 18 patients with clinical diagnosis of small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia (M:F=8:10, mean age: 8.3 years, mean time interval after the initial infection; 26 menths). We evaluated the lung parenchymal and bronchial abnormalities on HRCT (n=18). In addition, presence of air-trapping was assessed on expiratory scans (n=13). The findings of HRCT were correlated with those of chest radiography performed during the acute phase of initial infection (n=15) and at the time of CT examination (n=18), respectively. HRCT revealed lung parenchymal abnormalities in 13 patients (72%). A mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was noted in ten patients (10/18, 56%) and air-trapping on expiratory scans was observed in nine (9/13), 69%). In nine of 14 (64%) with negative findings at follow-up chest radiography, one or both of the above parenchymal abnormalities was observed at HRCT. In four patients (27%), parenchymal abnormalities were seen at HRCT in areas considered normal at acute-phase chest radiography. Bronchiectasis or ateclectasis was observed in eight (44%) and four (22%) patients, respectively, at HRCT. The CT features of Swyer-James syndrome such as a unilateral hyperlucent lung with reduced lung volume and attenuated vessels were noted in two patients(11%). HRCT can clearly demonstrate lung parenchymal and bronchial abnormalities of small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia in children

  19. Ultrafine particles in the airway aggravated experimental lung injury through impairment in Treg function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanggang; Cao, Yinghua; Sun, Yue; Xu, Ruxiang; Zheng, Zhendong; Song, Haihan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition characterized by rapid-onset alveolar-capillary damage mediated by pathogenic proinflammatory immune responses. Since exposure to airway particulate matter (PM) could significantly change the inflammatory status of the individual, we investigated whether PM instillation in the airway could alter the course of ALI, using a murine model with experimental lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS challenge. We found that PM-treated mice presented significantly aggravated lung injury, which was characterized by further reductions in body weight, increased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and higher mortality rate, compared to control saline-treated mice. The PM-treated mice also presented elevated lung and systemic type 1 T helper cell (Th1) frequency as well as reduced lung regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency, which was associated with severity of lung injury. Further examinations revealed that the Treg function was impaired in PM-treated mice, characterized by significantly repressed transforming growth factor beta production. Adoptive transfer of functional Tregs from control mice to PM-treated mice significantly improved their prognosis after intratracheal LPS challenge. Together, these results demonstrated that first, PM in the airway aggravated lung injury; second, severity of lung injury was associated with T cell subset imbalance in PM-treated mice; and third, PM treatment induced quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the Tregs. PMID:27179778

  20. How Lungs Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Diseases > How Lungs Work How Lungs Work The Respiratory System Your lungs are part of ... Parts of the Respiratory System and How They Work Airways SINUSES are hollow spaces in the bones ...

  1. Tracking of Inhaled Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoparticles in Lungs of SKH-1 Mice with Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, M Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Behnke, Thomas; Mitkovski, Miso; Monecke, Sebastian; Dullin, Christian; Kilfeather, Stephen; Dressel, Ralf; Resch-Genger, Ute; Alves, Frauke

    2015-12-22

    Molecular imaging of inflammatory lung diseases, such as asthma, has been limited to date. The recruitment of innate immune cells to the airways is central to the inflammation process. This study exploits these cells for imaging purposes within the lung, using inhaled polystyrene nanoparticles loaded with the near-infrared fluorescence dye Itrybe (Itrybe-NPs). By means of in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging of an ovalbumin-based allergic airway inflammation (AAI) model in hairless SKH-1 mice, we show that subsequent to intranasal application of Itrybe-NPs, AAI lungs display fluorescence intensities significantly higher than those in lungs of control mice for at least 24 h. Ex vivo immunofluorescence analysis of lung tissue demonstrates the uptake of Itrybe-NPs predominantly by CD68(+)CD11c(+)ECF-L(+)MHCII(low) cells, identifying them as alveolar M2 macrophages in the peribronchial and alveolar areas. The in vivo results were validated by confocal microscopy, overlapping tile analysis, and flow cytometry, showing an amount of Itrybe-NP-containing macrophages in lungs of AAI mice significantly larger than that in controls. A small percentage of NP-containing cells were identified as dendritic cells. Flow cytometry of tracheobronchial lymph nodes showed that Itrybe-NPs were negligible in lung draining lymph nodes 24 h after inhalation. This imaging approach may advance preclinical monitoring of AAI in vivo over time and aid the investigation of the role that macrophages play during lung inflammation. Furthermore, it allows for tracking of inhaled nanoparticles and can hence be utilized for studies of the fate of potential new nanotherapeutics.

  2. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  3. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  4. The extracellular matrix: Friend or foe in airway disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Airway remodelling includes thickening of the basement membrane and alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. These changes play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of pulmonary fibrotic diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Insight into the mec

  5. CORRELATES BETWEEN HUMAN LUNG INJURY AFTER PARTICLE EXPOSURE AND RECURRENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION IN THE HORSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of the clinical presentation, physiologic changes, and pathology of the human response to particulate matter (PM) are comparable to inflammatory airway disease (lAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)lheaves in the horse. Both present with symptoms of cough,...

  6. Relationship between airway inflammation and remodeling in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górska K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite a number of important differences in the pathogenesis, course and prognosis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, these two entities also have common features with airway inflammation being one of them. Airway remodeling is a characteristic feature of asthma, but data on the bronchial wall thickening in COPD patients are still scarce. Aim To assess the relation between the inflammatory cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and thickness of bronchial walls assessed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT in asthma and COPD patients. Material and methods The study was conducted in 9 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma (M/F 4/5, mean age 35 ± 10 years and 11 patients with mild-to-moderate COPD (M/F 7/4, mean age 57 ± 9 years. In all subjects lung function tests and HRCT scanning of the chest were performed. External (D and internal (L diameters of the airways were assessed at five selected lung levels. The lumen area (AL, wall area (WA, wall thickness (WT and bronchial wall thickness (WT/D ratio were calculated. Eight patients with asthma and 8 patients with COPD underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Total and differential cell counts were assessed in the BAL fluid. Results Mean FEV1% pred was 80 ± 19%, and 73 ± 20% in asthma and COPD patients, respectively (NS. No significant differences in the total and differential cell counts in BALF were found in patients with asthma and COPD. There were no significant differences in the airway diameter or airway wall thickness. The mean inner airway diameter was 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.3 mm and the mean lumen area was 1.8 ± 0.7 and 1.6 ± 0.7 mm2 in asthma and COPD, respectively (NS. Negative correlations between the eosinophil count in BALF and inner airway diameter (r = -0.7, P Conclusions In mild-to-moderate asthma and COPD the airway diameter and thickness are similar. In asthmatics, the airway diameter might be

  7. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvihill, Michael S.; Kratz, Johannes R.; Patrick Pham; Jablons, David M.; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer de...

  8. Porous antioxidant polymer microparticles as therapeutic systems for the airway inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dahee; Kang, Changsun; Jung, Eunkyeong; Yoo, Donghyuck; Wu, Dongmei; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-07-10

    Inhaling steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is the most common treatment for airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. However, frequent steroid administration causes adverse side effects. Therefore, the successful clinical translation of numerous steroidal drugs greatly needs pulmonary drug delivery systems which are formulated from biocompatible and non-immunogenic polymers. We have recently developed a new family of biodegradable polymer, vanillyl alcohol-containing copolyoxalate (PVAX) which is able to scavenge hydrogen peroxide and exert potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. In this work, we report the therapeutic potential of porous PVAX microparticles which encapsulate dexamethasone (DEX) as a therapeutic system for airway inflammatory diseases. PVAX microparticles themselves reduced oxidative stress and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the lung of ovalbumin-challenged asthmatic mice. However, DEX-loaded porous PVAX microparticles showed significantly enhanced therapeutic effects than PVAX microparticles, suggesting the synergistic effects of PVAX with DEX. In addition, PVAX microparticles showed no inflammatory responses to lung tissues. Given their excellent biocompatibility and intrinsic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, PVAX microparticles hold tremendous potential as therapeutic systems for the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:27151077

  9. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  10. Airway disease: similarities and differences between asthma, COPD and bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Athanazio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Airway diseases are highly prevalent worldwide; however, the prevalence of these diseases is underestimated. Although these diseases present several common characteristics, they have different clinical outcomes. The differentiation between asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis in the early stage of disease is extremely important for the adoption of appropriate therapeutic measures. However, because of the high prevalence of these diseases and the common pathophysiological pathways, some patients with different diseases may present with similar symptoms. The objective of this review is to highlight the similarities and differences between these diseases in terms of the risk factors, pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Margaritopoulos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currently considered aetiologically linked to smoking and a few others which are more likely to develop in smokers. Here, we aim to focus on the most recent findings regarding the role of smoking in the pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of ILDs.

  12. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritopoulos, George A; Vasarmidi, Eirini; Jacob, Joseph; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M

    2015-09-01

    For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currently considered aetiologically linked to smoking and a few others which are more likely to develop in smokers. Here, we aim to focus on the most recent findings regarding the role of smoking in the pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of ILDs. PMID:26324804

  13. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, b...

  14. Effects of pulmonary vascular pressures and flow on airway and parenchymal mechanics in isolated rat lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Petak, Ferenc; Habre, Walid; Hantos, Zoltán; Peter D Sly; Morel, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Changes in pulmonary hemodynamics have been shown to alter the mechanical properties of the lungs, but the exact mechanisms are not clear. We therefore investigated the effects of alterations in pulmonary vascular pressure and flow (Q(p)) on the mechanical properties of the airways and the parenchyma by varying these parameters independently in three groups of isolated perfused normal rat lungs. The pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc(est)), estimated from the pulmonary arterial (Ppa) and left a...

  15. The microbiome in chronic inflammatory airway disease: A threatened species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robin John; Van Niekerk, Andre; Jeevarathnum, Ashley C; Feldman, Charles; Richards On Behalf Of The South African Allergic Rhinitis Working Group, Guy A

    2016-08-01

    The human body is exposed to a multitude of microbes and infectious organisms throughout life. Many of these organisms colonise the skin, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and airway. We now recognise that this colonisation includes the lower airway, previously thought to be sterile. These colonising organisms play an important role in disease prevention, including an array of chronic inflammatory conditions that are unrelated to infectious diseases. However, new evidence of immune dysregulation suggests that early colonisation, especially of the GITand airway, by pathogenic micro-organisms, has deleterious effects that may contribute to the potential to induce chronic inflammation in young children, which may only express itself in adult life. PMID:27499401

  16. Alcoholic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kershaw, Corey D.; Guidot, David M.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to its well-known association with lung infection (i.e., pneumonia), alcohol abuse now is recognized as an independent factor that increases by three- to four-fold the incidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe form of acute lung injury with a mortality rate of 40 to 50 percent. This translates to tens of thousands of excess deaths in the United States each year from alcohol-mediated lung injury, which is comparable to scarring of the liver (i.e., cirrhosis) in...

  17. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHEMETRY (ADAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    We measured, in vivo, the airspace calibers of the small airways and alveoli by ADAM in the lungs of children of ages 6 to 18 years and adults aged 18 to 80 years. ADAM utilizes the gravitational settling time of inhaled monodisperse particles to infer the vertical distance to th...

  19. International union against tuberculosis and lung disease (IUATLD): initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklake, M R

    1995-12-01

    IUATLD initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease developed in the late 1970s, coincident with improving tuberculosis control, and have targeted acute respiratory infections in children and chronic airways disease in adults and in children. The focus has been on methodology and the tools required to document the distribution and determinants of disease, and is illustrated in data gathered in African populations. Instruments developed include a simplified method of measuring bronchial hyper-reactivity and an asthma questionnaire Non-standard methods of questionnaire administration have also been validated, methods which are appropriate for use in the burgeoning urban communities and workforces of sub-Saharan Africa made up of rural migrants from different tribes and language groups. In addition, a review of reference values available for interpreting lung function in sub-Saharan African populations indicates a need to take into account a secular trend over the last two decades towards higher spirometric values. In the published data from Africa, not inconsiderable between-country differences are evident in the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults and of asthma in children. In addition, rates for childhood asthma were consistently higher in urban vs rural communities, with environmental factors playing an important role as well as being locally specific. Not only does the burden of morbidity attributable to both the chronic airway diseases reviewed justify past IUATLD initiatives in non-tuberculous lung disease, but it also argues that future initiatives should focus on investigating between- and within-country differences using a standardized methodology, with a view to identifying local environmental determinants susceptible to intervention and control. Curbing tobacco use is clearly important, not only to benefit the health of adult smokers for whom the ill-health consequences have long been recognized, but, and more important, to protect the health of

  20. LF-15 & T7, synthetic peptides derived from tumstatin, attenuate aspects of airway remodelling in a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karryn T Grafton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumstatin is a segment of the collagen-IV protein that is markedly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Tumstatin can play an important role in the development of airway remodelling associated with asthma due to its anti-angiogenic properties. This study assessed the anti-angiogenic properties of smaller peptides derived from tumstatin, which contain the interface tumstatin uses to interact with the αVβ3 integrin. METHODS: Primary human lung endothelial cells were exposed to the LF-15, T3 and T7 tumstatin-derived peptides and assessed for cell viability and tube formation in vitro. The impact of the anti-angiogenic properties on airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR was then examined using a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airways disease. RESULTS: The LF-15 and T7 peptides significantly reduced endothelial cell viability and attenuated tube formation in vitro. Mice exposed to OVA+ LF-15 or OVA+T7 also had reduced total lung vascularity and AHR was attenuated compared to mice exposed to OVA alone. T3 peptides reduced cell viability but had no effect on any other parameters. CONCLUSION: The LF-15 and T7 peptides may be appropriate candidates for use as novel pharmacotherapies due to their small size and anti-angiogenic properties observed in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Update on host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hector, Andreas; Frey, Nina; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In the era of long-term inhaled antibiotics and increasing CF patient survival, new “emerging” pathogens are detected in CF airways, yet their pathophysiological disease relevance remains largely controversial and incompletely defined. As a response to chronic microbial triggers, innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils, are continuously recruited into CF airways where they combat pathogens but also cause...

  2. Airway gene transfer in a non-human primate: lentiviral gene expression in marmoset lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, N; Miller, D; Cmielewski, P; Donnelley, M; Bright, R; Parsons, D W

    2013-01-01

    Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) must be assessed for safety and efficacy, so testing in a non-human primate (NHP) model is invaluable. In this pilot study we determined if the conducting airways of marmosets (n = 2) could be transduced using an airway pre-treatment followed by an intratracheal bolus dose of a VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral (LV) vector (LacZ reporter). LacZ gene expression (X-gal) was assessed after 7 days and found primarily in conducting airway epithelia as well as in alveolar regions. The LacZ gene was not detected in liver or spleen via qPCR. Vector p24 protein bio-distribution into blood was transient. Dosing was well tolerated. This preliminary study confirmed the transducibility of CF-relevant airway cell types. The marmoset is a promising NHP model for testing and translating genetic treatments for CF airway disease towards clinical trials. PMID:23412644

  3. Neutrophil elastase and matrix metalloproteinase 12 in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudius J; Schultz, Carsten; Mall, Marcus A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic lung disease remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent studies in young children with CF diagnosed by newborn screening identified neutrophil elastase (NE), a major product released from neutrophils in inflamed airways, as a key risk factor for the onset and early progression of CF lung disease. However, the understanding of how NE and potentially other proteases contribute to the complex in vivo pathogenesis of CF lung disease remains limited. In this review, we summarize recent progress in this area based on studies in βENaC-overexpressing (βENaC-Tg) mice featuring CF-like lung disease and novel protease-specific Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors for localization and quantification of protease activity in the lung. These studies demonstrated that NE is implicated in several key features of CF lung disease such as neutrophilic airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and structural lung damage in vivo. Furthermore, these studies identified macrophage elastase (matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12)) as an additional protease contributing to early lung damage in βENaC-Tg mice. Collectively, these results suggest that NE and MMP12 released from activated neutrophils and macrophages in mucus-obstructed airways play important pathogenetic roles and may serve as potential therapeutic targets to prevent and/or delay irreversible structural lung damage in patients with CF. PMID:27456476

  4. Programmed Death Ligand 1 Promotes Early-Life Chlamydia Respiratory Infection-Induced Severe Allergic Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Malcolm R; Nguyen, Duc H; Brown, Alexandra C; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Kim, Richard Y; Yagita, Hideo; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia infections are frequent causes of respiratory illness, particularly pneumonia in infants, and are linked to permanent reductions in lung function and the induction of asthma. However, the immune responses that protect against early-life infection and the mechanisms that lead to chronic lung disease are incompletely understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 in promoting early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection, and infection-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and severe allergic airway disease in later life. Infection increased PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, mRNA expression in the lung. Flow cytometric analysis of whole lung homogenates identified monocytes, dendritic cells, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells as major sources of PD-1 and PD-L1. Inhibition of PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, during infection ablated infection-induced AHR in later life. Given that PD-L1 was the most highly up-regulated and its targeting prevented infection-induced AHR, subsequent analyses focused on this ligand. Inhibition of PD-L1 had no effect on Chlamydia load but suppressed infection-induced pulmonary inflammation. Infection decreased the levels of the IL-13 decoy receptor in the lung, which were restored to baseline levels by inhibition of PD-L1. Finally, inhibition of PD-L1 during infection prevented subsequent infection-induced severe allergic airways disease in later life by decreasing IL-13 levels, Gob-5 expression, mucus production, and AHR. Thus, early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection-induced PD-L1 promotes severe inflammation during infection, permanent reductions in lung function, and the development of more severe allergic airway disease in later life.

  5. Inhaled adrenergics and anticholinergics in obstructive lung disease: do they enhance mucociliary clearance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ruben D

    2007-09-01

    Pulmonary mucociliary clearance is an essential defense mechanism against bacteria and particulate matter. Mucociliary dysfunction is an important feature of obstructive lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. This dysfunction in airway clearance is associated with accelerated loss of lung function in patients with obstructive lung disease. The involvement of the cholinergic and adrenergic neural pathways in the pathophysiology of mucus hypersecretion suggests the potential therapeutic role of bronchodilators as mucoactive agents. Although anticholinergics and adrenergic agonist bronchodilators have been routinely used, alone or in combination, to enhance mucociliary clearance in patients with obstructive lung disease, the existing evidence does not consistently show clinical effectiveness.

  6. The effect of inspiration on airway dimensions measured in CT images from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Wille, Mathilde; Thomsen, Laura;

    2013-01-01

    of the same subject using image registration. Mixed effect models were used to predict the relative change in lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) in airways of generation 0 (trachea) to 6 based on relative changes in the segmented total lung volume (TLV). Results: On average, 1.0, 2.0, 3.9, 7.6, 15...... and Materials: We selected from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial 978 subjects without COPD who were scanned annually for 5 years with low-dose multi-slice CT. Using in-house developed software, the lungs and airways were automatically segmented and corresponding airway branches were found in all scans...

  7. Interstitial lung disease in scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Sara R; Castelino, Flavia V

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multiorgan involvement. Interstitial lung disease is a common complication of systemic sclerosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of interstitial lung disease hinges on careful clinical evaluation and pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. Effective therapeutic options are still limited. Several experimental therapies are currently in early-phase clinical trials and show promise.

  8. Complement system in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Pankita H; Wilkes, David S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Pneumoproteins in interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Rob

    2006-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases (ILD)s are a diverse group of pulmonary disorders that are classified together because of similar clinical, roentgenographic, physiologic, or pathologic manifestations, compromising over 100 different members that have been broadly classified into several categories. The major abnormality in ILDs is disruption of the lung parenchyma. Sarcoidosis is the commonest ILD in the western world. In our own experience, hypersensitivity pneumonitis is also quite common in...

  10. Predominant constitutive CFTR conductance in small airways

    OpenAIRE

    Lytle Christian; Wang Xiaofei; Quinton Paul M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are inflammation of the small airways (bronchiolitis) and destruction of lung parenchyma (emphysema). These forms of disease arise from chronic prolonged infections, which are usually never present in the normal lung. Despite the fact that primary hygiene and defense of the airways presumably requires a well controlled fluid environment on the surface of the bronchiolar airway, very little is known ...

  11. Vascular injury in lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaled particulates which stimulate a 'delayed', cellular mode of alveolar clearance are excreted to the airways through lymphoid foci in the bronchial bifurcations. The anatomic relations and developing pathology of the tissues adjacent to these foci, including the divisions of accompanying arteries, were studied by serial sectioning and photomicrographic modelling of rat lungs. The changes are typical of classic 'delayed' inflammatory reactions and, in the rat, the fully developed stage is characterised by fibrinoid necrosis involving all three layers of the arterial wall in a linear lesion across the leading edge of the flow divider. An hypothesis was developed to relate the injury to pulsatile forces. Recent published findings indicate that similarly placed lesions, with species-specific changes in development, are universal in both cerebral and extra-cranial arterial forks of man and animals. Possible associations of the microvascular changes with human atherosclerosis and their further significance in pulmonary and systemic effects arising from industrial and environmental contaminants are explored. (author)

  12. Lung surfactant in subacute pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Spragg Roger G; Devendra Gehan

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a surface active material composed of both lipids and proteins that is produced by alveolar type II pneumocytes. Abnormalities of surfactant in the immature lung or in the acutely inflamed mature lung are well described. However, in a variety of subacute diseases of the mature lung, abnormalities of lung surfactant may also be of importance. These diseases include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, pneumo...

  13. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Husam Sakkijha; Majdy M Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertens...

  14. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950308 Inhibition of mRNA expression of sillicoticcollagen gene by tetrandrine.HE Yuxian(何玉先),etal.Occup Med Instit,CAMS,Beijing,100050.Chin JPrev Med 1995;29(1):18-20.Effects of tetrandrine(TT) on types Ⅰ and Ⅱ col-lagen gene mRNA in lung tissues of silicotic rats werestudied with RNA dot blot and in situ hybridizatin bycDNA coding human and mouse Proα1(Ⅰ) and Proα1(Ⅲ) collagen.Results revealed that types Ⅰ and Ⅲcollagen gene mRNA content in lung tissues of rats ex-posed to silica dust for two to four months was obvi-

  15. Spectrum of fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Padilla, Maria L

    2009-02-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by inflammation and/or fibrosis of the pulmonary interstitium. In 2002, the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society revised the classification of interstitial lung diseases and introduced the term diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are a subtype of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are subdivided into usual interstitial pneumonia (with its clinical counterpart idiopathic interstitial pneumonia), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease, and lymphocytic pneumonia. Sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis are the 2 most common granulomatous diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis/polymyositis (causing antisynthetase syndrome) are diffuse parenchymal lung diseases of known association because these conditions are associated with connective tissue disease. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare genetic diffuse parenchymal lung disease characterized by the clinical triad of pulmonary disease, oculocutaneous albinism, and bleeding diathesis. This review provides an overview of the chronic fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Its primary objective is to illuminate the clinical challenges encountered by clinicians who manage the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases regularly and to offer potential solutions to those challenges. Treatment for the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases is limited, and for many patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation remains the best option. Although much has been learned about the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases during the past decade, research in these diseases is urgently needed. PMID:19170214

  16. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Mulvihill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development. The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed, and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  17. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael S.Mulvihill; Johannes R.Kratz; Patrick Pham; David M.Jablons; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.Recently,advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis.Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury.In this review,we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development.The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed,and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  18. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S;

    2015-01-01

    On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP...... suffering from allergies and asthma, more than half of these patients are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision Medicine represents a novel approach in medicine, embracing 4 key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic and functional endotyping of the disease......, with participation of the patient in the decision making process of therapeutic actions, and taking into account predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of Precision Medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the Epidemic of Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases...

  19. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S;

    2015-01-01

    On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP...... Effectiveness Group (REG). MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, underlined the importance of the need for a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach for patients with Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases, and encouraged a joint initiative to control....... This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The Commissioner underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient...

  20. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10-40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  1. Usefulness of texture features for segmentation of lungs with severe diffuse interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Li, Qiang

    2010-03-01

    We developed an automated method for the segmentation of lungs with severe diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) in multi-detector CT. In this study, we would like to compare the performance levels of this method and a thresholdingbased segmentation method for normal lungs, moderately abnormal lungs, severely abnormal lungs, and all lungs in our database. Our database includes 31 normal cases and 45 abnormal cases with severe DILD. The outlines of lungs were manually delineated by a medical physicist and confirmed by an experienced chest radiologist. These outlines were used as reference standards for the evaluation of the segmentation results. We first employed a thresholding technique for CT value to obtain initial lungs, which contain normal and mildly abnormal lung parenchyma. We then used texture-feature images derived from co-occurrence matrix to further segment lung regions with severe DILD. The segmented lung regions with severe DILD were combined with the initial lungs to generate the final segmentation results. We also identified and removed the airways to improve the accuracy of the segmentation results. We used three metrics, i.e., overlap, volume agreement, and mean absolute distance (MAD) between automatically segmented lung and reference lung to evaluate the performance of our segmentation method and the thresholding-based segmentation method. Our segmentation method achieved a mean overlap of 96.1%, a mean volume agreement of 98.1%, and a mean MAD of 0.96 mm for the 45 abnormal cases. On the other hand the thresholding-based segmentation method achieved a mean overlap of 94.2%, a mean volume agreement of 95.8%, and a mean MAD of 1.51 mm for the 45 abnormal cases. Our new method obtained higher performance level than the thresholding-based segmentation method.

  2. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930124 The effect of glycosaminoglycans inthe genesis of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis.LIBaoyu(李保玉),et al.Dept Pathol,Jilin MedColl,132001.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis 1992;15(4):204-205.The pulmonary interstitial fibrosis was causedby injecting Bleomycin into mouse trachea.Afterthe injection,the volume of glycosaminoglycans(GAG)in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungtissues was increased.The observation underhistochemical stain and electron microscopeshowed that the distribution of GAG in lung tis-sues was varied at different time after the injec-tion,and related to the volume of collagen pro-teins and the formation of pulmonary interstitialfibrosis.

  3. Thin-section CT imaging that correlates with pulmonary function tests in obstructive airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hiroaki, E-mail: arakawa@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine (Japan); Fukushima, Yasutugu [Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Dokkyo Medical University (Japan); Kaji, Yasushi [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify independent CT findings that correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with obstructive airway diseases. Materials and methods: Sixty-eight patients with obstructive airway disease and 29 normal subjects (mean age, 52 years; 36 men and 61 women) underwent inspiratory and expiratory thin-section CT and PFTs. Patient with obvious emphysema was excluded. Two radiologists independently reviewed the images and semi-quantitatively evaluated lung attenuation (mosaic perfusion, air trapping) and airway abnormalities (extent and severity of bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis or centrilobular nodules, mucous plugging). Univariate, multivariate and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed with CT findings and PFTs. Results: Forty-two patients showed obstructive PFTs, 26 symptomatic patients showed near-normal PFTs. On univariate analysis, air trapping and bronchial wall thickening showed highest correlation with obstructive PFTs such as FEV1.0/FVC, MMEF and FEF75 (r ranged from -0.712 to -0.782; p < 0.001), while mosaic perfusion and mucous plugging showed moderate correlation, and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis and nodules showed the least, but significant, correlation. Multiple logistic analyses revealed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening as the only significant independent determinants of obstructive PFTs. ROC analysis revealed the cut-off value of air trapping for obstructive PFTs to be one-third of whole lung (area under curve, 0.847). Conclusions: Our study confirmed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening are the most important observations when imaging obstructive PFTs. The cut-off value of air trapping for identifying obstructive PFTs was one-third of lung irrespective of inspiratory CT findings.

  4. Mechanisms of pollution-induced airway disease: in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, D.B. [Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, North Carolina (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Several studies have investigated the effects of ozone, sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) on lung function in normal and asthmatic subjects. Decreased lung function has been observed with ozone levels as low as 0.15 ppm - this effect is concentration dependent and is exacerbated by exercise. A number of lines of evidence suggest that the effect on lung function is mediated, at lest in part, by neural mechanisms. In both normals and asthmatics, ozone has been shown to induce neutrophilic inflammation, with increased levels of several inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin E{sub 2}. However, in normal subjects, none of the markers of inflammation correlate with changes in lung function. The lung function changes in asthmatics may be associated with inflammatory effects; alternatively, ozone may prime the airways for an increased response to subsequently inhaled allergen. Indeed, an influx of both polymorphonucleocytes and eosinophils has been observed in asthmatic patients after ozone exposure. It has been suggested that the effect of ozone on classic allergen-induced bronchoconstriction may be more significant than any direct effect of this pollutant in asthmatics. SO{sub 2} does not appear to affect lung function in normal subjects, but may induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Nasal breathing, which is often impaired in asthmatics, reduces the pulmonary effects of SO{sub 2}, since this water-soluble gas is absorbed by the nasal mucosa. NO{sub 2} may also influence lung function in asthmatics, but further research is warranted. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} alone do not seem to have a priming effect in asthmatics, but a combination of these two gases has resulted in a heightened sensitivity to subsequently inhaled allergen. (au)

  5. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a final common pathway of a broad heterogeneous group of parenchymal lung disorders. It is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lung leading to restriction and diminished oxygen transfer. Clinically, the presenting symptoms of ILD are non-specific (cough and progressive dyspnea on exertion and are often attributed to other diseases, thus delaying diagnosis and timely therapy. Clues from the medical history along with the clinical context and radiologic findings provide the initial basis for prioritizing diagnostic possibilities for a patient with ILD. An accurate prognosis and optimal treatment strategy for patients with ILDs can only be after an accurate diagnosis. This review will assist pulmonary physicians and medicine specialist in recognition of ILD. Extensive literature search has been made through PubMed and also Book References has been used for writing this review.

  6. Hyperpolarized 3He Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Bronchoscopic Airway Bypass in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB. Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies.

  7. Tracheobronchomalacia/excessive dynamic airway collapse in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with persistent expiratory wheeze: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhwani, Girish; Sodhi, Rakhee; Saini, Manju; Jethani, Varuna; Khanduri, Sushant; Singh, Baltej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) refers to a condition in which structural integrity of cartilaginous wall of trachea is lost. Excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) is characterized by excessive invagination of posterior wall of trachea. In both these conditions, airway lumen gets compromised, especially during expiration, which can lead to symptoms such as breathlessness, cough, and wheezing. Both these conditions can be present in obstructive lung diseases; TBM due to chronic airway inflammation and EDAC due to dynamic compressive forces during expiration. The present study was planned with the hypothesis that TBM/EDAC could also produce expiratory wheeze in patients with obstructive airway disorders. Hence, prevalence and factors affecting presence of this entity in patients with obstructive airway diseases were the aims and objectives of this study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with obstructive airway disorders (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] or bronchial asthma), who were stable on medical management, but having persistent expiratory wheezing, were included in the study. They were evaluated for TBM/EDAC by bronchoscopy and computed tomographic scan of chest. The presence of TBM/EDAC was correlated with variables including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking index, level of dyspnea, and severity of disease. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62.7 ± 7.81 years. Out of 25 patients, 14 were males. TBM/EDAC was found in 40% of study subjects. Age, sex, BMI, severity of disease, frequency of exacerbations and radiological findings etc., were not found to have any association with presence of TBM/EDAC. Conclusion: TBM/EDAC is common in patients with obstructive airway disorders and should be evaluated in these patients, especially with persistent expiratory wheezing as diagnosis of this entity could provide another treatment option in these patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management.

  8. Hypoxic Epithelial Necrosis Triggers Neutrophilic Inflammation via IL-1 Receptor Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsching, Benedikt; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Trojanek, Joanna B.; Schubert, Susanne C.; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Agrawal, Raman; Muley, Thomas; Kahn, Nicolas; Sticht, Carsten; Gunkel, Nikolas; Welte, Tobias; Scott H Randell; Länger, Florian; Schnabel, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: In many organs, hypoxic cell death triggers sterile neutrophilic inflammation via IL-1R signaling. Although hypoxia is common in airways from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), its role in neutrophilic inflammation remains unknown. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic epithelial necrosis caused by airway mucus obstruction precedes neutrophilic inflammation in Scnn1b-transgenic (Scnn1b-Tg) mice with CF-like lung disease.

  9. Lung surfactant in subacute pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spragg Roger G

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a surface active material composed of both lipids and proteins that is produced by alveolar type II pneumocytes. Abnormalities of surfactant in the immature lung or in the acutely inflamed mature lung are well described. However, in a variety of subacute diseases of the mature lung, abnormalities of lung surfactant may also be of importance. These diseases include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, pneumonia, and alveolar proteinosis. Understanding of the mechanisms that disturb the lung surfactant system may lead to novel rational therapies for these diseases.

  10. Correlation among regional ventilation, airway resistance and particle deposition in normal and severe asthmatic lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-11-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are performed to investigate flow characteristics and quantify particle deposition with normal and severe asthmatic lungs. Continuity and Navier-Stokes equations are solved with unstructured meshes and finite element method; a large eddy simulation model is adopted to capture turbulent and/or transitional flows created in the glottis. The human airway models are reconstructed from CT volumetric images, and the subject-specific boundary condition is imposed to the 3D ending branches with the aid of an image registration technique. As a result, several constricted airways are captured in CT images of severe asthmatic subjects, causing significant pressure drop with high air speed because the constriction of airways creates high flow resistance. The simulated instantaneous velocity fields obtained are then employed to track transport and deposition of 2.5 μm particles. It is found that high flow resistance regions are correlated with high particle-deposition regions. In other words, the constricted airways can induce high airway resistance and subsequently increase particle deposition in the regions. This result may be applied to understand the characteristics of deposition of pharmaceutical aerosols or bacteria. This work was supported in part by NIH grants R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421.

  11. Cigarette smoke activates the proto-oncogene c-src to promote airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew; Foronjy, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke-mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  12. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  13. Pneumoproteins in interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Rob

    2006-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases (ILD)s are a diverse group of pulmonary disorders that are classified together because of similar clinical, roentgenographic, physiologic, or pathologic manifestations, compromising over 100 different members that have been broadly classified into several categories. T

  14. Regulatory T cells and regulation of allergic airway disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Helen; Taube, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Diseases like asthma have dramatically increased in the last decades. The reasons for the rising prevalence are still controversially discussed. Besides the genetic predisposition a number of different causes are thought to affect the increase of allergies. These include the hygiene hypothesis as well as changes in intestinal microbiota. Allergic airway inflammation is driven by T cells but it has become clear that tolerance and also suppression of allergic inflammation are mediated by so cal...

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Nadia N; Paré, Peter D; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W Mark; Pascoe, Chris D; Arsenault, Bryna A; Postma, Dirkje S; Boezen, H Marike; Bossé, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2015-08-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, CA) Human660W-Quad BeadChip on European Americans with COPD from the Lung Health Study. Linear regression models with correlated meta-analyses, including data from baseline (n = 2,814) and Year 5 (n = 2,657), were used to test for common genetic variants associated with airway responsiveness. Genotypic imputation was performed using reference 1000 Genomes Project data. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in lung tissues were assessed for the top 10 markers identified, and immunohistochemistry assays assessed protein staining for SGCD and MYH15. Four genes were identified within the top 10 associations with airway responsiveness. Markers on chromosome 9p21.2 flanked by LINGO2 met a predetermined threshold of genome-wide significance (P < 9.57 × 10(-8)). Markers on chromosomes 3q13.1 (flanked by MYH15), 5q33 (SGCD), and 6q21 (PDSS2) yielded suggestive evidence of association (9.57 × 10(-8) < P ≤ 4.6 × 10(-6)). Gene expression studies in lung tissue showed single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 5 and 3 to act as eQTL for SGCD (P = 2.57 × 10(-9)) and MYH15 (P = 1.62 × 10(-6)), respectively. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localization of SGCD protein to airway smooth muscle and vessels and MYH15 to airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and inflammatory cells. We identified novel loci associated with airway responsiveness in a GWAS among smokers with COPD. Risk alleles on chromosomes 5 and 3 acted as eQTLs for SGCD and MYH15 messenger RNA, and these proteins were expressed in lung cells relevant to the development of airway responsiveness. PMID:25514360

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Peter D.; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D.; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W. Mark; Pascoe, Chris D.; Arsenault, Bryna A.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boezen, H. Marike; Bossé, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R.; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, CA) Human660W-Quad BeadChip on European Americans with COPD from the Lung Health Study. Linear regression models with correlated meta-analyses, including data from baseline (n = 2,814) and Year 5 (n = 2,657), were used to test for common genetic variants associated with airway responsiveness. Genotypic imputation was performed using reference 1000 Genomes Project data. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in lung tissues were assessed for the top 10 markers identified, and immunohistochemistry assays assessed protein staining for SGCD and MYH15. Four genes were identified within the top 10 associations with airway responsiveness. Markers on chromosome 9p21.2 flanked by LINGO2 met a predetermined threshold of genome-wide significance (P < 9.57 × 10−8). Markers on chromosomes 3q13.1 (flanked by MYH15), 5q33 (SGCD), and 6q21 (PDSS2) yielded suggestive evidence of association (9.57 × 10−8 < P ≤ 4.6 × 10−6). Gene expression studies in lung tissue showed single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 5 and 3 to act as eQTL for SGCD (P = 2.57 × 10−9) and MYH15 (P = 1.62 × 10−6), respectively. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localization of SGCD protein to airway smooth muscle and vessels and MYH15 to airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and inflammatory cells. We identified novel loci associated with airway responsiveness in a GWAS among smokers with COPD. Risk alleles on chromosomes 5 and 3 acted as eQTLs for SGCD and MYH15 messenger RNA, and these proteins were expressed in lung cells relevant to the development of airway responsiveness. PMID:25514360

  17. In vivo role of platelet-derived growth factor-BB in airway smooth muscle proliferation in mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Jeremy A; Ask, Kjetil; Farkas, Laszlo; Smith, Jane Ann; Ellis, Russ; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Martin; Inman, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperplasia in asthma likely contributes considerably to functional changes. Investigating the mechanisms behind proliferation of these cells may lead to therapeutic benefit. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB is a well known ASM mitogen in vitro but has yet to be directly explored using in vivo mouse models in the context of ASM proliferation and airway responsiveness. To determine the in vivo influence of PDGF-BB on gene transcripts encoding contractile proteins, ASM proliferation, and airway physiology, we used an adenovirus overexpression system and a model of chronic allergen exposure. We used adenovirus technology to selectively overexpress PDGF-BB in the airway epithelium of mice. Outcome measurements, including airway physiology, real time RT-PCR measurements, proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining, and airway smooth muscle quantification, were performed 7 days after exposure. The same outcome measurements were performed 24 hours and 4 weeks after a chronic allergen exposure model. PDGF-BB overexpression resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness, decreased lung compliance, increased airway smooth muscle cell numbers, positive proliferating cell nuclear antigen-stained airway smooth muscle cells, and a reduction in genes encoding contractile proteins. Chronic allergen exposure resulted in elevations in lung lavage PDGF-BB, which were observed in conjunction with changes in gene transcript expression encoding contractile proteins and ASM proliferation. We demonstrate for the first time in vivo that PDGF-BB induces ASM hyperplasia and changes in lung mechanics in mice and that, during periods of allergen exposure changes in lung, PDGF-BB are associated with changes in airway structure and function.

  18. Impact of viruses on airway diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Johnston

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available There is strong epidemiological evidence that respiratory viral infections are associated with 80–85% of asthma exacerbations in children. There is less evidence in adults, but the available data suggest viruses are associated with around two-thirds to three-quarters of exacerbations in adults. These associations include severe exacerbations requiring hospitalisation. The most common viruses detected in these studies were rhinoviruses, accounting for two-thirds of viruses detected. Asthmatics have increased susceptibility to respiratory virus infection and have recently been shown to have profoundly defective interferon-beta responses to virus infection, resulting in increased virus replication. Atypical bacterial infections are also associated with chronic asthma and asthma exacerbations and a recent study indicates antibiotic therapy active against atypical bacteria is effective in treatment of exacerbations. Recent data also indicates asthmatics are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease, suggesting they may also have impaired antibacterial immunity. Research is urgently required to determine whether augmenting anti-infective immunity is beneficial in the treatment/prevention of asthma exacerbations. More recent data also implicates viruses in the majority of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Studies are also required investigating anti-infective host defence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Adenocarcinoma of Lung Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Prasanta R; Aggarwal, Deepak; Punia, Rajpal S; Janmeja, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) presenting as lung cancer have been reported rarely from India. The present case describes a possibly primary lung cancer in a non-smoker who presented radiologically as a case of ILD. The possible mechanisms available in the literature are discussed.

  20. Airway microbiome dynamics in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yvonne J; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy; Nariya, Snehal; Boushey, Homer A; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-08-01

    Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance (≥ 2-fold, P microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome.

  1. Diffuse lung disease: Pneumoconioses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper begins with a discussion of the 1980 International Labour Organization classification of the pneumoconioses. Emphasis is on the common pneumoconioses, that is, silicosis, coalworker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related pleural and parenchymal disease. Examples of the five radiographic forms of silicosis-simple and complicated silicosis, Caplan syndrome, silicotuberculosis, and acute silicosis- are presented, and the differential diagnoses are discussed. Discussion of asbestos-related disease included pleural manifestations such as plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, and asbestos pleural effusion as well as asbestosis and malignancies associated with asbestos exposure, such as bronchogenic carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma. Although the standard radiographic findings are stressed, the use of CT in the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and the staging of dust-related malignancies is also discussed

  2. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008051 Effects of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on respiratory muscle fatigue in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease:a randomized controlled trial. SUN Lihua(孙丽华),et al.Dept Pulm, Nanjing 1st Hosp, Nanjing Med Univ, Nanjing 210006. Chin J Intern Med 2007;46(12):992-995. Objective To study the effects of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) on respiratory muscle fatigue in patients

  3. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005206 The pivotal role of CXCR3 in the patho-genesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. GAO Jin-ming(高金明), Dept Respir Med, PUMC Hosp, PUMC & CAMS, Beijing 100730. Chin J Tu-berc Respir Dis, 2005; 28 (1): 28-32. Objective: To investigate the contribution of chemokine receptor-CXCR3 to the fibrotic disease process induced by bleomycin in CXCR3 gene defi-

  4. Use of inhaled anticholinergic agents in obstructive airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ruben D

    2007-07-01

    In the last 2 decades, anticholinergic agents have been generally regarded as the first-choice bronchodilator therapy in the routine management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and, to a lesser extent, asthma. Anticholinergics are particularly important bronchodilators in COPD, because the vagal tone appears to be the only reversible component of airflow limitation in COPD. The inhaled anticholinergics approved for clinical use are synthetic quaternary ammonium congeners of atropine, and include ipratropium bromide, oxitropium bromide, and tiotropium bromide. This article reviews the most current evidence for inhaled anticholinergics in obstructive airway disease and summarizes outcomes reported in randomized controlled trials.

  5. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  6. Noninfectious lung pathology in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Mary B; Tazelaar, Henry D; Myers, Jeffrey L; Hunninghake, Gary W; Kakar, Sanjay; Kalra, Sanjay X; Ashton, Rendell; Colby, Thomas V

    2003-02-01

    Lung involvement in Crohn's disease is not well characterized. We reviewed our experience with 11 lung biopsies (seven wedge and four transbronchial) from patients with Crohn's disease to study this association further. Negative cultures, special stains for organisms Gomori-methenamine-silver [GMS], acid fast), and polymerase chain reaction for (four cases) were required for inclusion. The group included five women and six men with a mean age of 47 years (range 13-84 years). A diagnosis of Crohn's disease preceded the lung disease in nine patients. In two patients the diagnosis of Crohn's disease followed the diagnosis of their pulmonary disease 1 and 15 months later. Radiologically, eight patients had diffuse infiltrates, two had bilateral nodular infiltrates, and one had a mass. Chronic bronchiolitis with nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in four patients, one of whom was taking mesalamine. Two patients had an acute bronchiolitis associated with a neutrophil-rich bronchopneumonia with suppuration and vague granulomatous features. One patient on mesalamine had cellular interstitial pneumonia with rare giant cells. Four patients demonstrated organizing pneumonia with focal granulomatous features, two of whom were taking mesalamine, and one of these two responded to infliximab (anti-tumor necrosis factor) monoclonal antibody therapy. Noninfectious pulmonary disease in patients with Crohn's disease has variable histologic appearances, including granulomatous inflammation and airway-centered disease resembling that seen in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drugs may contribute to pulmonary disease in some patients. PMID:12548168

  7. Neutrophilic airways inflammation in lung cancer: the role of exhaled LTB-4 and IL-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Silvio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in lung cancer biology presuppose its inflammatory origin. In this regard, LTB-4 and IL-8 are recognized to play a crucial role in neutrophil recruitment into airways during lung cancer. Notwithstanding the intriguing hypothesis, the exact role of neutrophilic inflammation in tumour biology remains complex and not completely known. The aim of this study was to give our contribution in this field by investigating LTB-4 and IL-8 in the breath condensate of NSCLC patients and verifying their role in cancer development and progression. Method We enrolled 50 NSCLC patients and 35 controls. LTB-4 and IL-8 concentrations were measured in the breath condensate and the blood of all the subjects under study using EIA kits. Thirty NSCLC patients and ten controls underwent induced sputum collection and analysis. Results LTB-4 and IL-8 resulted higher in breath condensate and the blood of NSCLC patients compared to controls. Significantly higher concentrations were found as the cancer stages progressed. A positive correlation was observed between exhaled IL-8 and LTB-4 and the percentage of neutrophils in the induced sputum. Conclusion The high concentrations of exhaled LTB-4 and IL-8 showed the presence of a neutrophilic inflammation in the airways of NSCLC patients and gave a further support to the inflammatory signalling in lung cancer. These exhaled proteins could represent a suitable non-invasive marker in the diagnosis and monitoring of lung cancer.

  8. Vitronectin expression in the airways of subjects with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina M Salazar-Peláez

    Full Text Available Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC, cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls. Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling.

  9. Vitronectin expression in the airways of subjects with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M; Correa, Mario A; Ortega, Jorge E; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  10. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Thoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bordes, Ramon [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Monte-Carlo-Model for the aerosol bolus dispersion in the human lung. Part 2. Model predictions for the diseased lung; Monte-Carlo-Modell der Aerosolbolusdispersion in der menschlichen Lunge. Teil 2. Modellvorhersagen fuer die kranke Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, R.; Pawlak, E.; Hofmann, W. [Salzburg Univ. (Austria). Abt. fuer Physik und Biophysik

    2007-07-01

    After a mathematical extension of the existing model for the theoretical description of the aerosol bolus dispersion, the behavior of particle pulses in diseased lung structures was simulated. The geometry used for healthy lungs was modified in two aspects: First, a modelling of possible airway obstructions, which usually occur in patients with chronic bronchitis, chronic asthma or cystic fibrosis, was carried out and, second, a theoretical approximation of the emphysema, being observed in lungs of smokers, but also as an accompanying phenomenon in obstructive diseases, was established. According to the modified model, in lungs with airway obstructions the exhaled bolus exhibited a decreased dispersion with respect to healthy subjects, whereas in emphysematous lungs the respective half-width of the peak was increased. Standard deviation and skewness of the bolus were similarly influenced by the modified lung architecture. A combination of airway obstruction and emphysema caused an extensive compensation of individual dispersion effects, complicating a secure distinction from the healthy lung. According to the model, a special diagnostic value may be assigned to the bolus deposition, showing significant deviations from the normal case for all simulated diseases. (orig.)

  13. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    OpenAIRE

    Clement Annick; Nathan Nadia; Epaud Ralph; Fauroux Brigitte; Corvol Harriet

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathologic...

  14. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  15. NET balancing: A problem in inflammatory lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Z Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs are beneficial antimicrobial defense structures that can help fight against invading pathogens in the host. However, recent studies reveal that NETs exert adverse effects in a number of diseases including many lung diseases. Most of the inflammatory lung diseases are characterized with a massive influx of neutrophils into the airways. Neutrophils contribute to the pathology of these diseases. To date, NETs have been identified in the lungs of cystic fibrosis, acute lung injury, allergic asthma and lungs infected with bacteria, virus, or fungi. These microbes and several host factors can stimulate NET formation, or NETosis. Different forms of NETosis have been identified; these NETotic pathways are dependent on the types of stimuli. All of these pathways however appear to result in the formation of NETs with DNA, modified extracellular histones, proteases and cytotoxic enzymes. Some of the NET components are immunogenic and damaging to the host tissue. Innate immune collectins such as pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D binds NETs, and enhances the clearance of dying cells and DNA by alveolar macrophages. In many inflammatory lung diseases, bronchoalveolar SP-D levels are altered and its deficiency results in the accumulation of DNA in the lungs. Some of the other therapeutic molecules under consideration for treating NET-related diseases include DNases, antiproteases, myeloperoxidase inhibitors, peptidylarginine deiminase-4 inhibitors and anti-histone antibodies. Too much of the good thing can be a bad thing. Maintaining the right balance of NET formation and reducing the amounts of NETs that accumulate in the tissues are essential for harnessing the power of NETs with minimal damage to the hosts.

  16. Advances in cell and gene-based therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray, Paul B

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  17. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.)

  18. Clinical Features of Interstitial Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Gune-Il; Lee, Kwang Hee; Jeong, Seong Whan; Uh, Soo-taek; Jin, So Young; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Jai Soung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kang, Chang Hee; Park, Choon Sik

    1996-01-01

    Objectives Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are heterogenous groups of disorders that involve the interstitium of the lung. Lung biopsy is mandatory in most cases of ILD for diagnosis. In Korea, a few clinical data about ILD were analyzed on the basis of pathologic proof. Thus, we analysed the clinical profiles of patients with ILD who had lung biopsy in a tertiary university hospital. Methods Clinical and pathologic data concerning 100 patients who had open lung biopsy (OLB) and/or transbron...

  19. Emission Tomography in Embolic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Robert M.; Khan, Omar; Bennett, J. Graeme; Ell, Peter J

    1982-01-01

    Ventilation-perfusion lung scans and emission tomography studies were performed in 84 patients with suspected embolic lung disease. Concordant data were obtained in 72 patients (57 positive, 15 negative); results were discordant in ten patients and indeterminate in two.

  20. Regenerative potential of human airway stem cells in lung epithelial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Wu, Tong; Evangelista-Leite, Daniele; Mathisen, Douglas J; Ott, Harald C

    2016-11-01

    Bio-engineered organs for transplantation may ultimately provide a personalized solution for end-stage organ failure, without the risk of rejection. Building upon the process of whole organ perfusion decellularization, we aimed to develop novel, translational methods for the recellularization and regeneration of transplantable lung constructs. We first isolated a proliferative KRT5(+)TP63(+) basal epithelial stem cell population from human lung tissue and demonstrated expansion capacity in conventional 2D culture. We then repopulated acellular rat scaffolds in ex vivo whole organ culture and observed continued cell proliferation, in combination with primary pulmonary endothelial cells. To show clinical scalability, and to test the regenerative capacity of the basal cell population in a human context, we then recellularized and cultured isolated human lung scaffolds under biomimetic conditions. Analysis of the regenerated tissue constructs confirmed cell viability and sustained metabolic activity over 7 days of culture. Tissue analysis revealed extensive recellularization with organized tissue architecture and morphology, and preserved basal epithelial cell phenotype. The recellularized lung constructs displayed dynamic compliance and rudimentary gas exchange capacity. Our results underline the regenerative potential of patient-derived human airway stem cells in lung tissue engineering. We anticipate these advances to have clinically relevant implications for whole lung bioengineering and ex vivo organ repair. PMID:27622532

  1. Haemodynamic effects of terbutaline in chronic obstructive airways disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Teule, G. J.; Majid, P A

    1980-01-01

    Terbutaline, a cardioselective beta-adrenoceptor agonist, administered intravenously (250 micrograms) to seven patients with chronic obstructive airways disease (mean FEV1 0.99 l) resulted in reduction of mean pulmonary artery pressure (resting 23 +/- 2 to 19 +/- 2 mmHg, p < 0.05; exercise 43 +/- 3 to 35 +/- 3 mmHg, p < 0.05) and calculated pulmonary vascular resistance (resting 168 +/- 27 to 109 +/- 17 dyne s cm-5, p < 0.01; exercise 170 +/- 30 to 119 +/- 18 dyne s cm-5, p < 0.01) accompanie...

  2. Update on host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Andreas; Frey, Nina; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections are hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In the era of long-term inhaled antibiotics and increasing CF patient survival, new "emerging" pathogens are detected in CF airways, yet their pathophysiological disease relevance remains largely controversial and incompletely defined. As a response to chronic microbial triggers, innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils, are continuously recruited into CF airways where they combat pathogens but also cause tissue injury through release of oxidants and proteases. The coordinated interplay between host immune cell activation and pathogens is essential for the outcome of CF lung disease. Here, we provide a concise overview and update on host-pathogen interactions in CF lung disease. PMID:26905568

  3. Haemophilus influenzae infection drives IL-17-mediated neutrophilic allergic airways disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ama-Tawiah Essilfie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with stable asthma has prominent neutrophilic and reduced eosinophilic inflammation, which is associated with attenuated airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Haemophilus influenzae has been isolated from the airways of neutrophilic asthmatics; however, the nature of the association between infection and the development of neutrophilic asthma is not understood. Our aim was to investigate the effects of H. influenzae respiratory infection on the development of hallmark features of asthma in a mouse model of allergic airways disease (AAD. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA and intranasally challenged with OVA 12-15 days later to induce AAD. Mice were infected with non-typeable H. influenzae during or 10 days after sensitization, and the effects of infection on the development of key features of AAD were assessed on day 16. T-helper 17 cells were enumerated by fluorescent-activated cell sorting and depleted with anti-IL-17 neutralizing antibody. We show that infection in AAD significantly reduced eosinophilic inflammation, OVA-induced IL-5, IL-13 and IFN-γ responses and AHR; however, infection increased airway neutrophil influx in response to OVA challenge. Augmented neutrophilic inflammation correlated with increased IL-17 responses and IL-17 expressing macrophages and neutrophils (early, innate and T lymphocytes (late, adaptive in the lung. Significantly, depletion of IL-17 completely abrogated infection-induced neutrophilic inflammation during AAD. In conclusion, H. influenzae infection synergizes with AAD to induce Th17 immune responses that drive the development of neutrophilic and suppress eosinophilic inflammation during AAD. This results in a phenotype that is similar to neutrophilic asthma. Infection-induced neutrophilic inflammation in AAD is mediated by IL-17 responses.

  4. Extracorporeal Lung Support as a Bridge to Airway Stenting and Radiotherapy for Airway-Obstructing Pancoast Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLenon, Melissa; Bittle, Gregory J; Jones, Kevin; Menaker, Jay; Pham, Si M; Iacono, Aldo T; Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Rajagopal, Keshava

    2016-07-01

    Venovenous (V-V) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for respiratory failure that is suspected to be reversible (bridge to recovery), or as a bridge to lung transplantation. Patients with proximal airway obstruction due to endobronchial malignancy can develop acute respiratory failure, and may benefit from V-V ECMO as a bridge to airway intervention, further treatment, and eventual recovery. We describe a case of a superior sulcus tumor with tracheobronchial and superior vena cava invasion causing both respiratory failure and superior vena cava syndrome. This was treated successfully with V-V ECMO, bronchial stenting, and radiotherapy. PMID:27343540

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iraklis Tsangaris; Georgios Tsaknis; Anastasia Anthi; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this ...

  6. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  7. Sleep disordered breathing in interstitial lung disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Lauren K; Corte, Tamera J

    2014-12-16

    Patients with interstitial lung disease commonly exhibit abnormal sleep architecture and increased sleep fragmentation on polysomnography. Fatigue is a frequent complaint, and it is likely that poor sleep quality is a significant contributor. A number of studies have shown that sleep disordered breathing is prevalent in this population, particularly in the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis subgroup. The factors that predispose these patients to obstructive sleep apnoea are not well understood, however it is believed that reduced caudal traction on the upper airway can enhance collapsibility. Ventilatory control system instability may also be an important factor, particularly in those with increased chemo-responsiveness, and in hypoxic conditions. Transient, repetitive nocturnal oxygen desaturation is frequently observed in interstitial lung disease, both with and without associated obstructive apnoeas. There is increasing evidence that sleep-desaturation is associated with increased mortality, and may be important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in this population. PMID:25516856

  8. Ventilatory strategies in obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilla, Francisco José; Morán, Indalecio; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Mancebo, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by expiratory flow limitation (EFL) due to progressive airflow obstruction. The various mechanisms that cause EFL are central to understanding the physiopathology of COPD. At the end of expiration, dynamic inflation may occur due to incomplete emptying the lungs. This "extra" volume increases the alveolar pressure at the end of the expiration, resulting in auto-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or PEEPi. Acute exacerbations of COPD may result in increased airway resistance and inspiratory effort, further leading to dynamic hyperinflation. COPD exacerbations may be triggered by environmental exposures, infections (viral and bacterial), or bronchial inflammation, and may result in worsening respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation (MV). Acute exacerbations of COPD need to be distinguished from other events such as cardiac failure or pulmonary emboli. Strategies to treat acute respiratory failure (ARF) in COPD patients include noninvasive ventilation (NIV), pressure support ventilation, and tracheal intubation with MV. In this review, we discuss invasive and noninvasive techniques to address ARF in this patient population. When invasive MV is used, settings should be adjusted in a way that minimizes hyperinflation, while providing reasonable gas exchange, respiratory muscle rest, and proper patient-ventilator interaction. Further, weaning from MV may be difficult in these patients, and factors amenable to pharmacological correction (such as increased bronchial resistance, tracheobronchial infections, and heart failure) are to be systematically searched and treated. In selected patients, early use of NIV may hasten the process of weaning from MV and improve outcomes. PMID:25111641

  9. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S;

    2016-01-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS), and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized, on October 14, 2015, a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP...... the most frequently diagnosed chronic noncommunicable diseases in the EU; 30% of the total European population is suffering from allergies and asthma, and more than half are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine represents a novel approach, embracing four key features......: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic, and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision-making process of therapeutic actions, and considering predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of precision medicine into clinical practice...

  10. Surfactant metabolism in the newborn : The impact of ventilation strategy and lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlin, Kajsa

    2005-01-01

    Developmental deficiency in pulmonary surfactant leads to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants, but all newborns may have impaired surfactant metabolism secondary to lung disease or ventilator induced lung injury. Exogenous surfactant treatment is usually administered in conjunction with mechanical ventilation. If instead surfactant administration is followed by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP), the treatment response appears to be more sus...

  11. Computer analysis of ventilation-perfusion scans for detection and assessment of lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, G H; Seed, W A; Vernon, P.

    1985-01-01

    A previously reported computer analysis has been used to provide numerical ventilation-perfusion lung scan data, for comparison with tests of airways function and results of arterial blood gas analysis in 11 patients with pulmonary embolism, 18 with asthma, and 37 with chronic obstructive lung disease. In pulmonary embolism an index of underperfusion showed high sensitivity, and an index of ventilation-perfusion mismatching correlated well with severity (hypoxaemia). In asthma an index of und...

  12. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases. PMID:23959715

  13. Allergic airway disease : studies on diesel exhaust exposures, oxylipins and antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Nirina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway disease, i.e. allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma, is a common health problem. The prevalence is increasing in most countries of the world. Traffic-related air pollution has been found to induce and enhance allergic airway disease, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Oxylipins are fatty acid metabolites, of which several have been linked to asthmatic airway inflammation. Oxylipin profiles have previously been investigated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), mainly reflecti...

  14. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Fetita, Catalin I.; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5–10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. ...

  15. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Annick

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathological situations can impair gas exchange and, therefore, may contribute to progressive lung damage and ILD. Consequently, diagnosis approach needs to be structured with a clinical evaluation requiring a careful history paying attention to exposures and systemic diseases. Several classifications for ILD have been proposed but none is entirely satisfactory especially in children. The present article reviews current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms, etiology and diagnostic approaches, as well as therapeutic strategies. The following diagnostic grouping is used to discuss the various causes of pediatric ILD: 1 exposure-related ILD; 2 systemic disease-associated ILD; 3 alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD; and 4 ILD specific to infancy. Therapeutic options include mainly anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and/or anti-fibrotic drugs. The outcome is highly variable with a mortality rate around 15%. An overall favorable response to corticosteroid therapy is observed in around 50% of cases, often associated with sequelae such as limited exercise tolerance or the need for long-term oxygen therapy.

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  17. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  18. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond b...

  19. Current Status of Gene Therapy for Inherited Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy as a treatment modality for pulmonary disorders has attracted significant interest over the past decade. Since the initiation of the first clinical trials for cystic fibrosis lung disease using recombinant adenovirus in the early 1990s, the field has encountered numerous obstacles including vector inflammation, inefficient delivery, and vector production. Despite these obstacles, enthusiasm for lung gene therapy remains high. In part, this enthusiasm is fueled through the diligence of numerous researchers whose studies continue to reveal great potential of new gene transfer vectors that demonstrate increased tropism for airway epithelia. Several newly identified serotypes of adeno-associated virus have demonstrated substantial promise in animal models and will likely surface soon in clinical trials. Furthermore, an increased understanding of vector biology has also led to the development of new technologies to enhance the efficiency and selectivity of gene delivery to the lung. Although the promise of gene therapy to the lung has yet to be realized, the recent concentrated efforts in the field that focus on the basic virology of vector development will undoubtedly reap great rewards over the next decade in treating lung diseases. PMID:12524461

  20. Flavorings-Related Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fully expand the lungs). Lung volumes may show hyperinflation (i.e., too much air in the lungs ... X-rays are usually normal but may show hyperinflation. High-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) scans of the ...

  1. Clinical application of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in pediatric lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non invasive method for assessing the inflammatory status of children with airway disease. Different ways to measure FeNO levels are currently available. The possibility of measuring FeNO levels in an office setting even in young children, and the commercial availability of portable devices, support the routine use of FeNO determination in the daily pediatric practice. Although many confounding factors may affect its measurement, FeNO is now widely used in the management of children with asthma, and seems to provide significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than lung function or bronchial challenge tests. The role of FeNO in airway infection (e.g. viral bronchiolitis and common acquired pneumonia, in bronchiectasis, or in cases with diffuse lung disease is less clear. This review focuses on the most recent advances and the current clinical applications of FeNO measurement in pediatric lung disease.

  2. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, ex...

  3. A mouse model of airway disease: oncostatin M-induced pulmonary eosinophilia, goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness are STAT6 dependent, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is STAT6 independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Dominik K; Kerr, Christine; Fattouh, Ramzi; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Khan, Waliul I; Jordana, Manel; Richards, Carl D

    2011-01-15

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a pleiotropic cytokine of the gp130 cytokine family, has been implicated in chronic allergic inflammatory and fibrotic disease states associated with tissue eosinophilia. Mouse (m)OSM induces airway eosinophilic inflammation and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in vivo and regulates STAT6 activation in vitro. To determine the requirement of STAT6 in OSM-induced effects in vivo, we examined wild-type (WT) and STAT6-knockout (STAT6(-/-)) C57BL/6 mouse lung responses to transient ectopic overexpression of mOSM using an adenoviral vector (AdmOSM). Intratracheal AdmOSM elicited persistent eosinophilic lung inflammation that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. AdmOSM also induced pronounced pulmonary remodeling characterized by goblet cell hyperplasia and parenchymal interstitial fibrosis. Goblet cell hyperplasia was STAT6 dependent; however, parenchymal interstitial fibrosis was not. OSM also induced airway hyperresponsiveness in WT mice that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. OSM stimulated an inflammatory signature in the lungs of WT mice that demonstrated STAT6-dependent regulation of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13), chemokines (eotaxin-1/2, MCP-1, keratinocyte chemoattractant), and extracellular matrix modulators (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, matrix metalloproteinase-13), but STAT6-independent regulation of IL-4Rα, total lung collagen, collagen-1A1, -1A2 mRNA, and parenchymal collagen and α smooth muscle actin accumulation. Thus, overexpression of mOSM induces STAT6-dependent pulmonary eosinophilia, mucous/goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness but STAT6-independent mechanisms of lung tissue extracellular matrix accumulation. These results also suggest that eosinophil or neutrophil accumulation in mouse lungs is not required for OSM-induced lung parenchymal collagen deposition and that OSM may have unique roles in the pathogenesis of allergic and fibrotic lung disease. PMID:21160052

  4. Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Archontogeorgis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of more than two hundred diseases of either known or unknown etiology with different pathogenesis and prognosis. Lung cancer, which is the major cause of cancer death in the developed countries, is mainly attributed to cigarette smoking and exposure to inhaled carcinogens. Different studies suggest a link between ILDs and lung cancer, through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation, coagulation, dysregulated apoptosis, focal hypoxia, activation, and accumulation of myofibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix accumulation. This paper reviews current evidence on the association between lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pneumoconiosis.

  5. Cystic fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial interactions, and radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Obstructive lung disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality; thus, most efforts to improve outcomes are directed toward slowing or halting lung-disease progression. Current therapies, such as mucolytics, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilators, and antibiotics, aim to suppress airway inflammation and the processes that stimulate it, namely, retention and infection of mucus plaques at the airway surface. New approaches to therapy that aim to ameliorate specific CFTR mutations or mutational classes by restoring normal expression or function are being investigated. Because of its sensitivity in detecting changes associated with early airway obstruction and regional lung disease, high-resolution CT (HRCT) complements pulmonary function testing in defining disease natural history and measuring response to both conventional and experimental therapies. In this review, perspectives on the genetics and microbiology of CF provide a context for understanding the increasing importance of HRCT and other imaging techniques in assessing CF therapies. (orig.)

  6. Cystic fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial interactions, and radiological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Gibson, Ronald L. [University of Washington, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Effmann, Eric L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Obstructive lung disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality; thus, most efforts to improve outcomes are directed toward slowing or halting lung-disease progression. Current therapies, such as mucolytics, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilators, and antibiotics, aim to suppress airway inflammation and the processes that stimulate it, namely, retention and infection of mucus plaques at the airway surface. New approaches to therapy that aim to ameliorate specific CFTR mutations or mutational classes by restoring normal expression or function are being investigated. Because of its sensitivity in detecting changes associated with early airway obstruction and regional lung disease, high-resolution CT (HRCT) complements pulmonary function testing in defining disease natural history and measuring response to both conventional and experimental therapies. In this review, perspectives on the genetics and microbiology of CF provide a context for understanding the increasing importance of HRCT and other imaging techniques in assessing CF therapies. (orig.)

  7. Airway Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Arrested Alveolar Growth in Neonatal Lung Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    van Haaften, Timothy; Byrne, Roisin; Bonnet, Sebastien; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Akabutu, John; Bouchentouf, Manaf; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Galipeau, Jacques; Haromy, Alois; Eaton, Farah; Chen, Ming; Hashimoto, Kyoko; Abley, Doris; Korbutt, Greg; Archer, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and emphysema are characterized by arrested alveolar development or loss of alveoli; both are significant global health problems and currently lack effective therapy. Bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) prevent adult lung injury, but their therapeutic potential in neonatal lung disease is unknown.

  8. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ.

  9. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  10. Nonallergic rhinitis and its association with smoking and lower airway disease: A general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; von Buchwald, Christian; Thomsen, Simon F;

    2011-01-01

    The cause of nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) and its relation to lower airway disease remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive analysis of the occurrence of rhinitis in a Danish general population with focus on NAR and its association with smoking and lower airway disease....

  11. Role of dystrophin in airway smooth muscle phenotype, contraction and lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    Full Text Available Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type. In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM.

  12. Accumulation of BDCA1+ Dendritic Cells in Interstitial Fibrotic Lung Diseases and Th2-High Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Alexandra M.; Matthay, Michael A.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine P.; Wolters, Paul J.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Fahy, John V.; Shin, Jeoung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) significantly contribute to the pathology of several mouse lung disease models. However, little is known of the contribution of DCs to human lung diseases. In this study, we examined infiltration with BDCA1+ DCs of human lungs in patients with interstitial lung diseases or asthma. Using flow cytometry, we found that these DCs increased by 5∼6 fold in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or hypersensitivity pneumonitis, which are both characterized by extensive fibrosis in parenchyma. The same DC subset also significantly increased in the lung parenchyma of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although the degree of increase was relatively modest. By employing immunofluorescence microscopy using FcεRI and MHCII as the specific markers for BDCA1+ DCs, we found that the numbers of BDCA1+ DCs also significantly increased in the airway epithelium of Th2 inflammation-associated asthma. These findings suggest a potential contribution of BDCA1+ DCs in human lung diseases associated with interstitial fibrosis or Th2 airway inflammation. PMID:24915147

  13. Bronchial airway gene expression in smokers with lung or head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of cancers of the respiratory tract, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC). In order to better understand carcinogenesis of the lung and upper airways, we have compared the gene expression profiles of tumor-distant, histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens obtained from current smokers with NSCLC or HNC (SC, considered as a single group), as well as nonsmokers (NS) and smokers without cancer (SNC). RNA from a total of 97 biopsies was used for gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array). Differentially expressed genes were used to compare NS, SNC, and SC, and functional analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Smoking-related cancer of the respiratory tract was found to affect the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic biotransformation proteins, as well as proteins associated with crucial inflammation/immunity pathways and other processes that protect the airway from the chemicals in cigarette smoke or contribute to carcinogenesis. Finally, we used the prediction analysis for microarray (PAM) method to identify gene signatures of cigarette smoking and cancer, and uncovered a 15-gene signature that distinguished between SNC and SC with an accuracy of 83%. Thus, gene profiling of histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens provided insight into cigarette-induced carcinogenesis of the respiratory tract and gene signatures of cancer in smokers

  14. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in human airway correlates with lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, David Chi-Leung; Luo, Susan Yang; Fu, Kin-Hang; Lui, Macy Mei-Sze; Chan, Koon-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivans; Gao, Boning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Ip, Mary Sau-Man; Minna, John Dorrance

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine and its derivatives, by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on bronchial epithelial cells, can regulate cellular signaling and inflammatory processes. Delineation of nAChR subtypes and their responses to nicotine stimulation in bronchial epithelium may provide information for therapeutic targeting in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. Expression of nAChR subunit genes in 60 bronchial epithelial biopsies and immunohistochemical staining for the subcellular locations of nAChR subunit expression were evaluated. Seven human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) were exposed to nicotine in vitro for their response in nAChR subunit gene expression to nicotine exposure and removal. The relative normalized amount of expression of nAChR α4, α5, and α7 and immunohistochemical staining intensity of nAChR α4, α5, and β3 expression showed significant correlation with lung function parameters. Nicotine stimulation in HBECs resulted in transient increase in the levels of nAChR α5 and α6 but more sustained increase in nAChR α7 expression. nAChR expression in bronchial epithelium was found to correlate with lung function. Nicotine exposure in HBECs resulted in both short and longer term responses in nAChR subunit gene expression. These results gave insight into the potential of targeting nAChRs for therapy in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. PMID:26608528

  15. Local long-term expression of lentivirally delivered IL-10 in the lung attenuates obliteration of intrapulmonary allograft airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shin; Sato, Masaaki; Liu, Mingyao; Loisel-Meyer, Severine; Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Zehong, Guan; Medin, Jeffrey A; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-11-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is a form of chronic rejection after lung transplantation. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) facilitate long-term gene transduction in many tissues and organs. We hypothesized that lentiviral gene transfer of interleukin (IL)-10, a potent immune-modulating cytokine, to the lung could modulate the alloimmune responses in the lung after transplantation. C57BL6 mice received LVs encoding luciferase, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), or human IL-10 (huIL-10) through airways and underwent repeated bioluminescent imaging, immunofluorescence imaging, or ELISA of lung tissues, respectively. Luciferase activities peaked at day 7 and were stable after day 28 to over 15 months. eGFP staining demonstrated LV-mediated gene transduction mainly in alveolar macrophages. LV-huIL-10 delivery resulted in stable long-term expression of huIL-10 in the lung tissue (average 3.66 pg/mg at 1 year). Intrapulmonary allograft tracheal transplantation (BALBc→C57BL6) was used as a model of OB. LV-huIL-10 or LV-eGFP were delivered 7 days before transplantation and compared with no LV-transfection group. Allograft airways at day 28 were almost completely obliterated in all the groups. However, at day 42, allograft airways treated with LV-huIL-10 showed a spectrum of attenuation in airway fibrosis ranging from complete obliteration through bubble-like partial opening to complete patency with epithelial coverage in association with a significantly reduced obliteration ratio compared with the other groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated gene transduction is useful in achieving long-term transgene expression in the lung. Long-term IL-10 expression has the potential to attenuate allograft airway obliteration. LV-mediated gene therapy could be a useful strategy to prevent or treat OB after lung transplantation. PMID:21568692

  16. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio De Felice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA, upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228 and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228 of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8% and “low” (34.8% patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6% and “simple mismatch” (5.9% types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs, intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI, and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  17. Commentary: research on the mechanisms of the occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this commentary, the pathogenesis of alveolitis is examined and elucidated by animal models. The use of broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) and Ga-67 citrate whole-body scanning as a measure of the activity of alveolar inflammation in workers is discussed. Gallium scan indices have been reported to be elevated in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; diseases which may now be evaluated at earlier, potentially reversible stages. Research in emphysema and other lung diseases associated with α1 antitrypsin deficiency may help explain why coal miners develop focal emphysema. Furthermore, investigation of genetic factors may reveal why workers with similar exposures have a different susceptibility for the development of pneumoconiosis or lung cancer. Occupational asthma may not respond to removal of the worker from exposure because reactive airways may be a predisposing factor for chronic ashthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. A continuing challenge will be disease risk in new industries such as electronics and alternate energy industries and new diseases in worker groups not previously studied, such as the variety of pneumoconioses among dental laboratory technicians who work with exotic metal alloys. 52 references

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SMALL AIRWAYS AND ALVEOLI FROM CHILDHOOD TO ADULT LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHOMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the human development of pulmonary airspaces is important for calculating the dose from exposure to inhaled materials as a function of age. We have measured, in vivo, the airspace caliber of the small airways and alveoli by aerosol-derived airway morphometry (ADAM) ...

  19. A Case of IgG4-Related Lung Disease Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jee Hwan; Hong, Sun In; Cho, Dong Hui; Chae, Eun Jin; Song, Joon Seon; Song, Jin Woo

    2014-08-01

    Intrathoracic involvement of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease has recently been reported. However, a subset of the disease presenting as interstitial lung disease is rare. Here, we report a case of a 35-year-old man with IgG4-related lung disease with manifestations similar to those of interstitial lung disease. Chest computed tomography showed diffuse ground glass opacities and rapidly progressive pleural and subpleural fibrosis in both upper lobes. Histological findings showed diffuse interstitial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with an increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells. Serum levels of IgG and IgG4 were also increased. The patient was diagnosed with IgG4-related lung disease, treated with anti-inflammatory agents, and showed improvement. Lung involvement of IgG4-related disease can present as interstitial lung disease and, therefore, should be differentiated when evaluating interstitial lung disease.

  20. Facts and promises on lung biomarkers in interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Ilaria; Zorzetto, Michele; Bonella, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a heterogeneous group of >100 pulmonary disorders. ILDs are characterized by an irreversible architectural distortion and impaired gas exchange; however, there is great variability in the clinical course. ILD diagnosis requires a combination of clinical data, radiological imaging and histological findings (when a lung biopsy is required). At the same time, successful management of ILD patients strictly depends on an accurate and confident diagnosis. In this context, the detection of reliable biomarkers able to identify ILD subtypes, avoiding lung biopsy, as well as the capacity to stratify patients and predict over time the disease course, has become a primary aim for all research studies in this field.

  1. Sex Steroid Signaling: Implications for Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sathish, Venkatachalem; Martin, Yvette N.; Y. S. Prakash

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone) have biological and pathophysiological actions in peripheral, non-reproductive organs, including the lung. Clinically, sex differences in the incidence, morbidity and mortality of lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer and pulmonary hypertension have been noted, although intrinsic sex differences vs. the roles of sex steroids are...

  2. Advances in Surgical Treatment of Congenital Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragalie, William S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is frequently present in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Infants with CHD and TBM appear to do worse than those without TBM. The principle of operative intervention for TBM is to improve function of the airway and clinical status. When indicated, conventional surgical options include tracheostomy, aortopexy, tracheoplasty, and anterior tracheal suspension. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of severe tracheobonchomalacia, which can be associated with a mortality rate as high as 80%. Congenital tracheal stenosis is also frequently associated with CHD (vascular rings, atrioventricular canal defects, and septal defects) and may require concomitant repair. Repair of tracheal stenosis is often associated with distal TBM. This article addresses new techniques that can be performed in corrective surgery for both TBM and congenital tracheal stenosis. PMID:27568138

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides and Innate Lung Defenses: Role in Infectious and Noninfectious Lung Diseases and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; Amatngalim, Gimano D; van der Does, Anne M; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory infections are a major clinical problem, and treatment is increasingly complicated by the emergence of microbial antibiotic resistance. Development of new antibiotics is notoriously costly and slow; therefore, alternative strategies are needed. Antimicrobial peptides, central effector molecules of the immune system, are being considered as alternatives to conventional antibiotics. These peptides display a range of activities, including not only direct antimicrobial activity, but also immunomodulation and wound repair. In the lung, airway epithelial cells and neutrophils in particular contribute to their synthesis. The relevance of antimicrobial peptides for host defense against infection has been demonstrated in animal models and is supported by observations in patient studies, showing altered expression and/or unfavorable circumstances for their action in a variety of lung diseases. Importantly, antimicrobial peptides are active against microorganisms that are resistant against conventional antibiotics, including multidrug-resistant bacteria. Several strategies have been proposed to use these peptides in the treatment of infections, including direct administration of antimicrobial peptides, enhancement of their local production, and creation of more favorable circumstances for their action. In this review, recent developments in antimicrobial peptides research in the lung and clinical applications for novel therapies of lung diseases are discussed.

  4. Volumetric capnography for the evaluation of chronic airways diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Veronez L; Pereira MC; Doria da Silva SM; Barcaui LA; De Capitani EM; Moreira MM; Paschoal IA

    2014-01-01

    Liliani de Fátima Veronez,1 Monica Corso Pereira,2 Silvia Maria Doria da Silva,2 Luisa Affi Barcaui,2 Eduardo Mello De Capitani,2 Marcos Mello Moreira,2 Ilma Aparecida Paschoalz2 1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Votuporanga (Educational Foundation of Votuporanga), Votuporanga, 2Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Sao Paulo, BrazilBackground: Obstructive lung diseases of different etiologies pre...

  5. Rheumatoid lung disease, pneumothorax, and eosinophilia.

    OpenAIRE

    Crisp, A J; Armstrong, R D; Grahame, R.; Dussek, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of the triad of rheumatoid lung disease, spontaneous pneumothorax, and peripheral blood eosinophilia are reported. Cavitation of a rheumatoid lung nodule caused the pneumothorax in at least 1 case. The significance of eosinophilia and its value as a marker of extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid disease are discussed.

  6. [Interstitial lung diseases associated with smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nová, Markéta; Hornychová, Helena; Matěj, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    There are many different interstitial lung diseases associated with smoking. This short review describes officially recognized disorders (desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and pulmonary Langerhans´cells histiocytosis) and entities with uncertain relationship to smoking, which have recently been published in the literature. Histopathological pictures and differential diagnosis of smoking-related diseases of the lungs are discussed. PMID:27223588

  7. Smoking and Other Interstitial Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Carpio Carlos; Gómez-Carrera Luis; Álvarez-Sala Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in the development of some uncommon respiratory interstitial diseases. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung diseases are characterized by a diffuse alveolar and peribronchiolar filling with macrophages, respectively. Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is a rare interstitial lung disorder characterized by the proliferation of Langerhans' cell forming interstitial infiltrates and nodules that c...

  8. Distending Pressure Did Not Activate Acute Phase or Inflammatory Responses in the Airways and Lungs of Fetal, Preterm Lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Y Petersen

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation at birth causes airway injury and lung inflammation in preterm sheep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is being increasingly used clinically to transition preterm infants at birth.To test if distending pressures will activate acute phase reactants and inflammatory changes in the airways of fetal, preterm lambs.The head and chest of fetal lambs at 128±1 day GA were surgically exteriorized. With placental circulation intact, fetal lambs were then randomized to one of five 15 minute interventions: PEEP of 0, 4, 8, 12, or 16 cmH2O. Recruitment volumes were recorded. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for 30 min after the intervention. The twins of each 0 cmH2O animal served as controls. Fetal lung fluid (FLF, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL, right mainstem bronchi and peripheral lung tissue were evaluated for inflammation.Recruitment volume increased from 0.4±0.04 mL/kg at 4 cmH2O to 2.4±0.3 mL/kg at 16 cmH2O. The lambs were surfactant deficient, and all pressures were below the opening inflection pressure on pressure-volume curve. mRNA expression of early response genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines did not increase in airway tissue or lung tissue at any pressure compared to controls. FLF and BAL also did not have increases in early response proteins. No histologic changes or Egr-1 activation was present at the pressures used.Distending pressures as high as 16 cmH2O did not recruit lung volume at birth and did not increase markers of injury in the lung or airways in non-breathing preterm fetal sheep.

  9. Microstructural alterations of sputum in cystic fibrosis lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Jung, James; Joseph, Andrea; Thaxton, Abigail L.; West, Natalie E.; Boyle, Michael P.; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The stasis of mucus secretions in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to recurrent infections and pulmonary exacerbations, resulting in decreased survival. Prior studies have assessed the biochemical and biophysical features of airway mucus in individuals with CF. However, these measurements are unable to probe mucus structure on microscopic length scales relevant to key players in the progression of CF-related lung disease, namely, viruses, bacteria, and neutrophils. In this study, we quantitatively determined sputum microstructure based on the diffusion of muco-inert nanoparticle probes in CF sputum and found that a reduction in sputum mesh pore size is characteristic of CF patients with reduced lung function, as indicated by measured FEV1. We also discovered that the effect of ex vivo treatment of CF sputum with rhDNase I (Pulmozyme) on microstructure is dependent upon the time interval between the most recent inhaled rhDNase I treatment and the sample collection. Microstructure of mucus may serve as a marker for the extent of CF lung disease and as a parameter for assessing the effectiveness of mucus-altering agents. PMID:27812540

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Caminati; Roberto Cassandro; Sergio Harari

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. ...

  11. Living near a Major Road in Beijing: Association with Lower Lung Function, Airway Acidification, and Chronic Cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Wei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution in people who live near major roads in Beijing is associated with lower lung function, airway acidification, and a higher prevalence of chronic cough. EBC pH is a potential useful biomarker for evaluating air pollution exposure.

  12. Human apolipoprotein E genotypes differentially modify house dust mite-induced airway disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Xianglan; Dai, Cuilian; Fredriksson, Karin;

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is an endogenous negative regulator of airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and mucous cell metaplasia in experimental models of house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway disease. The gene encoding human apoE is polymorphic, with three common alleles (e2, e3, and e4) reflecting single ...

  13. PRAGMA-CF. A quantitative structural lung disease CT outcome in young children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenow, Tim; Oudraad, Merel C.J.; Murray, Conor P.;

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for demonstrating cystic fibrosis (CF) airways disease. However, there are no standardised outcome measures appropriate for children under 6 years. OBJECTIVES: We developed the Perth-Rotterdam Annotated Grid Morphometric Analysis for CF...... effect sizes are presented. CONCLUSIONS: PRAGMA-CF is a sensitive and reproducible outcome measure for assessing the extent of lung disease in very young children with CF....

  14. Imaging of occupational and environmental lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, M. [Kinki Cuo Chest Medical Center, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    The chest radiograph is the basic tool for identifying occupational and environmental lung diseases; however, its sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of occupational and environmental lung diseases are low. High-resolution CT is the optimal method of recognizing parenchymal abnormalities in occupational and environmental disease. With the exception of pleural plaques, the CT findings of occupational and environmental lung diseases are nonspecific. Therefore, correlation of imaging features with history of exposure, other clinical features, and sometimes pathology is needed for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  15. Environmentally persistent free radicals induce airway hyperresponsiveness in neonatal rat lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lominiki Slawo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased asthma risk/exacerbation in children and infants is associated with exposure to elevated levels of ultrafine particulate matter (PM. The presence of a newly realized class of pollutants, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs, in PM from combustion sources suggests a potentially unrecognized risk factor for the development and/or exacerbation of asthma. Methods Neonatal rats (7-days of age were exposed to EPFR-containing combustion generated ultrafine particles (CGUFP, non-EPFR containing CGUFP, or air for 20 minutes per day for one week. Pulmonary function was assessed in exposed rats and age matched controls. Lavage fluid was isolated and assayed for cellularity and cytokines and in vivo indicators of oxidative stress. Pulmonary histopathology and characterization of differential protein expression in lung homogenates was also performed. Results Neonates exposed to EPFR-containing CGUFP developed significant pulmonary inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. This correlated with increased levels of oxidative stress in the lungs. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis, we identified 16 differentially expressed proteins between control and CGUFP exposed groups. In the rats exposed to EPFR-containing CGUFP; peroxiredoxin-6, cofilin1, and annexin A8 were upregulated. Conclusions Exposure of neonates to EPFR-containing CGUFP induced pulmonary oxidative stress and lung dysfunction. This correlated with alterations in the expression of various proteins associated with the response to oxidative stress and the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor translocation in T lymphocytes.

  16. A Lagrangian Approach for Calculating Microsphere Deposition in a One-Dimensional Lung-Airway Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Mayank; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2015-09-01

    Using the open-source software openfoam as the solver, a novel approach to calculate microsphere transport and deposition in a 1D human lung-equivalent trumpet model (TM) is presented. Specifically, for particle deposition in a nonlinear trumpetlike configuration a new radial force has been developed which, along with the regular drag force, generates particle trajectories toward the wall. The new semi-empirical force is a function of any given inlet volumetric flow rate, micron-particle diameter, and lung volume. Particle-deposition fractions (DFs) in the size range from 2 μm to 10 μm are in agreement with experimental datasets for different laminar and turbulent inhalation flow rates as well as total volumes. Typical run times on a single processor workstation to obtain actual total deposition results at comparable accuracy are 200 times less than that for an idealized whole-lung geometry (i.e., a 3D-1D model with airways up to 23rd generation in single-path only). PMID:26141916

  17. Lung Function, Airway Inflammation, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Exposure in Mexican Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Escamilla-Nuñez, Maria Consuelo; Schilmann, Astrid; Hernandez-Cadena, Leticia; Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Sjödin, Andreas; Del Río-Navarro, Blanca Estela; Díaz-Sanchez, David; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Sly, Peter; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with lung function and pH of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in Mexican schoolchildren. Methods A pilot study was performed in a subsample of 64 schoolchildren from Mexico City. Lung function and pH of EBC were measured and metabolites of PAHs in urine samples were determined. The association was analyzed using robust regression models. Results A 10% increase in the concentrations of 2-hydroxyfluorene was significantly negatively associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (−11.2 mL, 95% CI: −22.2 to −0.02), forced vital capacity (−11.6 mL, 95% CI: −22.9 to −0.2), and pH of EBC (−0.035, 95% CI: −0.066 to −0.005). Conclusion Biomarkers of PAHs exposure were inversely associated with lung function and decrease of ph of EBC as a marker of airway inflammation in Mexican schoolchildren. PMID:24500378

  18. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Roberta Pisi,1 Marina Aiello,1 Andrea Zanini,2 Panagiota Tzani,1 Davide Paleari,3 Emilio Marangio,1 Antonio Spanevello,2,4 Gabriele Nicolini,5 Alfredo Chetta1 1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, 2Division of Pneumology, IRCCS Rehabilitation Institute of Tradate, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Tradate, 3Medical Department, Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, 4Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, 5Corporate Clinical Development, Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, Italy Background: We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10% by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L-1 and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20 were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L-1 was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 µg was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L and percentage (≥12% change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs and FVC (volume responders, VRs.Results: Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L-1 (> upper normal limit and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L-1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (P<0.05 for all comparisons. Compared to the 69 nonresponders and the 8 FRs, the 16 VRs had significantly higher R5 and R5 – R20 values (P<0.05, lower X5 values (P<0.05, and greater airflow obstruction and lung

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells and inflammatory lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, S S; Co, C; Rojas, M

    2009-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are emerging as a therapeutic modality in various inflammatory disease states. A number of ongoing randomized Phase I/II clinical trials are evaluating the effects of allogeneic MSC infusion in patients with multiple sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, Crohn's disease, and severe chronic myocardial ischemia. MSCs are also being considered as a potential therapy in patients with inflammatory lung diseases. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated compelling benefits from the administration of MSCs in animal models of lung injury. These studies are leading to growing interest in the therapeutic use of MSCs in inflammatory lung diseases. In this Review, we describe how the immunoregulatory effects of MSCs can confer substantial protection in the setting of lung diseases such as acute lung injury, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. We also address potential pitfalls related to the therapeutic use of MSCs in fibrotic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, we identify emerging areas for MSC- based therapies in modulating oxidative stress and in attenuating inflammation in alcohol-related acute lung injury. PMID:19352305

  20. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels.

  1. /sup 67/Gallium citrate lung scans in interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.

    1976-02-01

    Patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease often require a lung biopsy to determine the diagnosis and proper therapy. However, once the diagnosis is established, clinical evaluation of symptoms, chest roentgenogram and pulmonary function testing are the only noninvasive means currently available to assess activity of the disease process and response to the therapy. Although these measures appear adequate in the presence of acute active disease in which response to therapy results in readily demonstrable changes in the above parameters, they may be insensitive to subtle changes that can occur in minimally active disease with slowly progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis over a period of years. A more sensitive noninvasive technique for identifying these cases with a smoldering diffuse interstitial inflammatory process might greatly improve our ability to effectively manage such patients. With this in mind, the value of gallium lung scan was investigated to assess its ability to predict inflammatory activity in such a clinical setting.

  2. Novel level-set based segmentation method of the lung at HRCT images of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongjin; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Park, Sang Ok; Lee, Ho; Shin, Yeong Gil; Kim, Soo-Hong

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for reliable segmentation of the lung at HRCT of DILD. Our method consists of four main steps. First, the airway and colon are segmented and excluded by thresholding(-974 HU) and connected component analysis. Second, initial lung is identified by thresholding(-474 HU). Third, shape propagation outward the lung is performed on the initial lung. Actual lung boundaries exist inside the propagated boundaries. Finally, subsequent shape modeling level-set inward the lung from the propagated boundary can identify the lung boundary when the curvature term was highly weighted. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the segmentation results of 54 patients are compared with those of manual segmentation done by an expert radiologist. The value of 1 minus volumetric overlap is less than 5% error. Accurate result of our method would be useful in determining the lung parenchyma at HRCT, which is the essential step for the automatic classification and quantification of diffuse interstitial lung disease.

  3. Animal Models of Allergic Airways Disease: Where Are We and Where to Next?

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, David G.; Tully, Jane E.; Nolin, James D.; Jansen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Irvin, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    In a complex inflammatory airways disease such as asthma, abnormalities in a plethora of molecular and cellular pathways ultimately culminate in characteristic impairments in respiratory function. The ability to study disease pathophysiology in the setting of a functioning immune and respiratory system therefore makes mouse models an invaluable tool in translational research. Despite the vast understanding of inflammatory airways diseases gained from mouse models to date, concern over the val...

  4. Spirometry and Obstructive Lung Disease in Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    NR Anthonisen; Dik, N; J Manfreda; LL Roos

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry, the measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity, is recommended in the diagnosis and management of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The present report describes spirometry use in Manitoba and tests the hypothesis that regional spirometry use correlates with the prevalence of physician-diagnosed obstructive lung diseases.METHODS: Spirometry is remunerated on a fee-for-service basis by Man...

  5. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides cause airway contraction and lung neutrophil infiltration via formyl peptide receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenceslau, Camilla Ferreira; Szasz, Theodora; McCarthy, Cameron G; Baban, Babak; NeSmith, Elizabeth; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory failure is a common characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Trauma and severe blood loss cause the release of endogenous molecules known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MITs) are DAMPs that share similarities with bacterial N-formylated peptides, and are potent immune system activators. Recently, we observed that hemorrhagic shock-induced increases in plasma levels of F-MITs associated with lung damage, and that antagonism of formyl peptide receptors (FPR) ameliorated hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury in rats. Corroborating these data, in the present study, it was observed that F-MITs expression is higher in plasma samples from trauma patients with SIRS or sepsis when compared to control trauma group. Therefore, to better understand the role of F-MITs in the regulation of lung and airway function, we studied the hypothesis that F-MITs lead to airway contraction and lung inflammation. We observed that F-MITs induced concentration-dependent contraction in trachea, bronchi and bronchioles. However, pre-treatment with mast cells degranulator or FPR antagonist decreased this response. Finally, intratracheal challenge with F-MITs increased neutrophil elastase expression in lung and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cell division control protein 42 expression in all airway segments. These data suggest that F-MITs could be a putative target to treat respiratory failure in trauma patients. PMID:26923940

  6. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Kelly Suzanne; Doel, Tom; Brightling, Chris

    2014-11-28

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by airway obstruction and airflow imitation and pose a huge burden to society. These obstructive lung diseases impact the lung physiology across multiple biological scales. Environmental stimuli are introduced via inhalation at the organ scale, and consequently impact upon the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular scale by triggering signaling pathways. These changes are propagated upwards to the organ level again and vice versa. In order to understand the pathophysiology behind these diseases we need to integrate and understand changes occurring across these scales and this is the driving force for multiscale computational modeling. There is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and assessment of obstructive lung diseases. Standard clinical measures are based on global function tests which ignore the highly heterogeneous regional changes that are characteristic of obstructive lung disease pathophysiology. Advances in scanning technology such as hyperpolarized gas MRI has led to new regional measurements of ventilation, perfusion and gas diffusion in the lungs, while new image processing techniques allow these measures to be combined with information from structural imaging such as Computed Tomography (CT). However, it is not yet known how to derive clinical measures for obstructive diseases from this wealth of new data. Computational modeling offers a powerful approach for investigating this relationship between imaging measurements and disease severity, and understanding the effects of different disease subtypes, which is key to developing improved diagnostic methods. Gaining an understanding of a system as complex as the respiratory system is difficult if not impossible via experimental methods alone. Computational models offer a complementary method to unravel the structure-function relationships occurring within a multiscale, multiphysics system such as this. Here we review the currentstate

  7. Occupational rhinitis and occupational asthma; one airway two diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of 'one airway, one disease' refers to the frequent comorbidity of asthma and rhinitis. However, only limited research has been done on this association for the diverse range of occupational respiratory sensitisers. The relative frequency of rhinitis was determined for the 15 respiratory sensitisers reported to cause at least 10 cases of rhinitis or asthma to The Health and Occupation Reporting (THOR) network between 1997 and 2006. Of 1408 cases, 1190 were sole diagnoses of asthma, 138 sole diagnoses of rhinitis and in 80 cases asthma coexisted with rhinitis. The six sensitisers for which rhinitis featured in over 15% of cases were all particulates and known to cause release of mast cell mediators, either directly or through IgE antibodies. Four of the other nine sensitisers often exist as vapours and only two have been consistently associated with IgE-mediated disease mechanisms. Particle size did not appear to correlate with the relative frequency of rhinitis. Despite its limitations this study would support the hypothesis that there are at least two mechanistic categories of respiratory sensitisation with rhinitis being relatively more common where the mechanism is IgE-mediated. Particulate nature may be another important factor to consider in future studies.

  8. Airway wall thickening and emphysema show independent familial aggregation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bipen D; Coxson, Harvey O; Pillai, Sreekumar G;

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: It is unclear whether airway wall thickening and emphysema make independent contributions to airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and whether these phenotypes cluster within families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether airway wall thickening and emphysema (1...... severity of airway wall thickening and emphysema. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A total of 3,096 individuals were recruited to the study, of whom 1,159 (519 probands and 640 siblings) had technically adequate high-resolution computed tomography scans without significant non-COPD-related thoracic disease....... Airway wall thickness correlated with pack-years smoked (P < or = 0.001) and symptoms of chronic bronchitis (P < 0.001). FEV(1) (expressed as % predicted) was independently associated with airway wall thickness at a lumen perimeter of 10 mm (P = 0.0001) and 20 mm (P = 0.0013) and emphysema at -950...

  9. Association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: the missing link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-li

    2013-01-01

    Objective This review focuses on current knowledge of specific processes that drive chronic airway inflammation which are important in the pathogenesis of both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from studies reported in the PubMed database (1997-2012) using the terms of COPD and lung cancer.Study selection Data from published articles about prevalence of COPD-lung cancer overlap and mechanism involved in lung cancer development in COPD were identified,retrieved and reviewed.Results COPD prevalence,morbidity and mortality vary and are directly related to the prevalence of tobacco smoking except in developing countries where air pollution resulting from the burning of biomass fuels is also important.COPD is characterized by a chronic inflammation of lower airway and,importantly,the presence of COPD increases the risk of lung cancer up to 4.5 fold among long-term smokers.COPD is by far the greatest risk factor for lung cancer amongst smokers and is found in 50%-90% of patients with lung cancer.Conclusions Both COPD and lung cancer are tobacco smoking-associated chronic diseases that cluster in families and aggravate with age,and 50%-70% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer have declined spirometric evidence of COPD.Understanding and targeting common pathogenic mechanisms for lung cancer and COPD would have potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for patients with these lung diseases and for people at risk.

  10. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  12. Endotoxin-induced nitric oxide production rescues airway growth and maturation in atrophic fetal rat lung explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammation induces premature maturation of the fetal lung but the signals causing this effect remain unclear. We determined if nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 μg ml-1), participated in this process. Fetal rat lung airway surface complexity rose 2.5-fold over 96 h in response to LPS and was associated with increased iNOS protein expression and activity. iNOS inhibition by N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine-2HCl (L-NIL) abolished this and induced airway atrophy similar to untreated explants. Surfactant protein-C (SP-C) expression was also induced by LPS and abolished by L-NIL. As TGFβ suppresses iNOS activity, we determined if feedback regulation modulated NO-dependent maturation. LPS induced TGFβ1 release and SMAD4 nuclear translocation 96 h after treatment. Treatment of explants with a blocking antibody against TGFβ1 sustained NO production and airway morphogenesis whereas recombinant TGFβ1 antagonized these effects. Feedback regulation of NO synthesis by TGFβ may, thus, modulate airway branching and maturation of the fetal lung

  13. Studies of human airways in vitro: A review of the methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Hulsmann, Anthon; de Jongste, Johan

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe pathophysiology of human airway narrowing is only partly understood. In order to gain more insight in the mechanisms of human lung diseases and potential beneficial therapeutic agents, adequate models are needed. Animal airway models are of limited value since lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unique to humans and because the mechanisms of airway narrowing differ between species. Therefore, it is important to perform studies on h...

  14. Viral Bronchiolitis in Young Rats Causes Small Airway Lesions that Correlate with Reduced Lung Function

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkness, Ronald L.; Renee J Szakaly; Louis A Rosenthal; Sullivan, Ruth; James E Gern; Lemanske, Robert F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Viral illness with wheezing during infancy is associated with the inception of childhood asthma. Small airway dysfunction is a component of childhood asthma, but little is known about how viral illness at an early age may affect the structure and function of small airways. We used a well-characterized rat model of postbronchiolitis chronic airway dysfunction to address how postinfectious small airway lesions affect airway physiological function and if the structure/function correlates persist...

  15. Obstructive airway lesion in infants and small children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New 133Xe lung function test which is applicable in infants and small children was designed and successfully applied to the patient from 6 months to 10 years of age. 133Xe washout curve was analysed by back projection method into fast and slow compartment and 3 washout indices was calculated from the data of slow compartment. These washout indices which express the grade of washout delay of poorly ventilated area of the lung made it clear that the obstructive airway lesion is present in the patient who has a sign of respiratory failure. Washout indices well correlated with the grade of alveolar septal hypertrophy (correlation coefficient = index 1:0.842, index 2:0.632, index 3:0.864) and also well correlated with the numbers of postoperative day during which intensive respiratory care was necessary (correlation coefficient = index 1:0.686, index 2:0.648, index 3:0.736). So that it can be concluded that washout indices will diagnose the alveolar histopathological change which is seen in patient with congenital heart disease without having a biopsy and give a usefull information when the planning of postoperative respiratory care is made up. (J.P.N.)

  16. The Airway Microbiome at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  17. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  18. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO2 carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-19F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-19F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-19F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-19F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH2O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH2O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure

  19. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne R Prince

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or CLD. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+/CD16(+ monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02. Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+ macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02. At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+ mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03, but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05 or CD36 (p = 0.05 positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  20. The long-term programming effect of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D in pregnancy on allergic airway disease and lung function in offspring after 20 to 25 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne; Maslova, Ekaterina; Strøm, Marin;

    2015-01-01

    [70%]). RESULTS: Exposure to a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration (≥125 nmol/L) was associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations in offspring (hazard ratio [HR], 1.81; 95% CI, 0.78-4.16) during 25 years of follow-up compared with the reference group (75-..., there were lower risks of asthma hospitalizations (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.08-1.02) and asthma medication use (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95) in those exposed to a low maternal 25(OH)D concentration (... and offspring allergen-specific IgE, total IgE, and eosinophil cationic protein levels; self-reported doctor's diagnosis of asthma or hay fever; or lung function at 20 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Our study does not provide support for a protective effect of a high maternal 25(OH)D concentration on outcomes...

  1. Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaswamy Guha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Asian countries where the Buddhism and Taoism are mainstream religions, incense burning is a daily practice. A typical composition of stick incense consists of 21% (by weight of herbal and wood powder, 35% of fragrance material, 11% of adhesive powder, and 33% of bamboo stick. Incense smoke (fumes contains particulate matter (PM, gas products and many organic compounds. On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 mg/g burned as compared to 10 mg/g burned for cigarettes. The gas products from burning incense include CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, and others. Incense burning also produces volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The air pollution in and around various temples has been documented to have harmful effects on health. When incense smoke pollutants are inhaled, they cause respiratory system dysfunction. Incense smoke is a risk factor for elevated cord blood IgE levels and has been indicated to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Incense smoke also has been associated with neoplasm and extracts of particulate matter from incense smoke are found to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test with TA98 and activation. In order to prevent airway disease and other health problem, it is advisable that people should reduce the exposure time when they worship at the temple with heavy incense smokes, and ventilate their house when they burn incense at home.

  2. Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chang; Krishnaswamy, Guha; Chi, David S

    2008-04-25

    In Asian countries where the Buddhism and Taoism are mainstream religions, incense burning is a daily practice. A typical composition of stick incense consists of 21% (by weight) of herbal and wood powder, 35% of fragrance material, 11% of adhesive powder, and 33% of bamboo stick. Incense smoke (fumes) contains particulate matter (PM), gas products and many organic compounds. On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 mg/g burned as compared to 10 mg/g burned for cigarettes. The gas products from burning incense include CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, and others. Incense burning also produces volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The air pollution in and around various temples has been documented to have harmful effects on health. When incense smoke pollutants are inhaled, they cause respiratory system dysfunction. Incense smoke is a risk factor for elevated cord blood IgE levels and has been indicated to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Incense smoke also has been associated with neoplasm and extracts of particulate matter from incense smoke are found to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test with TA98 and activation. In order to prevent airway disease and other health problem, it is advisable that people should reduce the exposure time when they worship at the temple with heavy incense smokes, and ventilate their house when they burn incense at home.

  3. Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chang; Krishnaswamy, Guha; Chi, David S

    2008-01-01

    In Asian countries where the Buddhism and Taoism are mainstream religions, incense burning is a daily practice. A typical composition of stick incense consists of 21% (by weight) of herbal and wood powder, 35% of fragrance material, 11% of adhesive powder, and 33% of bamboo stick. Incense smoke (fumes) contains particulate matter (PM), gas products and many organic compounds. On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 mg/g burned as compared to 10 mg/g burned for cigarettes. The gas products from burning incense include CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, and others. Incense burning also produces volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The air pollution in and around various temples has been documented to have harmful effects on health. When incense smoke pollutants are inhaled, they cause respiratory system dysfunction. Incense smoke is a risk factor for elevated cord blood IgE levels and has been indicated to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Incense smoke also has been associated with neoplasm and extracts of particulate matter from incense smoke are found to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test with TA98 and activation. In order to prevent airway disease and other health problem, it is advisable that people should reduce the exposure time when they worship at the temple with heavy incense smokes, and ventilate their house when they burn incense at home. PMID:18439280

  4. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics.

  5. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  6. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  7. NOD-like receptors in lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eChaput

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The lung is a particularly vulnerable organ at the interface of the body and the exterior environment. It is constantly exposed to microbes and particles by inhalation. The innate immune system needs to react promptly and adequately to potential dangers posed by these microbes and particles, while at the same time avoiding extensive tissue damage. NOD-like receptors (NLRs represent a group of key sensors for microbes and damage in the lung. As such they are important players in various infectious as well as acute and chronic sterile inflammatory diseases, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD, acute lung injury/ARDS, pneumoconiosis and asthma. Activation of most known NLRs leads to the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and/or to the induction of cell death. We will review NLR functions in the lung during infection and sterile inflammation.

  8. No effect of elevated operating lung volumes on airway function during variable workrate exercise in asthmatic humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klansky, Andrew; Irvin, Charlie; Morrison-Taylor, Adriane; Ahlstrand, Sarah; Labrie, Danielle; Haverkamp, Hans Christian

    2016-07-01

    In asthmatic adults, airway caliber fluctuates during variable intensity exercise such that bronchodilation (BD) occurs with increased workrate whereas bronchoconstriction (BC) occurs with decreased workrate. We hypothesized that increased lung mechanical stretch would prevent BC during such variable workrate exercise. Ten asthmatic and ten nonasthmatic subjects completed two exercise trials on a cycle ergometer. Both trials included a 28-min exercise bout consisting of alternating four min periods at workloads equal to 40 % (Low) and 70% (High) peak power output. During one trial, subjects breathed spontaneously throughout exercise (SVT), such that tidal volume (VT) and end-inspiratory lung volume (EILV) were increased by 0.5 and 0.6 liters during the high compared with the low workload in nonasthmatic and asthmatic subjects, respectively. During the second trial (MVT), VT and EILV were maintained constant when transitioning from the high to the low workload. Forced exhalations from total lung capacity were performed during each exercise workload. In asthmatic subjects, forced expiratory volume 1.0 s (FEV1.0) increased and decreased with the increases and decreases in workrate during both SVT (Low, 3.3 ± 0.3 liters; High, 3.6 ± 0.2 liters; P < 0.05) and MVT (Low, 3.3 ± 0.3 liters; High, 3.5 ± 0.2 liters; P < 0.05). Thus increased lung stretch during MVT did not prevent decreases in airway caliber when workload was reduced. We conclude that neural factors controlling airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractile activity during whole body exercise are more robust determinants of airway caliber than the ability of lung stretch to alter ASM actin-myosin binding and contraction. PMID:27150833

  9. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  10. Exhaled breath condensate: a promising source for biomarkers of lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Yeligar, Samantha M; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2012-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been increasingly studied as a noninvasive research method for sampling the alveolar and airway space and is recognized as a promising source of biomarkers of lung diseases. Substances measured in EBC include oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators, such as arachidonic acid derivatives, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, reduced and oxidized glutathione, and inflammatory cytokines. Although EBC has great potential as a source of biomarkers in many lung diseases, the low concentrations of compounds within the EBC present challenges in sample collection and analysis. Although EBC is viewed as a noninvasive method for sampling airway lining fluid (ALF), validation is necessary to confirm that EBC truly represents the ALF. Likewise, a dilution factor for the EBC is needed in order to compare across subjects and determine changes in the ALF. The aims of this paper are to address the characteristics of EBC; strategies to standardize EBC sample collection and review available analytical techniques for EBC analysis. PMID:23365513

  11. Exhaled Breath Condensate: A Promising Source for Biomarkers of Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled breath condensate (EBC has been increasingly studied as a noninvasive research method for sampling the alveolar and airway space and is recognized as a promising source of biomarkers of lung diseases. Substances measured in EBC include oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators, such as arachidonic acid derivatives, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, reduced and oxidized glutathione, and inflammatory cytokines. Although EBC has great potential as a source of biomarkers in many lung diseases, the low concentrations of compounds within the EBC present challenges in sample collection and analysis. Although EBC is viewed as a noninvasive method for sampling airway lining fluid (ALF, validation is necessary to confirm that EBC truly represents the ALF. Likewise, a dilution factor for the EBC is needed in order to compare across subjects and determine changes in the ALF. The aims of this paper are to address the characteristics of EBC; strategies to standardize EBC sample collection and review available analytical techniques for EBC analysis.

  12. Solid fuel smoke exposure and risk of obstructive airways disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qorbani Mostafa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case–control study, 83 patients with OAD (cases were compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview was performed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history, cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure to BHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke and the population attributable fraction (PAF was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and 30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60 for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20 for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI = 1.14-4.35. Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08. Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%.

  13. Lung pressures and gas transport during high-frequency airway and chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Ye, T H; Tran, N H

    1989-09-01

    The major goal of this study was to compare gas exchange, tidal volume (VT), and dynamic lung pressures resulting from high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO) with the corresponding effects in high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). Eight anesthetized paralyzed dogs were maintained eucapnic with HFAO and HFCWO at frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz in the former and 0.5 to 8 Hz in the latter. Tracheal (delta Ptr) and esophageal (delta Pes) pressure swings, VT, and arterial blood gases were measured in addition to respiratory impedance and static pressure-volume curves. Mean positive pressure (25-30 cmH2O) in the chest cuff associated with HFCWO generation decreased lung volume by approximately 200 ml and increased pulmonary impedance significantly. Aside from this decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC), no change in lung volume occurred as a result of dynamic factors during the course of HFCWO application. With HFAO, a small degree of hyperinflation occurred only at 16 Hz. Arterial PO2 decreased by 5 Torr on average during HFCWO. VT decreased with increasing frequency in both cases, but VT during HFCWO was smaller over the range of frequencies compared with HFAO. delta Pes and delta Ptr between 1 and 8 Hz were lower than the corresponding pressure swings obtained with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) applied at 0.25 Hz. delta Pes was minimized at 1 Hz during HFCWO; however, delta Ptr decreased continuously with decreasing frequency and, below 2 Hz, became progressively smaller than the corresponding values obtained with HFAO and CMV.

  14. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  15. Lung-homing of endothelial progenitor cells and airway vascularization is only partially dependant on eosinophils in a house dust mite-exposed mouse model of allergic asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirooya Sivapalan

    Full Text Available Asthmatic responses involve a systemic component where activation of the bone marrow leads to mobilization and lung-homing of progenitor cells. This traffic may be driven by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, a potent progenitor chemoattractant. We have previously shown that airway angiogenesis, an early remodeling event, can be inhibited by preventing the migration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC to the lungs. Given intranasally, AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist that inhibits SDF-1 mediated effects, attenuated allergen-induced lung-homing of EPC, vascularization of pulmonary tissue, airway eosinophilia and development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Since SDF-1 is also an eosinophil chemoattractant, we investigated, using a transgenic eosinophil deficient mouse strain (PHIL whether EPC lung accumulation and lung vascularization in allergic airway responses is dependent on eosinophilic inflammation.Wild-type (WT BALB/c and eosinophil deficient (PHIL mice were sensitized to house dust mite (HDM using a chronic exposure protocol and treated with AMD3100 to modulate SDF-1 stimulated progenitor traffic. Following HDM challenge, lung-extracted EPCs were enumerated along with airway inflammation, microvessel density (MVD and airway methacholine responsiveness (AHR.Following Ag sensitization, both WT and PHIL mice exhibited HDM-induced increase in airway inflammation, EPC lung-accumulation, lung angiogenesis and AHR. Treatment with AMD3100 significantly attenuated outcome measures in both groups of mice. Significantly lower levels of EPC and a trend for lower vascularization were detected in PHIL versus WT mice.This study shows that while allergen-induced lung-homing of endothelial progenitor cells, increased tissue vascularization and development lung dysfunction can occur in the absence of eosinophils, the presence of these cells worsens the pathology of the allergic response.

  16. The role of the small airways in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Matteo; Usmani, Omar S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), represent a major social and economic burden for worldwide health systems. During recent years, increasing attention has been directed to the role of small airways in respiratory diseases, and their exact contribution to the pathophysiology of asthma and COPD continues to be clarified. Indeed, it has been suggested that small airways play a distinct role in specific disease phenotypes. Besides providing information on small airways structure and diagnostic procedures, this review therefore aims to present updated and evidence-based findings on the role of small airways in the pathophysiology of asthma and COPD. Most of the available information derives from either pathological studies or review articles and there are few data on the natural history of small airways disease in the onset or progression of asthma and COPD. Comparisons between studies on the role of small airways are hard to draw because both asthma and COPD are highly heterogeneous conditions. Most studies have been performed in small population samples, and different techniques to characterize aspects of small airways function have been employed in order to assess inflammation and remodelling. Most methods of assessing small airways dysfunction have been largely confined to research purposes, but some data are encouraging, supporting the utilization of certain techniques into daily clinical practice, particularly for early-stage diseases, when subjects are often asymptomatic and routine pulmonary function tests may be within normal ranges. In this context further clinical trials and real-life feedback on large populations are desirable.

  17. How Can 1+1=3? beta(2)-Adrenergic and Glucocorticoid Receptor Agonist Synergism in Obstructive Airway Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Martina; Michel, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    For a long time it was believed that beta(2)-adrenergic receptor agonists used in the treatment of obstructive airway diseases worked primarily on airway smooth muscle cells, causing relaxation, whereas glucocorticoids primarily improved airway function via their anti-inflammatory action, indicating

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown KK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joshua J Solomon, Kevin K BrownAutoimmune Lung Center and Interstitial Lung Disease Program, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the US population. Patients can have extra-articular manifestations of their disease and the lungs are commonly involved. RA can affect any compartment of the respiratory system and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT of the lung is abnormal in over half of these patients. Interstitial lung disease is a dreaded complication of RA. It is more prevalent in smokers, males, and those with high antibody titers. The pathogenesis is unknown but data suggest an environmental insult in the setting of a genetic predisposition. Smoking may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease through citrullination of protein in the lung leading to the development of autoimmunity. Patients usually present in middle age with cough and dyspnea. Pulmonary function testing most commonly shows reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and HRCT reveals a combination of reticulation and ground glass abnormalities. The most common pattern on HRCT and histopathology is usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia seen less frequently. There are no large-scale well-controlled treatment trials. In severe or progressive cases, treatment usually consists of corticosteroids with or without a cytotoxic agent for 6 months or longer. RA interstitial lung disease is progressive; over half of patients show radiographic progression within 2 years. Patients with a UIP pattern on biopsy have a survival similar to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, interstitial lung disease, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, usual interstitial pneumonia, anti-CCP

  19. Exposure conditions, lung function and airway symptoms in industrial production of wood pellets. A pilot project; Exponeringsfoerhaallanden, lungfunktion och luftvaegsbesaer vid industriell produktion av traepellets. Ett pilotprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edman, Katja; Loefstedt, Haakan; Berg, Peter; Bryngelsson, I.L.; Fedeli, Cecilia; Selden, Anders [Oerebro Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Yrkes- och miljoemedicinska kliniken; Eriksson, Kaare [Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Holmstroem, Mats; Rask- Andersen, Anna [Uppsala Univ. Hospital (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    The production of wood pellets is a relatively new branch of the Swedish wood industry and has increased during the last years. A pilot study was performed to investigate the prevalence of airway symptoms, lung function and exposure among all 39 men employed in industrial production of wood pellets at six companies. The study included a questionnaire, medical examination, registration of nasal-PEF (peak expiratory flow) during a week, allergy screening (Phadiatop) and lung function (spirometry) before and after work shift. The results were compared with different reference data from other Swedish studies. Exposure measurements of monoterpenes and wood dust on filter and with a data logger (DataRAM) were also performed. The study group reported a higher frequency of cough without phlegm, awakening due to breathlessness and current asthma medication compared with reference data. For five of the six participants with physician-diagnosed asthma the disease debuted before the current employment and the results did not indicate an unusual asthma morbidity. Spirometry showed lower lung function before work shift than expected. However no difference over work shift was observed. A negative and non-significant correlation was seen between time with current work task and lung function. The study group reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms mostly blockage, sneezing and dryness compared with reference data. The registrations of nasal-PEF did not show any differences between work and spare time. The prevalence of positive Phadiatop (23 %) did not differ from reference data. No association between exposure (wood dust and monoterpenes) and acute effects on lung function was observed. The wood dust exposure (0.16-19 mg/m{sup 3}) was high and 11 of 24 measurements exceeded the present Swedish occupational exposure limit of 2 mg/m{sup 3}. Peak exposures could be identified, e.g. at cleaning of engines with compressed air, with the DataRAM. The exposure to monoterpenes (0

  20. Bactericidal/Permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 in airway host protection and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Clemente J; Cohn, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease.

  1. Adult stem cells for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic, progressive and lethal lung diseases. The incidence of IPF and COPD increases with age, independent of exposure to common environmental risk factors. At present, there is limited understanding of the relationship between ageing and the development of chronic lung diseases. One hypothesis is that chronic injury drives to exhaustion the local and systemic repair responses in the lung. These changes are accentuated during ageing where there is a progressive accumulation of senescent cells. Recently, stem cells have emerged as a critical reparative mechanism for lung injury. In this review, we discuss the repair response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (B-MSC) after lung injury and how their function is affected by ageing. Our own work has demonstrated a protective role of B-MSC in several animal models of acute and chronic lung injury. We recently demonstrated the association, using animal models, between age and an increase in the susceptibility to develop severe injury and fibrosis. At the same time, we have identified functional differences between B-MSC isolated from young and old animals. Further studies are required to understand the functional impairment of ageing B-MSC, ultimately leading to a rapid stem cell depletion or fatigue, interfering with their ability to play a protective role in lung injury. The elucidation of these events will help in the development of rational and new therapeutic strategies for COPD and IPF. PMID:23648014

  2. Respiratory Conditions Update: Restrictive Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, H Coleman

    2016-09-01

    Restrictive lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by a restrictive pattern on spirometry and confirmed by a reduction in total lung volume. Patients with more severe symptoms may have a reduced diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Etiologies can be intrinsic with lung parenchymal involvement, as in interstitial lung diseases, or extrinsic to the lung, as in obesity and neuromuscular disorders. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic progressive interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis for which treatment is primarily supportive with oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and management of comorbid conditions. Newer drugs for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as pirfenidone and nintedanib, can slow disease progression. Referral for evaluation for lung transplantation is recommended for appropriate patients. Obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increasingly are common health issues, with symptoms that can include snoring, daytime somnolence, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, witnessed apneas, and morning headaches. Serum bicarbonate may serve as a biomarker in screening for subclinical obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Preoperative evaluations should assess pulmonary risk in addition to cardiac risk with a thorough history, laboratory tests, and functional capacity assessments. Optimization of management may include weight loss, pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen therapy, and respiratory support. PMID:27576233

  3. Histopathologic approach to the surgical lung biopsy in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kirk D; Urisman, Anatoly

    2012-03-01

    Interpretation of lung biopsy specimens is an integral part in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD). The process of evaluating a surgical lung biopsy for disease involves answering several questions. Unlike much of surgical pathology of neoplastic lung disease, arriving at the correct diagnosis in nonneoplastic lung disease often requires correlation with clinical and radiologic findings. The topic of ILD or diffuse infiltrative lung disease covers several hundred entities. This article is meant to be a launching point in the clinician's approach to the histologic evaluation of lung disease.

  4. Postnatal development of the bronchiolar club cells of distal airways in the mouse lung: stereological and molecular biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Srikanth; Graulich, Tilman; Oruqaj, Gani; Pfreimer, Susanne; Seimetz, Michael; Stamme, Cordula; Mariani, Thomas J; Weissmann, Norbert; Mühlfeld, Christian; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2016-06-01

    Club (Clara) cells are nonciliated secretory epithelial cells present in bronchioles of distal pulmonary airways. So far, no information is available on the postnatal differentiation of club cells by a combination of molecular biological, biochemical, and stereological approaches in the murine lung. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the changes in the club cell secretory proteins (CC10, surfactant proteins A, B and D) and club cell abundance within the epithelium of bronchioles of distal airways during the postnatal development of the mouse lung. Perfusion-fixed murine lungs of three developmental stages (newborn, 15-day-old and adult) were used. Frozen, unfixed lungs were used for cryosectioning and subsequent laser-assisted microdissection of bronchiolar epithelial cells and RT-PCR analyses. High resolution analyses of the three-dimensional structures and composition of lung airways were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Finally, using design-based stereology, the total and average club cell volume and the volume of secretory granules were quantified by light and transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that murine club cells are immature at birth and differentiate postnatally. Further, increase of the club cell volume and number of intracellular granules are closely correlated to the total lung volume enlargement. However, secretory granule density was only increased within the first 15 days of postnatal development. The differentiation is accompanied by a decrease in glycogen content, and a close positive relationship between CC10 expression and secretory granule abundance. Taken together, our data are consistent with the concept that the morphological and functional differentiation of club cells is a postnatal phenomenon. PMID:26796206

  5. Distal Airway Stem Cells Render Alveoli in Vitro and During Lung Regeneration Following H1N1 Influenza Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pooja A.; Hu, Yuanyu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hoe, Neo Boon; Wei, Tay Seok; Mu, Dakai; Sun, Yan; Joo, Lim Siew; Dagher, Rania; Zielonka, Elisabeth; Wang, Yun; Chow, Vincent T.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The extent of lung regeneration following catastrophic damage and the potential role of adult stem cells in such a process remains obscure. Sublethal infection of mice with an H1N1 influenza virus related to that of the 1918 pandemic triggers massive airway damage followed by apparent regeneration. We show here that p63-expressing stem cells in the bronchiolar epithelium undergo rapid proliferation after infection and radiate to interbronchiolar regions of alveolar ablation. Once there, these...

  6. Interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Athol U

    2014-10-01

    Based on international collaborative data, interstitial lung disease is now the most frequent cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), having supplanted renal crisis in that regard. Despite detailed explorations of candidate mediators, no primary pathway in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease associated with SSc (SSc-ILD) has been definitively identified and, therefore, treatment with current agents is only partially successful. However, as immunomodulatory agents do, on average, retard progression of lung disease, early identification of SSc-ILD, using thoracic high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), is highly desirable. The decision whether to introduce therapy immediately is often difficult as the balance of risk and benefit favours a strategy of careful observation when lung disease is very limited, especially in long-standing SSc. The threshold for initiating treatment is substantially reduced when lung disease is severe, systemic disease is short in duration or ongoing progression is evident, based on pulmonary function tests and symptoms. This review summarises epidemiology, pathogenesis, difficult clinical problems and management issues in SSc-ILD.

  7. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  8. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article. PMID:26234096

  9. Spatial distribution of sequential ventilation during mechanical ventilation of the uninjured lung: an argument for cyclical airway collapse and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altemeier William A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI is a recognized complication of mechanical ventilation. Although the specific mechanism by which mechanical ventilation causes lung injury remains an active area of study, the application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP reduces its severity. We have previously reported that VILI is spatially heterogeneous with the most severe injury in the dorsal-caudal lung. This regional injury heterogeneity was abolished by the application of PEEP = 8 cm H2O. We hypothesized that the spatial distribution of lung injury correlates with areas in which cyclical airway collapse and recruitment occurs. Methods To test this hypothesis, rabbits were mechanically ventilated in the supine posture, and regional ventilation distribution was measured under four conditions: tidal volumes (VT of 6 and 12 ml/kg with PEEP levels of 0 and 8 cm H2O. Results We found that relative ventilation was sequentially redistributed towards dorsal-caudal lung with increasing tidal volume. This sequential ventilation redistribution was abolished with the addition of PEEP. Conclusions These results suggest that cyclical airway collapse and recruitment is regionally heterogeneous and spatially correlated with areas most susceptible to VILI.

  10. Analysis of impulse oscillometric measures of lung function and respiratory system model parameters in small airway-impaired and healthy children over a 2-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Pat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Is Impulse Oscillometry System (IOS a valuable tool to measure respiratory system function in Children? Asthma (A is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease in children. Therefore, early and accurate assessment of respiratory function is of tremendous clinical interest in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of respiratory conditions in this subpopulation. IOS has been successfully used to measure lung function in children with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity to small airway impairments (SAI and asthma. IOS measures of airway function and equivalent electrical circuit models of the human respiratory system have been developed to quantify the severity of these conditions. Previously, we have evaluated several known respiratory models based on the Mead's model and more parsimonious versions based on fitting IOS data known as extended RIC (eRIC and augmented RIC (aRIC models have emerged, which offer advantages over earlier models. Methods IOS data from twenty-six children were collected and compared during pre-bronchodilation (pre-B and post- bronchodilation (post-B conditions over a period of 2 years. Results and Discussion Are the IOS and model parameters capable of differentiating between healthy children and children with respiratory system distress? Children were classified into two main categories: Healthy (H and Small Airway-Impaired (SAI. The IOS measures and respiratory model parameters analyzed differed consistently between H and SAI children. SAI children showed smaller trend of "growth" and larger trend of bronchodilator responses than H children. The two model parameters: peripheral compliance (Cp and peripheral resistance (Rp tracked IOS indices of small airway function well. Cp was a more sensitive index than Rp. Both eRIC and aRIC Cps and the IOS Reactance Area, AX, (also known as the "Goldman Triangle" showed good correlations. Conclusions What are the most useful IOS and model parameters? In

  11. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  12. Relationship between airway inflammation and remodeling in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Górska K; Krenke R; Kosciuch J; Korczynski P; Zukowska M; Domagala-Kulawik J; Maskey-Warzechowska M; Chazan R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Despite a number of important differences in the pathogenesis, course and prognosis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), these two entities also have common features with airway inflammation being one of them. Airway remodeling is a characteristic feature of asthma, but data on the bronchial wall thickening in COPD patients are still scarce. Aim To assess the relation between the inflammatory cell count in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and thickness o...

  13. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Moghaddam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Javad Moghaddam1, Cesar E Ochoa1,2, Sanjay Sethi3, Burton F Dickey1,41Department of Pulmonary Medicine, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Tecnológico de Monterrey School of Medicine, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; 3Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA; 4Center for Inflammation and Infection, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is predicted to become the third leading cause of death in the world by 2020. It is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles and gases, most commonly cigarette smoke. Among smokers with COPD, even following withdrawal of cigarette smoke, inflammation persists and lung function continues to deteriorate. One possible explanation is that bacterial colonization of smoke-damaged airways, most commonly with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, perpetuates airway injury and inflammation. Furthermore, COPD has also been identified as an independent risk factor for lung cancer irrespective of concomitant cigarette smoke exposure. In this article, we review the role of NTHi in airway inflammation that may lead to COPD progression and lung cancer promotion.Keywords: COPD, NTHi, inflammation

  14. Rituximab-induced interstitial lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqibullah, Matiuallah; Shaker, Saher B; Bach, Karen S;

    2015-01-01

    , rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Recently, RTX has also been suggested for the treatment of certain connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Rare but serious pulmonary adverse reactions are reported. To raise awareness about...

  15. Electronic Nose and Exhaled Breath NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Airways Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Penas, Andreu; Capuano, Rosamaria; Mondino, Chiara; Trové, Andrea; Macagno, Francesco; Zini, Gina; Cattani, Paola; Martinelli, Eugenio; Motta, Andrea; Macis, Giuseppe; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Montuschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Breathomics, the multidimensional molecular analysis of exhaled breath, includes analysis of exhaled breath with gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and electronic noses (e-noses), and metabolomics of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), a non-invasive technique which provides information on the composition of airway lining fluid, generally by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or MS methods. Metabolomics is the identification and quantification of small molecular weight metabolites in a biofluid. Specific profiles of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and metabolites in EBC (breathprints) are potentially useful surrogate markers of inflammatory respiratory diseases. Electronic noses (e-noses) are artificial sensor systems, usually consisting of chemical cross-reactive sensor arrays for characterization of patterns of breath volatile compounds, and algorithms for breathprints classification. E-noses are handheld, portable, and provide real-time data. E-nose breathprints can reflect respiratory inflammation. E-noses and NMR-based metabolomics of EBC can distinguish patients with respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, and lung cancer, or diseases with a clinically relevant respiratory component including cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia, and healthy individuals. Breathomics has also been reported to identify patients affected by different types of respiratory diseases. Patterns of breath volatile compounds detected by e-nose and EBC metabolic profiles have been associated with asthma phenotypes. In combination with other -omics platforms, breathomics might provide a molecular approach to respiratory disease phenotyping and a molecular basis to tailored pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Breathomics might also contribute to identify new surrogate markers of respiratory inflammation, thus, facilitating drug discovery. Validation in newly recruited, prospective independent cohorts is essential for development of e

  16. Reversing disability of irreversible lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiep, B. L.

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive multifaceted team approach for integrating medical management, coping skills, self-management techniques, and exercise reconditioning. It provides patients with chronic lung disease the ability to adapt and live full and nearly normal lives. These changes are possible because the overall disability includes significant reversible components: Patients have bronchospasm, infection, and cor pulmonale; they respond to progressively impaired lungs by pro...

  17. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juvet, Stephen C; David Hwang; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling...

  18. The triterpenoid CDDO limits inflammation in preclinical models of cystic fibrosis lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, David P.; Ziady, Assem G.; Shank, Samuel L.; Eastman, Jean F.; Davis, Pamela B.

    2009-01-01

    Excessive inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is a contributor to progressive pulmonary decline. Effective and well-tolerated anti-inflammatory therapy may preserve lung function, thereby improving quality and length of life. In this paper, we assess the anti-inflammatory effects of the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) in preclinical models of CF airway inflammation. In our experiments, mice carrying the R117H Cftr mutation have sig...

  19. VEGF is deposited in the subepithelial matrix at the leading edge of branching airways and stimulates neovascularization in the murine embryonic lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, A M; Morgenthau, L; Zhu, X; Farber, H W; Cardoso, W V

    2000-11-01

    We used whole lung cultures as a model to study blood vessel formation in vitro and to examine the role that epithelial-mesenchymal interactions play during embryonic pulmonary vascular development. Mouse lungs were isolated at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) and cultured for up to 4 days prior to blood vessel analysis. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM/CD31) and thrombomodulin (TM/CD141) immunolocalization demonstrate that vascular development occurs in lung cultures. The vascular structures identified in lung cultures first appear as a loosely associated plexus of capillary-like structures that with time surround the airways. To investigate the potential role of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) during pulmonary neovascularization, we immunolocalized VEGF in embryonic lungs. Our data demonstrate that VEGF is uniformly present in the airway epithelium and the subepithelial matrix of E11.5 lungs. At later time points, E13.5 and E15.5, VEGF is no longer detected in the proximal airways, but is restricted to the branching tips of airways in the distal lung. RT-PCR analysis reveals that VEGF(164) is the predominant isoform expressed in lung cultures. Grafting heparin-bound VEGF(164) beads onto lung explants locally stimulates a marked neovascular response within 48 hr in culture. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR reveals an 18% increase in PECAM mRNA in VEGF(164)-treated whole lung cultures as compared with untreated cultures. The restricted temporal and spatial expression of VEGF suggests that matrix-associated VEGF links airway branching with blood vessel formation by stimulating neovascularization at the leading edge of branching airways. PMID:11066091

  20. Cigarette Smoke Activates the Proto-Oncogene c-Src to Promote Airway Inflammation and Lung Tissue Destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew; Foronjy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src...

  1. Interleukin-33 from Monocytes Recruited to the Lung Contributes to House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroki; Takahashi, Koichiro; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Kato, Go; Kurata, Keigo; Kimura, Shinya; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-33 (IL-33) activates group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), resulting in T-helper-2 inflammation in bronchial asthma. Airway epithelial cells were reported as sources of IL-33 during apoptosis and necrosis. However, IL-33 is known to be from sources other than airway epithelial cells such as leukocytes, and the mechanisms of IL-33 production and release are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of IL-33 production by monocytes in airway inflammation. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with a house dust mite (HDM) preparation. Airway inflammation was assessed by quantifying inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) levels in lung. Immunohistochemistry for IL-33 in lung sections was also performed. Ly6c, CD11b, and CD11c expression was examined by flow cytometry. Clodronate liposomes were used in the HDM-airway inflammation model to deplete circulating monocytes. Results The IL-33, but not IL-25 or TSLP, level in lung homogenates was markedly increased in HDM mice compared to control mice. IL-33-positive cells in the lungs were identified using immunohistochemistry and were increased in areas surrounding bronchi and vasculature. Furthermore, IL-33 levels were increased in mononuclear cells derived from lungs of HDM mice compared to controls. The expression of Ly6c in mononuclear cells was significantly higher in HDM mice than in controls. Treatment with clodronate liposomes led to inhibition of not only inflammatory cells in BAL fluid, airway hyper reactivity and Th2 cytokines in lung, but also IL-33 in lung. Conclusion IL-33 from monocytes recruited to the lung may contribute to the pathogenesis of HDM-induced airway inflammation. PMID:27310495

  2. Interleukin-33 from Monocytes Recruited to the Lung Contributes to House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tashiro

    Full Text Available Interleukin-33 (IL-33 activates group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2, resulting in T-helper-2 inflammation in bronchial asthma. Airway epithelial cells were reported as sources of IL-33 during apoptosis and necrosis. However, IL-33 is known to be from sources other than airway epithelial cells such as leukocytes, and the mechanisms of IL-33 production and release are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of IL-33 production by monocytes in airway inflammation.BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with a house dust mite (HDM preparation. Airway inflammation was assessed by quantifying inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP levels in lung. Immunohistochemistry for IL-33 in lung sections was also performed. Ly6c, CD11b, and CD11c expression was examined by flow cytometry. Clodronate liposomes were used in the HDM-airway inflammation model to deplete circulating monocytes.The IL-33, but not IL-25 or TSLP, level in lung homogenates was markedly increased in HDM mice compared to control mice. IL-33-positive cells in the lungs were identified using immunohistochemistry and were increased in areas surrounding bronchi and vasculature. Furthermore, IL-33 levels were increased in mononuclear cells derived from lungs of HDM mice compared to controls. The expression of Ly6c in mononuclear cells was significantly higher in HDM mice than in controls. Treatment with clodronate liposomes led to inhibition of not only inflammatory cells in BAL fluid, airway hyper reactivity and Th2 cytokines in lung, but also IL-33 in lung.IL-33 from monocytes recruited to the lung may contribute to the pathogenesis of HDM-induced airway inflammation.

  3. Sex differences in emphysema and airway disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camp, Pat G; Coxson, Harvey O; Levy, Robert D;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors of previous reports have suggested that women are more susceptible to cigarette smoke and to an airway-predominant COPD phenotype rather than an emphysema-predominant COPD phenotype. The purpose of this study was to test for sex differences in COPD phenotypes by using high...

  4. Exposure-related diffuse lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Cecile S; Lynch, David A; Cool, Carlyne D

    2008-12-01

    Practicing pulmonologists are often faced with the question of whether a lung disease is related to something in the patient's workplace, home, or recreational environment. Recognizing a lung disease as exposure related creates both opportunities and obligations for clinicians. In addition to managing the patient, the obligation to consider risks to others and to prevent ongoing exposure is a challenge that requires diagnostic clarity and collaboration between multiple specialists. We present five illustrative case studies of patients with diffuse lung diseases from environmental and occupational exposures in which communication between the pulmonologist, radiologist, and pathologist was essential for both medical and public health management. Diagnostic and treatment strategies as well as social and preventive interventions are reviewed, with key points for the practicing pulmonologist. PMID:19221960

  5. Obstructive lung disease in acute medical patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Seemungal, T.; Harrinarine, R.; Rios, M.; Abiraj, V.; Ali, A.; Lacki, N.; Mahabir, N.; Ramoutar, V.; King, C. P.; Bhowmik, A.; Wedzicha, J A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of adult medical patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using the Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD), and its relation to vascular disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted to acute medical wards. Interviewer administered questionnaire, anthropometric and spirometric measurements were done. RESULTS: Spirometry was performed in 720 acute admissio...

  6. Living near a Major Road in Beijing: Association with Lower Lung Function, Airway Acidification, and Chronic Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhan-Wei; Zhao, Yan-Ni; Cheng, Yuan; Guo, Cui-Yan; Wang, Xi; Li, Nan; Liu, Jun-Qing; Kang, Hui; Xia, Guo-Guang; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Ping-Ji; Ma, Jing; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Su, Li; Wang, Guang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of near-road pollution on lung function in China have not been well studied. We aimed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution on lung function, airway inflammation, and respiratory symptoms. Methods: We enrolled 1003 residents aged 57.96 ± 8.99 years living in the Shichahai Community in Beijing. Distances between home addresses and the nearest major roads were measured to calculate home-road distance. We used the distance categories 1, 2, and 3, representing 200 m, respectively, as the dose indicator for traffic-related air pollution exposure. Lung function, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, and interleukin 6 levels were measured. As a follow-up, 398 participants had a second lung function assessment about 3 years later, and lung function decline was also examined as an outcome. We used regression analysis to assess the impacts of home-road distance on lung function and respiratory symptoms. As the EBC biomarker data were not normally distributed, we performed correlation analysis between home-road distance categories and EBC biomarkers. Results: Participants living a shorter distance from major roads had lower percentage of predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1% −1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.20 to −2.89). The odds ratio for chronic cough was 2.54 (95% CI: 1.57–4.10) for category 1 and 1.97 (95% CI: 1.16–3.37) for category 2, compared with category 3. EBC pH was positively correlated with road distance (rank correlation coefficient of Spearman [rs] = 0.176, P air pollution in people who live near major roads in Beijing is associated with lower lung function, airway acidification, and a higher prevalence of chronic cough. EBC pH is a potential useful biomarker for evaluating air pollution exposure. PMID:27625090

  7. Towards the modeling of mucus draining from human lung: role of airways deformation on air-mucus interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eMauroy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chest physiotherapy is an empirical technique used to help secretions to get out of the lung whenever stagnation occurs. Although commonly used, little is known about the inner mechanisms of chest physiotherapy and controversies about its use are coming out regularly. Thus, a scientific validation of chest physiotherapy is needed to evaluate its effects on secretions.We setup a quasi-static numerical model of chest physiotherapy based on thorax and lung physiology and on their respective biophysics. We modeled the lung with an idealized deformable symmetric bifurcating tree. Bronchi and their inner fluids mechanics are assumed axisymmetric. Static data from the literature is used to build a model for the lung's mechanics. Secretions motion is the consequence of the shear constraints apply by the air flow. The input of the model is the pressure on the chest wall at each time, and the output is the bronchi geometry and air and secretions properties. In the limit of our model, we mimicked manual and mechanical chest physiotherapy techniques. We show that for secretions to move, air flow has to be high enough to overcome secretion resistance to motion. Moreover, the higher the pressure or the quicker it is applied, the higher is the air flow and thus the mobilization of secretions. However, pressures too high are efficient up to a point where airways compressions prevents air flow to increase any further. Generally, the first effects of manipulations is a decrease of the airway tree hydrodynamic resistance, thus improving ventilation even if secretions do not get out of the lungs. Also, some secretions might be pushed deeper into the lungs; this effect is stronger for high pressures and for mechanical chest physiotherapy. Finally, we propose and tested two adimensional numbers that depend on lung properties and that allow to measure the efficiency and comfort of a manipulation.

  8. Non-invasive ventilation used as an adjunct to airway clearance treatments improves lung function during an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Dwyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: During an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, is non-invasive ventilation beneficial as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen? Design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty adults with moderate to severe cystic fibrosis lung disease and who were admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation. Intervention: Comprehensive inpatient care (control group compared to the same care with the addition of non-invasive ventilation during airway clearance treatments from Day 2 of admission until discharge (experimental group. Outcome measures: Lung function and subjective symptom severity were measured daily. Fatigue was measured at admission and discharge on the Schwartz Fatigue Scale from 7 (no fatigue to 63 (worst fatigue points. Quality of life and exercise capacity were also measured at admission and discharge. Length of admission and time to next hospital admission were recorded. Results: Analysed as the primary outcome, the experimental group had a greater rate of improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 than the control group, but this was not statistically significant (MD 0.13% predicted per day, 95% CI –0.03 to 0.28. However, the experimental group had a significantly higher FEV1 at discharge than the control group (MD 4.2% predicted, 95% CI 0.1 to 8.3. The experimental group reported significantly lower levels of fatigue on the Schwartz fatigue scale at discharge than the control group (MD 6 points, 95% CI 1 to 11. There was no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in subjective symptom severity, quality of life, exercise capacity, length of hospital admission or time to next hospital admission. Conclusion: Among people hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, the use of non-invasive ventilation as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen significantly improves FEV1 and fatigue. Trial

  9. Diffuse interstitial lung disease: overlaps and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Simon L.F.; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Histopathological analysis of lung biopsy material allows the diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias; however, the strength of this diagnosis is sometimes subverted by interobserver variation and sampling. The American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society recommendations of 2002 provide a framework for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and proposed an integrated clinical, radiological and histopathological approach. These recommendations represent a break with tradition by replacing the 'gold standard' of histopathology with the combined 'silver standards' of clinical, imaging and histopathological information. One of the pitfalls of a rigid classification system for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is its failure to accommodate the phenomenon of overlapping disease patterns. This article reviews the various ways that interstitial lung disease may be classified and discusses their applicability. In addition the issue of overlap disease patterns is considered in the context of histopathological interobserver variation and sampling error and how a pigeonhole approach to disease classification may overlook these hybrid entities. (orig.)

  10. Early sensitisation and development of allergic airway disease - risk factors and predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    The development and phenotypic expression of allergic airway disease depends on a complex interaction between genetic and several environmental factors, such as exposure to food, inhalant allergens and non-specific adjuvant factors (e.g. tobacco smoke, air pollution and infections). The first...... development of allergic disease at birth. Early sensitisation, cow's milk allergy and atopic eczema are predictors for later development of allergic airway disease. Exposure to indoor allergens, especially house dust mite allergens, is a risk factor for sensitisation and development of asthma later in...

  11. Neuropeptide expression in the lungs in tuberculosis and sarcoidosis - comparisons with non-specific lung diseases and irradiated lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the proximal and distal bronchi was studied in humans with tuberculosis and sarcoidosis by use of radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemically. Sample from patients shows chronic obstructive disease (COPD), and irradiated lungs are also examinated. There were no statistical difference in VIP and NPY concentrations between the different patient groups. However, in eleven cases from all three groups of patients (out of in total 40) high contents of VIP in both segmental and lobar bronchi was observed. It's interesting, all the samples from patients showing market allergic manifestations exhibited high VIP levels. The SP levels were observed to be low or even to be undetectable in tuberculosis disordered tissue. There were fewer neuropeptide - immunoreactive nerve fibres in the 'affected' than in 'unaffected' sides of tuberculosis patients. Conclusions: There appear to be changes in the innervation pattern in tuberculosis affected lungs tissue, but not in response to sarcoidosis. Allergic airways manifestations and seems to correlate to high VIP level in bronchi. (author)

  12. Lung involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavec Goran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Systemic connective tissue diseases (SCTD are chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders of unknown cause that can involve different organs and systems. Their course and prognosis are different. All of them can, more or less, involve the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of respiratory symptoms, lung function disorders, radiography and high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT abnormalities, and their correlation with the duration of the disease and the applied treatment. Methods. In 47 non-randomized consecutive patients standard chest radiography, HRCT, and lung function tests were done. Results. Hypoxemia was present in nine of the patients with respiratory symptoms (20%. In all of them chest radiography was normal. In five of these patients lung fibrosis was established using HRCT. Half of all the patients with SCTD had symptoms of lung involvement. Lung function tests disorders of various degrees were found in 40% of the patients. The outcome and the degree of lung function disorders were neither in correlation with the duration of SCTD nor with therapy used (p > 0.05 Spearmans Ro. Conclusion. Pulmonary fibrosis occurs in about 10% of the patients with SCTD, and possibly not due to the applied treatment regimens. Hypoxemia could be a sing of existing pulmonary fibrosis in the absence of disorders on standard chest radiography.

  13. CLINICAL PROFILE OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASES CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Gagiya Ashok K; Suthar Hemang N; Bhagat Gautam R

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are very few studies are done on interstitial lung diseases (ILD) in India. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 30 patients of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) proven interstitial lung diseases in tertiary care centre. Results: Most common etiological causes of ILD were occupational (46.62%), Rheumatoid Arthritis (13.32%), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (33.33 %). Majority were in age group 40-49 years (mean age-45.23 years) and 66.5% male patients. C...

  14. Vitronectin Expression in the Airways of Subjects with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M.; Abraham, Thomas; Ana M Herrera; Mario A Correa; Ortega, Jorge E; Paré, Peter D.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung dis...

  15. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  16. [The application of "preventive treatment theory" in chronic airway inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing-Cheng; Liu, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Ying

    2013-07-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as chronic airway inflammatory diseases, seriously threaten the health of human beings. Chinese medicine has obvious advantages in prevention and treatment of them. "Preventive treatment theory" is a sort summarization of preventive medicine in Chinese medicine. The theory is not only reflected at the disease prevention levels, also embodied in the active treatment and the rehabilitation process. It was especially deep and colorfully embodied in the prevention and treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD. In this paper,clarified were the prevention and treatment targets, ways of thinking and methods in different stages of asthma and COPD from various viewpoints including prevention before disease occurrence, treating disease at disease onset, preventing the aggravation once disease occurs, and consolidation after disease occurs. We hope to improve ways of thinking and prevention and treatment levels of bronchial asthma and COPD by Chinese medicine. PMID:24063226

  17. Diffuse Cystic Lung Diseases: Diagnostic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai-Feng; Feng, Ruie; Cui, Han; Tian, Xinlun; Wang, Hanping; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Weihong; Lo, Bee Hong

    2016-06-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease (DCLD) is a group of heterogeneous diseases that present as diffuse cystic changes in the lung on computed tomography of the chest. Most DCLD diseases are rare, although they might resemble common diseases such as emphysema and bronchiectasis. Main causes of DCLD include lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, amyloidosis, light-chain deposition disease, Sjögren syndrome, and primary or metastatic neoplasm. We discuss clinical factors that are helpful in the differential diagnosis of DCLDsuch as sex and age, symptoms and signs, extrapulmonary presentations, cigarette smoking, and family history. Investigations for DCLD include high-resolution computed tomography, biochemical and histopathological studies, genetic tests, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoscopic and video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsies. A proposed diagnostic algorithm would enhance ease of diagnosing most cases of DCLD. PMID:27231867

  18. [Interstitial lung diseases. The pattern is important].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, L

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a number of rare entities with an estimated incidence of 10-25 per 100,000 inhabitants but the incidence greatly increases beyond the age of 65 years. The prognosis depends on the underlying cause. The fibrotic disorders show a set of radiological and histopathological patterns that are distinct but not entirely specific. In the absence of a clear clinical picture and consistent high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, patients are advised to undergo surgical lung biopsies from two or three lung lobes (or transbronchial biopsies) to determine the histopathological pattern. The ILDs are differentiated into disorders of known causes (e.g. collagen vascular disease, drug-related), idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), granulomatous ILDs (e.g. sarcoidosis) and other forms of ILD (e.g. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis). The IIPs encompass idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), non-specific interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, cryptogen organizing pneumonia, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia. Additionally, a category of unclassified interstitial pneumonia exists. The pathologist has to recognize and address the histopathological pattern. In a multidisciplinary discussion the disorder is allocated to a clinicopathological entity and the histopathological pattern plays a major role in the classification of the entity. Recognition of the underlying pattern and the respective histopathological differential diagnoses is important as the therapy varies depending on the cause and ranges from elimination of the stimulus (if possible) to antifibrotic drug therapy up to preparation for lung transplantation.

  19. Challenges in pulmonary fibrosis · 3: Cystic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Frankel, Stephen K.; Kevin K. Brown

    2007-01-01

    Cystic lung disease is a frequently encountered problem caused by a diverse group of diseases. Distinguishing true cystic lung disease from other entities, such as cavitary lung disease and emphysema, is important given the differing prognostic implications. In this paper the features of the cystic lung diseases are reviewed and contrasted with their mimics, and the clinical and radiographic features of both diffuse (pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis) and f...

  20. Stem Cell and Biological Interventions to treat Allergic Airway Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Heather

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate immune modulation with a particular focus on airway inflammation and allergic pathogenesis. This was probed in a model of pathogen driven immunomodulation (B. pertussis), and two models of therapeutic intervention namely immunisation (attenuated B. pertussis, BPZE1) or using a candidate cell therapy approach (mesenchymal stem cells, MSC). This work demonstrated that, in contrast to virulent B. pertussis, an attenuated, candidate vaccin...

  1. Radioaerosol lung scanning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a coordinated research project of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a multicentre joint study on radioaerosol lung scan using the BARC nebulizer has prospectively been carried out during 1988-1992 with the participation of 10 member countries in Asia [Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand]. The study was designed so that it would primarily cover chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the other related and common pulmonary diseases. The study also included normal controls and asymptomatic smokers. The purposes of this presentation are three fold: firstly, to document the usefulness of the nebulizer and the validity of user's protocol in imaging COPD and other lung diseases; secondly, to discuss scan features of the individual COPD and other disorders studied and thirdly, to correlate scan alterations with radiographic findings. Before proceeding with a systematic analysis of aerosol scan patterns in the disease groups, we documented normal pattern. The next step was the assessment of scan features in those who had been smoking for more than several years but had no symptoms or signs referable to airways. The lung diseases we analyzed included COPD [emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma and bronchiectasis], bronchial obstruction, compensatory overinflation and other common lung diseases such as lobar pneumonia, tuberculosis, interstitial fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, lung edema and primary and metastatic lung cancers. Lung embolism, inhalation bums and glue-sniffer's lung are separately discussed by Dr. Sundram of Singapore elsewhere in this book. The larger portion of this chapter is allocated to the discussion of COPD with a special effort made in sorting out differential scan features. Diagnostic criteria in individual COPD were defined for each category of disease and basic clinical symptoms and signs and pertinent laboratory data as well as radiographic manifestations are

  2. Normal expiratory flow rate and lung volumes in patients with combined emphysema and interstitial lung disease: A case series and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Heathcote, Karen L; Donald W Cockcroft; Fladeland, Derek A.; Fenton, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a sma...

  3. Legionnaire disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Legionnaire disease is an infection of the lungs and airways. It is caused by Legionella bacteria. Causes The bacteria that cause Legionnaire disease have ...

  4. Anesthetic techniques to facilitate lung lavage for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children-new airway techniques and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Caroline A; Wilmshurst, Sally L; Black, Ann E

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis require whole lung lavage to clear the accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material within the alveoli, to maintain respiratory function. Anesthesia for this presents a challenge due to preexisting respiratory failure, and the small diameter and length of the pediatric airway, which is often unable to accommodate existing one-lung isolation and ventilation equipment. Novel techniques to facilitate lung lavage on seven occasions are described and placed in the context of the existing literature to date. PMID:25664978

  5. Increased expression of senescence markers in cystic fibrosis airways

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Bernard M.; Wong, Jessica K.; Degan, Simone; Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Zheng, Shuo; Haridass, Prashamsha; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by chronic neutrophilic airway inflammation and increased levels of neutrophil elastase (NE) in the airways. We have previously reported that NE treatment triggers cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest can lead to senescence, a complete loss of replicative capacity. Importantly, senescent cells can be proinflammatory and would perpetuate CF chronic inflammation. By immunohistochemistry, we evaluated whether airway sections from CF an...

  6. Interstitial lung disease in the connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antin-Ozerkis, Danielle; Rubinowitz, Ami; Evans, Janine; Homer, Robert J; Matthay, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    The connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are inflammatory, immune-mediated disorders in which interstitial lung disease (ILD) is common and clinically important. Interstitial lung disease may be the first manifestation of a CTD in a previously healthy patient. CTD-associated ILD frequently presents with the gradual onset of cough and dyspnea, although rarely may present with fulminant respiratory failure. Infection and drug reaction should always be ruled out. A diagnosis of idiopathic ILD should never be made without a careful search for subtle evidence of underlying CTD. Treatment of CTD-ILD typically includes corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents.

  7. Airway shape assessment with visual feed-back in asthma and obstructive diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetita, Catalin; Ortner, Margarete; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Ould Hmeidi, Yahya; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2010-02-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma patients has been studied in vivo by means of endobronchial biopsies allowing to assess structural and inflammatory changes. However, this technique remains relatively invasive and difficult to use in longitudinal trials. The development of alternative non-invasive tests, namely exploiting high-resolution imaging modalities such as MSCT, is gaining interest in the medical community. This paper develops a fullyautomated airway shape assessment approach based on the 3D segmentation of the airway lumen from MSCT data. The objective is to easily notify the radiologist on bronchus shape variations (stenoses, bronchiectasis) along the airway tree during a simple visual investigation. The visual feed-back is provided by means of a volumerendered color coding of the airway calibers which are robustly defined and computed, based on a specific 3D discrete distance function able to deal with small size structures. The color volume rendering (CVR) information is further on reinforced by the definition and computation of a shape variation index along the airway medial axis enabling to detect specific configurations of stenoses. Such cases often occur near bifurcations (bronchial spurs) and they are either missed in the CVR or difficult to spot due to occlusions by other segments. Consequently, all detected shape variations (stenoses, dilations and thickened spurs) can be additionally displayed on the medial axis and investigated together with the CVR information. The proposed approach was evaluated on a MSCT database including twelve patients with severe or moderate persistent asthma, or severe COPD, by analyzing segmental and subsegmental bronchi of the right lung. The only CVR information provided for a limited number of views allowed to detect 78% of stenoses and bronchial spurs in these patients, whereas the inclusion of the shape variation index enabled to complement the missing information.

  8. Leukocyte trafficking in alveoli and airway passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerschuk Claire M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many pulmonary diseases preferentially affect the large airways or the alveoli. Although the mechanisms are often particular to each disease process, site-specific differences in leukocyte trafficking and the regulation of inflammation also occur. Differences in the process of margination, sequestration, adhesion, and migration occur that can be attributed to differences in anatomy, hemodynamics, and the expression of proteins. The large airways are nourished by the bronchial circulation, whereas the pulmonary circulation feeds the distal lung parenchyma. The presence of different cell types in large airways from those in alveoli might contribute to site-specific differences in the molecular regulation of the inflammatory process.

  9. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-asthma lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Morehead

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder in Western countries, and its relationship to airways disorders (e.g. asthma has been well established. Lung diseases other than asthma have also been associated with GERD, but the nature and scope of this relationship has not been fully defined. Diseases that have been associated with GERD include bronchiolitis syndromes, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma and nontubercular mycobacterial infection. Diagnostic evaluation centres upon proving both reflux and pulmonary aspiration, which may be accomplished in some cases by lung biopsy. However, in many cases a compatible clinical and radiographic picture coupled with proof of proximal reflux by combined oesophageal probe testing may suffice for a provisional diagnosis and allow institution of anti-reflux measures. Proton-pump inhibitors are the medications of choice for GERD; other interventions shown to reduce reflux are weight loss, elevation of the head of the bed and avoidance of recumbency after meals. However, acid suppression therapy does not address non-acid reflux that may be important in disease pathogenesis in select patients, and lifestyle modifications often fail. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the procedure of choice for medically refractory GERD with excellent short-term results with respect to respiratory symptoms associated with GERD; however, long-term studies document a significant percentage of patients requiring ongoing acid suppression therapy.

  10. Protein misfolding and obstructive lung disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has evolved a number of mechanisms to manage the accumulation of incorrectly folded proteins. This results in loss of function of these proteins, but occasionally, in conditions such as α-1 antitrpysin (A1AT) deficiency, the misfolded protein can acquire a toxic gain of function promoting exaggerated ER stress responses and inflammation. Mutations leading to deficiency in a second serine proteinase inhibitor, α-1 antichymotrpysin (ACT), can induce potentially similar consequences. A1AT and ACT deficiencies are associated with chronic obstructive lung disease. Until recently, it was thought that the lung diseases associated with these conditions were entirely due to loss of antiprotease protection in the lung (i.e., loss of function), whereas gain of function was the major cause of the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency. This paradigm is being increasingly challenged because ER stress is being recognized in bronchial epithelial cells and inflammatory cells normally resident in the lung, giving rise to an inflammatory phenotype that adds to the proteolytic burden associated with these conditions. In this article, we describe the cellular mechanisms that are activated to cope with an increasing burden of misfolded proteins within the ER in A1AT and ACT deficiency, show how these events are linked to inflammation, and outline the therapeutic strategies that can potentially interfere with production of misfolded proteins.

  11. Rare lung diseases I--Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM); subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia. LAM is a rare, progressive and (without intervention) often fatal interstitial lung disease that predominantly affects women of childbearing age. LAM is characterized by progressive interstitial infiltration of the lung by smooth muscle cells, resulting in diffuse cystic changes of the lung parenchyma. The molecular basis of this disorder has been delineated over the past five years and LAM is now known to be a consequence of mutations in the tuberous sclerosis genes. This knowledge, combined with advances in our understanding of the signalling pathways regulated by these genes, has given rise to potential molecular therapies that hold great promise for treating this devastating disease. PMID:17036091

  12. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF LUNG STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF THE AIRWAYS OF GUINEA PIGS AFTER LONG-TERM EXPOSURE WITH NANOSIZED MAGNETITE A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Abramenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of study, in which we examined the influence of nanosized magnetite on breath organs histological structure and contractility activity of the airways of guinea pigs by method of mechanography has been presented. In the lungs of experimental animals an inflammatory response developed as a result of long-term inhalation intake of nanosized magnetite. Also the functional status of the airways changed and appeared as changing of amplitude of contractility response under the action of histamine.

  14. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Kristine Dames da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm as well as values for the inspiration (Zi and expiration cycles (Ze at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi and expiration (Zbe, respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p90%. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2 this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3 the within-breath forced oscillation technique may provide novel parameters that facilitate the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  15. Response to Commentary on "The influence of lung airways branching structure and diffusion time on measurements and models of short-range 3He gas MR diffusion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-02-01

    Our extensive investigation of the cylinder model theory through numerical modelling and purpose-designed experiments has demonstrated that it does produce inaccurate estimates of airway dimensions at all diffusion times currently used. This is due to a variety of effects: incomplete treatment of non-Gaussian effects, finite airway size, branching geometry, background susceptibility gradients and diffusion time dependence of the (3)He MR diffusion behaviour in acinar airways. The cylinder model is a good starting point for the development of a lung morphometry technique from (3)He diffusion MR but its limitations need to be understood and documented in the interest of reliable clinical interpretation. PMID:24342570

  16. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S. [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Medicine; Wong, Y. [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5{+-}13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively.

  17. AGER -429T/C is associated with an increased lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Beucher

    Full Text Available The clinical course of cystic fibrosis (CF varies between patients bearing identical CFTR mutations, suggesting the involvement of modifier genes. We assessed the association of lung disease severity with the variant AGER -429 T/C, coding for RAGE, a pro-inflammatory protein, in CF patients from the French CF Gene Modifier Study. We analyzed the lung function of 967 CF patients p.Phe508del homozygous. FEV(1 was analyzed as CF-specific percentile adjusted on age, height and mortality. AGER -429T/C polymorphism was genotyped and its function was evaluated in vitro by measurement of the luciferase activity. AGER -429 minor allele (C was associated with poorer lung function (p = 0.03. In vitro, the promoter activity was higher in cells transfected with AGER -429C compared to cells transfected with the AGER -429T allele (p = 0.016 in BEAS-2B cells. AGER seems to be a modifier gene of lung disease severity in CF, and could be an interesting biomarker of CF airway inflammation. The functional promoter AGER -429C variant is associated with an increased RAGE expression that can lead to an increased lung inflammation and a more severe lung disease.

  18. Role of surfactant protein A in non-infectious lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a large multimeric protein found in the airways and alveoli of the lungs. SP-A is a member of the collectin family of proteins, characterized by NH2-terminal collagen-like regions and COOH-terminal lectin domains. Although other surfactant proteins such as SP-B function to reduce surface tension in the lungs, SP-A as well as SP-D regulates the pulmonary immune response. To date, a number of studies have shown the immunoregulatory function of SP-A, mainly in the field of infectious diseases. By binding to a wide variety of pathogens, SP-A opsonizes and enhances pathogen uptake by phagocytes. In addition to the effect on pathogens, recent studies have shown that SP-A also modulates lung immune system in the area of non-infectious lung diseases. In this review, the potential role of SP-A in the multiple aspects of pulmonary host defense will be discussed, focusing mainly on non-infectious lung diseases such as acute and chronic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. J. Med. Invest. 61: 1-6, February, 2014. PMID:24705741

  19. Aeroparticles, Composition, and Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Falcon-Rodriguez, Carlos I.; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past 60 years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently particulate matter (PM) is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics, and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution...

  20. FEV 6 as screening tool in spirometric diagnosis of obstructive airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malolan P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The use of spirometry is currently limited to the diagnosis of obstructive airway disease for tertiary centers mainly because of the unmet need for technical expertise and funding. Use in primary care asks for a simpler and cost-effective screening tool for obstructive airway disease. Aim: To estimate the efficacy of FEV 6 against the current standard of FVC in the spirometric diagnosis of obstructive airway disease. Setting and Design: The Pulmonary Function Laboratory of a tertiary care hospital in Coastal South India. It was a descriptive study. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 150 serial patients on ATS standardized spirometers. The patients were classified into normal subjects and those with airway obstruction, further categorized as mild, moderate and severe and those with mixed defect. Those with obstruction were also classified as having reversible and irreversible defects. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using SPSS Software (v.11.5, statistical test ANOVA and Pearson correlation was done and P less than 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: FVC and FEV 6 showed a linear correlation in all subjects. The difference in means was statistically significant in all subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of FEV 1 /FEV 6 in comparison to FEV 1 /FVC were both found to be 100%. Conclusion: FEV 6 is an excellent screening tool in the diagnosis of airway obstruction but, there is a necessity for further research to confirm our findings. There is also a need for reference values in an Indian setting to find out the efficiency of this new parameter. Our sample size is relatively small and comprises of a very high proportion (70% of subjects with airway obstruction and so our results may not be applicable for use in general population.

  1. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lung function and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Lange, Peter; Bojesen, Stig Egil;

    2014-01-01

    25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk o...

  2. Association between airway obstruction and peripheral arterial stiffness in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付志方

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between se-verity of airway obstruction and peripheral arterial stiffness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD).Methods 81 COPD patients[aged(78.32±6.98)yrs,73 males,8 females]from Jan2008 to Oct 2012 were enrolled in Geriatric Department

  3. Outgrowth of the Bacterial Airway Microbiome after Rhinovirus Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molyneaux, Philip L; Patrick Mallia; Cox, Michael J.; Joseph Footitt; Willis-Owen, Saffron A.G.; Daniel Homola; Maria-Belen Trujillo-Torralbo; Sarah Elkin; Onn Min Kon; Cookson, William O. C.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Rhinovirus infection is followed by significantly increased frequencies of positive, potentially pathogenic sputum cultures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear whether these represent de novo infections or an increased load of organisms from the complex microbial communities (microbiome) in the lower airways.

  4. [HRCT patterns of the most important interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases are a mixed group of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases which can have an acute or chronic course. Idiopathic diseases and diseases with an underlying cause (e.g. collagen vascular diseases) share the same patterns. Thin section computed tomography (CT) plays a central role

  5. The Rabbit as a Model for Studying Lung Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurfatin Asyikhin Kamaruzaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No single animal model can reproduce all of the human features of both acute and chronic lung diseases. However, the rabbit is a reliable model and clinically relevant facsimile of human disease. The similarities between rabbits and humans in terms of airway anatomy and responses to inflammatory mediators highlight the value of this species in the investigation of lung disease pathophysiology and in the development of therapeutic agents. The inflammatory responses shown by the rabbit model, especially in the case of asthma, are comparable with those that occur in humans. The allergic rabbit model has been used extensively in drug screening tests, and this model and humans appear to be sensitive to similar drugs. In addition, recent studies have shown that the rabbit serves as a good platform for cell delivery for the purpose of stem-cell-based therapy.

  6. Rare lung diseases I – Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juvet, Stephen C; David Hwang; Downey, Gregory P.

    2006-01-01

    The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM); subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alph...

  7. Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the major source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for airway hyperresponsiveness, remodeling and lung inflammatory responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothenberg Marc E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginase is significantly upregulated in the lungs in murine models of asthma, as well as in human asthma, but its role in allergic airway inflammation has not been fully elucidated in mice. Results In order to test the hypothesis that arginase has a role in allergic airway inflammation we generated arginase I-deficient bone marrow (BM chimeric mice. Following transfer of arginase I-deficient BM into irradiated recipient mice, arginase I expression was not required for hematopoietic reconstitution and baseline immunity. Arginase I deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells decreased allergen-induced lung arginase by 85.8 ± 5.6%. In contrast, arginase II-deficient mice had increased lung arginase activity following allergen challenge to a similar level to wild type mice. BM-derived arginase I was not required for allergen-elicited sensitization, recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lung, and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and collagen deposition were similar in arginase-deficient and wild type mice. Additionally, arginase II-deficient mice respond similarly to their control wild type mice with allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, proliferation and collagen deposition. Conclusion Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the predominant source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness or collagen deposition.

  8. Role of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SayedMehran Marashian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are identified as novel population of hematopoietic cells which protect the body by coordinating the innate immune response against a wide range of threats including infections, tissue damages and homeostatic disturbances. ILCs, particularly ILC2 cells, are found throughout the body including the brain. ILCs are morphologically similar to lymphocytes, express and release high levels of T-helper (Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines but do not express classical cell-surface markers that are associated with other immune cell lineages.Three types of ILCs (ILC1, 2 & 3 have been reported depending upon the cytokines produced. ILC1 cells encompass natural killer (NK cells and interferon (IFN-g releasing cells; ILC2 cells release the Th2 cytokines, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 in response to IL-25 and IL-33; and ILC3 cells which release IL-17 and IL-22. ILC2 cells have been implicated inmucosal reactions occurring in animal models of allergic asthma and virus-induced lung disorders resulting in the regulation of airway remodeling and tissue homeostasis.There is evidence for increased ILC2 cell numbers in allergic responses in man but little is known about the role of ILCs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Further understanding of the characteristics of ILCs such as their origin, location and phenotypes and function would help to clarify the role of these cells in the pathogenesis of various lung diseases.In this review we will focus on the role of ILC2 cells and consider their origin, function,location and possible role in the pathogenesis of the chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma and COPD.   

  9. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia;

    2012-01-01

    inflammation in asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease raises an alternative possibility that airway inflammation is promoted by non-neuronal TRPA1.By using Real-Time PCR and calcium imaging, we found that cultured human airway cells, including fibroblasts, epithelial and smooth muscle cells express...... activation orchestrates an additional inflammatory response which is not neurogenic. This finding suggests that non-neuronal TRPA1 in the airways is functional and potentially capable of contributing to inflammatory airway diseases....... functional TRPA1 channels. By using immunohistochemistry, TRPA1 staining was observed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells in sections taken from human airways and lung, and from airways and lung of wild-type, but not TRPA1-deficient mice. In cultured human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells...

  10. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption. PMID:27104378

  11. Screening older patients for obstructive airways disease in a semi-rural practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, J.; Meaker, M; Searle, M.; Ratcliffe, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Obstructive airways disease in older patients is reported to be not only common, but frequently overlooked and untreated by general practitioners. This study examines the value of screening elderly patients in a large semi-rural general practice for potentially treatable asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
METHODS—A random sample of 353 patients aged 60-75 years attended a nurse run screening clinic for pulmonary function testing, serial pe...

  12. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Kristine Dames da Silva; Alvaro Camilo Dias Faria; Agnaldo José Lopes; Pedro Lopes de Melo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy indi...

  13. Update on the roles of distal airways in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This review is the summary of a workshop on the role of distal airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which took place in 2009 in Vence, France. The evidence showing inflammation and remodelling in distal airways and the possible involvement of these in the pathobiology, physiology, clinical manifestations and natural history of COPD were examined. The usefulness and limitations of physiological tests and imaging techniques for assessing distal airways abnormalities were evaluated. Ex vivo studies in isolated lungs and invasive measurements of airway resistance in living individuals have revealed that distal airways represent the main site of airflow limitation in COPD. Structural changes in small conducting airways, including increased wall thickness and obstruction by muco-inflammatory exudates, and emphysema (resulting in premature airway closure, were important determinants of airflow limitation. Infiltration of small conducting airways by phagocytes (macrophages and neutrophils, dendritic cells and T and B lymphocytes increased with airflow limitation. Distal airways abnormalities were associated with patient-related outcomes (e.g. dyspnoea and reduced health-related quality of life and with the natural history of the disease, as reflected by lung function decline and mortality. These data provide a clear rationale for targeting distal airways in COPD.

  14. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Caminati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs, particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed “out-of-proportion” PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs.

  17. The association between combined non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Wook Kim,1 Kwang-Nam Jin,2 Eun Young Heo,3 Sung Soo Park,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Deog Kyeom Kim31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Whereas the epidemiological association between lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease, is well known, limited studies have examined the association between lung cancer and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, a representative chronic airway inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the association between bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with COPD.Methods: A matched case–control study was conducted in a referral hospital in South Korea. Among COPD patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity <0.7 and forced expiratory volume in one second ≤70% [% predicted] who underwent chest computed tomography (CT between January 1, 2010 and May 30, 2013, patients with lung cancer and controls matched for age, sex, and smoking history were selected. The risk of lung cancer was assessed according to the presence of underlying bronchiectasis confirmed by chest CT.Results: The study enrolled 99 cases and 198 controls. Combined bronchiectasis on chest CT was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12–0.52, P<0.001. Significant associations were found in

  18. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Olsson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberc

  19. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » Treatment of lung carcinoid, by type and extent of disease Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  20. Airway hyperresponsiveness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : A marker of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tkacova, Ruzena; Dai, Darlene L Y; Vonk, Judith M; Leung, Janice M; Hiemstra, Pieter S; van den Berge, Maarten; Kunz, Lisette; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Tashkin, Donald; Wise, Robert; Connett, John; Ng, Raymond; McManus, Bruce; Paul Man, S F; Postma, Dirkje S; Sin, Don D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of airway hyperreactivity (AHR) on respiratory mortality and systemic inflammation among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is largely unknown. We used data from 2 large studies to determine the relationship between AHR and FEV1 decline, respiratory mor

  1. Interleukin-19: a constituent of the regulome that controls antigen presenting cells in the lungs and airway responses to microbial products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+ alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/- mice were studied at baseline (naïve and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2 expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T

  2. Blue Journal Conference. Aging and Susceptibility to Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Murthy, Mahadev; Balch, William E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie; White, Eric S.; Levy, Bruce D.; Busse, Paula J; Tuder, Rubin M.; Veena B Antony; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Budinger, G. R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the population in the United States and throughout the developed world has increased morbidity and mortality attributable to lung disease, while the morbidity and mortality from other prevalent diseases has declined or remained stable. Recognizing the importance of aging in the development of lung disease, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) highlighted this topic as a core theme for the 2014 annual meeting. The relationship between aging and lung disease was discussed in several...

  3. Epidemiology and diagnostic assessment of interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Thomeer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases affect the parenchyma of the lung including the pulmonary alveolar epithelium, the capillary endothelium and the spaces between these structures, together with the tissues within the septa including the perivascular and perilymphatic tissues. Although the different interstitial lung diseases have rather similar clinical presentations with increasing shortness of breath, a restrictive lung function and a widespread shadowing on the chest radiograph, they comprise...

  4. Environmental and genetic risk factors and gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, R.; Gottlieb, D. J.; O'Connor, G T

    2000-01-01

    Current understanding of the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States, suggests that chronic inflammation leads to the airways obstruction and parenchymal destruction that characterize this condition. Environmental factors, especially tobacco smoke exposure, are known to accelerate longitudinal decline of lung function, and there is substantial evidence that upregulation of inflammatory pathways plays a ...

  5. Unclassifiable interstitial lung disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnik, Kate; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate classification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) requires a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates input from an experienced respirologist, chest radiologist and lung pathologist. Despite a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation, up to 15% of ILD patients have unclassifiable ILD and cannot be given a specific diagnosis. The objectives of this review are to discuss the definition and features of unclassifiable ILD, identify the barriers to ILD classification and outline an approach to management of unclassifiable ILD. Several recent studies have described the characteristics of these patients; however, there are inconsistencies in the definition and terminology of unclassifiable ILD due to limited research in this population. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate evaluation and management of patients with unclassifiable ILD.

  6. Unclassifiable interstitial lung disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnik, Kate; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate classification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) requires a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates input from an experienced respirologist, chest radiologist and lung pathologist. Despite a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation, up to 15% of ILD patients have unclassifiable ILD and cannot be given a specific diagnosis. The objectives of this review are to discuss the definition and features of unclassifiable ILD, identify the barriers to ILD classification and outline an approach to management of unclassifiable ILD. Several recent studies have described the characteristics of these patients; however, there are inconsistencies in the definition and terminology of unclassifiable ILD due to limited research in this population. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate evaluation and management of patients with unclassifiable ILD. PMID:26059704

  7. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed.

  8. Hazy increased density in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the significance of ground glass density on high-resolution CT scans of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other lung disorders, the authors have reviewed 200 high-resolution CT studies and found 50 cases demonstrating areas of hazy increased lung density. Disease entities most often associated with this finding included DIP, UIP, alveolar proteinosis, sarcoidosis, and bronchiolitis obliterans/ organizing pneumonia. Pathologic examination revealed either cellular or fluid material lining terminal air spaces, often associated with alveolar wall infiltration and an absence of fibrosis. Gallium scans and bronchoalveolar lavage in some cases showed active inflammation Follow-up high-resolution CT studies in 10 patients showed either change or resolution of the hazy densities, confirming the presence of a reversible parenchymal lesion

  9. Impaired activation of adenylyl cyclase in lung of the Basenji-greyhound model of airway hyperresponsiveness: decreased numbers of high affinity beta-adrenoceptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Emala, C. W.; Aryana, A.; Hirshman, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. To evaluate mechanisms involved in the impaired beta-adrenoceptor stimulation of adenylyl cyclase in tissues from the Basenji-greyhound (BG) dog model of airway hyperresponsiveness, we compared agonist and antagonist binding affinity of beta-adrenoceptors, beta-adrenoceptor subtypes, percentage of beta-adrenoceptors sequestered, and coupling of the beta-adrenoceptor to Gs alpha in lung membranes from BG and control mongrel dogs. We found that lung membranes from the BG dog had higher total...

  10. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  11. Excessive dynamic airway collapse in a small cohort of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Represas-Represas

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of collapse at each anatomic level was as follows: Aortic arch, 16.1% (SD, 13.6%; carina, 19.4% (SD, 15.9%; and bronchus intermedius, 21.7% (SD, 16.1%. At the point of maximal collapse, the percentage of collapse was 26.8% (SD, 16%. EDAC was demonstrated at any of the three anatomical points in five patients, corresponding to 9.4% (95% CI, 3.1% to 20.6% of the sample and affecting the three anatomical points in only two cases. A statistically significant correlation was only found with the total lung capacity (TLC. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of EDAC observed in a sample of patients with different levels of COPD severity is low. The degree of dynamic central airway collapse was not related to the patient′s epidemiological or clinical features, and did not affect lung function, symptoms, capacity for effort, or quality of life.

  12. New approaches to the modulation of inflammatory processes in airway disease models: ATS 2001, May 18-23, San Francisco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hele David J

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 97th American Thoracic Society meeting proved to be an excellent meeting, providing a wealth of new information on inflammatory diseases of the airways. Once again there appeared to be an increased emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with most of the major drug companies concentrating a large part of their efforts in this field. An assessment of the new British Thoracic Society guidelines, which are designed to promote better management of COPD, was also presented at the meeting. Potential new treatments for inflammatory diseases of the airways including COPD were described, ranging from phase III trial data with GlaxoSmithKline's PDE4 inhibitor, Cilomilast (Ariflo® to the development of AstraZeneca's novel dual dopamine D2-receptor/β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, Viozan™. Of particular interest was Byk Gulden's Ciclesonide, a new corticosteroid with equivalent efficacy to the market leaders but with an improved safety profile. The same company also presented data on their PDE4 inhibitor, Roflumilast, which is now in phase II/III. Bayer presented data on their PDE4 inhibitor, BAY 19-8004, in a smoking animal model and claimed greater anti-inflammatory efficacy than with a steroid. Asta Medica (now known as Elbion also described a new potent PDE4 inhibitor, AWD 12-281, with anti-inflammatory activity. In the bronchodilator field, an analysis of data from a one-year trial with Boehringer Ingelheim's Tiotropium revealed a possible improvement in lung function in COPD patients; this needs to be confirmed in a specifically designed study. Inhibitors of p38 (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and syk kinase were also discussed as anti-inflammatory agents with potential in the treatment of COPD and asthma. GlaxoSmithKline's p38 kinase inhibitor, SB 239063, appeared to be the most advanced of these with clinical data expected in two to three years. Lyn kinase was also discussed as a novel target for inflammatory airway diseases.

  13. Nitric oxide metabolites in cystic fibrosis lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Grasemann, H; Ioannidis, I.; Tomkiewicz, R; de Groot, H.; Rubin, B; Ratjen, F

    1998-01-01

    Although the activity of nitric oxide (NO) synthases are increased in lung tissue of patients with cystic fibrosis, the concentrations of nasal and exhaled NO have recently been found to be decreased in cystic fibrosis. This could either be due to reduced NO formation or metabolism of NO within airway fluids. In this study, the stable NO metabolites, nitrate and nitrite, were determined in the saliva and sputum of 18 stable cystic fibrosis patients, 21 cystic fibrosis pat...

  14. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  15. Selective targeting of TGF-β activation to treat fibroinflammatory airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J; Erle, David J; Reichardt, Louis F; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2014-06-18

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  16. Investigation of mucus transport in an idealized lung airway model using multiphase CFD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Rahul; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    Mucus, a Bingham fluid is transported in the pulmonary airways by consistent beating of the cilia and exhibits a wide range of physical properties in response to the core air flow and various pathological conditions. A better understanding of the interfacial instability is required as it plays a crucial role in gas transport, mixing, mucus clearance and drug delivery. In the current study, mucus is modelled as a Newtonian fluid and the two phase gas-liquid flow in the airways is investigated using an inhomogeneous Eulerian-Eulerian approach. The complex interface between the phases is tracked using the conventional VOF (Volume of Fluid) method. Results from our CFD simulations which are performed in idealized single and double bifurcation geometries will be presented and the influence of airflow rate, mucus layer thickness, mucus viscosity, airway geometry (branching & diameter) and surface tension on mucus flow behavior will be discussed. Mean mucus layer thickness, pressure drop due to momentum transfer & increased airway resistance, mucus transport speed and the flow morphology will be compared to existing experimental and theoretical data.

  17. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E.; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C.; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13–dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5–12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25897174

  18. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  19. CLINICAL PROFILE OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASES CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagiya Ashok K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are very few studies are done on interstitial lung diseases (ILD in India. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 30 patients of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT proven interstitial lung diseases in tertiary care centre. Results: Most common etiological causes of ILD were occupational (46.62%, Rheumatoid Arthritis (13.32%, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (33.33 %. Majority were in age group 40-49 years (mean age-45.23 years and 66.5% male patients. Common symptoms were breathlessness on exertion (100%, dry cough (43.29%, anorexia (50% and joint pain (16.65%. Clubbing and bilateral crepitations were present in 50% and 63.27% of patients respectively. X- ray chest showed reticulo-nodular pattern (60%. Restrictive pattern (96.57% was present in majority patients in spirometry. Conclusion: Availability of non-invasive investigations like HRCT chest has increased our early recognitions of ILDs. Association of ILD in patients with autoimmune diseases must be ruled out. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 2-4

  20. Genetic testing in diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spagnolo Paolo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD represent a diverse group of disorders affecting the distal lung parenchyma, specifically the tissue and spaces surrounding the alveoli, which may be filled with inflammatory cells, proliferating fibroblasts or established fibrosis, often leading to architectural distortion and impaired gas exchange. While the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are known or inferred for some DPLD (such as sarcoidosis, silicosis, drug reactions and collagen vascular diseases, the pathogenesis of the majority of these entities - particularly those characterized by progressive fibrosis - is poorly understood. Several lines of evidence indicate that the development of pulmonary fibrosis is genetically determined. They include: 1. familial clustering; 2. the occurrence of pulmonary fibrosis in the context of rare inherited disorders; 3. substantial variability in the development of pulmonary fibrosis amongst individuals exposed to organic or inorganic dusts; 4. difference in susceptibility to fibrogenic stimuli amongst inbred strains of mice. This review focuses on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and sarcoidosis, the two most common DPLD and the two entities for which there is stronger evidence of a genetic predisposition, although how aberrant genes interact with each other and with environmental factors, such as smoking in IPF and infectious agents in sarcoidosis, in determining disease susceptibility and clinical phenotypes is largely unknown. Finally, we discuss practical issues and implications for both patients and physicians of recent advances in the genetics of sarcoidosis and IPF.

  1. The impact of oil spill to lung health--Insights from an RNA-seq study of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Baddoo, Melody C; Flemington, Erik K; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, He

    2016-03-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (BP oil spill) in the Gulf of Mexico was a unique disaster event, where a huge amount of oil spilled from the sea bed and a large volume of dispersants were applied to clean the spill. The operation lasted for almost 3 months and involved >50,000 workers. The potential health hazards to these workers may be significant as previous research suggested an association of persistent respiratory symptoms with exposure to oil and oil dispersants. To reveal the potential effects of oil and oil dispersants on the respiratory system at the molecular level, we evaluated the transcriptomic profile of human airway epithelial cells grown under treatment of crude oil, the dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527, and oil-dispersant mixtures. We identified a very strong effect of Corexit 9500 treatment, with 84 genes (response genes) differentially expressed in treatment vs. control samples. We discovered an interactive effect of oil-dispersant mixtures; while no response gene was found for Corexit 9527 treatment alone, cells treated with Corexit 9527+oil mixture showed an increased number of response genes (46 response genes), suggesting a synergic effect of 9527 with oil on airway epithelial cells. Through GO (gene ontology) functional term and pathway-based analysis, we identified upregulation of gene sets involved in angiogenesis and immune responses and downregulation of gene sets involved in cell junctions and steroid synthesis as the prevailing transcriptomic signatures in the cells treated with Corexit 9500, oil, or Corexit 9500+oil mixture. Interestingly, these key molecular signatures coincide with important pathological features observed in common lung diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the detrimental effects of oil and oil dispersants to the respiratory system and suggests significant health impacts of the recent BP oil spill to those people

  2. The impact of oil spill to lung health--Insights from an RNA-seq study of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Baddoo, Melody C; Flemington, Erik K; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, He

    2016-03-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (BP oil spill) in the Gulf of Mexico was a unique disaster event, where a huge amount of oil spilled from the sea bed and a large volume of dispersants were applied to clean the spill. The operation lasted for almost 3 months and involved >50,000 workers. The potential health hazards to these workers may be significant as previous research suggested an association of persistent respiratory symptoms with exposure to oil and oil dispersants. To reveal the potential effects of oil and oil dispersants on the respiratory system at the molecular level, we evaluated the transcriptomic profile of human airway epithelial cells grown under treatment of crude oil, the dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527, and oil-dispersant mixtures. We identified a very strong effect of Corexit 9500 treatment, with 84 genes (response genes) differentially expressed in treatment vs. control samples. We discovered an interactive effect of oil-dispersant mixtures; while no response gene was found for Corexit 9527 treatment alone, cells treated with Corexit 9527+oil mixture showed an increased number of response genes (46 response genes), suggesting a synergic effect of 9527 with oil on airway epithelial cells. Through GO (gene ontology) functional term and pathway-based analysis, we identified upregulation of gene sets involved in angiogenesis and immune responses and downregulation of gene sets involved in cell junctions and steroid synthesis as the prevailing transcriptomic signatures in the cells treated with Corexit 9500, oil, or Corexit 9500+oil mixture. Interestingly, these key molecular signatures coincide with important pathological features observed in common lung diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the detrimental effects of oil and oil dispersants to the respiratory system and suggests significant health impacts of the recent BP oil spill to those people

  3. [CYSTIC FIBROSIS: CARE OF THE LUNG DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    (Rh-DNase) and/or hydration (hypertonic saline) nebulisations, Moreover, treatment with inhaled antibiotics is indicated (tobramycin, colistine or aztreonam lysine) for chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The treatment regimen also includes bronchodilators for bronchospasms and azithromycin. Regular physical activity is recommended. A treatment potentiating the CFTR protein, ivacaftor, is now indicated for patients with a class 3 mutation. Initial bronchial infection with PA must be treated as soon as possible in order to eradicate the pathogen. Pulmonary exacerbations require antibiotic courses, either orally or intravenously for PA infection. Complications require hospitalisation, with thoracic chest tube placement for a pneumothorax or bronchial artery embolisation for massive hemoptysis. Oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation with a nasal mask become necessary when respiratory insufficiency progresses, justifying the initiation of the lung transplant process. Lung disease affects the prognosis of cystic fibrosis, therefore its management in cystic fibrosis centres is of utmost importance. Maintenance treatment mainly relies on daily chest physiotherapy, which can be facilitated by mucolytic PMID:26749716

  4. [Pneumococcal vaccination in obstructive lung diseases -- what can we expect?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M; Lode, H; de Roux, A; Zielen, S

    2005-03-01

    Many countries' guidelines recommend pneumococcal vaccination for patients suffering from obstructive airway disease. This paper reviews the literature as to immunogenicity and safety of this immunization. There is no evidence for a negative effect of pneumococcal vaccination on these patients. Only a few data exist on the preventive impact of pneumococcal vaccination as to exacerbations of obstructive airway diseases. Existing studies mostly took up this question as a side aspect. The effect in children and adults appears limited. On the other hand, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine prevents life-threatening invasive infections in children younger than 5 years, and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine protects healthy adults against bacteriaemic pneumonia. Thus, pneumococcal vaccination of patients suffering from obstructive airway disease is recommendable.

  5. [Interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidevaux-Janin, Sylvie; Dudler, Jean; Nicod, Laurent P; Lazor, Romain

    2011-11-23

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is found in up to 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is clinically manifest in 5 to 10%, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The most frequent histopathological forms are usual interstitial pneumonia and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Another recently described presentation is combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Similarly to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute exacerbation of ILD may occur in RA and is associated with severe prognosis. Smoking is a known risk factor of RA and may also play a role in the pathogenesis of RA-associated ILD, in combination with genetic and immunologic mechanisms. Several treatments of RA may also lead to drug-induced ILD.

  6. Rare Lung Diseases I – Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the first in a series that will review selected rare lung diseases. The objective of this series is to promote a greater understanding and awareness of these unusual conditions among respirologists. Each article will begin with a case that serves as a focal point for a discussion of the pathophysiology and management of the particular condition. The first article is on lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM; subsequent articles will focus on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and primary ciliary dyskinesia.

  7. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Symon, Zvi, E-mail: symonz@sheba.health.gov.il [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  8. Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 modulates airway smooth muscle cell phenotype in experimental asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilecki, Bartosz; Schlosser, Anders; Wulf-Johansson, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, several proteins of the extracellular matrix have been characterised as active contributors to allergic airway disease. Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is an extracellular matrix protein abundant in the lung, whose biological functions remain poorly understood...

  9. Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Li, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease (ILD) in thoracic computed tomography (CT) is an important and difficult task in the development of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Therefore, we developed in this study a texture analysis-based method for accurate segmentation of lungs with severe ILD in multidetector CT scans.

  10. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  11. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Attenuate Lung Injury in a Murine Model of Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Muhammad; Baveja, Rajiv; Liang, Olin D.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Lee, Changjin; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease, known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), remains a serious complication of prematurity despite advances in the treatment of extremely low birth weight infants.

  12. The Coordinated Action of CC Chemokines in the Lung Orchestrates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, Jose-Angel; Lloyd, Clare M.; Wen, Danyi; Albar, Juan P.; Wells, Timothy N.C.; Proudfoot, Amanda; Martinez-A, C.; Dorf, Martin; Bjerke, Torbjörn; Coyle, Anthony J.; Gutierrez-Ramos, Jose-Carlos

    1998-01-01

    The complex pathophysiology of lung allergic inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) that characterize asthma is achieved by the regulated accumulation and activation of different leukocyte subsets in the lung. The development and maintenance of these processes correlate with the coordinated production of chemokines. Here, we have assessed the role that different chemokines play in lung allergic inflammation and BHR by blocking their activities in vivo. Our results show that bloc...

  13. Critical Role of Airway Macrophages in Modulating Disease Severity during Influenza Virus Infection of Mice ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tate, M.D.; Pickett, D L; Rooijen, van, J.; Brooks, A G; Reading, P C

    2010-01-01

    Airway macrophages provide a first line of host defense against a range of airborne pathogens, including influenza virus. In this study, we show that influenza viruses differ markedly in their abilities to infect murine macrophages in vitro and that infection of macrophages is nonproductive and no infectious virus is released. Virus strain BJx109 (H3N2) infected macrophages with high efficiency and was associated with mild disease following intranasal infection of mice. In contrast, virus str...

  14. Alterations of the Murine Gut Microbiome with Age and Allergic Airway Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Vital; Harkema, Jack R; Mike Rizzo; James Tiedje; Christina Brandenberger

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of asthma. With advanced age the microbiome and the immune system are changing and, currently, little is known about how these two factors contribute to the development of allergic asthma in the elderly. In this study we investigated the associations between the intestinal microbiome and allergic airway disease in young and old mice that were sensitized and challenged with house dust mite (HDM). After challenge, the animals were sa...

  15. Relationships between respiratory and airway resistances and activity-related dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plantier L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Mahut1,2, Aurore Caumont-Prim3,4, Laurent Plantier1,5, Karine Gillet-Juvin1,6, Etienne Callens1, Olivier Sanchez5,6, Brigitte Chevalier-Bidaud3, Plamen Bokov1, Christophe Delclaux1,5,71Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Physiologie – Clinique de la Dyspnée, F-75015 Paris, France; 2Cabinet La Berma, 4 avenue de la Providence; F-92160 Antony, France; 3AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Unité d'Épidémiologie et de Recherche Clinique, F-75015 Paris, France; 4INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Épidémiologique 4, F-75015 Paris, France; 5Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, F-75015 Paris, France; 6AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Pneumologie; F-75015 Paris, France; 7CIC 9201 Plurithématique, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, F-75015 Paris, FranceBackground: The aims of the study were: (1 to compare numerical parameters of specific airway resistance (total, sRawtot, effective, sRaweff and at 0.5 L • s-1, sRaw0.5 and indices obtained from the forced oscillation technique (FOT: resistance extrapolated at 0 Hz [Rrs0 Hz], mean resistance [Rrsmean], and resistance/frequency slope [Rrsslope] and (2 to assess their relationships with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: A specific statistical approach, principal component analysis that also allows graphic representation of all correlations between functional parameters was used. A total of 108 patients (mean ± SD age: 65 ± 9 years, 31 women; GOLD stages: I, 14; II, 47; III, 39 and IV, 8 underwent spirometry, body plethysmography, FOT, and Medical Research Council (MRC scale assessments.Results: Principal component analysis determined that the functional parameters were described by three independent dimensions (airway caliber, lung volumes and their combination, specific resistance and that resistance parameters of the two techniques

  16. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  17. The lungs need to be deflated: effects of glycopyrronium on lung hyperinflation in COPD patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sanguinetti, Claudio M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation caused by bronchial alterations, small airways disease and parenchymal destruction. In patients with COPD the structural and functional lung alterations can progress more or less rapidly from the initial small airways disease to an overt COPD where a severe expiratory flow limitation takes place. In these conditions, lung hyperinflation develops characterized by increase in functional residual capac...

  18. Pneumococcal Vaccine and Patients with Pulmonary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Allen, Mary Beth; Aliberti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary diseases describe chronic diseases that affect the airways and lung parenchyma. Examples of common chronic pulmonary diseases include asthma, bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive lung disease, lung fibrosis, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Pulmonary infection is considered a significant cause of mortality in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading isolated bacteria from adult patients with community-acquired pne...

  19. Lung Stem and Progenitor Cells in Tissue Homeostasis and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leeman, Kristen T.; Fillmore, Christine M.; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian lung is a complex organ containing numerous putative stem/progenitor cell populations that contribute to region-specific tissue homeostasis and repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances in identifying and studying these cell populations in the context of lung homeostasis and disease. Genetically engineered mice now allow for lineage tracing of several lung stem and progenitor cell populations in vivo during different types of lung injury repair. Using specific sets of c...

  20. Airway malacia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: prevalence, morphology and relationship with emphysema, bronchiectasis and bronchial wall thickening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Rastelli, Andrea; Schembri, Valentina; Filippo, Massimo de [University of Parma, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiology, Parma (Italy); Chetta, Alfredo [University of Parma, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Respiratory Diseases, Parma (Italy); Fasano, Luca; Pacilli, Angela Maria [Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Unita Operativa di Fisiopatologia Respiratoria, Bologna (Italy); Di Scioscio, Valerio; Bartalena, Tommaso; Zompatori, Maurizio [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Cardiothoracic Institute, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of airway malacia and its relationship with ancillary morphologic features in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of patients with COPD who were imaged with inspiratory and dynamic expiratory multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Airway malacia was defined as {>=}50% expiratory reduction of the airway lumen. Both distribution and morphology of airway malacia were assessed. The extent of emphysema, extent of bronchiectasis and severity of bronchial wall thickness were quantified. The final study cohort was comprised of 71 patients. Airway malacia was seen in 38 of 71 patients (53%), and such proportion was roughly maintained in each stage of COPD severity. Almost all tracheomalacia cases (23/25, 92%) were characterised by an expiratory anterior bowing of the posterior membranous wall. Both emphysema and bronchiectasis extent did not differ between patients with and without airway malacia (p > 0.05). Bronchial wall thickness severity was significantly higher in patients with airway malacia and correlated with the degree of maximal bronchial collapse (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrated a strong association between airway malacia and COPD, disclosing a significant relationship with bronchial wall thickening. (orig.)

  1. Airway malacia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: prevalence, morphology and relationship with emphysema, bronchiectasis and bronchial wall thickening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of airway malacia and its relationship with ancillary morphologic features in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of patients with COPD who were imaged with inspiratory and dynamic expiratory multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Airway malacia was defined as ≥50% expiratory reduction of the airway lumen. Both distribution and morphology of airway malacia were assessed. The extent of emphysema, extent of bronchiectasis and severity of bronchial wall thickness were quantified. The final study cohort was comprised of 71 patients. Airway malacia was seen in 38 of 71 patients (53%), and such proportion was roughly maintained in each stage of COPD severity. Almost all tracheomalacia cases (23/25, 92%) were characterised by an expiratory anterior bowing of the posterior membranous wall. Both emphysema and bronchiectasis extent did not differ between patients with and without airway malacia (p > 0.05). Bronchial wall thickness severity was significantly higher in patients with airway malacia and correlated with the degree of maximal bronchial collapse (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrated a strong association between airway malacia and COPD, disclosing a significant relationship with bronchial wall thickening. (orig.)

  2. Spontaneous breathing with airway pressure release ventilation favors ventilation in dependent lung regions and counters cyclic alveolar collapse in oleic-acid-induced lung injury: a randomized controlled computed tomography trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wrigge, Hermann; Zinserling, Jörg; Neumann, Peter; Muders, Thomas; Magnusson, Anders; Putensen, Christian; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Experimental and clinical studies have shown a reduction in intrapulmonary shunt with spontaneous breathing during airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) in acute lung injury. This reduction was related to reduced atelectasis and increased aeration. We hypothesized that spontaneous breathing will result in better ventilation and aeration of dependent lung areas and in less cyclic collapse during the tidal breath. Methods In this randomized controlled experimental trial, 22 pi...

  3. Inflammatory Diseases of the Lung Induced by Conventional Cigarette Smoke: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Shin, Stephanie; Hwang, John H

    2015-11-01

    Smoking-induced lung diseases were extremely rare prior to the 20th century. With commercialization and introduction of machine-made cigarettes, worldwide use skyrocketed and several new pulmonary diseases have been recognized. The majority of pulmonary diseases caused by cigarette smoke (CS) are inflammatory in origin. Airway epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages have altered inflammatory signaling in response to CS, which leads to recruitment of lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, and mast cells to the lungs-depending on the signaling pathway (nuclear factor-κB, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) activated. Multiple proteins are upregulated and secreted in response to CS exposure, and many of these have immunomodulatory activities that contribute to disease pathogenesis. In particular, metalloproteases 9 and 12, surfactant protein D, antimicrobial peptides (LL-37 and human β defensin 2), and IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17 have been found in higher quantities in the lungs of smokers with ongoing inflammation. However, many underlying mechanisms of smoking-induced inflammatory diseases are not yet known. We review here the known cellular and molecular mechanisms of CS-induced diseases, including COPD, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, chronic rhinosinusitis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and chronic bacterial infections. We also discuss inflammation induced by secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure and the pulmonary diseases that result. New targeted antiinflammatory therapeutic options are currently under investigation and hopefully will yield promising results for the treatment of these highly prevalent smoking-induced diseases. PMID:26135024

  4. Unevenness of lung perfusion images and pulmonary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Takeo; Isawa, Toyoharu; Hirano, Tomio; Anazawa, Yoshiki; Miki, Makoto; Konno, Kiyoshi; Motomiya, Masakichi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the unevenness of perfusion distribution in the lungs in conjunction with underlying lung pathology. Twenty-one parameters as described previously were defined out of horizontal radioactive count profiles on perfusion lung image data taken in 64x64 matrixes. Principal component analysis has revealed that the 1st component or Z1 is represented by AREA, the area of the lung, and ANG, the slope of the mean count profile, Z2, by N, the number of peaks, Z3 and Z4, by YG and XG, the barycentric coordinates of count distribution, Z5, by MAC, the maximal count and Z6, by CSD, the degree of scatter in count from the peak count. How those parameters differ in each lung pathology has been determined from 657 lung perfusion image data. In pulmonary emphysema, the lung volumes are larger than those in normal subjects. The AREA and ANG were consequently larger in value and N was also significantly larger, indicating the increased regional alveolar pressure and the compressed or destroyed vascular beds. In diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), N was increased probably because the distal airways were either narrowed or obstructed by inflammatory processes inducing regional alveolar hypoxia and/or alveolar hyperinflation. In fibrosis, both AREA and N were significantly smaller. In congestive heart failure with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension, YG was smaller probably because of 'reversal of perfusion'. In pulmonary sarcoidosis, an increase in YG was the only abnormality. (author).

  5. Unevenness of lung perfusion images and pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the unevenness of perfusion distribution in the lungs in conjunction with underlying lung pathology. Twenty-one parameters as described previously were defined out of horizontal radioactive count profiles on perfusion lung image data taken in 64x64 matrixes. Principal component analysis has revealed that the 1st component or Z1 is represented by AREA, the area of the lung, and ANG, the slope of the mean count profile, Z2, by N, the number of peaks, Z3 and Z4, by YG and XG, the barycentric coordinates of count distribution, Z5, by MAC, the maximal count and Z6, by CSD, the degree of scatter in count from the peak count. How those parameters differ in each lung pathology has been determined from 657 lung perfusion image data. In pulmonary emphysema, the lung volumes are larger than those in normal subjects. The AREA and ANG were consequently larger in value and N was also significantly larger, indicating the increased regional alveolar pressure and the compressed or destroyed vascular beds. In diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), N was increased probably because the distal airways were either narrowed or obstructed by inflammatory processes inducing regional alveolar hypoxia and/or alveolar hyperinflation. In fibrosis, both AREA and N were significantly smaller. In congestive heart failure with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension, YG was smaller probably because of 'reversal of perfusion'. In pulmonary sarcoidosis, an increase in YG was the only abnormality. (author)

  6. Normal Expiratory Flow Rate and Lung Volumes in Patients with Combined Emphysema and Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Heathcote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. The present report describes 10 patients with progressive breathlessness, three of whom experienced severe limitation in their quality of life. All patients showed lung interstitial involvement and emphysema on computed tomography scan of the chest. The 10 patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange. Normal lung volumes do not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  7. The Lung Microbiome, Immunity, and the Pathogenesis of Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, David N; Dickson, Robert P; Moore, Bethany B

    2016-06-15

    The development of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis has uncovered the previously unappreciated complexity of the bacterial microbiome at various anatomic sites. The microbiome of the lung has relatively less bacterial biomass when compared with the lower gastrointestinal tract yet displays considerable diversity. The composition of the lung microbiome is determined by elimination, immigration, and relative growth within its communities. Chronic lung disease alters these factors. Many forms of chronic lung disease demonstrate exacerbations that drive disease progression and are poorly understood. Mounting evidence supports ways in which microbiota dysbiosis can influence host defense and immunity, and in turn may contribute to disease exacerbations. Thus, the key to understanding the pathogenesis of chronic lung disease may reside in deciphering the complex interactions between the host, pathogen, and resident microbiota during stable disease and exacerbations. In this brief review we discuss new insights into these labyrinthine relationships. PMID:27260767

  8. Respiratory failure due to infliximab induced interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavas, Sotiris; Balis, Evangelos; Lazarou, Vasiliki; Kouvela, Marousa; Tatsis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Although poorly understood, interstitial lung disease has been reported as a possible complication of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. We report a case of interstitial lung disease in a 64-year-old man with psoriasis 3 weeks after the initiation of infliximab treatment. The patient had received two fortnightly infusions of infliximab following a short course of methotrexate. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral ground glass and interstitial infiltrates, while the results of microbiology and immunologic workup were negative. Likewise, bronchoalveolar lavage detected neither typical nor atypical pathogens. Infliximab-induced interstitial lung injury was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was administered which resulted in rapid clinical and radiological improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of interstitial lung disease due to infliximab in the psoriasis population. The patient had no pre-existing lung pathology, while his previous exposure to methotrexate was minimal and was not temporally associated with the induction of interstitial lung disease.

  9. Lung Growth and Airway Function after Lobectomy in Infancy for Congenital Lobar Emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, John T.; Wohl, Mary Ellen B.; Strieder, Denise J.; Jackson, Andrew C.; Morton, John R.; Zwerdling, Robert G.; Griscom, N. Thorne; Treves, Salvador; Williams, Adrian J.; Schuster, Samuel

    1980-01-01

    To characterize the outcome of lobectomy in infancy and the low expiratory flows which persist after lobectomy for congenital lobar emphysema, 15 subjects with this history were studied at age 8-30 yr. Total lung capacity was normal in all, but higher values (P < 0.05) were observed in nine subjects with upper lobectomy than in five subjects with right middle lobectomy. Ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity was correlated (P < 0.05) with the amount of lung missing as estimated from ...

  10. Airway Remodelling in Asthma and COPD: Findings, Similarities, and Differences Using Quantitative CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Dournes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling is a well-established feature in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD, secondary to chronic airway inflammation. The structural changes found on pathological examination of remodelled airway wall have been shown to display similarities but also differences. Computed tomography (CT is today a remarkable tool to assess airway wall morphology in vivo since submillimetric acquisitions over the whole lung volume could be obtained allowing 3D evaluation. Recently, CT-derived indices extracted from CT images have been described and are thought to assess airway remodelling. This may help understand the complex mechanism underlying the remodelling process, which is still not fully understood. This paper summarizes the various methods described to quantify airway remodelling in asthma and COPD using CT, and similarities and differences between both diseases will be emphasized.

  11. THE ROLE OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES OF AIRWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Fedosenko; L. M. Ogorodova; M. A. Karnaushkina; Ye. S. Kulikov; I. A. Deyev; N. A. Kirillova

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the results of studies on the composition of microbial communities in the airways of healthy subjects and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Modern technologies of molecular-genetic identification methods of microorganisms allow to perform a deep analysis  of  the  respiratory  microbiom.  It  is  of  considerable  interest  to  determine  the  role  of  the microbiome in the development of human diseases of the bronchopulmonary system, and to under...

  12. Lamb model of respiratory syncytial virus-associated lung disease: insights to pathogenesis and novel treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  13. Emphysema- and airway-dominant COPD phenotypes defined by standardised quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Deepak R; Gupta, Sumit; Burggraf, Dorothe; Vom Silberberg, Suzan J; Heimbeck, Irene; Heiss-Neumann, Marion S; Haeussinger, Karl; Newby, Chris; Hargadon, Beverley; Raj, Vimal; Singh, Dave; Kolsum, Umme; Hofer, Thomas P; Al-Shair, Khaled; Luetzen, Niklas; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Benea, Giorgio; Leprotti, Stefano; Boschetto, Piera; Gorecka, Dorota; Nowinski, Adam; Oniszh, Karina; Castell, Wolfgang Zu; Hagen, Michael; Barta, Imre; Döme, Balázs; Strausz, Janos; Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas R; Gut, Ivo; Hohlfeld, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Lavae-Mokhtari, Mahyar; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Brightling, Christopher; Parr, David G

    2016-07-01

    EvA (Emphysema versus Airway disease) is a multicentre project to study mechanisms and identify biomarkers of emphysema and airway disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this study was to delineate objectively imaging-based emphysema-dominant and airway disease-dominant phenotypes using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) indices, standardised with a novel phantom-based approach.441 subjects with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages 1-3) were assessed in terms of clinical and physiological measurements, laboratory testing and standardised QCT indices of emphysema and airway wall geometry.QCT indices were influenced by scanner non-conformity, but standardisation significantly reduced variability (pemphysema-dominant", "airway disease-dominant", "mixed" disease and "mild" disease. The emphysema-dominant group had significantly higher lung volumes, lower gas transfer coefficient, lower oxygen (PO2 ) and carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) tensions, higher haemoglobin and higher blood leukocyte numbers than the airway disease-dominant group.The utility of QCT for phenotyping in the setting of an international multicentre study is improved by standardisation. QCT indices of emphysema and airway disease can delineate within a population of patients with COPD, phenotypic groups that have typical clinical features known to be associated with emphysema-dominant and airway-dominant disease. PMID:27230444

  14. Muscarinic receptors on airway mesenchymal cells : Novel findings for an ancient target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; Zaagsma, Johan; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Since ancient times, anticholinergics have been used as a bronchodilator therapy for obstructive lung diseases. Targets of these drugs are G-protein-coupled muscarinic M-1, M-2 and M-3 receptors in the airways, which have long been recognized to regulate vagally-induced airway smooth muscle contract

  15. Influence of inspiratory flow rate, particle size, and airway caliber on aerosolized drug delivery to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolovich, M A

    2000-06-01

    A number of studies in the literature support the use of fine aerosols of drug, inhaled at low IFRs to target peripheral airways, with the objective of improving clinical responses to inhaled therapy (Fig. 8). Attempts have been made to separate response due to changes in total administered dose or the surface concentration of the dose from response due to changes in site of deposition--both are affected by the particle size of the aerosol, with IFR additionally influencing the latter. The tools for measuring dose and distribution have improved over the last 10-15 years, and thus we should expect greater accuracy in these measurements for assessing drug delivery to the lung. There are still issues, though, in producing radiolabeled (99m)technetium aerosols that are precise markers for the pharmaceutical product being tested and in quantitating absolute doses deposited in the lung. PET isotopes may provide the means for directly labelling a drug and perhaps can offer an alternative for making these measurements in the future, but deposition measurements should not be used in isolation; protocols should incorporate clinical tests to provide parallel therapeutic data in response to inhalation of the drug by the various patient populations being studied.

  16. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  17. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  18. Changing anaerobic spectrum in suppurative lung disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beena, V K; Kumari, G R; Rao, P V; Murty, M V; Shivananda, P G

    1996-01-01

    A spectrum of three different anaerobes were isolated from a debilitated patient with suppurative lung disease, within a two-year period. Repeated isolation from three consecutive samples and symptomatic relief with metronidazole provide clinical evidence of anaerobic lung infection. This case emphasizes the importance of anaerobic culture in cases of protracted pulmonary suppurative disease. PMID:8822645

  19. 11.5.Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930305 Immunoenzymatic labeling of mono-clonal antibodies for surface antigens of T—cellby using immune complexes of APAAP in pa-tients with interstitial lung disease.HOU Xian-ming(侯显明),et al.Respir Dis Res Instit,Chi-na Med Univ,Shenyang,110001.Chin J InternMed 1992;31(12):748—751.The use of unlabeled antibody bridging tech-nique with alkaline phosphatase moncional an-tialkaline phosphatase (APAAP) complexesmakes it possible to solve the problem of shortdurability of immunofluorescent staining and theproblem of nonspecific endogenous enzyme in-terference of blood cells with immunoperoxidasemethod.The technique of APAAP allows saris-

  20. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.